Group Title: CFREC-Apopka research report - Central Florida Research and Education Center-Apopka ; RH-94-2
Title: Storage temperature and duration affect propagation of Dracaena fragrans 'Massangeana'
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00065888/00001
 Material Information
Title: Storage temperature and duration affect propagation of Dracaena fragrans 'Massangeana'
Series Title: CFREC-Apopka research report
Physical Description: 7 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Conover, Charles Albert, 1934-
Central Florida Research and Education Center--Apopka
Publisher: University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Central Florida Research and Education Center
Place of Publication: Apopka FL
Publication Date: 1994
 Subjects
Subject: Plants, Ornamental -- Propagation -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Dracaena -- Propagation -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Plants, Ornamental -- Effect of temperature on -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. 3).
Statement of Responsibility: C.A. Conover.
General Note: Caption title.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00065888
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 70627412

Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida






SCentral Florida Research
UNIVERSITY OF
FLOR A and Education Center
e FL ORIDAciences Rh
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Research Report


Storage Temperature and Duration affect Propagation of Dracaena fragrans
'Massangeana'
,oin Scienc0
C.A. Conover1 LUbr!'&
CFREC-Apopka Research Report RH-94-2 c 3 0 994


University of Florida
Dracaena fragrans 'Massangeana' is usually propagated from cane pieces of varying
lengths. The time required to grow from cane into salable plant material is variable for local
growers, since root and shoot development and growth in Florida is much slower during the
winter months. To better manage resources, growers need to know the effects of cane storage
on propagation during both winter and summer.

In earlier research conducted during the winter, root and shoot growth of 1-ft and 3-ft
cane sections stored after shipping in coolers maintained at 40, 50, 60 or 70F for 2, 4, 6 or
8 weeks were compared to a control group propagated in a greenhouse immediately after
shipping (Conover and Poole, 1991). One-ft or 3-ft cane stored at 40F for over 2 weeks was
damaged and in unsalable condition after propagation. Rooting was improved on cane stored
at 50, 60 or 70F for up to 8 weeks compared to rooting of unstored cane.
However, as storage time increased, shoot length on 1-ft cane decreased. Length of shoots on
3-ft cane stored at 50, 60 or 70F for more than 4 weeks after propagation were also shorter
than shoots on cane propagated without storage. Additional experiments were carried out to
determine storage effects on propagation during the summer and to further refine optimum
storage temperature and duration for 'Massangeana' cane.

Materials and Methods

These experiments were replicates of each other in all details except cane length.
Experiment 1 used 1-ft cane while experiment 2 used 3-ft cane. On July 30, 1991, unrooted 1-ft
and 3-ft cane, imported from Costa Rica, arrived at CFREC-Apopka. A control group was
propagated immediately after arrival, without undergoing storage treatments. Cane was
propagated in cypress shavings mounded around the cane bases on a greenhouse bench where


'Professor of Environmental Horticulture and Center Director, Central Florida Research and
Education Center, 2807 Binion Rd., Apopka, FL 32712.
1


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational
information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin.
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE, HOME ECONOMICS, STATE OF FLORIDA, IFAS, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA,
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.








maximum light intensity was 1500 ft-c and air temperatures ranged from 65 to 90F. An
intermittent mist system provided 5 minutes mist at 30 minute intervals from 12:00 noon until
4:00 pm daily. Remaining 'Massangeana' cane were stored upright in dark airtight coolers
maintained at 60, 70, 80 or 90F, for 2, 4, 6 or 8 weeks.

Cane were removed from temperature controlled storage at 2 week intervals starting on
August 13, for cane stored 2 weeks and cane stored 8 weeks on September 23, 1991. After
removal from storage, cane were propagated on the same greenhouse bench as the control group.

After 19 weeks of propagation, number of roots, root grade (based on 1 = no roots, 2
= little root system development and growth, 3 = average root system, 4 = good root system
and 5 = excellent root system), number of shoots and total shoot length were determined. Final
data was recorded for the control group on December 5, for cane stored 2 weeks on December
19, 1991, for cane stored 4 weeks on Jan 2, for cane stored 6 weeks on Jan 16 and for cane
stored 8 weeks on Jan 30, 1992; thus, all cane remained on the propagation bench for the same
length of time.

Results

Interaction of storage temperature and duration affected number of roots on 1-ft Dracaena
'Massangeana' cane when counted 19 weeks after cane were placed in the propagation area
(Table 1). Although number of roots on 1-ft cane was somewhat variable, cane stored at 90F
for over 2 weeks or at any temperature except 80F for longer than 6 weeks had less roots than
others (Table 1).

Root grade of 1-ft cane was also affected by interaction of storage temperature and
duration (Table 2). Root grade of cane stored at 90F decreased with each increase in storage
duration. Root grade decreased after 4 weeks storage for cane stored at 80F, and decreased
after 6 weeks for cane stored at 60 or 70F. One-ft cane produced less than 2 shoots per cane
and shoots were much shorter on cane stored at 900F for more than 2 weeks or at 800F for over
6 weeks compared to other cane tested (Tables 3 and 4).

In experiment 2, interaction of storage temperature and duration affected root grade and
total shoot length of 3-ft cane. Best quality root systems were in the control group, plants stored
at 60 or 70F for up to 4 weeks or at 800F for 2 weeks (Table 5). When compared to shoot
length of the control (122.6-cm), storage at any temperature and duration retarded shoot
development (Table 6). Shoots were much shorter on cane stored at 90F compared to cane
stored at lower temperatures.

Total number of roots and shoots on 3-ft cane were not affected by interaction of storage
temperature and duration. After propagation, 3-ft cane stored at 60, 70 or 80F had produced
over 20 roots and more than 2 shoots per cane, while cane stored at 90*F had less than 10 roots
and 2 shoots per pot (Table 7). Cane stored over 4 weeks also had less than 20 roots per pot,
but total number of shoots on 3-ft cane was not affected by time spent in storage.








Conclusions


For 1-ft cane propagated in this test, root growth after up to 6 weeks storage at 60 or
70F and shoot growth after storage for up to 8 weeks at 60 to 700F was comparable to the
unstored control group. Although storage retarded shoot length on 3-ft cane, root system
development was mostly good on cane stored at 60, 70 or 80F for up to 8 weeks.

In an earlier test, conducted during the winter/spring growing season, growth of 3-ft cane
stored for up to 4 weeks at 60 or 70F was comparable to unstored cane. However, overall
growth and development of 3 ft-c cane was much slower during the earlier experiment,
conducted during the cool season compared to cane growth in this test conducted during the
summer months. In the earlier test, growth differences between stored and unstored cane may
not have been significant because overall growth and development was retarded during the
winter. In this test, shoot growth on 3-ft cane was retarded by any storage time tested. Growth
retardation may have occurred because 3-ft cane was stored during August, a more active
growing period.

When experimental results were compared, 1-ft cane growth and development was more
variable within treatments compared to that of 3-ft cane. One of biggest problems local growers
are having with Dracaena 'Massangeana' is the great variability of rooting and sprouting of 1-ft
cane. In this test, storage of 1-ft cane at 60 or 70F for up to 6 weeks during the summer did
not retard shoot growth even though in the earlier test shoot retardation was observed on cane
stored for any time during the winter.

In summary, these and previous experiments demonstrate that cane storage is possible
for up to 8 weeks and best storage temperatures are in the 60 to 700F range. However, some
growth delay may be observed on stored cane compared to those propagated immediately.
Delays may occur for 3-ft cane stored during the summer or cane stored for over 4 weeks during
winter. One-ft cane growth may be retarded if cane is stored during the winter or if cane is
stored for over 6 weeks during the summer.

Reference

Conover, C. A. and R. T. Poole. 1991. Storage time and temperature affect growth of
Dracaenafragrans 'Massangeana'. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 104:331-333.








Table 1.


Interaction effects of storage temperature and duration on number of roots on 1-ft
Dracaena fragrans 'Massangeana' cane 19 weeks after removal from storage.
Experiment 1.


Storage Temperature Storage duration (weeks)
F) 2 4 6 8

60 13.4 13.0 21.8 9.4
70 11.0 18.8 23.6 6.6
80 15.8 15.2 12.8 23.8
90 12.6 8.8 3.4 0.0

Interaction results significant at P = 0.0001.
Control group, which were propagated without undergoing storage averaged 16 roots per plant.


Table 2.


Interaction effects of storage temperature and duration on root grade of 1-ft
Dracaena fragrans 'Massangeana' cane 19 weeks after removal from storage.
Experiment 1.


Storage Temperature Storage duration (weeks)
(OF) 2 4 6 8

60 4.8z 4.6 5.0 3.7
70 4.7 5.0 5.0 3.1
80 4.6 4.9 4.1 4.1
90 4.7 3.1 1.8 1.0

Interaction results significant at P = 0.0001.
Average root grade of the control group, which did not undergo storage, was 4.8.
zRoot grade based on a scale of 1 = no roots, 2 = little root system development and growth,
3 = average root system, 4 = good root system and 5 = excellent root system.








Table 3.


Interaction effects of storage temperature and duration on number of shoots
produced on 1-ft Dracaenafragrans 'Massangeana' cane 19 weeks after removal
from storage. Experiment 1.


Storage Temperature Storage duration (weeks)
(F) 2 4 6 8

60 2.0 2.5 2.8 1.8
70 2.4 2.2 2.4 2.6
80 2.2 2.0 2.2 1.4
90 2.2 1.8 0.6 0.0

Interaction results significant at P = 0.0052.
The control group, which did not undergo storage, averaged 2 shoots per plant.







Table 4. Interaction effects of storage temperature and duration on total length (cm) of
shoots produced on 1-ft Dracaena fragrans 'Massangeana' cane 19 weeks after
removal from storage. Experiment 1.
Storage Temperature Storage duration (weeks)
(OF) 2 4 6 8

60 55.2 56.2 71.2 54.4
70 54.6 63.6 55.8 51.2
80 53.6 47.6 52.8 35.8
90 59.2 40.0 10.8 0.0

Interaction results significant at P = 0.0001.
Average total shoot length of the control group, which did not undergo storage, was 59.0 cm.








Table 5.


Interaction effects of storage temperature and duration on root grade of 3-ft
Dracaena fragrans 'Massangeana' cane 19 weeks after removal from storage.
Experiment 2.


Storage Temperature Storage duration (weeks)
(F) 2 4 6 8

60 5.0z 5.0 4.6 4.7
70 5.0 5.0 4.5 4.8
80 5.0 4.9 3.3 4.1
90 4.9 2.8 1.4 1.3

Interaction results significant at P = 0.0001.
Average root grade of the control group, which did not undergo storage, was 5.0.
zRoot grade based on a scale of 1 = no roots, 2 = little root system development and growth,
3 = average root system, 4 = good root system and 5 = excellent root system.


Table 6.


Interaction effects of storage temperature and duration on total length (cm) of
shoots produced on 3-ft Dracaena fragrans 'Massangeana' cane 19 weeks after
propagation. Experiment 2.


Storage Temperature Storage duration (weeks)
(F) 2 4 6 8

60 94.4 80.8 86.2 74.0
70 95.4 69.8 88.8 83.2
80 84.0 93.4 57.4 64.6
90 76.6 48.8 10.6 12.4


Interaction results significant at P = 0.0417.
Total shoot length of the control group, which


did not undergo storage, averaged 122.6 cm.









Table 7. Effects of storage temperature and duration on total number of roots and shoots
on 3-ft Dracaena fragrans 'Massangeana' cane 19 weeks after removal from
storage. Experiment 2.
Storage temp (F) Total roots Total shoots
60 21.4 2.4
70 20.7 2.2
80 20.8 2.6
90 9.6 1.6
Significance
linear ** *
quadratic *
cubic ns *


Storage duration
2 weeks 26.8 2.2
4 weeks 20.2 2.3
6 weeks 10.2 2.2
8 weeks 15.2 2.0
Significance
linear ** ns
quadratic ** ns
cubic ns

The control group, which did not undergo storage, averaged 26.8 roots and 2.8 shoots per cane.
zns, *, **; Results nonsignificant, significant at P = 0.05, or P = 0.01 respectively.









4* '




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs