• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 The robin
 The house that Jack built
 My mother
 More nursery rhymes
 The dogs' dinner party
 The cats' tea party
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Cock Robin's picture book
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00066156/00001
 Material Information
Title: Cock Robin's picture book
Physical Description: 1 v. (various pagings) : col. ill. ; 19 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Kronheim & Co ( Printer of plates )
George Routledge and Sons ( Publisher )
Publisher: George Routledge and Sons
Place of Publication: London
New York
Publication Date: [1873]
 Subjects
Subject: Nursery rhymes   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1873   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes -- 1873   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1873
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: with thirty-six pages of plates printed in colours by Kronheim & Co..
General Note: Interleaved with blank pages.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00066156
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002219859
notis - ALG0047
oclc - 13707077

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page i
    The robin
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    The house that Jack built
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    My mother
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    More nursery rhymes
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    The dogs' dinner party
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        8Page 6-7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    The cats' tea party
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6-7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text




















. ....








COCK ROBIN'S




PICTURE BOOK.



WITH
THIRTY-SIX PAGES OF PLATES,4
PRINTED IN COLOURS BY KRONHEIMT & CO.













LONDON NE NEW YORK:
GEORGE ROUTLEDGE AND SONS.



















THE ROBIN.



.,-" 7.--;./ _- -- -- -' -.










THE ROBIN.




AWAY, pretty Robin, fly home to your
nest,
To make you my captive would please
me the best,
And feed you with worms and with
bread:
Your eyes are so sparkling, your feathers
so soft,
Your little wings flutter so pretty aloft,
And your breast is all cover'd with red.


3





THE ROBIN.


But then, wouldd be cruel to keep you, I
know,
So stretch out your wings, little Robin,
and go,
Fly home to your young ones again;
Go listen once more to your mate's pretty
song,
And chirrup and twitter there all the day
long,
Secure from the wind and the rain.


5






THE ROBIN.


But when the leaves fall, and the winter

winds blow,

And the green fields are cover'd all ov

with snow,

And the clouds in white feathers

descend;

When the springs are all ice, and t

rivulets freeze,

And the long shining icicles drop frc

the trees,

Then, Robin, remember your friend.


8


r-


er


he


)m


I






THE ROBIN.


With cold and with hunger half-famish'd
and weak
Then tap at my window again with your
beak,
Nor shall your petition be vain;
You shall fly to my bosom and perch on
my thumbs,
Or hop round the table and pick up the
crumbs,
And need not be hungry again.


10
















THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.












THE


HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.



THIS is the house that Jack built.


This is the malt,
That lay in the house that

This is the rat,
That ate the malt,
That lay in the house that


Jack built.




Jack built.


This is the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt,
That lay in the house that Jack built.


3





TIE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.


This is the dog,
That worried the cat,
That kill'd the rat,
That ate the malt,
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the cow with the 'crumpled horn,
That toss'd the dog,
That worried the cat,,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt,
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the maiden all forlorn,
That milk'd the cow with the crumpled horn,
That toss'd the dog,
That worried the cat,
That kill'd the rat,
That ate the malt,
That lay in the house that Jack built.
5





THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.



This is the man all tatter'd and torn,
That kiss'd the maiden all forlorn,
That milk'd the cow with the crumpled horn,
That toss'd the dog,
That worried the cat,
That kill'd the rat,
That ate the malt,
That lay in the house that Jack built.


This is the priest all shaven and shorn,
That married the man all tatter'd and torn,
That kiss'd the maiden all forlorn,
That milk'd the cow with the crumpled horn,
That toss'd the dog,
That worried the cat,
That kill'd the rat,
That ate the malt,
That lay in the house that Jack built.

8






THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.


This is the cock that crowd in the morn,
That waked the priest all shaven and shorn,
That married the man all tatter'd and torn,
That kiss'd the maiden all forlorn,
That milk'd the cow with the crumpled horn,
That toss'd the dog,
That worried the cat,
That kill'd the rat,
That ate the malt,
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the farmer who sow'd the corn,
That kept the cock that crowd in the morn,
That waked the priest all shaven and shorn,
That married the man all tatter'd and torn,
That kiss'd the maiden all forlorn,
That milk'd the cow with the crumpled horn,
That toss'd the dog,
That worried the cat,
That kill'd the rat,
That ate the malt,
That lay in the house that Jack built.


















MY MOTHER.


.-,', ,,, < < 1^ **',. ". : '







MY MOTHER.


WHO fed me from her gentle breast,
And hush'd me in her arms to rest,
And on my cheek sweet kisses priest ?
My Mother.

When sleep forsook my open eye,
Who was it sung sweet hushaby,
And rock'd me that I should not cry?
My Mother.

Who sat and watched my infant head,
When sleeping on my cradle bed,
And tears of sweet affection shed ?
My Mother.
3






MY MOTHER.


When pain and sickness made me cry,
Who gazed upon my heavy eye,
And wept for fear that I should die?
My Mother.

Who dress'd my doll in clothes so gay,
And taught me pretty how to play,
And minded all I had to say ?
My Mother.


Who ran to help me when I fell,
And would some pretty story tell,
Or kiss the place to make it well?
My Mother.


5






MY MOTHER.


Who taught my infant lips to pray,
And love GOD'S holy book and day,
And walk in Wisdom's pleasant way?
My Mother.

And can I ever cease to be
Affectionate and kind to thee,
Who was so very kind to me,
My Mother ?

Ah, no! the thought I cannot bear;
And if GOD please my life to spare,
I hope I shall reward thy care,
My Mother.


8





MY MOTHER,


When thou art feeble, old, and gray,
My healthy arm shall be thy stay,
And I will soothe thy pains away,
My Mother.

And when I see thee hang thy head,
'Twill be my turn to watch thy bed,
And tears of sweet affection shed,
My Mother.

For GOD, who lives above the skies,
Would look with vengeance in His eyes,
If I should ever dare despise
My Mother.


10


















MORE NURSERY RHYMES.


o'.i .,










MORE NURSERY RHYMES.




JACK and Gill went up the hill
To fetch a pail of water;
Jack fell down, and broke his crown,
And Gill. came tumbling after.

Up Jack got and home did trot
As fast as he could caper;
Dame Gill had the job to plaster his nob
With vinegar and brown paper.


3






MORE NURSERY RHYMES.


Ding dong bell, Pussy's in the well.
Who put her in? Little Tommy Green.
Who pulled her out? Little Tommy
Trout.
What a naughty boy was that,
Thus to drown poor Pussy Cat.


There was an owl lived in an oak,
Whiskey, Whaskey, Weedle;
And all the words he ever spoke
Were Fiddle, Faddle, Feedle.

A gunner chanced to come that way,
Whiskey, Whaskey, Weedle;
Says he, "I'll shoot you, silly bird,
So Fiddle, Faddle, Feedle!"
5





MORE NURSERY RHYMES.


Little Jack Homer sat in a corner,
Eating a Christmas pie;
He put in his thumb, and he took out a
plum,
And said What a good boy am I!"



Ba-a, ba-a, Black Sheep,
Have you any wool?
Yes sir, yes sir,
Three bags full:
One for my master,
One for my dame,
And one for the little boy
That lives in our lane.


8






MORE NURSERY RHYMES.


There was an old woman who lived in a
shoe,
She had so many children, she didn't know
what to do;
She gave them some broth, without any
bread,
She whipped them all round, and sent
them to bed.














THE DOGS' DINNER PARTY.











THE DOGS' DINNER PARTY.



MR. BLENHEIM was a very gentlemanly dog, and
Mrs. Blenheim was quite the lady; both were well-
bred, handsome, and fond of good company. They
lived in a nice house, by Hyde Park Corner. Now
Mr. Blenheim was one day in the library, dozing
in his arm-chair after dinner, when Mrs. B. thus
addressed him:
Rouse up, Blenny dear, and tell me about these
notes of invitation for our dinner-party."
I am rather sleepy," said he, so you must read
the list over to me."
Mrs. B. read the names of Mr. Tan-Terrier, Mr.
Fox-Hound, Mr. Dane, Mr. Mastiff, Mr. Beagle, Mr.
Poodle, Mr. Barker--Mr. Bull-Dog concluding the
list. "Mr. Bull-Dog!" cried Mrs. B., looking vexed,
" why do you ask him ? no one considers him res-
pectable."
"It will not do to leave him out, dear! said Mr.
Blenheim, who then got up, and went lazily to the
desk to write the invitations.
3






TIHE DOGS' DINNER PARTY.


Pug, the Page, went to Kennel Court, the. country
box of Mr. Fox-Hound, and found that sporting
character near home, wiping his brow after a good
hunt. His manners were more blunt than his teeth,
and his loud voice could be heard miles off. He was
called a jolly dog," and seldom dined alone. But
his great delight was the chase of a fox; he could
then hardly give tongue enough to express his joy.
After asking Pug after Mrs. Blenheim's health, he
accepted the invitation.
Florio, the Courier, waited on Mr. Barker with his
note of invitation. Mr. Barker lived in a snug little
house, in a farmyard, where he had the charge of
watching over and protecting the live stock. He at
first feared he must decline the invitation, but, on
second thoughts, he resolved to venture; it was not
a late dinner, and he would manage to get away
early. Unluckily, his coat was rather the worse for
wear, but he could boast of a handsome collar at any
rate,-and so he accepted.
When Pug, the Page, reached the dwelling-place
of Mr. Bull-Dog, he found him lying close to a bit
of an old tub, in a dirty yard, smoking a short pipe
very coolly. Mr. Bull-Dog snarled a little at being
disturbed, and then read the note. Oh,you can
say I'll be sure to come," said he, "I am always ready
for a good feed. Now, young one," said he to Pug,
5






THE DOGS' DINNER PARTY.


with a growl, "I advise you to cut away as fast as
you can! "
At last the day of the grand dinner-party arrived,
and the-guests all assembled, in good spirits, with
keen appetites for the feast. Never had so many
sleek, well-dressed dogs met together before, and the
variety of their coats and countenances was very
striking. All were, in compliment to the gentle
hostess, Mrs. Blenheim, on their best behaviour, and
great was the harmony that prevailed. Ample justice,
too, was done to the good things liberally provided
for their entertainment; and, strange to say, for so
large a party and so mixed a company, no excess was
committed either in eating or drinking. Social chat
was the order of the day; compliments were ex-
changed; toasts, praising every guest in turn, were
proposed and received with cordiality; speeches were
made, which were applauded even when not called
for or understood; and for a long time it seemed
that no Lord Mayor's feast could have passed off
more brilliantly, or have given greater satisfaction.
Mr. Bull-Dog was, however, ini-'iig from among
the guests after a time; it seems that he found the
sports rather dull, and so had sneaked off. Presently
a gi-rat uproar was heard; and it was found that he
had gone below, and had eaten up all the servants'
dinner; so they all joined together to punish him,
8






THE DOGS' DINNER PARTY.
and after some trouble, contrived to kick him out of
the house; and very foolish he looked, in spite of his
tipsy swagger.
As Mr. Bull-Dog had lost his pipe in the street, he
thought he would turn into a public-house to get
another: here he 4g;iiu misbehaved, and was soon
turned out; some mischievous boys then got hold of
him, tied an old tin saucepan to his tail, and chased
him through the streets. The faster he ran, the more
he bumped himself with the saucepan; and the more
he yelled with pain, the more the boys pelted him
with mud and stones. At length he reached his
dirty dwelling, more dead than alive.
Poor Mrs. Blenheim! she was, indeed, much to be
pitied, to have her nice dinner-party disturbed by so
vulgar a creature. This shows how careful we should
be in avoiding low company.














THE CATS' TEA PARTY.












THE CATS' TEA PARTY.

~-------iL-,-^^^^,s._------


Miss TABITHA PUSSYCAT was a quiet, sleek, old
creature, and was so prim, that her friends called her
an old maid; and some of them even said that she
was an old cat, but they were the people who were
not asked to her nice tea parties. When she gave -a
tea party, she sent her page Jackoo to invite her
friends. Jackoo was a clever monkey, who had come
from his last place at the Zoological Gardens, where
he had been used to see a great deal of company.
One day Miss Tabitha made up her mind to have
a larger party than usual, so she sent out for a dish
of pink shrimps, a bag of muffins, a tea-cake, a new
French loaf, and a pound of fresh butter. Then she
sent Jackoo out in his new coat to invite her friends.
First, there was Mr. Velvet Purr, a quiet old
bachelor, who sat nearly all day in the sun on a garden
seat watching the birds, but who was much too well
fed to catch mice. Miss Velveteen Purr, his sister,
3







THE CATS' TEA PARTY.


went with him ; she was a very pretty singer, wore a
fur tippet, and drank a good deal of milk to soften
her voice.
Sir Claude Scratch was a very different person.
He was proud of his high family, for his father was
second cousin to Dick Whittington's Cat, and had
seen a great deal of the world. Sir Claude was very
proud of his whiskers, and before he went to the tea
party, he called on Frizzle Frog, the barber, to be
shaved. While he sat there, with the towel under
his chin, who should look in but his friend Captain
Black, a very fierce looking fellow, who had killed
hundreds of rats, and was always ready to fight. He
was a great favourite with the ladies, and said be
would go to tea though he had not been invited.
The four Misses White were already on their way
to Miss Pussycat's house, in their clean stockings, and
the nice silky dresses that their mother had given
them. Old Mrs. White lived at the baker's round the
corner, and her daughters' names were Fluffy, Tibby,
Titty, and Tip; all of them famous for their beautiful
skins and their bright eyes. You may be sure that
the four Masters Tortoise Shell were waiting for
them, for they had been ready all the afternoon, with
their tail coats on, for the purpose of walking with
these charming young ladies. They were very young
5







TIHE CATS' TEA PARTY.
gentlemen, so that they were quite proud at being
asked.
It was a very grand tea table, and when all the
party sat down it was more than Jackoo could do to
wait upon them,-but the gentlemen handed the tea
to the ladies, and picked out the largest shrimps for
the Misses White, and nearly emptied the cream-jug
for Miss Velvet Purr, and helped themselves to muf-
fins, and were very merry indeed.
Captain Black was so attentive that he would hand
round the bread and butter. He took the plate from
under the very nose of Sir Claude Scratch, which
made that person so angry, that nothing but a smile
from Miss Tabitha would appease him.
After tea Miss Purr was asked to sing, and when
she had taken another sip of milk she said she would
give them an old song with variations. Then Miss
Tabitha, who had a very fine ear, gave them a little
French Song which had a chorus of Tant Mieux, and
they all joined in, Captain Black and Mr. Velvet
Purr singing the Bass. Then the Captain told a
story of his travels to the Isle of Dogs, and Sir Claude
related an adventure at St. Kitts, which set them all
laughing.
But the great fun of the evening was when the
four Masters Tortoise Shell, whose names were Bob-
8






THE CATS' TEA PARTY.


stay, Rattle, Clipper, and Dick, came into the room
with great white collars and black faces, and began
to sing like the Ethiopian Serenaders. Bobstay played
the Fiddle, Rattle the Bones, Clipper the Banjo, and
Dick the Tambourine. When they sang Old Dan
Tucker," and Kafoozlum," the four Misses White
almost fell off their seats with laughing, and Sir
Claude was seen to put the tail of his coat into his
mouth; Captain Black didn't like it much, for he had
a dark complexion and thought they were laughing
at him.
At last it was time for them to be going, and Mr.
Velvet Purr, who was very careful not to be out too
late, brushed his coat in the hall, and said good night.
Captain Black smoothed his fur jacket; Sir Claude
Scratch stroked his whiskers, and the ladies began to
arrange their dress for walking. Then there was such
a fuss as they all said Good-bye," that some of the
neighbours looked out of window to see what was the
matter; especially as Captain Black and Sir Claude
quarrelled and fought in the street. At last, how-
ever, all the party got safely home.


10







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