Group Title: NFES mimeo rpt.
Title: Spring tomato observations at the North Florida Experiment Station
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00066017/00001
 Material Information
Title: Spring tomato observations at the North Florida Experiment Station
Series Title: NFES mimeo rpt.
Physical Description: 6 leaves : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Young, H. W ( Harold William ), 1930-
North Florida Experiment Station
Publisher: North Florida Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Quincy Fla
Publication Date: 1961
 Subjects
Subject: Tomatoes -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Tomatoes -- Harvesting   ( lcsh )
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Statement of Responsibility: by H.W. Young.
General Note: Caption title.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00066017
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 69150601

Full Text
100


NORTH FLORIDA EXPERIMENT STATION
Quincy, Florida

December 6, 1961

NFES MIMEO REPORT 62-3

SPRING TOMATO OBSERVATIONS AT THE NORTH FLORIDA EXPERIMENT STATION

by H. W. Young
Assistant Horticulturist

Although both spring and fall tomato trials are conducted at this Station,
this report only concerns spring plantings. Spring trials include both variety
tests (in cooperation with the Southern Tomato Exchange Program, STEP) and tests
pertaining to cultivation practices and breeding. This report includes only data on
replicated STEP trials grown in the spring season of 1960 and 1961.

PROCEDURE

Seed was planted in flats in a greenhouse, transplanted later at a 2-inch
square spacing in other flats, and then moved to the field when five to six inches
tall. All plots were replicated six times as 25-foot single-row plots. Fruit was
harvested at least twice a week in the "pink stage" of maturity.

Table 1 outlines certain plantings and harvesting information. Table 2
indicates the soil analyses before and after each crop. Table 3 shows the amount
and kind of fertilizer applied. Each plot was treated with Telone, at 21 pounds per
acre, for nematode cbnt rl. Chlordane was used for control of soil insects.
Present Florida recommendations were followed for insect and disease control.
Insecticides and fungicides were applied at 5- to 7-day intervals depending on
weather conditions.

RESULTS

Table 4 summarizes the results with staked and pruned (two stems) plants in
the 1960 and 1961 spring seasons. The large differences in marketable yields
between the two seasons were due mainly to a greater severity of fruit cracking in
1960.

Table 5 gives the results of a 1960 staked and unpruned test. Because of
the 3-foot spacing, the overall yields were lower than in other staked tests with
an 18-inch spacing. Also, because of the dense foliage, it was difficult to
penetrate the plants with spray materials and insect damage to fruit was excessive.

The results of an unstaked and unpruned tests in 1961 (Table 6) indicates
that soil rots may reduce the amount of marketable fruit.

DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS

All varieties tested performed satisfactorily. Of the-older varieties,
Rutgers is still recommended for northern Florida. In spite of its susceptibility
to cracking and its consistently lower yields than the ne varieties its fruit
quality is readily acceptable and it has a wide range of dptability' .Home'stead
24, presently recommended for this area, produces more ea"" fruit than Rutgers and
has been readily accepted by market buyers. Manapal, a ndETFlorida variety, is
outstanding for fruit quality and disease resistance and is 'e:tainly .worthy of trial











Marion produces acceptable fruit quality and has higher yields than Rutgers. It
appears well adapted to the area. Indian River is a high yielder and produces good
quality fruit. Seed of unnamed varieties is not presently available from seed
companies.

SUMMARY

At present the varieties recommended for spring production in the Quincy
area are Homestead 24 and Rutgers. Varieties suggested for limited trial are
Indian River, Marion and Manapal. For home garden production, in addition to the
above mentioned varieties, Manalucie is suggested.


350 copies








Table 1. Planting and harvesting information of the spring plots, 1960 and 1961.


Date
Plot of Field Row Plant Method of Harvest
No. seeding planting distance spacing cultivation period

1960
18 2-12 3-31 4 ft. l1 !7. staked, pruned 6-6 6-24
19 2-12 4-1 4 ft. 3 ft. staked, unpruned 6-6 6-24

1961
21 1-28 3-16 4 ft. 1l ft. staked, pruned 6-6 7-10
22 1-28 3-16 4 ft. 3 ft. unstaked, unpruned 6-7 6-29



Table 2. Soil test analyses before and after each crop.


Plot Pounds per acre
No. Date pH P205 K20 CaO MgO

3.960
18 2-22-59 6.7 28 259 1371 340
7-1-60 6.4 70 360 992 260

19 12-11-59 6.5 37 287 1119 340
7-1-60 6.5 78 270 1120 290

1961
21 7-1-60 5.4 17 100 300 75
8-15-61 6.2 234 755 300

22 7-1-60 5.4 17 100 300 75
8-15-61 6.3 26 219 811 249



Table 3. Fertilizer treatments on tomato plots.


Founds per acre
Plot Dolomite Ammonium
No. lime 6-8-6 Manure nitrate 14-0-14

1960
18 1;000 1,879 30,000 104 104
19 1,000 1,879 30,000 104 104
1961
21 2,000 1,032 30,000 -
22 2,000 516 30,000








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