Group Title: ARC-A mimeo report - Agricultural Research Center-Apopka ; RH72-1
Title: Herbicides and the foliage industry
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00066000/00001
 Material Information
Title: Herbicides and the foliage industry
Series Title: Mimeo report - ARC-A
Physical Description: 7 leaves : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Poole, R. T ( Richard Turk )
Waters, W. E ( Will E )
Pate, A. J
Agricultural Research Center (Apopka, Fla.)
Publisher: University of Florida, IFAS, Agricultural Research Center
Place of Publication: Apopka Fla
Publication Date: 1972
 Subjects
Subject: Foliage plants -- Growth -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by R.T. Poole, Will E. Waters and A.J. Pate.
General Note: Caption title.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00066000
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 71194218

Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida









HERBICIDES AND THE FOLIAGE INDUSTRY --
I. STOCK BEDS HUME LIRAF

By
By AUG 2 7 197

R. T. Poole, Will E. Waters and A. J. Pate
Agricultural Research Center i
Apopka, Florida .AS
Mimeo'Report ARC-A 1972-1 *

Producers of tropical foliage plants maintain stock beds for several

years in the same place as sources of propagating material and cuttings are

harvested periodically for propagation. Normally stock plantings form a

dense protective mat over the ground that reduces weed introduction and

competition. However, weeds frequently become a major problem through

encroachment after initial planting or after propagating materials have been

removed and costly hand labor is now the principal method of weed control.

Safe and effective herbicides applied to the beds after planting and after

harvest would greatly benefit the foliage plant industry.


Philodendron oxycardium (Cordatum), Dieffenbachia picta 'Exotica'

and Syngonium podophyllum 'Nephthytis Green Gold' were planted in ground

beds February 23, 1970. Herbicides were applied May 6, July 24 and October

19, 1970 and yield of stock plants was recorded periodically. The experi-

ment was terminated March 12, 1971.

June 1, 1971 a second experiment was initiated which included

'Cordatum', 'Nephthytis Green Gold' and 'Exotica' plus Cordyline terminilis

'Baby Doll' and Rhaphidophora aurea 'Golden Pothos'. Portions of this

experiment are still in progress.

Rooted cuttings of the above mentioned plants were transplanted into

ground beds of Lakeland fine sand amended with 2 inches of peat. The beds

were located under 80% shade in a slat shed covered with 2 mil polyethylene











and heated during the cold months. Plants were fertilized with 13-6-12

Osmocote at 2000 ppa at 6 month intervals and supplemented with liquid feed.

Data obtained included weed control, crop tolerance, yield and rooting

response, yield data collected included fresh weight, length and number of

nodes. Data was compared to control and expressed as percent of control.

Herbicides, formulations, manufacturers and amounts of herbicides

used in the tests are listed in Table 1. Plants tested for herbicide

tolerance are listed in Table 2.

Weight of CORDATUM was not appreciably affected by herbicides except

for Eptam at 6 pounds active ingredient per acre (ai/A) and Amiben at 4 pounds

ai/A (Tables 3 and 4).

Herbicides which did not reduce weight of NEPHTHYTIS were Dacthal-

CIPC, Planavin, Treflan,GS-13638 and MC 4379 (Tables 3 and 4).

Yield responses from DIEFFENBACHIA EXOTICA to herbicides differed

greatly between 1970 and 1971. Only GS-13638 appeared satisfactory in

1970, however, in 1971, only Princep reduced yield slightly (Tables 3 and 4).

All herbicides used in Exp. 2 appeared safe for use on GOLDEN POTHOS

(Table 4). All herbicides used in Exp. 2, except possibly MC 4379, appeared

satisfactory for use on BABY DOLL (Table 4).

MC 4379 caused necrosis of young leaves of most plants tested 2-3

days after application. However, new growth was unaffected and yield

was not appreciably reduced (Table 4).

Weeds were not present in sufficient number during 1970 to evaluate

herbicidel effectiveness on weeds. However, weed control was evaluated

during 1971 and all herbicides gave adequate weed control with the possible

exception of Dacthal (Table 5). The major weed species present in the

experimental area were Richardia scabra (Florida Purslane), Cyperus










compressus (Water sedge), Digitaria sanguinalis (Crabgrass) and Amaranthus

retroflexus (Pigweed).

Some cuttings taken from stock beds treated with herbicides were

propagated to determine the effect of herbicides on subsequent rooting.

Herbicides apparently had no effect on rooting of cuttings (Table 6).


SUMMARY

Although further research needs to be conducted on previously tested

herbicides as well as additional herbicides, producers of foliage plants

may wish to try, on an experimental basis for themselves, some herbicides.

Data from these two experiments indicate that commercially available

herbicides which may be used effectively with little or no reduction in

yield or leaf damage on a variety of foliage plants are: Planavin at

rates up to 3 pounds active ingredient per acre (ai/A) and Treflan, 4'

pounds ai/A. Princep treated plots possibly would have produced higher

yields if the herbicides was applied less frequently.

Before using a herbicide the grower should read carefully all

instructions relating to the herbicide and use the herbicide on a small

experimental plot before treating a large area. Only the recommended

rate should be applied because larger rates may severely reduce growth of

stock plants.

Herbicides used in this research are pre-emergent herbicides which,

at recommended rates, have little tS no effect on weeds already established.

To be most effective they should be applied immediately after removal of

weeds. A satisfactory procedure to follow is to harvest the cuttings,

remove all weeds and apply the herbicide. Irrigation (?f inch) immediately















-4-

following herbicide application will reduce toxicity and improve effect-

iveness of the herbicide.


CAUTION. The above results are obtained from ground beds that have

been treated for one year in Exp. 1 and 6 months in Exp. 2. Repeated

applications of herbicides may cause an increase of the herbicide in the

soil and reduced yield of the crop.



MENTION OF A MATERIAL DOES NOT IMPLY ANY GUARANTEE OF EFFECTIVE-

NESS OR SAFETY. SPECIFIC TRADE NAMES USED DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT OR

PREFERENCE OF THESE COMPOUNDS OVER EQUIVALENT COMPOUNDS.










Table 1. Nomenclature, formulations, manufacturer and rates
tested on foliage plants.


of herbicides


Trade names Common Pounds Material
and formulations name* Manufacturer ai/A per acre


Amiben 23.4 EC amiben Amchem 4 2.0 gals

AAtrex 80 WP atrazine Giegy 2 2.5 Ibs

Dacthal 75 WP DCPA Diamond 12 16 lbs

Eptam 89.5 EF EPTC Stauffer 6 0.9 gals

GS-13638 50 WP GS-13638 Giegy 4 8.0 Ibs

MC-4379 21 EC MC-4379 Mobil 1.5 0.8 gals

Planavin 75 WP nitralin Shell 3 4.0 Ibs

Princep 4 G simazine Giegy 2 50 Ibs

Telvar 30 WP monuron Dupont 3 3.8 Ibs

Treflan 44.5 EC trifluralin Elanco 4 1.0 gal

Common names accepted by the Terminology Committee of the Weed Science
Society of America.


Table 2. Plants tested for


Scientific name


Cordyline terminalis

Dieffenbachia picta

Philodendron oxycardium

Rhapidop1ora aurea

Syngonium podophyllum


herbicide tolerance.


Common name


Baby Doll

Exotica

Cordatum

Golden Pothos

Green Gold Nephthytis








-6-

Table 3. Yield (% control) from stock beds treated with
herbicides May 6, July 24 and October 19, 1970.
Experiment 1.


Herbicide ai/A Cordatum Nephthytis Exotica


Control

Dacthal CIPC

Planavin

Princep

AAtrex

Telvar

Treflan

Eptam

Amiben

GS 13638


6-1

4

2

2

3

4

6

4

3


100 100

.5 101 114

96 132

96 76

111 64

116 83

93 89

73 79

:.84 56

100 115


Table 4.


Yield (% control) of 3tock beds treated with herbicides June
10 and September 13, L971. Experiment 2.


Herbicide ai/A Cordatum Nephthytis Exotica Pothos Baby Doll


Control 100 :00 100 100 100

Princep 2 103 85 86 94 100

GS 13638 4 106 :10 93 90 103

Treflan 4 97 105 106 108 96

Planavin 3 97 107 104 125 103

Dacthal 12 101 .19 109 105 103

MC 4379 1.5 101 .02 102 103 78


100

78

70

53

57

18

71

65

56

112











Table 5. Weed control (%) in foliage
Herbicides applied June 10,
13, 1971. Experiment 2.


stock beds.
September


Herbicide ai/A Aug 3 Dec 12


Control 0 0

Princep 4 G 2 79 73

GS-1363~ 50 WP 4 74. 83

Treflan 44.5 EC 4 87 73

Planavin 75 WP 3 88 65

Dacthal 75 WP 12 55 47

MC-4379 21 EC 1.5 79 78


Table 6. Rooting grade of cuttings. Stock
beds sprayed May 6, 1970. Cuttings
taken July 17. Graded August 14.


Herbicide ai/A Nephthytis Cordatum


Control 2.6 3.4

Dacthal-CIPC 6-1.5 2.8 3.2

Planavin 4 2.. 7 3.0

Princep 2 2.1 3.2

AAtrex 2 2.9 3.3

Telvar 3 2.8 3.3

Treflan 4 2.5 3.0

Eptam 6 2.6 3.1

Amiben 4 2.7 3.1

GS 13638 3 2.3 3.0 -

12 a no roots. 4 heay rooting,


I
(*
C
C




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs