Group Title: CFREC-Apopka research report - Central Florida Research and Education Center-Apopka ; RH-88-2
Title: Effects of fertilizer rates on growth of Hibiscus rosa-sinensi 'Brilliant Red'
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00065964/00001
 Material Information
Title: Effects of fertilizer rates on growth of Hibiscus rosa-sinensi 'Brilliant Red'
Series Title: CFREC-Apopka research report
Physical Description: 4 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Chase, A. R ( Ann Renee )
Poole, R. T ( Richard Turk )
Central Florida Research and Education Center--Apopka
Publisher: University of Florida, IFAS, Central Florida Research and Education Center-Apopka
Place of Publication: Apopka FL
Publication Date: 1988
 Subjects
Subject: Hibiscus -- Fertilizers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Hibiscus -- Growth -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. 2).
Statement of Responsibility: A.R. Chase and R.T. Poole.
General Note: Caption title.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00065964
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 70947953

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Effects of Fertilizer Rates on Growth of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis
'Brilliant Red'
Central Science A. R. Chase and R. T. Poole'
Library
University of Florida, IFAS,
?iAR 9 1~9P Central Florida Research and Education Center Apopka
CFREC-Apopka Research Report, RH-88-2
University o1 i iscus are rapidly gaining popularity as a potted flowering crop.
..-They have been employed in tropical and subtropical areas for many years as
perennial shrubs and as such are produced under shade or full-sun
conditions. New cultivars which have been introduced for the potted flower
industry are produced many times in greenhouses with other flowering crops
of long standing, such as chrysanthemums and poinsettias. Methods for
producing hibiscus under greenhouse conditions are not widely researched
(1). The following research was conducted to evaluate effects of
fertilizer rate on growth of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis 'Brilliant Red'.

Three tests were conducted using cuttings of 'Brilliant Red' obtained
from commercial producers approximately 3-4 inches long with 3-5 leaves and
rooted in a potting medium consisting of Canadian peat and pine bark (1:1
by volume) amended with 7 lbs dolomite and 1.5 lbs Micromax (micronutrient
source from Sierra Chemical Co., Milpitas, CA 95035) per cubic yard. The
medium was steam-treated at 1900F for approximately 1.5 hour prior to these
additions. Plants were top-dressed with Osmocote (19:6:12, slow-release
* fertilizer from Sierra Chemical Co.) at the following rates: 2.5, 5, 7.5,
10, 12.5, 15, and 17.5 g/5 inch pot. Fertilizer was applied once at test
initiation. Light levels and temperatures varied between Expts. 1, 2 and 3
and are given below for each experiment. Plants were irrigated by hand 2
or 3 times weekly as needed. Ten single pot replicates were included for
each treatment.

The first experiment was conducted from November 5, 1986 to January 7,
1987. Temperatures were 65 to 850F and light levels approximately 1000
ft-c maximum. The second experiment was conducted from February 13 to
April 14, 1987, with temperatures of 65 to 900F and the maximum light level
of 2000 ft-c. The final experiment was conducted from April 9 to June 8,
1987. Temperatures were approximately 72-950F with a maximum light level of
2000 ft-c.

Soluble salts were recorded monthly using the pour-through method (2).
Water was added to each pot until 100 ml of the resulting leachate was
collected in a beaker beneath the pot. Leachate soluble salts were
evaluated using a Hach Conductivity Meter #2511 (Hach Chemical Company,
Ames, Iowa 50010). The following growth characteristics were recorded:


1Associate Professor of Plant Pathology and Professor of Physiology,
respectively, Central Florida Research and Education Center, 2807 Binion
Road, Apopka, FL 32703.
Special thanks to A&L Southern Agricultural Laboratory in Pompano Beach
) for providing tissue analyses for this work.










number of leaves, total shoot length, number of shoots and top grade. Top
grade was determined visually on the following scale: 1 = dead; 2 = poor,
unsalable; 3 = marginal, salable; 4 = good, salable; and 5 = excellent,
salable. Nutrient content of mature leaves was determined for the final
test only. Mature leaf tissue was harvested, dried at 600C, and ground.
Tissue analyses were performed by A & L Southern Agricultural Laboratories
in Pompano Beach, Florida.

Number of leaves was not affected by fertilizer level in any test, but
the total shoot length decreased with an increase in fertilizer in all
three tests (Table 1). The highest fertilizer application produced only
about 63% of the growth of the lowest fertilizer application. However,
plant grade increased as fertilizer increased to the 7.5 g level before
decreasing at higher fertilizer rates. A wide range of fertilizer (2.5 -
10.0 g) produced good, salable plants with a soluble salts (SS) level of
1206 3250 pmhos/cm approximately 2 weeks after fertilizer application.
Soluble salts had decreased considerably after 10 weeks for the first two
levels, 2.5 and 5.0 g, remained about the same for the third level, 7.5 g,
but were still higher for levels from 10.0 17.5. The best level was 7.5
g which is slightly less than suggested by Neumaier et al (1).

Tissue content of nitrogen (N), potassium (K) and phosphorus (P) each
increased as fertilizer level increased up to the 12.5 g rate (Table 2).
At higher rates P continued to increase, N decreased and K remained stable.
Best levels for tissue content of excellent quality Hibiscus 'Brilliant
Red' are probably within the range, by % dry weight: N, 3.0 4.0; P, 0.30
- 0.60; K, 2.0 2.5; Ca, 1.5 1.8; Mg, 0.5 0.7; Na, 0.40 0.60; S,
0.30 0.60; by parts per million; B, 40 60; Cu, 4 6; Al, 40 100; Fe,
75 100; Mn, 300 500; and Zn, 200 250.
References

1. Neumaier, E. E., T. M. Blessington and J. A. Price. 1987. Effect of
light and fertilizer rate and source on flowering, growth and quality
of Hibiscus. HortScience 22(5):902-904.

2. Wright, R. D. 1986. The pour-through nutrient extraction procedure.
HortScience 21(2):227-229.









Table 1. Effect of fertilizer level applied February 13, 1987 on plant
growth of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis 'Brilliant Red' and soluble salts of
the medium (Test 2).


Fertilizer level Number Total shoot Plant grade Soluble salts,umhos/cm
g Osmocote 19:6:12 leaves length of 1 = dead Pour-through method
(N:P:K)/5" pot 1 inch shoots >2 inch 5 = excellent Feb 18 Mar 17 Apr 14


2.5 32 110 4.3 1206 1075 384
5.0 29 92 4.4 1956 3562 1194
7.5 30 92 4.8 2562 3625 2425
10.0 31 86 4.0 3250 7250 4125
12.5 27 78 3.5 4875 9875 7000
15.0 28 77 3.5 6000 13375 8250
17.5 27 69 3.2 5362 14250 9000


Significant effects

Linear ** ** ** ** **
Quadratic NS NS NS NS NS
Remainder NS NS NS NS NS NS

"Significant effects using analysis of variance at P = 0.05 (*) or P = 0.01
(**) levels or not significant (ns).










Table 2. Influence of
'Brilliant Red'.


19:3:10 (N:P:K) Osmocote on elemental content of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis


Osmocote
19:6:12 % dry weight ppm
g/5" pot N P K Ca Mg Na S B Cu Al Fe Mn Zn


2.5 2.0 0.23 1.5 1.5 0.58 0.58 0.33 48 4 40 75 375 238
5.0 3.3 0.32 1.8 1.7 0.59 0.58 0.50 50 5 78 91 429 195
7.5 3.5 0.54 2.4 1.8 0.62 0.43 0.60 53 5 92 82 576 323
10.0 3.7 0.71 2.5 1.6 0.62 0.45 0.54 58 5 50 95 482 234
12.5 4.4 0.75 2.5 1.7 0.63 0.45 0.52 41 6 30 104 537 232
15.0 3.6 0.80 2.6 1.4 0.59 0.41 0.43 46 5 46 88 462 235
17.5 3.9 1.19 2.6 1.5 0.57 0.48 0.46 53 6 52 99 569 253

Significant effects"

Linear ** ** ** ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns
Quadratic ** ns ** ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns

aSignificant effects using analysis of variance at P = 0.05 (*) or P = 0.01 (**) levels or
not significant (ns).




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