Group Title: ARC-A research report - Agricultural Research Center-Apopka ; RH-73-1
Title: Factors influencing micronutrient use in tropical foliage production
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00065979/00001
 Material Information
Title: Factors influencing micronutrient use in tropical foliage production
Series Title: ARC-Apopka research report
Physical Description: 5 leaves : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Conover, Charles Albert, 1934-
Poole, R. T ( Richard Turk )
Agricultural Research Center (Apopka, Fla.)
Publisher: University of Florida, IFAS, Agricultural Research Center
Place of Publication: Apopka FL
Publication Date: 1973
 Subjects
Subject: Foliage plants -- Nutrition -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: C.A. Conover and R.T. Poole.
General Note: Caption title.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00065979
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 71064092

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Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
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R oi FACTORS INFLUENCING MICRONUTRIENT USE IN TROPICAL FOLIAGE PRODUCTION

C. A. Conover and R. T. Poole
University of Florida, IFAS
ARC-Apopka Mimeo Report PIH-1973-1

Micronutrients (also called minor, trace or secondary el ments) are needed

in small, but critical amounts, by green plants and include er(N.j(j/ja|

zinc, copper, boron, molybdenum and chlorine. In recent ye rs micronutrients

Have been recognized as an important part of foliage produce ion, a t

commonly used in fertilization programs. IAS. O U I

The need for micronutrient additions to organic soil mixturesTa n~

established in many areas of crop production. Present micronutrient recommend-

ations for foliage growers are designed to provide a form of "crop insurance"

for those who have experienced problems with iron, manganese, copper and other

micronutrient deficiencies in previous crops. Additions of micronutrients are

especially desirable when the soil medium is composed entirely of components

such as peat, bark, shavings, perlite, vermiculite or washed sand which are<

usually low in these nutrients.

Additions of micronutrients to soil mixtures or their inclusion in fertilizer

programs require considerable planning, because low levels provide little benefit

while high levels are generally toxic to plant growth. Boron and manganese have

been shown to be phytotoxic at low levels to many plant genera and have been

implicated in recent foliage crop damage reports.

Sixth increased usage of micronutrients by foliage growers some guidelines

seem necessary, and the following points are designed to prevent crop damage

from excessive applications of any micronutrient mixture as well as provide

minimum required amounts.









1. When recommended rates of micronutrients are incorporated into the

soil medium (Table 1), use of fertilizers with micronutrients are not recommended

for 1 year because of possible phytotoxicities. Micronutrient availability is

influenced by pH, and therefore, suggested amounts in Table 1 depend on whether

dolomite, calcium carbonate or other pH influencing amendments have been added

to the potting soil.

2. Continuous use of fertilizers containing micronutrients are not

recommended unless the percentages of the various micronutrients are less than

the maximum suggested in Table 2 and the yearly amount of fertilizer applied

to the same soil is less than 9000 lbs/A/yr. Infrequent application of

fertilizers with higher levels are acceptable, provided the amounts for these

elements does not exceed the amount listed in Table 2.

3. Micronutrlents should not be incorporated into soil mixtures prior to

steam sterilization because steaming increases availability.

4. When-including sludge or other organic fertilizers containing

micronutrients in soil mixtures reduce additions of subsequent micronutrients.

Foliage growers who experience problems with micronutrient deficiencies

should remember that the one most often causing the problem is iron. In these

cases, rapid recovery can be obtained with a foliar spray of chelated iron.

Growers who tank mix their own fertilizer formulations from single components

such as ammonium nitrate, potassium nitrate, phosphoric acid etc. may utilize a

commercial soluble micronutrient additive such as Peters Soluble Trace Element

Mixture, THIS, Sequestrene or Neutral Trace Elements provided they follow the

suggestions in Table 2 concerning percentages of each element. Some commercially

prepared micronutrient mixtures are too high in certainelements such as boron,

which limits their use because the correct boron level does not provide desired

levels of other micronutrients.







-3-


Table 1. Suggested rates of micronutrient mixtures or single components
to include in soil media at various pH levels.


Rate Ibs/cu yd
Trade or pH pH
common name 4.0 to 5.5 5.5 to 7.0

Mixtures

Es-Min-El 3/4 to 1 1 to 1 1/2

FTE-503 1/5 to 1/4 1/4 to 1/2
Perk 1 1/2 to 2 2 1/2 to 3

Vigoro Supplement X 3/4 to, 1 1 1/2 to 2

Single'elements add all 4

Copper Sulphate (C8S04) 1/2 oz. 1 oz.

Iron Chelate (Sequestrene 33b) 1/2 oz. 1 oz.

Manganese Sulphate (MnS04) 1/2 oz. 1 oz.

Zinc Sulphate (ZnSO4) 1/2 oz. 1 oz.










iable 2. Levels of micronutrients to include in fertilizer formulations used on tropical
fciogeS when yearly fertilizer amount applied does not exceed 206 lbs/1000 s.
ft, (9000 lbs/A/yr) .


Minimum .
""O'.Lt/OOO
percent sq, ft/,vyr


MIlcronutrent


Suggested
oz 1000
percent sq ft/yr


Maximum
oz/1000
percent sq ft/yr


Tron (i'0o,3)

MebIanese (MnO)


0.15

0.10


S 0.10


Zinc (ZnO)

Copper (CuO)


Boron (3903)

LiMoi.ybde .i (Mo03)
Chlorine (cl)


0.05

0.02

0.001.


;:.05


5.0

3.5

3.5

1.7


0.20

0.15

0.15

0.10


0.7 0.03


0.005


1.7


0.10


khen less total poundage is used, proportionally higher percentages of the individual
elements may be used as long as the yearly amounts do not exceed those suggested.


6.5

5.0

5.0

3.5

1.5

0.17


0.30

0.25

0.20

0.15

0.05

0.01


10.0

8.3

6.5

5.0

1.7

0.35


3.5


4.00 140.0








-5-


Table 3. Comparison of contents in percent of mixtures that may be
incorporated into growing media for a micronutrient source.

Vigoro
Es-Min- FTE Supplement X
Element El No. 503 Perk with FTE

Microelements

1 Boron
(B203) 1.6 9.75 0.7 0.25

2 Copper
(cuo) 2.8 3.75 0.3 0.45

3 Iron
(Fe203) 3.0 25.70 5.2 9.00

4 Manganese
(MnO) 9.3 9.50 3.0 4.0

5 Molybdenum
(Mo03) None 0.30 0.003 .001

6 Zinc
(ZnO) 3.5 9.75 0.9 2.00

Macroelements

7 Calcium
(CaO) None None None 15.0

3 Magnesium
(MgO) 2.4 None 15.2 25.0

9 Sulfur
(SO2) None None 4.5 6.4




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