Group Title: Mimeo report - University of Florida North Florida Experiment Station ; 65-1
Title: Fattening steers in dry lot and in pasture
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00066032/00001
 Material Information
Title: Fattening steers in dry lot and in pasture
Series Title: NFES mimeo rpt.
Physical Description: 13 leaves : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Baker, F. S ( Frank Sloan ), 1921-
North Florida Experiment Station
Publisher: North Florida Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Quincy Fla
Publication Date: 1964
 Subjects
Subject: Beef cattle -- Feeding and feeds -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Statement of Responsibility: F.S. Baker, Jr.
General Note: Caption title.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00066032
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 69660777

Full Text




NORTH FLORIDA EXPERIMENT STATION
Quincy, Florida

July 13, 1964


NFES Mimeo Rpt. 65-1

FATTENING STEERS IN DRY LOT
AND IN PASTURE

F. S. Baker, Jr.1


In both 1961 and 1962, steer gains from unsupplemented Bahia grass
pasture were slow, resulting in the cattle not attaining satisfactory finish
for slaughter at the end of the pasture season.2 Supplementing the Bahia
with grain improved steer gains, but at least 10 pounds grain per head daily
was needed to produce U. S. Good grade carcasses at the end of the pasture
season. Carcass yields were low for steers slaughtered directly off Bahia,
with or without grain supplement on the pasture. Purchasing stockers at
an average cost of $24.24 per 100 pounds in the spring and slaughtering after
four months was unprofitable. Prices received for carcasses did not pay the
average cost of the cattle and the feed consumed during the two years with
any of the pasture groups, while comparable groups full-fed in dry lot had
a slight return above costs of cattle and feed. Of the various groups
slaughtered off pasture, those that received daily 10 pounds or more of
grain showed the least financial loss.

With either no grain or 5 pounds daily, steers grazing millet
pasture in 1963 gained considerably faster than those on Bahia. With higher
levels of grain, cattle on Bahia gained slightly more. During the pasture
season, the average daily gain for all millet steers was 0.34 pound faster
than for the Bahia lots. Carcasses of cattle slaughtered off millet were
heavier but carcass grades were similar to those from Bahia cattle.

Steers pastured on Bahia prior to finishing in dry lot required an
average of 20 days longer in the feedlot to reach 915 pound slaughter weight
in 1963, and 44 days longer to attain 950 pounds in 1962, than similar steers
fed entirely in the feedlot without pasturing. There was no financial
advantage to pasturing prior to feedlot finishing in 1962 and only a slight
advantage to pasturing in 1963. Fat cover over the rib eye was slightly
thicker for straight dry lot as compared with pasture-grazed, feedlot-
finished steers. Grazing millet before feedlot finishing gave some economic
advantage over straight dry lot feeding to the same final weight. Slightly
higher carcass grades, slightly heavier carcasses, and slightly lower pasture
costs resulted in $10.43 more net return per head with cattle pastured on
millet and finished in the feedlot as compared with those grazing Bahia
before finishing in the feedlot.

Animal Husbandman, North Florida Experiment Station.
2NFES Mimeo Rpts. 62-5 (1964) and 63-7 (1963)








- 2 -


EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE

Cattle used.- One hundred short yearling steers grading medium to
mostly good were purchased in Alabama auction sales. They were typical of
British breed stocker-feeder cattle widely used by cattle feeders in the
North Floridd areas

Pasture.- Permanent pasture consisted of productive Argentine Bahia
fertilized annually with 500 pounds per acre 0-14-14 and limed at the rate
of one ton per acre at four-year intervals. Nitrogen was furnished by a
heavy growth of crimson clover prior to the Bahia grazing season. The
grazing trial was not begun until the clover had seeded and matured. Bahia
forage was abundant during the grazing season.

Temporary pasture was Starr millet seeded with no fertilization
following a small grain crop that received 500 pounds per acre 4-12-12 at
planting and 60 pounds N per acre in December. The millet was topdressed
with 30 pounds N per acre in August. Because of dry weather following
seeding, stand of millet was poor, but abundant forage was available
throughout the season from the limited millet and native grasses in the
pasture. Pasture was mowed as necessary to control excess growth.

Weighing conditions of cattle and carcasses.- The steers were
maintained on a preliminary ration until shipping shrink had been overcome.
They were then weighed on trial at approximately the same weights as purchase
weights, and these initial weights were not shrunk. Cattle slaughtered at
the end of the Pasture Phase were trucked three miles to Quincy in the early
morning, weighed, and the Quincy weights shrunk 3 percent. The shrunk
Quincy weights were used as final weights at the end of the Pasture Phase.
Cattle placed in the Feedlot Finishing Phase at the end of the pasture
season were weighed at the feedlot and their weights shrunk the same as
their mates who were slaughtered. Final slaughter weights at the end of
the Feedlot Finishing Phase were also taken at the Quincy packing plant and
were shrunk 3 percent. Shrunk slaughter-weights were used in calculating
both steer gain and carcass yield.

Carcass weights were hot weights less 2 1/2 percent.

Experimental design, Pasture Phase:

Lot 11M 0.60 acre per head Millet Pasture.
Lot 11B 1.30 acres per head Bahia Pasture.

Lot 12M 0.40 acre per head Millet Pasture + 5 pounds grain daily.
Lot 12B 1.10 acres per head Bahia Pasture + 5 pounds grain daily.

Lot 13M 0.40 acre per head Millet Pasture + 10 pounds grain daily.
Lot 13B 0.80 acre Bahia Pasture + 10 pounds grain daily.

Lot 14M 0.20 acre per head Millet Pasture + full-feed grain.
Lot 14B 0.40 acre Bahia Pasture 4- full-feed grain.

Lot 15M Dry lot full-feed grain.
Lot 15B Dry lot full-feed grain.






- 3 -


Half of each lot, selected on live weight and estimated grade, was
slaughtered at the end of the Pasture Phase, and the remainder of each group
was placed or continued in the feedlot.

Feedlot-Finishing Phase.- Although pastured separately, corresponding
lots (11M and 11B), for example) were fed as groups (Lot 11) in the Feedlot
Finishing Phase. The five groups were given a full-feed of grain in dry lot
until they reached an average slaughter weight of approximately 915 pounds.
No feed additives were used except vitamin A which was supplied to all groups
in dry lot at the rate of 25,000 I. U. per head daily.

Table 1 gives feed prices and Table 2 shows prices received for
carcasses.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

I. Effect of Level of Feeding During Pasture Phase.

Pasture Phase.- Steers on both millet and Bahia pastures (Tables 3
and 4)gained more slowly than those in the preceding year (NFES Mimeo Rpt.
63-7). Gains of all pasture groups (Lots 11-14) were more economical than
the gain of the dry lot steers (Lot 15). None of the pasture steers except
those full-fed grain (Lot 14) attained enough finish during the Pasture Phase
to grade U. S. Good in the carcass. Cattle full-fed on pasture (Lot 14) and
those full-fed in dry lot (Lot 15) had the same average carcass grade at the
end of the Pasture Phase; unlike results in previous trials dry lot-fed
steers did not have higher yielding carcasses. Of the groups slaughtered at
the end of the Pasture Phase, none had sufficient sales returns to pay costs
of cattle and feed. Lot 14 steers, full-fed on grass had the smallest
financial loss, and Lot 11 with no feed on grass had the greatest.

Feedlot-Finishing Phase.- Steers fed either no grain (Lot 11) or
only 5 pounds daily (Lot 12) during the Pasture Phase gained somewhat faster
in the subsequent Feedlot Finishing Phase than those previously fed higher
levels of grain (Lots 13, 14, and 15) (Table 5). It should be pointed out,
however, that the groups that received higher levels of grain during the
Pasture Phase had higher carcass yields at the end of the Feedlot Phase. If
final weights of the five groups were adjusted to the same carcass yield,
there would be little difference in feedlot gain of the four pasture groups,
with gain of the Lot 15 dry lot group somewhat higher. Carcass grades were
slightly higher for steers fed 10 pounds or more of grain daily prior to
going into the feedlot. With exception of slightly more marbling in
carcasses of heavier grain-fed cattle, other carcass characteristics recorded
were not related to amount of grain feeding during the preceding Pasture
Phase. Total feed costs and costs of feed per 100 pounds gain were greater
during the combined Pasture-Feedlot Phases for lots fed larger amounts of
grain during the Pasture Phase (Table 6). Because of higher sales returns of
the latter groups, net returns of the five lots were similar. Cattle
pastured with or without grain supplement before finishing in the feedlot
had no marked economic advantage over cattle fed in dry lot for the entire
trial.

II. Temporary Millet Versus Permanent Bahia Pasture.

Pasture Phase.- Steers that grazed millet gained faster and yielded
heavier carcasses when slaughtered off pasture than those that grazed






- 4 -


Argentine Bahia (Tables 7 and 8). Other carcass characteristics were similar
for cattle from the two pastures. None of the groups slaughtered off pasture
returned a profit, but millet-grazed cattle had a somewhat smaller loss than
Bahia-pastured cattle. With Bahia groups that were slaughtered off grass,
most favorable returns were with cattle fed heavier rates of grain. With
millet groups, cattle supplemented with grain had smaller economic losses
than those pastured without grain, but there were only slight differences in
returns from various rates of grain feeding with cattle slaughtered off
millet.

Feedlot Finishing Phase.- Tables 9 and 10 give results of cattle
grazed on Millet and Bahia pastures with various rates of grain supplementa-
tion and then finished in the feedlot at the end of the Pasture Phase. Also
included are results of steers given a full-feed of grain in dry lot
throughout both the Pasture and Feedlot-Finishing Phases (Lots 15M and 15B).
The four millet groups gained an average of 0.27 pound per head daily faster
than the comparable Bahia lots on pasture, and both groups made approximately
the same average gain in the feedlot, resulting in an average of 0.12 pound
per head daily faster gain for the millet steers for the combined pasture and
feedlot periods. Carcasses of millet cattle averaged 15 pounds heavier than
those of Bahia cattle, but other carcass characteristics were similar.
Cattle that grazed millet prior to finishing in the feedlot had an average
net return of $7.10 more than those that grazed Bahia before going in the
feedlot. All groups showed economic losses. The lot full-fed on Bahia
(Lot 14B) before finishing had the most favorable return of the Bahia groups;
while there was little difference in returns between the no grain (Lot 11M),
5 pounds daily (Lot 12M), and 10 pounds daily (Lot 13M) millet groups.
These four groups had somewhat more favorable returns than straight dry lot-
fed groups (Lots 15M and 15B); but average net return of neither the four
Bahia nor four Millet lots was appreciably higher than comparable lots fed
entirely in dry lot. Based on these results, there appeared to be no marked
economic advantage from use of pasture prior to feedlot finishing as compared
with straight dry lot finishing.

SUMMARY

Although steers on pasture did not gain as well as in previous
years, costs of gain on pasture with or without grain supplement were lower
than with full-fed dry lot cattle. Despite relatively low costs of gain on
pasture, gains were too small to appreciably lower cost per hundredweight
of the cattle during the pasture period. Steers pastured without grain or
with only 5 or 10 pounds daily and slaughtered at the end of the pasture
season graded mostly standard in the carcass. Full-fed steers either on
pasture or in dry lot had carcasses that graded average good. Of the cattle
slaughtered off pasture, those that had received grain had smaller financial
losses than the steers that were grazed without grain supplement.

With steers finished in dry lot and final weights adjusted to the
same carcass yield, feedlot performance was apparently not affected by level
of feeding during the preceding Pasture Phase. The various groups were fed
to the same approximate final weight. Cattle pastured with or without grain
supplement before finishing in the feedlot had no marked economic advantage
over those fed in dry lot for the entire trial.

Steers that grazed millet gained faster and had heavier carcasses
when slaughtered off pasture than those that grazed Argentine Bahia. Millet-
grazed cattle performed as well as Bahia cattle during the subsequent feedlot






- 5 -


period, resulting in a daily gain advantage of 0.12 pound for the millet
cattle during the overall pasture-feedlot period. Likewise steers that
previously grazed millet had carcasses averaging 15 pounds heavier and net
returns averaging $7.18 higher than steers that grazed Bahia before going
in the feedlot.


Table 1.- Feed Prices.


Feed


Price per ton


Ground snapped corn
Citrus molasses
41% cottonseed meal + vitamin A
Coastal Bermuda hay
Salt
Steamed bonemeal
Trace mineralized salt
Millet pasture
Bahia pasture
Aurofac 10


$40.00
35.00
85.00
22.50
36.00
90.00
65.00
17.50/acre
10.00/acre
0.90/pound


Table 2.- Prices Received for Carcasses (fall 1963 and winter 1964).


Grade Per cwt.

U. S. Choice $39.50
U. S. Good 38.00
U. S. Standard 37.00
U. S. Utility 33.00


FSB
7/15/64
400 cc






Table 3.-Pasture Phase (Entire Group, Millet and Bahia Pasture).


Lot 11 Lot 12 Lot 13 Lot 14 Lot 15
Pasture +
Pasture, Pasture + Pasture + Full-feed Dry lot
Pasture Treatment No grain 5 lbs. grain 10 lbs. grain grain Full-feed


Days
Ave. initial weight
Ave. final weight
Ave. gain
Ave. daily gain
Average feed per head:
Pasture (acres)
Concentrates
Hay
Mineral
Cost

Average daily ration:
Ground snapped corn
Citrus molasses
41% cottonseed meal
Coastal Bermuda hay
Pasture (acres)
Feed per 100 pounds gain:
Pasture (acres)
Concentrates *
Roughage *
Mineral
Cost
Economic data:
Cost cwt. stockers
Cost head stockers
Feed cost
Cost cattle and feed
Cost cwt cattle and feed
Other costs ($0.10 day)
Total cost
Cost cwt.


117
564
650
86
0.74

0.950


12.5
$ 12.11


117
564
700
136
1.16

0.750
585

5.2
$ 23.45


4.00

1.00


0.0081

1.103


14.5
$ 14.05

$ 24.61
138,75
12.11
150.86
23.21
11.70
162.56
25.01


0.0064

0.552
430(327)
---(103)
4.8
$ 17.27

$ 24.61
138.73
23.45
162.18
23.19
11.70
173.88
24.86


117
564
730
167
1.42

0.600
1170

8.7
$ 33.78


9.00

1.00


0.0051

0.360
702(512)
---(190)
5.2
$ 20.26

$ 24.61
138.70
33.78
172.48
23.62
11.70
184.18
25.22


117
569
744
174
1.49

0.300
1814

7.0
$ 42.87


14.50


1.00

0.0025

0.160
988(711)
---(277)
3.9
$ 23.34

$ 24.61
140.10
42.87
182.97
24.60
11.70
194.67
26.17


117
564
762
198
1.69


2249
223
5.9
$ 53.50


14.89
1.91
2.41
1.90



1135(871)
112(376)
3.0
$ 26.99

$ 24.61
138.68
53.50
192.18
25.23
11.70
203.88
26.77


shelled corn basis cob and shuck as roughage.


. Numbers in parentheses on







Table 4.-Cattle Slaughtered at End of Pasture Phase (Half of steers from each group, Table 1).


Lot 11 Lot 12 Lot 13 Lot 14 Lot 15
Pasture + Pasture + Pasture +
Pasture, 5 lbs. 10 lbs, Full-feed Dry lot,
Pasture Treatment no grain grain grain grain Full-feed


Days
Ave. daily gain
Ave. slaughter weight
Ave. carcass weight
Carcass yield
Carcass grades



Ave. carcass grade
Ave. degree marbling
Area rib eye (sq. in.)
Color fat
Price cwt. carcass
Price cwt. on foot
Price carcass
Cost cattle and feed
Return above costs
cattle and feed
Other costs ($0.10 day)
Total cost
Net return


117
0.66
650
341
52.41

1 good
7 std.
2 utility
(Low std.+)
Prac. devoid+
8.5
Creamy
$36.33
19.04
123.76
152.90

-29.14
11.70
164.60
-40.84


117
1.19
699
388
55,50

3 good
6 std,
1 utility
(High std.)
Traco~
9.1
Creamy
$36.99
20.53
143.48
161.29

-17.81
11.70
172.99
-29.51


117
1.41
729
416
56.98

2 good
8 std.

(High std.)
Traces +
9.5
Creamy
$37.33
21.27
155.15
172.61

-17.46
11.70
184.31
-29.16


117
1.54
750
443
59.09
2 choice
4 good
3 std.

(Ave. good)
Sliglh
9.7
Creamy
$38.01
22.46
168.48
183.25

-14.77
11.70
194.95
-26.47


117
1.69
763
448
58.70
1 choice
8 good
1 std.

(Ave. good)
Slight +
10.5
White
$38.05
22.34
170.43
192.52

-22.09
11.70
204.22
-33.79


- ----






Table 5.-Feedlot Finishing Phase (Cattle from Millet and Bahia Pastures).


Lot 11 Lot 12 Lot 13 Lot 14 Lot 15
Pasture + Pasture + Pasture +
Pasture, 5 lbs. 10 lbs. Full-feed Dry lot,
Previous Pasture Treatment No grain grain grain grain Full-feed


Days 114
Ave. initial weight 650
Ave. final weight 916
Ave. gain 266
Ave. daily gain 2.33
Average daily ration:
Ground snapped corn 19.08
Citrus molasses 2.96
41% cottonseed meal 2.36
Coastal Bermuda hay 1.95
Feed per 100 pounds gain:
Concentrates 1046(842)
Roughage 84(288)
Mineral 3.3
Cost $ 24.15
Carcass and financial data:
Slaughter weight 916
Carcass weight 541
Carcass yield 59.10
Ave. carcass grade (High gd./low ch.)
Degree marbling Small +
Area rib eye (sq. in.) 11.1
Fat cover rib eye (in.) 0.50
Economic data:
Price cwt. carcass $ 38.63
Price cwt. on foot 22.83
Price carcass 209.08
Cost cattle and feed 224.67
Return above costs cattle & feed 15.59
Other costs ($0.10 day) 11.40
Total cost 236.07
Net return 26.99


101
700
918
218
2.15

16.86
2.83
2.35
1.70

1023(827)
79(275)
1.9
$ 23.80

918
544
59.30
(High gd./low
Small
10.3
0.54

$ 38.60
22.89
210.01
226.52
16.51
10.10
236.62
26.61


94
731
905
174
1.85

16.48
2.74
2.34
2.34

1166(943)
126(349)
2.8
$ 27.60

905
548
60.59
ch.) (Low ch.)
Small +
9.2
0.61

$ 39.04
23.65
214.07
232.02
17.95
9.40
241.42
27.35


* Numbers in parentheses on shelled corn basis cob and shuck as roughage.


91
751
909
158
1.74

14.87
2.70
2.34
2.44

1143(930)
140(353)
4.0
$ 27.55

909
560
61.62
(Low ch.)
Modest -
11.0
0.56

$ 39.04
24.06
218.68
236.81
- 18.13
9.10
245.91
- 27.23


77
760
911
151
1.80

16.73
2.61
2.42
2.21

1114(900)
113(327)
3.0
$ 26.42

911
564
61.95
(Low ch.)
Modest
11.1
0.58

$ 39.22
24.30
221.32
243.29
- 21.97
7.70
250.99
- 29.67





Table 6.-Pasture and Dry Lot Phase (Cattle from I-llet and Bahia Pastures).


Lot 11 Lot 12 Lot 13 Lot 14 Lot 15
Pasture, Pasture + Pasture + Pasture + Dry lot,
Pasture Treatment No grain 5 lbs. grain 10 lbs. grain Full-feed grain full-feed


Days
Ave. gain
Ave. daily gain
Ave. feed per head:
Pasture (acres)
Concentrates
Hay
Mineral
Cost
Feed per 100 pounds gain
Pasture (acres)
Concentrates *
Roughage *-
Mineral
Cost
Carcass data:
Slaughter weight
Carcass weight
Carcass yield
Ave. carcass grade
Degree marbling
Area rib eye (sq. in.)
Fat cover rib eye (in.)
Economic data:
Cost cwt. stockers
Cost head stockers
Cost feed pasture phase
Cost feed feedlot
Sale price cwt. carcass
Sale price cwt. on foot
Sale price head
Cost cattle and feed
Return above costs
cattle and feed
Other costs ($0.10 day)
Total cost
Net return


231
360
1.56

0.950
2784
222
19.2
$ 76.29

0.264
773(622)
62(213)
6.0
$ 21.17

916
541
59.10
(High gd/low ch.)
Small +
11.1
0.50

$ 24.61
136.68
12.11
64.18
38.63
22.83
209.08
212.97

-3.89
23.10
236.07
-26.99


218
350
1.61

0.750
2812
172
9.3
$ 75.21

0.214
803(642)
49(210)
2.7
$ 21.47

918
544
59.30
(High gd/low ch.)
Small
10.3
0.54

$ 24.61
139.61
23.45
51.76
38.60
22.89
210.01
214.82

-4.81
21.80
236.62
-26.61


211
342
1.62

0.600
3197
220
13.6
$ 81.75

0.175
935(730)
64(269)
4.0
$ 23.90

905
548
60.59
(Low ch.)
Small +
9.2
0.61

$ 24.61
138.55
33.76
47.99
39.04
23.65
214.07
220.30

-6.23
21.10
241.40
-27.33


208
346
1.66

0.300
3626
222
13.4
$ 86.52

0.087
1048(801)
64(311)
3.8
$ 25.03

909
560
61.62
(Low ch.)
Modest -
11.0
0.56

$ 24.61
138.60
42.87
43.65
39.04
24.06
218.68
225.12

-6.44
20.80
245.92
-27.24


194
349
1.80


3925
393
12.4
$ 93.26


1125(886)
113(352)
3.5
$ 26.74

911
564
61.95
(Low ch.)
Modest
11.1
0.58

$ 24.61
138.33
53.50
39.76
39.22
24.30
221.32
231.59

-10.27
19.40
250.99
-29.67


* Numbers in parentheses on shelled corn basis cob and shuck


as roughage.








Table 7.- Cattle Slaughtered at End of Pasture Phase (Millet Pasture Groups).


Lo M ot 12M Lot 1 Lot3M Lot 14M Lot 15M
Millet Millet Millet Millet Average _
Pasture, Pasture + Pasture Pasture + Millet Dry Lot,
Pasture Treatment No grain 5 lbs. grain 10 lbs. grain Full-feed grain Groups Full-feed


Days
Ave. daily gain
Ave. slaughter weight
Ave. carcass weight
Ave. carcass yield
Carcass grades



Ave. carcass grade
Degree marbling (ave.)
Color fat
Price cwt. carcass
Price cwt. on foot
Price carcass
Cost cattle and feed
Return above costs
cattle and feed
Other costs ($0.10 day)
Total cost
Net return


117
0.86
670
350
52.19

1 good
3 std.
1 utility
(Low/Ave.std. )
Traces -
Creamy
$ 36.45
19.02
127.49
150.96

-23.47
11.70
162.66
-35.17


117
1.29
717
399
55.69

2 good
3 std.

(High std.)
Traces +
Creamy
$ 37.45
20.85
149.48
160.75

-11.27
11.70
172.45
-22.97


117
1.46
744
430
57.77

1 good
4 std.

(High std.)
Traces +
Creamy
$ 37.43
21.62
160.85
174.67

-13.82
11.70
186.37
-25.52


117
1.70
756
446
59.00
1 choice
3 good
1 std.

(Ave. good)
Slight +
Creamy
$ 38.14
22.50
170.02
183.06

-13.04
11.70
194.76
-24.74


117
1.33
722
406
56.23
1 choice
7 good
11 std.
1 utility
(High std.)
Traces +
Creamy
$ 37.43
21.05
151.96
167.36

-15.40
11.70
179.06
-27.10


117
1.65
773
451
58.28
1 choice
3 good
1 std.

(Ave. good)
Slight
White
$ 38.10
22.20
171.68
196.64

-24.96
11.70
208.34
-36.66


-- --









Table 8.- Cattle Slaughtered at End of Pasture Phase (Bahia Pasture Groups).


Lot 11B


Pasture Treatment


Bahia
Pasture,
No grain


Lot 12B
Bahia
Pasture +
5 lbs.
grain


Lot 13B
Bahia
Pasture +
10 lbs.
grain


Lot 14B
Bahia
Pasture +
Full-feed
rain


Lot 15B


Average
Bahia
Groups


Dry lot,
Full-feed


Days
Ave. daily gain
Ave. slaughter weight
Ave. carcass weight
Ave. carcass yield
Carcass grades



Ave, carcass grade
Degree marbling (ave.)
Color fat
Price cwt. carcass
Price cwt. on foot
Price carcass
Cost cattle and feed
Return above costs
cattle and feed
Other costs ($0.10 day)
Total cost
Net return


117
0.47
630
331
52.64


4 std.
1 utility
(Low std.)
Prac. dev.+
Creamy
$36.22
19.06
120.02
154.85

-34.83
11.70
166.55
-46.53


117
1.08
681
377
55.30

1 good
3 std.
1 utility
(Ave./high std
Traces
Creamy
$36.51
20.19
137.48
161.85

-24.37
11.70
173.55
-36.07


117
1.36
71.5
401
56.16
_---
1 good
4 std.

.) (High std.:
Traces +
Creamy
$37.23
20.91
149.44
171.15

-21.71
11.70
182.85
-33.41


117
1.32
743
440
59.20
1 choice
1 good
2 std.

) (Ave. good)
Slight
Creamy white
$37.85
22.41
166.55
183.94

-17.39
11.70
195.64
-29.09


117
1.05
690
384
55.65
1 choice
3 good
13 std.
2 utility
(High std.)
Traces
Creamy
$37.02
20.60
142.15
167.69

-25.54
11.70
179.39
-37.24


117
1.73
753
445
59.14

5 good


(Ave. good)
Slight +
White
$38.00
22.47
169.18
188.40

-19.22
11.70
200.10
-30.92


--


--- -`~ ---











Table 9.- Cattle Slaughtered at End of Feedlot Phase (Millet Pasture Groups).


Lot 11M Lot 12M Average Lot 15M
Pasture Treatment fillet Pasture, Millet Pasture Millet Pasture Millet-Pasture Millet Diy Lot
No grain + 5 lbs. grain + 10 lbs. grain + Full-feed grain Groups Full-feed


Days feedlot
Ave. daily gain feedlot
Days pasture + feedlot
Ave. daily gain
Ave. slaughter weight
Ave. carcass weight
Carcass yield
Carcass grades

Ave. carcass grade
Degree marbling (ave.)
Area rib eye (sq. in.)
Fat cover rib eye (in.)
Price cwt. carcass
Price cwt. on foot
Price head
Cost pasture feed
Cost feedlot feed
Total cost feed
Feed cost cwt. gain
Return above cost cattle
and feed
Other costs ($0.10 day)
Total costs
Net return


114
2.37
231
1.66
942
558
59.23
3 choice
2 good
(Low choice)
Modest -
11.14
0.58
$ 38.92
23.05
217.11
10.78
64.18
74.96
19.59

+ 4.53
23.10
235.68
-18.57


101
2.04
218.
1.65
921
548
59.50
2 choice
3 good
(High gd./low ch.)
Small
10.14
0.54
$ 38.59
22.96
211.54
21.46
51.76
73.22
20.35

+ 0.11
21.80
233.23
-21.69


94
1.71
211
1.68
909
553
60.87
4 choice
1 good
(Low ch.)
Modest -
9.02
0.62
$ 38.91
23.46
216.69
33.65
47.99
81.64
23.01

1.29
21.10
239.08
-22.39


91
1.82
208
1.68
922
566
61.36
3 choice
2 good
(Low ch.)
Small +
11.30
0.48
$ 38.89
23.86
220.12
46.18
43.64
89.82
25.65

- 10.52
20.80
251.44
-31.32


100
2.01
217
1.67
924
556
60.17
12 choice
8 good
(Low ch.
Small +
10.40
0.56
$ 38.92
23.42
216.37
28.02
51.89
79.91
22.07

1.79
21.70
239.86
-23.49


77
1.92
194
1.92
921
566
61.53
4 choice
1 good
) (Low ch.)
Modest +
11.30
0.62
$ 39.22
24.13
222.14
54.00
39.76
93.76
25.23

6.73
19.40
248.27
-26.13


--









'Tal- 10.- Cattle Slaughtered at LEd of Feedlot Phase (Bahia Pasture Groups).


Lot 11-B Lot 12-B Lot 13-B Lot 14-B Average Lot 15B
Bahia Pasture, Bahia Pasture Bahia Pasture Bahia Pasture Bahia Dry lot,
i'aturc Treat.t__t No grain + 5 Ibs. grain + 10 lbs. grain + Full-feed grain Groups Full-feed


Days feedlot
Ave. daily gain feedlot
Days pasture feedlot
Ave. daily gain
Ave. slaughter weight
Ave. carcass weight
Carcass yield
Carcass grades

Ave. carcass grade
Degree marbling (ave.)
Area rib eye (sq. in.)
Fat cover rib eye (in.)
Price cwt. carcass
Price cwt. on foot
Price head
Cost pasture feed
Cost feedlot feed
Total cost feed
Feed cost cwt. gain
Return above cost
cattle and feed
Other costs ($0.10 day)
Total costs
Net return


114
2.29
231
1.46
890
525
58.97
1 choice
4 good
(High good)
Small
10.98
0.42
$ 38.32
22.60
201.04
13.44
64.18
77.62
22.96

-12.33
23.10
236.47
-35.43


101
2.27
218
1.56
914
540
59.09
2 choice
3 good
(High good)
Small
10.48
0.54
$ 38.61
22.81
208.47
25.46
51.76
77.22
22.66

-9.77
21.80
240.04
-31.57


94
1.99
211
1.56
901
543
60.30
3 choice
2 good
(Low choice)
Small
9.30
0.60
$ 38.91
23.46
211.46
34.52
47.99
82.51
25.06

-11.82
21.10
244.38
-32.92


91
1.66
208
1.64
895
554
61.89
4 choice
1 good
(Low choice)
Modest
10.70
0.64
$ 39.20
24.26
217.23
39.16
43.64
82.80
24.27

-1.96
20.80
239.99
-22.76


100
2.07
217
1.55
900
541
60.11
10 choice
10 good
(High gd./low
Small +
10.37
0.55
$ 38.73
23.28
209.55
28.15
51.89
80.04
23.75

-8.97
21.70
240.22
-30.67


77
1.99
194
1.68
901
562
62.38
,e 4 choice
1 good
ch.) (Low ch.)
Modest
10.90
0.54
$ 39.22
24.47
220.51
53.00
39.76
92.76
28.45

-13.81
19.40
253.72
-33.21




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