Group Title: Research report (North Florida Research and Education Center (Quincy, Fla.))
Title: Soybean tillage vs. predators and pests
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00066102/00001
 Material Information
Title: Soybean tillage vs. predators and pests
Series Title: Research report (North Florida Research and Education Center (Quincy, Fla.))
Physical Description: 6 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Teare, I. D ( Iwan Dale ), 1931-
Wright, D. L ( David L )
Funderburk, J. E ( Joseph E. ), 1954-
North Florida Research and Education Center (Quincy, Fla.)
Publisher: North Florida Research and Education Center
Place of Publication: Quincy Fla
Publication Date: 1992
 Subjects
Subject: Tillage -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Soybean -- Diseases and pests -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Pests -- Integrated control -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Insect pests -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical reference (p. 5).
Statement of Responsibility: I.D. Teare, D.L. Wright, and J.E. Funderburk.
General Note: Caption title.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00066102
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 71172506

Full Text




1 /VA- Soybean Tillage vs. Predators and Pests 8/

02 '7-/O I.D. Teare*, D.L. Wright, and J.E. Funderbdi/ ,
3 ABSTRACT ^ %

4 Soil tillage can influence the population -.y s of

5 arthropod pests and their natural enemies. Our objective was t

6 relate population densities of each predator [Geocoris spp.

7 (bigeyed bug) and Nabis and Reduviolus spp. (damsel bug)] to pest

8 densities [Anticarsia gemmatalis (Hubner), Plathypena scabra (F.),

9 and Nezara viridula (L.)]. Densities of all predators were

10 positively related to pest densities of A. cemmatalis and N.

11 viridula in 1985 and 1986. These positive correlations indicate

12 that observed differences between tillage treatments in bigeyed bug

13 and damsel bug predator populations were in response to the

14 abundance of A. gemmatalis and N. viridula. Populations of bigeyed

* bugs and damsel bugs were not correlated with P. scabra in either

16 year.

17

18

19

20

.21

22

23

24

25 North Fla. Res. and Educ. Ctr., Quincy FL 32351, Institute of

26 Food and Agricultural Sciences, Univ. of Fla., Gainesville, FL

S 32611. Research Report NF-92-10.










1 INTRODUCTION

2 Enhancement and conservation of beneficial predators is a

3 major priority in soybean integrated pest management (IPM)

4 programs. IPM strategies in soybean are designed to use

5 insecticides only when pest populations reach economically damaging

6 numbers and even to selectively use insecticides in ways to reduce

7 pest populations, but not result in a negative effect on predator

8 populations.

9 The statistical technique where insect predator and pest

10 densities are averaged over dates of sampling and tested by simple

11 linear regression has been used to determine if increases in

12 beneficial insect densities were the indirect effect of the

13 treatments (i.e., tillage, fertilizer) on increased pest densities

14 or the direct effect of the beneficial insect population

15 supplementing it's diet from the soybean treated plants [realizing

16 that most beneficial do minor feeding on plants (Naranjo and

17 Stimac, 1985) which suffer no damage from this feeding (Ridgeway

18 and Jones, 1968)].

19 The objective of this study was to study the relationships

20 each year (1985 and 1986) between pest and predators by simple

21 correlations of numbers of bigeyed bugs and damsel bugs in each

22 plot on each sample date with respective numbers of A. gemmatalis,

23 P. scabra and N. viridula.








1 MATERIALS AND METHODS

Soybean was grown on a Norfolk sandy loam soil (fine-loamy,

3 siliceous, thermic Typic Paleudult) at Quincy, Florida. Cobb was

4 planted on 30 July 1985 and Kirby was planted on 11 June 1986.

5 Nymphal and adult population densities of beneficial and pests

6 were sampled on 23 Aug, 4 and 28 Sept, 9 Oct, and 11 Nov in 1985

7 and 3, 15, 24 July, and 12 and 28 Aug in 1986 by beating the plants

8 on both sides of the row into a 0.9 m ground cloth placed between

9 the rows. Cultural methods and field plot design are described in

10 detail in Funderburk et al. (1988 and 1990) and will not be

11 repeated here.

12 Densities of bigeyed bugs and damsel bugs were estimated in

13 the Funderburk et al. (1988) study, and densities of A. gemmatalis,

14 P. scabra, and N. viridula were estimated in Funderburk et al.

is (1990) study. Relationships each year between the pests and the

16 predators were evaluated by simple correlations of the number of

17 bigeyed bugs and damsel bugs in each plot on each sample date with

18 respective number of A. qemmatalis, P. scabra, and N. viridula.
\









1 RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

2 Economically important pest and beneficial insects in the

3 study were A. gemmatalis, P. scabra, and N. viridula; and bogeyed

4 bug and damsel bug, respectively. Population densities of these

5 insects are contained in Funderburk et al. (1990 and 1988,

6 respectively).

7 Population densities of bigeyed bugs and damsel bugs were

8 significantly (P<0.05) correlated (based on r-values) with A.

9 gemmatalis in 1985 and 1986. Population densities of bigeyed bugs

10 were also significantly correlated with N. viridula in 1985 and

11 1986. Population densities of damsel bugs were significantly

12 correlated with N. viridula in 1985, but not in 1986. Population

13 densities of bigeyed bugs and damsel bugs were not correlated with

14 P. scabra either year. The r-value was positive for each

15 significant relationship in 1985 and 1986; consequently, predator

16 populations of bigeyed bugs and damsel bugs increased directly as

17 populations of A. gemmatalis and N. viridula increased.

18 These positive correlations indicate that observed differences

19 between tillage treatments in bigeyed bug and damsel bug predator

20 populations were in response to abundance of A. gemmatalis and N.

21 viridula, which undoubtedly were serving as their primary food

22 source.








1 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

* Our thanks to E. Brown, Senior Laboratory Technician; A. Brown,

3 Agricultural Supervisor; B. Kidd, Biological Scientist II; North

4 Fla. Res. and Educ. Ctr., Univ. of Fla, Quincy, FL 32351; for data

5 analysis, data collection, and plot preparation and management.

6
7 REFERENCES

8 Funderburk, J.E., Wright, D.L. & Teare, I.D. (1988) Preplant

9 tillage effects on population dynamics of soybean insect

10 predators. Crop Sci. 28,973-977.

11 Funderburk, J.E., Wright, D.L. & Teare, I.D. (1990) Preplant

12 tillage effects on populations dynamics of soybean insect

13 pests. Crop Sci. 30,686-690.

14 Naranjo, S.E. & Stimac, J.L. (1985) Development, survival, and

reproduction of Geocoris punctipes (Hemiptera:Lygaeidae):

16 Effects of plant feeding on soybean and associated weeds.

17 Environ. Entomol. 14,523-530.

18 Ridgeway, R.L. & Jones, S.L. (1968) Plant feeding by Geocoris

19 pallens and Nabis americoferus. iAnn. Entomol. Soc. Amer.

20 61,232-233.







me OJcmtWWtMeMM Mt oemummewMtolmlmmew
*>JC~iiniC>CiJMI-'O V~~P~OOOJrintO~O -' MI' lOO-CTt1t^ M


OC o > q > > 1 0> >0
tr t t n t HCL E ct+ rtmd to m t t E rt
1 + + 0H + + + +

0tlW Nl INH '+d H H t ,' 1> Ii


C +a ao r, 0 t. C ti
p) D tJ 30 Pi DO P

1 0 I Fl :: 0 O- H 0 H




P-) 1) II" 0 O)W +
W 1 *+p +p*W H
| td H H -to W H. Ir n > H W


aD "2 p2

Sp P- ) Q !




H H H
( D P0
(I) P) P)P c a f rt f+ a
t- IZ m la ID o) c P)
W C I H- HC W > C
r. to H 1 ,- Q -

4 a
c c


N) N0 N0 10 N N0 N
0 0 0 0 0 0 0







,. 1) 0 O OC CO O





0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 IH 0 0 0 0
S >. o 0 0 O. o0
\


0


0






o0 0






0 o


o o





0 0
o o
O O
0 0
H- 0(


K) t) N) N) N) N) m) N) N)
o o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0






I tO U UI IO U UI





P o o o o o o o o
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0








0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
S0 0 P O O O0
H (4i H
o o o o o o o o


*I
HW





mO
W tr o
oi-o

t0 (D I
S (D
0) (D I-


0 z-
0 r I-'-



C0







tr
kD










nB
tD




t 00

:0
*cD




0 5


rtcD



,-
P)
(D


rt
(D(D


(3,
1-0
rt (

0(D


rA
3 (D



rt


ft


H CQ
(D
rt
I M
P"



Ct

Fa

.1






0O


1t 0
. h




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs