Group Title: Mimeo report - University of Florida North Florida Experiment Station ; 66-4
Title: Fattening steers in dry lot and pasture
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00066036/00001
 Material Information
Title: Fattening steers in dry lot and pasture
Series Title: NFES mimeo rpt.
Physical Description: 13 leaves : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Baker, F. S ( Frank Sloan ), 1921-
North Florida Experiment Station
Publisher: North Florida Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Quincy Fla
Publication Date: 1965
 Subjects
Subject: Cattle -- Feeding and feeds -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Pastures -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Statement of Responsibility: F.S. Baker, Jr.
General Note: Caption title.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00066036
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 69661625

Full Text



NORTH FLORIDA EXPERIMENT STATION
Quincy, Florida

November 15, 1965

NFES Mimeo Rpt. 66-4

FATTENING STEERS IN DRY LOT AND PASTURE
F4 S. Baker, Jr.1

In three previous four-month trials, slow gains averaging 0&64 pound per head
daily were obtained with yearling steers grazing fertilized Argentine Bahiagfass with only
mineral supplement2. Cattle slaughtered off grass at the end of the pasture season had an
average carcass yield (dressing percentage) of 52.42 percent and an average carcass grade of
low standard (range of utility to standard). Supplementing the Bahiagrass with grain
improved steer gains, but neither 5 nor 10 pounds grain supplement per head daily consist-
ently produced U. S. Good grade carcasses at the end of the pasture period. Steers full-fed
grain on grass gained 23 pounds per head or 0.20 pound per head daily less than those full-
fed grain in dry lot; at the end of the four-month period cattle full-fed in dry lot had
higher grading carcasses that averaged 28 pounds heavier than those from steers full-fed on
grass. Furthermore, steers full-fed in dry lot had somewhat more satisfactory economic
returns at slaughter than the groups killed directly off pasture.

With either no grain, 5 pounds daily, 10 pounds daily, or a full-feed of grain,
steers grazing millet pasture made faster gains at lower costs per 100 pounds gain than
similar cattle grazing Argentine Bahiagrass during a two-year comparison. Average gain for
all millet steers was 28 pounds per head or 0.25 pound per head daily more than for the
Bahiagrass steers, with $4.48 less cost per 100 pounds gain with the millet pasture.
Carcasses of the cattle slaughtered off millet were heavier, but carcass grades were similar
to those from Bahia cattle.

Steers full-fed grain on pasture for four months subsequently required 14 days
longer in the feedlot to reach 925-pound slaughter weight than cattle full-fed entirely in
dry lot. Carcass characteristics were similar for the two groups, although the completely
dry lot-fed group had slightly thicker outside fat cover. As compared with straight dry lot
feeding, cattle with no grain, 5 pounds daily, or 10 pounds daily on pasture prior to dry
lot finishing required, respectively, 47, 32, and 21 days longer to reach slaughter weight.
Carcass grades were similar for all groups, but carcass weights were slightly heavier with
cattle fed higher levels of grain prior to dry lot finishing. Average differences in
economic net returns were inconclusive.

Cattle that grazed millet prior to dry lot finishing maintained some of the end-
of-pasture weight advantage over Argentine Bahiagrass steers until completion of a 102-day
dry lot finishing period, resulting in $8.81 per head greater average net return for the
millet-grazed cattle.

EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE

Cattle used.--One hundred short yearling steers grading medium to mostly good
were purchased in Southeastern auction sales. They were of British breeding and cost $20.55
per 100 pounds delivered to the North Florida Experiment Station Farm. Live weight shrink
from purchase to delivery weight was approximately 5.5 percent.



1Animal Husbandman, North Florida Experiment Station.
2NFES Mimeo Rpts. 62-5 (1962), 63-7 (1963), and 65-1 (1964).









Pasture.--Permanent pasture consisted of Argentine Bahia fertilized with an annual
application of 500 pounds per acre 4-12-12 and limed at the rate of one ton per acre at
five-year intervals. Additional nitrogen was furnished by a fair growth of crimson cloves
preceding the grass and by a June application of 65 pounds nitrogen per acre from ammonium
nitrate solution. Clover matured prior to the trial, and none was present in the Bahiagrass
pasttire during the June 16-October 13 experimental period. With surplus forage present
throughout the grazing period, it was necessary to remove some hay from the pastures to
prevent grass from maturing.

Gahia'millet was seeded with a grain drill at the rate of 30 pounds per acre on
April 29 following a small grain crop, which was fertilized with 500 pounds 4-12-12 and
60 pounds additional nitrogen per acre. An application of 65 pounds nitrogen per acre from
ammonium nitrate solution was made on June 15 and the millet was dusted with 50 pounds per
acre 1.75 percent Sevin on July 20 for armyworm control. The stand of millet was poor, with
considerable crabgrass present in all pastures throughout the trial. The millet-crabgrass
mixture furnished an adequate quantity of forage during the grazing period.

Weighing conditions of cattle and carcasses.--The steers were maintained on a
preliminary ration until the aforementioned 5.5 percent shipping shrink was overcome and
average weight of the cattle was approximately the same as purchase weight. Cattle were
then individually weighed, and the actual weights without shrink were used as initial
weights. Steers slaughtered at the end of the Pasture Phase were trucked three miles to
Quincy in the early morning, weighed, and the weights shrunk 3 percent. The shrunk Quincy
weights were used as final weights at the end of the Pasture Phase. Cattle placed in the
Feedlot Finishing Phase at the end of the pasture season were weighed at the feedlot and
their weights shrunk the same as their mates who were slaughtered. Final slaughter weights
at the end of the Feedlot Finishing Phase were also taken at the Quincy packing plant and
shrunk 3 percent. Shrunk slaughter weights were used in calculating both steer gain and
carcass yield or dressing percentage.

Carcass weights were hot weights less 2 1/2 percent.

Experimental design Pasture Phase.--

Lot 11M-0.60 acre per head Millet Pasture.
Lot 11B-1.30 acre per head Argentine Bahia Pasture.

Lot 121-0.40 acre per head Millet Pasture + 5 pounds grain daily.
Lot 12B-1.10 acres per head Argentine Bahia Pasture + 5 pounds grain daily.

Lot 13M-0.40 acre per head Millet Pasture + 10 pounds grain daily.
Lot 13B-0.80 acre per head Argentine Bahia Pasture + 10 pounds grain daily.

Lot 14M-0.20 acre per head Millet Pasture + full-feed grain.
Lot 14B-0.40 acre per head Argentine Bahia Pasture + full-feed grain.

Lot 15M-Dry lot full-feed grain.
Lot 15B-Dry lot full-geed grain.

Half of each group, selected on live weight and estimated grade, was slaughtered
at the end of the Pasture Phase, and the similar steers remaining in each group were placed
or continued in the feedlot.

Feedlot-Finishing Phase.--Although pastured or fed separately during the Pasture
Phase, corresponding lots (11M and 11B, for example) were fed as groups (Lot 11) in the
Feedlot Finishing Phase. The five groups were given a full-feed of grain (ground snapped





-3-


corn-citrus molasses ration) in dry lot until each lot reached an average slaughter weight
of approximately 945 pounds. No feed additives were used except Vitamin A, which was
supplied to all cattle in dry lot at the rate of 25,000 I. U. per head daily.

Table 1 gives feed prices, and Table 2 shows prices received for various grades
of carcasses.

Table l.--Feed Prices

Feed Price per ton
Ground snapped corn $40.00
Citrus molasses 34.00
41% cottonseed meal + vitamin A 80.00
Argentine Bahia hay 22.50
Salt 38.00
Steamed bonemeal 95.00
Trace mineralized salt blocks 65.00
Aurofac crumbles 27.50/cwt.
Millet pasture 20.00/acre
Bahia pasture 10.00/acre

Table 2.--Prices Received for Carcasses (fall 1964 and winter 1965).

Grade Per cwt.
U. S. Choice $39.00
U. S. Good 37.50
U. S. Standard 33.00
U. S. Utility 27.00

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

I. Effect of Level of Feeding During Pasture Phase.

Pasture Phase.--Table 3 shows performance of the combined Millet-Bahia groups
during the Pasture Phase. With the exception of Lot 14, which was full-fed grain, all
pasture groups (Lots 11-13) made more economical gains than the full-fed, dry lot steers
(Lot 15). Only the Lot 14 full-fed pasture group had comparable finish to that of the
Lot 15 dry lot cattle when slaughtered at the end of the Pasture Phase (Table 4); these two
full-fed groups had a slight return above costs of cattle and feed in contrast to the other
lots which showed financial losses.

Feedlot-Finishing Phase.--Compensatory gain resulted in larger live weight gain
by Lot 11, not previously fed grain during the Pasture Phase (Table 5). It should be noted,
however, that carcass yield of Lot 11 was lowest of any of the groups, and if final weights
and gains of all lots are adjusted to the same carcass yield (58.75), differences in live
weight gain are smaller than shown in Table 5. Based on the adjusted weight, feedlot
performance of Lot 14 (full-fed grain on pasture prior to the feedlot) is equal to that of
Lot 11. Although adjusting the final weight and gain of the straight dry lot groups
(Lot 15) on the basis of carcass weight improves its relative rate of gain, feedlot
performance of this group is still lower than that of the other lots, probably because of
the higher condition of the Lot 15 cattle at the beginning of the Feedlot-Finishing Period.
It is interesting to note from Table 6 that the overall (Pasture + Feedlot-Finishing Phase)
rate of gain is somewhat higher for groups fed the higher rates of grain throughout the
experiment (Lots 14 and 15), especially if final weights are adjusted to the same carcass
yield. Costs of gain and net returns favor the groups that were pastured prior to feedlot








finishing; Lot 11 with no grain on pasture had the highest net return. Carcasses of Lot 15,
fed entirely in dry lot, were 15 pounds heavier than those of cattle grazed without grain
before going into the feedlot (Lot 11), with carcass weights of other groups intermediate.
Although there were little differences in carcass grades of the various groups, outside
carcass fat cover was slightly thicker with the groups full-fed grain throughout
the experiment (Lots 14 and 15).

II. Temporary Millet versus Permanent Bahia Argentine Pasture.

Pasture Phase.--In contrast to results in previous years, s eers grazing millet
with no grain or only 5 pounds daily, gained no faster than comparablP cattle on Argentine
Bahiagrass (Tables 7 and 8P. The combined groups of cattle grazing millet gained an average
of 23 pounds per head or 0.20 pound per head daily more than those on Argentine Bahiagrass
because of the greater gains by the millet steers with a full-feed of grain (14M) and with
10 pounds per head daily (13M) than the comparable cattle on Bahia 14B and 13B). Overall
cost of gain for all cattle on millet was $17.11 per 100 pounds as compared with $19.94 on
Argentine Bahia. Cattle slaughtered directly off millet at the end of the Pasture Phase
had slightly heavier carcasses that graded higher than those from cattle slaughtered off
Bahia. Both millet and Bahia cattle had carcasses with slightly yellow fat color. Although
most groups slaughtered at the end of the Pasture Phase showed a financial loss, cattle
that grazed millet had a net advantage of $9.76 per head over those from Bahia.

Feedlot-Finishing Phase.--Tables 9 and 10 give results of cattle grazed on millet
and Bahia pastures with various rates of grain supplementation and then finished in the
feedlot at the end of the Pasture Phase. Bahia pasture groups gained somewhat faster in the
feedlot and produced carcasses that were as heavy as millet pasture groups. With negligible
differences in carcass grades, overall net financial returns were about the same for the
Bahia and millet cattle after finishing in the feedlot, which is in contrast to results in
previous years when millet-grazed cattle maintained a financial advantage at the end of
the feedlot period4. Also in contrast to 1963-1964 results, all groups pastured prior to
feedlot finishing had a higher net return than Lot 15, fed entirely in dry lot. No
treatment on millet showed a clear cut advantage; while on Bahia, Lot 11B, grazed without
grain and then finished in the feedlot, had a higher net return than the other lots.

SUMMARY

With a full-feed of grain, yearling steers in dry lot gained 0.45 pound per head
daily faster than similar cattle on pasture. Cost of gain was similar with the two groups.
Cattle pastured with no grain, 5 pounds daily, or 10 pounds daily gained more slowly but
with less cost per 100 pounds gain than either of the full-fed groups. Steers slaughtered
at the end of the pasture season after grazing either with no grain or with only 5 pounds
daily had carcasses that graded mostly standard and utility; those that received 10 pounds
grain daily on pasture graded half good and half standard in the carcass; cattle full-fed
on grass had carcasses that graded average to high good, which was about the same as those
from steers full-fed in dry lot, although carcasses from the dry lot cattle were heavier.
Most of the cattle slaughtered off pasture showed financial losses, but those that had the
higher rates of grain had the smallest losses, with steers full-fed on pasture having a
positive return above feed costs.

With steers finished in dry lot and final weights adjusted to the same carcass
yield, feed-lot performance was apparently not affected by level of feeding during the
preceding Pasture Phase. Highest gains were made by the group not fed grain on pasture and

3See footnote 2, page 1.
4See footnote 2, page 1.







-5-


the group full-fed on pasture before going into the feedlot, with intermediate gains by the
lots fed 5 and 10 pounds of grain daily on pasture. Although carcasses of cattle full-fed
in dry lot throughout the experiment were heavier than those of cattle grazed without grain
before going into the feedlot, differences in carcass grade were small among the various
groups. Cattle full-fed grain throughout the experiment had slightly thicker outside fat
cover. Pasturing cattle prior to feedlot finishing resulted in higher net returns than
straight dry lot feeding with no pasture.

Although steers with no grain or only 5 pounds daily gained no faster on Gahi.
Millet than on Argentine Bahiagrass pasture, average gain made by all cattle on millet was
larger than that on the Bahia and cost per 100 pounds gain was $2.83 lower on the millet.
With steers slaughtered directly off pasture, carcasses were slightly heavier and graded
higher from cattle that grazed millet, and net return per head averaged $9.76 higher for the
millet than for the Bahia cattle.

Unlike results in previous years, millet-grazed cattle did not maintain the end-
of-Pasture Phase advantage over Bahia cattle until the end of the subsequent Feedlot-
Finishing Period, when carcass characteristics and net returns of the cattle that previously
grazed the two pastures were similar. No treatment on millet showed a clear cut advantage,
while the group that grazed without grain prior to feedlot finishing had the highest net
return of any of the Bahia lots.

























FSB
12/6/65
400 CC






Table 3.-Pasture Phase (Entire Groups, Millet and Bahia Pasture).


Lot 11 Lot 12 Lot 13 Lot 14 Lot 15
Pasture +
Pasture, Pasture + Pasture + Full-feed Dry lot
Pasture Treatment No grain 5- bs. grain 10 lbs. grain- grain Full-feed


Number days
Avg. initial weight
Avg. final weight
Avg. gain
Avg. daily gain
Average Feed Per Head:
Pasture (acres)
Concentrates
Hay
Mineral
Cost
Average Daily Ration:
Ground snapped corn
Citrus molasses
41% cottonseed meal
Coastal Bermuda hay
Pasture (acres)
Feed Per 100 Pounds Gain:
Pasture (acres)
Concentrates*
Roughage*
Mineral
Cost
Economic Data:
Cost cwt. stockers
Cost head stockers
Feed cost
Cost cattle and feed
Cost cwt. cattle & feed
Other costs ($0.10 day)
Total cost
Cost cwt.


119
567
685
119
1.00

0.950


11.6
$ 12.86





0.0030

0.801


9.8
$ 10.85

$ 20.55
116.44
12.86
129.30
18.87
11.90
141.20
20.61


119
567
716
150
1.26

0.750
595

9.5
$ 24.06

4.00

1.00

0.0063

0.501
398(318)
- ( 80)
6.3
$ 16.07

$ 20.55
116.44
24.06
140.50
19.61
11.90
152.40
21.28


119
567
742
175
1.47

0.600
1190

8.6
$ 34.44

9.00

1.00

0.0050

0.342
679(526)
(153)
4.9
$ 19.64

$ 20.55
116.42
34.44
150.86
20.33
11.90
162.76
21.94


119
566
765
199
1.67

0.300
2017

6.8
$ 46.91

15.95

6.O0
1.00

0.0025

0.151
1015(776)
(239)
3.3
$ 23.60

$ 20.55
116.35
46.91
163,26
21.34
11.90
175.16
22.90


119
567
819
253
2.12


2630
271
6.1
$ 60.26

15.95
3.73
2.41
2.28



1041(853)
107(295)
2.5
$ 23.86

$ 20.55
116.46
60.26
176.72
21.57
11.90
188.62
23.02


* Numbers in parenthese on shelled corn basis -


cob and shuck as roughage.










Table 4.-Cattle Slaughtered at End of Pasture Phase (Half of steers from each group, Table 1).


Lot 11 Lot 12 Lot 13 Lot 14 Lot 15
Pasture +
Pasture, Pasture + Pasture + Full-feed Dry lot
Pasture Treatment No grain 5 lbs. grain 10 lbs. grain grain Full-feed


Days
Av. daily gain
Av. slaughter weight
Av. carcass weight
Carcass yield
Carcass grades



Av. carcass grade
Av. degree marbling
Area rib eye (sq. in.)
Color fat
Price cwt. carcass
Price cwt. on foot
Price carcass
Cost cattle and feed
Return above costs cattle
and feed
Other costs ($0.10 day)
Total cost
Net return


119
0.93
685
361
52.68

1 good
5 standard
4 utility
(Av. std.)
Prac. devoid+
8.4
Sl. yellow
$ 31.23
16.45
112.73
130.96

-18.23
11.90
142.86
-30.13


119
1.25
716
387
53.96

1 good
8 standard
1 utility
(Av. std.)
Traces
9.1
Creamy
$ 32.79
17.69
126.74
140.60

-13.86
11.90
152.50
-25.76


119
1.38
743
421
56.62

5 good
5 standard

(High std./low good)
Slight-
9.3
Sl. yellow
$ 35.38
20.03
148.84
150.86

-2.02
11.90
162.76
-13.92


119
1.66
764
448
53.65
4 choice
5 good
1 standard

(Avs/high good)
Small+
9.8
Sl. yellow
$ 37.68
22.10
168.93
163.51

+5.42
11.90
175.41
-6.48


119
2.15
820
468
57.07
2 choice
8 good
-

(Av. good)
Small-
9.8
White
$ 37.80
21.57
176.90
176.26

+0.64
11.90
188.16
-11.26







Table 5.-Feedlot Finishing Phase (cattle from millet and Bahia pastures).


Lot 11 Lot 12 Lot 13 Lot 14 Lot 15
Pasture +
Pasture, Pasture + Pasture + Full-feed Dry lot
Previous Pasture Treatment No grain 5 lbs. grain 10 lbs. grain grain Full-feed


Number days
Av. initial weight
Av. final weight
Av. gain
Av. daily gain
Average daily ration:
Ground snapped corn
Citrus molasses
41% cottonseed meal
Argentine Bahia hay
Feed per 100 pounds gain:
Concentrates*
Roughage*
Mineral
Cost
Carcass data:
Slaughter weight
Carcass weight
Carcass yield
Av. carcass grade
Degree marbling
Area rib eye (sq. in.)
Fat cover rib eye (in.)
Economic data:
Price cwt, carcass
Price cwt. on foot
Price carcass
Cost cattle and feed
Return above cattle and feed
Other costs ($0.10 day)
Total cost
Net return


111
685
941
257
2.31

18.36
3.59
2.37
2.87

1054(855)
124(323)
4.4
$ 24.23

941
553
58.75
(High good)
Small
11.2
0.38

$ 37.91
22.27
209.67
201.66
+8.01
11.10
212.76
-3.09


108
716
940
224
2.08

18.01
3.58
2.38
2.82

1155(938)
136(353)
4.0
$ 26.60

940
559
59.42
(High good)
Small+/Md st-
11.5
0.40

$ 38.14
22.66
213.13
211.92
-1.21
10.80
222.72
-9.59


101
741
936
195
1.93

16.00
3.55
2.41
2.33

1137(930)
121(328)
4.7
$ 26.26

936
560
59.84
(High good)
Small
11.5
0.36

$ 38.16
22.84
213.76
211.55
+2.21
10.10
221.65
-7.89


83
766
938
173
2.08

14.47
3.46
2.36
2.74

976(802)
132(306)
4.0
$ 23.01

938
561
59.81
(High good)
Small+/Mdst-
11.4
0.52

$$37.82
22.62
212.14
214.59
-2.45
8.30
222.89
-10.75


83
819
947
128
1.54

14.79
4.00
2.50
1.87

1378(1139)
121(360)
4.1
$ 31.78

947
568
59.95
(Low choice)
Modest+
11.1
0.57

$ 38.40
23.02
217.94
229.81
-11.87
8.30
238.11
-20.17


* Numbers in parentheses on shelled corn basis


- cob and shuck as roughage.








Table 6.-Pasture and Feedlot Finishing Phase (cattle from Millet and Bahia pastures).
Lot 11 Lot 12 Lot 13 Lot 14 Lot 15
Pasture +
Pasture, Pasture + Pasture + Full-feed Dry lot
Pasture Treatment No grain 5 lbs. grain 10 lbs. rain grain Full-feed

Number days 230 227 220 202 202
Av. initial weight 558 566 555 565 569
Av. final weight 941 940 936 938 947
Av. gain 383 374 382 373 378
Av. daily gain 1.67 1.65 1.73 1.85 1.87
Average feed per head:
Pasture (acres) 0.950 0.750 0.600 0.300 -
Concentrates 2701 3184 3408 3701 4396
Hay 318 304 236 228 427
Mineral 23.0 18.5 17.8 13.7 11.3
Cost $ 75.01 $ 83.69 $ 85.70 $ 86.60 $101.00
Feed per 100 pounds gain:
Pasture (acres) 0.248 0.200 0.157 0.080
Concentrates* 705(572) 850(688) 893(717) 992(784) 1163(956)
Roughage* 83(216) 81(243) 62(238) 61(269) 113(320)
Mineral 6.0 4.9 4.7 3.7 3.0
Cost $ 19.58 $ 22.36 $ 22.46 $ 23.21 $ 26.73
Economic data:
Cost cwt. stockers $ 20.55 $ 20.55 $ 20.55 $ 20.55 $ 20.55
Cost head stockers 114.75 116.33 113.95 116.09 116.91
Cost feed pasture phase 12.86 24.06 34.44 46.91 60.26
Cost feed feedlot 62.15 59.63 51.26 39.69 40.74
Sale price cwt. carcass 37.91 38.14 38.16 37.82 38.40
Sale price cwt. on foot 22.27 22.66 22.84 22.62 23.02
Carcass weight 553 559 560 561 568
Sale price head $209.67 $213.13 $213.76 $212.14 $217.94
Cost cattle and feed 189.76 200.02 199.65 202.69 217.91
Return above cattle and feed 19.91 13.11 14.11 9.45 0.03
Other costs ($0.10 day) 23.00 22.70 22.00 20.20 20.20
Total cost 212.76 222.72 221.65 222.89 238.11
Net return -3.09 -9.59 -7.89 -10.75 -20.17


* Numbers in parenthese on shelled corn basis


- cob and shuck as roughage.









Table 7.-Cattle Slaughtered at End of Pasture Phase (Millet Pasture Groups).


Lot 11M Lot 12M Lot 13M Lot 14M Lot 15M
Millet Millet Millet Millet Average
Pasture, Pasture + Pasture + Pasture + Millet Dry lot,
Pasture Treatment No grain 5 Ibs. grain 10 lbs. grain Full-Feed grain Groups Full-feed


Days 119
Av. daily gain 0.92
Av. slaughter weight 687
Av. carcass weight 358
Av. carcass yield 52.07
Carcass grades
1 good
3 standard
1 utility
Av. carcass grade (High std.)
Degree marbling (av.) Traces
Color fat Sl. yellow
Price cwt. carcass $ 32.79
Price cwt. on foot 17.07
Price carcass 117.24
Cost cattle and feed 130.85
Return above costs cattle
and feed -13.61
Other costs ($0.10 day) 11.90
Total dost 142.75
Net return -25.51


119
1.20
715
389
54.39

1 good
3 standard
1 utility
(Av./high std.)
Slight-
Creamy
$ 32.58
17.72
126.69
140.12

-13.43
11.90
152.02
-25.33


119
1.61
767
436
56.80

3 good
2 standard

(Low good)
Slight
Sl. yellow
$ 35.83
20.35
156.15
152.62

+3.53
11.90
164.52
-8.37


119
1.85
785
459
58.59
3 choice
2 good


(High gd./low ch.)
Modest-
Creamy
$ 38.38
22.48
176.46
164.59

+11.87
11.90
176.49
-0.03


119
1.40
739
411
55.62
3 choice
7 good
8 standard
2 utility
(Low good)
Slight+
Sl. Yellow
$ 35.07
19.50
144.14
147.05

-2.91
11.90
158.95
-14.81


119
2.29
821
466
56.77
1 choice
4 good


(Av. good)
Slight+
White
$ 37.82
21.48
176.24
173.15

-3.09
11.90
185.05
-8.81










Table 3.-Cattle Slaughtered at End of Pasture Phase (Bahia Pasture Groups).


Lot 11B Lot 12B Lot 13B Lot 14 3 Lot 153
Bahia Bahia Bahia Bahia v erag e
Pasture, Pasture + Pasture + Pasture + Bahia Dry lot,
Pasture Treatment To grain 5 lbs. grain 10 lbs. grain Full-feed grain Groups Full-feed


Days 119
Av. daily gain 0.93
Av. slaughter weight 684
Av. carcass weight 364
Av. carcass yield 53.29
Carcass grades

2 standard
3 utility
Av. carcass grade (Low std.)
Degreesmarbling (av.) Prac. devoid
Color fat Creamy
Price cwt. carcass $ 29.70
Price cwt. on foot 15.83
Price carcass 108.22
Cost cattle and feed 131.06
Return above costs cattle
and feed -22.84
Other costs ($0.10 day) 11.90
Total cost 142.96
Net returns -34.74


119
1.31
718
384
53.52


5 standard

(Low/av. std.)
Prac. devoid+
Creamy
$ 33.00
17.66
126.79
141.07

-14.28
11.90
152.97
-26.18


119
1.15
719
406
56.42

2 good
3 standard

(High std.)
Traces+
Sl. yellow
$ 34.89
19.69
141.53
154.03


119
1.46
744
437
58.71
1 choice
3 good
1 standard

(iv. good)
Small -
Sl. yellow
$ 36.95
21.69
161.39
162.43


-12.50
11.90
165.93
-24.40


-1.04
11.90
174.33
-12.94


119
1.21
716
398
55.59
1 choice
5 good
11 standard
3 utility
(Av./high std.)
Traces
Sl. yellow
$ 33.79
18.78
134.48
147.15

-12.67
11.90
159.05
-24.57


119
2.01
820
470
57.35
1 choice
4 good


(Av./high good)
Small-
White
$ 37.78
21.66
177.56
179.38

-1.82
11.90
191.28
-13.72










Table 9.--Cattle Slaughtered at End of Feedlot Phase (lillet Pasture Groups).

Lot 114M Lot 12>i Lot 13-1 Lot 141 Lot 15M
,,illet Millet lillet 'illet Average
Pasture Pasture + Pasture + Pasture + Millet Dry lot,
Pasture Treatment No grain 5 lbs. grain 10 lbs. grain Full-feed grain Groups Full-feed


Days feedlot
Av. daily gain feedlot
Days pasture + feedlot
Av. daily gain
Av. slaughter weight
Av. carcass weight
Carcass yield
Carcass grades


111
2.12
230
1.60
924
539
53.33
3 choice
1 good
1 standard


108
1.98
227
1.62
928
551
59.41
3 choice
1 good
1 standard


101
1.85
220
1.80
954
575
60.27
2 choice
3 good


33
1.76
202
1.80
931
561
60.29
2 choice
3 good


101
1.93
220
1.71
934
557
59.64
10 choice
8 good
2 standard


Av. carcass grade (Higi
Wv. degree marbling
Area rib eye (sq. in.)
Fat cover rib eye (in.)
Price cwt. carcass
Price cwt. on foot
Price head
Cost pasture feed
Cost feedlot feed
Total cost feed
Feed cost cwt. gain
Return above costs cattle
and feed
Other costs ($0.10 day)
Total costs
Net return


i gd./low ch.)(High good)
Small+ Small+
10.9 11.4
0.36 0.38
$ 37.71 $ 37.88
22.00 22.50
203.35 208.88
12.32 22.49
62.15 59.63
74.47 82.12
20.25 22.34


14.50
23.00
211.85
-8.50


11.56
22.70
220.02
-11.14


(High good)
Small
11.7
0.30
$ 38.16
23.00
219.48
34.42
51.26
85.68
21.63


(Low choice)
Modest
11.6
0.50
$ 38.13
22.99
214.06
48.48
39.69
88.17
24.25


19.09
22.00
222.39
-2.91


9.25
20.20
225.01
-10.95


(High gd./low ch.)(Low/av. ch.)
Small+ Modcrate-
11.4 10.7
0.39 0.52
$ 37.96 $ 38.70
22.64 23.11
211.44 214.34
29.43 60.49
53.18 40.74
82.61 101.23
22.10 29.58


13.60
22.00
219.82
-8.38


-7.15
22.00
243.49
-29.15


83
1.28
202
1.69
927
554
59.72
4 choice
1 good


--










Rable 10.-Cattle Slaughtered at End of Feedlot Phase (Bahia Pasture Groups).

Lot 11B Lot 12B Lot 13B Lot 14B Lot 15B
Bahia Bahia Bahia Bahia Average
Pasture Pasture + Pasture + Pasture + Bahia Dry lot,
Pasture Treatment No grain 5 Ibs. grain 10 lbs. grain Full-feed grain Groups Full-feed


Days feedlot
Av. daily gain
Days pasture + feedlot
Av. daily gain
Av. slaughter weight
Av. carcass weight
Carcass yield
Carcass grades


Av. carcass grade (Av
Av. degree marbling
Area rib eye (sq. in.)
Fat cover rib eye (in.)
Price cwt. carcass
Price cwt. on foot
Price head
Cost pasture feed
Cost feedlot feed
Total cost feed
Feed cost cwt. gain
Return above costs cattle
and feed
Other costs ($0.10 day)
Total costs
Net return


111 108
2.50 2.18
230 227
1.73 1.68
958 953
567 566
59.16 59.44
2 choice 3 choice
3 good 2 good

./high good)(High gd./Low dh.)
Small Modest-
11.5 11.6
0.40 0.42
$ 38.09 $ 38.39
22.54 22.82
215.99 217.37
13.39 25.62
62.15 59.63
75.54 85.25
18.97 22.38


25.33
23.00
213.66
+2.33


14.66
22.70
225.41
-8.04


101
2.02
220
1.67
918
545
59.39
2 choice
3 good

(High good)
Small
11.3
0.42
$ 38.17
22.67
208.04
34.47
51.26
85.73
23.37


83
2.40
202
1.89
945
561
59.34

5 good

(Av. good)
Small
11.2
0.54
$ 37.50
22.25
210.23
45.34
39.69
85.03
22.22


9.12
22.00
220.92
-12.88


9.67
20.20
220.76
-10.53


101
2.28
220
1.74
944
560
59.32
7 choice
13 good

(High good)
Small+
11.4
0.45
$ 38.02
22.55
212.91
29.71
53.18
82.89
21.69

14.70
22.00
220.19
-7.28


83
1.81
202
2.05
966
581
60.17
2 choice
3 good

(Low choice)
MAodest-
11.5
0.62
$ 38.12
22.93
221.53
60.03
40.74
100.77
24.38

7.20
20.20
234.53
-13.00




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