• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Seniors
 Recreation
 School spirit
 Industrial arts and mechanical...
 Elementary
 Intramurals
 Homecoming
 Science and man
 Business courses
 Art
 Juniors
 Art editorial
 Interns: Participants and...
 Basketball
 Elementary
 Drama festival
 Keyettes
 9th grade
 Freshmen
 Key club
 Advanced math & trigonometry
 Fashions for '58
 Physics
 Dino
 Y club
 Seventh grade
 Chemistry & biology
 Home economics 1 and Family...
 Sophomores
 The new buildings
 Gainesville at night
 Track
 Dance band
 Majorettes
 Baseball practice
 Tidal wave
 Second period speech class
 Economical and political progr...
 8th grade
 Elementary
 Parent-teachers association
 Classes
 Cheerleaders
 Seniors
 Back Cover














Group Title: Yongester
Title: Yongester. 1958
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00065812/00023
 Material Information
Title: Yongester. 1958
Series Title: Yongester.
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: P.K. Yonge Laboratory School
Publisher: P.K. Yonge Laboratory School
Publication Date: 1958
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00065812
Volume ID: VID00023
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Front Matter
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Seniors
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Recreation
        Page 10
    School spirit
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Industrial arts and mechanical drawing
        Page 13
    Elementary
        Page 14
    Intramurals
        Page 15
    Homecoming
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Science and man
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Business courses
        Page 22
    Art
        Page 23
    Juniors
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Art editorial
        Page 26
    Interns: Participants and observers
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Basketball
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Elementary
        Page 31
    Drama festival
        Page 32
    Keyettes
        Page 33
        Page 34
    9th grade
        Page 35
    Freshmen
        Page 36
    Key club
        Page 37
    Advanced math & trigonometry
        Page 38
    Fashions for '58
        Page 39
    Physics
        Page 40
    Dino
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Y club
        Page 43
    Seventh grade
        Page 44
    Chemistry & biology
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Home economics 1 and Family living
        Page 47
    Sophomores
        Page 48
        Page 49
    The new buildings
        Page 50
    Gainesville at night
        Page 51
    Track
        Page 52
    Dance band
        Page 53
    Majorettes
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Baseball practice
        Page 56
    Tidal wave
        Page 57
    Second period speech class
        Page 58
    Economical and political programs
        Page 59
    8th grade
        Page 60
    Elementary
        Page 61
    Parent-teachers association
        Page 62
    Classes
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Cheerleaders
        Page 66
    Seniors
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text













"YONGESTER"


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Here is your Yongester for 1957-58 with a "new" look. The staff has met all sorts of problems to
produce a book that gives you, the students of P.K.Y., a variety of views, opinions, personalities,
and learning experiences shared this year. The creativity of the students in every phase of school
life from Literature to Students Council and back to hot rods is shown in a variety of ways. If
you can't find a place for your speciality turn a new page and maybe it will turn up.

To get things started off with a "bang" let us explore that well known and controversial subject
"core". Since there are two sides to every question and the students have one and the faculty
another we will start with the opinions of Mr. Robert Gibson, faculty Mr. Gibson attended the
National Convention of Core Curriculum Teachers and is really charged up on the subject.

"Core Curriculum at P. K. Yonge is based on the belief that students learn a great deal more
when subject matter and knowledge are used for a specific purpose in solving personal and social
problems.

"The Core program utilizes many special subject areas (i.e. English, Social Studies, Science, Art,
Math, Music, etc.) in learning about ourselves and society.

"Emphasis areas are: (1) The development of critical thinking and a scientific method of making
decisions; (2) An examination of personal weakness and an attempt to correct these weaknesses;
(3) An understanding of the world in which we live and some of the problems which must be faced
and'met by society; (4) The' development of a philosophy of life which is satisfactory to the students
and to society; (5) The recognition of responsibilities and rights of individuals in a Democratic
society."


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The types of personal problems which are often in core are:
(1) What type of profession or vocation should I enter? (2)
Should I go to college? (3) How can I learn to read faster?
(4) What things can I do to gain friends? (5) How should I
behave in school, at home, and on dates? (6) What are the
responsibilities of a citizen in a democratic society?
Some of the social problems which are often met in Core are:


(1) What causes racial and religious prejudice? (2) How can
wars be stopped? (3) How does American caste and class
system affect me? (4) What are the effects of prejudice on
democracy? (5) What personal and social changes are
necessary in a "scientific age"? (6) What will be the place of
the Orient in the world of tomorrow?"


'47


From the point of view of the students the Core Curriculum
has a somewhat different look and for those people who
spend from two to three hours each day in core it is important
to know how they feel. The three hours and more are for the


seventh and eighth grades in the transitional period from
elementary to secondary school. It is in the nature of general
education and the children are with the same teacher.
This two-hour block enables the student and teacher to be-
come better' acquainted. Therefore a closer relationship
forms about a problem solving situation where the student
can work out his personal problems and those of the group.
Actual subject matter is planned by the student and teacher
working together in a democratic situation. For example
you pick the units in core (1) Segregation and racial
problems. (2) Boy and girl relations. (3) Atomic energy and
the ICBM.
Due to conflicting attitudes about Core and diversity of per-
sonalities the perfect situation is hard to find. Sometimes due
to the slowness of the democratic process in deciding subject
matter and the general lack of follow through on these de-
cisions the pupils become apathetic and disillusioned.


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S O N D J F M A M J



Core 12 ele. II Fla. 9 Senior 10 7 8 Senior
Room Play Picture





Ath. Foot Intra. Y Basket Jr. High Ele. Track Base Tennis Grad.
Ball Club Ball Sports Sports Ball





Org. Sch. Home- Key club Office Turtle Language News Honor Thes. Annual
Spirit coming Keyettes staff Club clubs Paper Court





Mis. Build. Rec. Hot ch'rleaders Moving PTA Stu. New Radio
Seq. Rods esp. the Day Lit. Build. Pro.
"B" squad Work



Sub. Ind. Science Art Phy. Chem. Lit. Econ. Math Spanish
Arts Pol.
Man Prob.
Mech.
Draw.



Other Bus. Speech Chorus Band Bio. Hom. Hist. Speech Latin
Sub. Course Ec.
Fam.
Liv.









Everyone knows that a person is either in or out. To be in is the prime objective of everyone. It is a well known
fact trying too hard to be in often makes one out. On the other hand trying too hard to be out can make one in. Here
are some of the In's and Out's by the Editor.
It's in to read the Yongester
It's out to be an Administrator
It's out to be Editor of the Annual
It's so far in to have an Introduction that it is out
It's in to be a Senior
It's way in to go to the Florida room
It's way out to be a teacher
It's the best to be in like Mrs. Parrish
It's in to loaf
It's in, in, in, to have a new building
It's nice to be young and in the Elementary grades
It's in to be in HiTide; if you win, you're out, but it's best to be in by being King or Queen
It's in to be a Quad captain
It's even in to be a Football player
It's way out to take Science or Man (or is it?)
It's very, very far in to take the Business courses
It's not so in to be a Junior
It's way, way out to take art, so far in fact, that it is in
It's out to be intelligent
It's in to be a cheer leader
It's out, out, out to eat in the lunch room
It's way out to be in the Science Club
It's in to be in the Little Women
It's in to be in the Keyette and Key Club
It's definitely out to be a communist
It's so far out to be a socialist that it is in
It's out to be able to spell
It's out to be drafted
It's in to conform
It's sort of in to participate in Intramurals
It's well known that trying too hard to be in, makes you out


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SENIORS


Here are some of the things the Seniors do:


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Go to School:
Members and officers of the Student Council
Members and officers of the Honor Court
Members and editors of the Annual
Cheerleaders, Football players
Majorettes, Thespians, Science Club
Basketball, Track, Baseball
Members of various committees
Officers of the class
Term project work
After School:
Work in stores, behind soda fountains, in garages, on farms
Take ballet, music lessons and singing lessons
Intramurals, Hunting, Baby-sit, Church activities, Turtle Clubbing


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. "12A has gotten down to business these past six
weeks. Our unit on Geo-Politics is going to be a smash-
ing success: Mr. Gibson is telling of Frenchmen and many
of the countries customs-Mr. Pate has 12B on the ball
too. We are finding out that the English language is
not so 'distand' after all."-
Tidal Wave


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Recreation


Bored to apathy by the core program, the students
of P.K.Yonge turn to the recreational facilities of
greater Gainesville. In a questionnaire given,
edited, and deleted by the annual staff, the
students of P.K.Yonge said they like to do the
following:
83:3% said "We would like to ...... (cen-
sored)..... ."
16.7% said "We are too busy trying to keep
up our "B" average in order to
hold our social status to recreate."
1 % stood on the 5th Amendment
101% total

In a more serious vein these are some of the
things that the students of P.K.Yonge really like
to do.
sports fishing talking
watching sports exploring riding
swimming reading cards
boating radio telephone
water skiing television eating
hunting records movies











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School Spirit: School Spirit is that indefinable
thing which makes a school. A school cannot de- Q
velop a reputation in educational circles if its O
"Spirit" is low or null. The fact that School Spirit -
covers everything from refraining from writing on
the walls to maintaining a "B" average, shows how a
important it is. The parents and faculty also play .
an important part in School Spirit, for without their "I
encouragement and support there is little School -
Spirit.
The co-curriculum at P.K. is "enriched" with such
activities as Homecoming, Varsity Sports, Thespians,
and even the dear ol' Annual Staff. All of these go
into the making of School Spirit but, without the
support of everyone participating in these activities
there can be no School Spirit.







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Four shots showing stages of construction.
The new P. K. Yonge will be one of the
most modern school plants in Florida.
color is used throughout the elementary
and secondary buildings to blend with
the total decor.


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Industrial Arts
and
Mechanical Drawing


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In the area of Industrial Arts and Mechanical Drawing the program contains a variety of interest-
ing learning areas. Mr. Williams, the director of this division, says: "Production information, raw
and finished jobs such as ships mass techniques, material characteristics, skills involved in various
jobs, production costs, tooling in large plants, labor trends, and organized labor are some of inter-
ests to be developed in the new PKY Industrial Arts program."


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The el-menlory school of P. K. Yonge is outstanding throughout the state and
nation for its fine p-'gram in child development.


Illustration at upper left shows Kinder-
gartners at work; middle photo shows
Sergeant Dyess and the boys; at right
Mrs. Kornpropst leads a reading group.


This program strives to de-
velop such qualities as lead-
ership-social adjustment and
scholarship through develop-
ment of individual interest.
This is accomplished
through teacher guidance
and student committees which
allow the student to culti-
vate their own leadership.


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HOMECOMING







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Homecoming is for the return of the Alumni. Although there
is a lack of support by many of the Alumni, Homecoming is a
festive and enjoyable occasion. Homecoming is made up of
these activities: HiTide, Parade, the Football game and then the
Breakfast. Many preparations and hard work go into these ac-
tivities. The students work together to aid each other in creating
a warm feeling and welcome for the returning Alumni.
The significance of Homecoming has tended to be moved
away from its original purpose. Some people feel that they are
more important than others in the presentations and this leads
to dismay. Homecoming must be joyful and all must attend
the various activities during this period of the returning Alumni
to their old Alma Mater.































Upper left-"Silhouettes"; above-Squad-
captain's car for Homecoming; at left-
"it's a Ford"; below-O'Neill and the
girls.











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Headcoach ........ .... MacDonald
Backfield ............ W hittington
"Score" .... .. .... O'Neill, Echols
"Get the water" Lastinger, Peck


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yard run fine tebm play. 7. '

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SCIENCE AND MAN


Up in the morning,
Off to school,
Go to the Fla. room,
Where we shoot the bull.

Down to Science & Man in 142,
We hurry along, we have work to do.
We lake our seats with a pleasant smile,
And talk and laugh for a very short while.

We go in with an open mind,
And leave with it filled.
Our talking and note passing,
Mr. McEntee has killed.

We study with a scientific mind,
About everyday problems,
And learn our scientific method,
When report time comes,
We won't be sobbin.

We learn to avoid superstitions,
Although a few never do.
We all must participate,
Mr. McEntee, us, and you.

It's fun while it lasts,
And when it's finally past,
Our minds are enriched to elation,
For Science and Man has helped our
education.
-Marlene Haven

















PKY 18..GREEN COVE SPRINGS 33

Offensive backfield of Woods, Swilley, Home,
and Stephens looks great no defense to
speak of for the second straight week...
Melton in defensive. backfield, is leading
tackler Woods scores our last TD on 62-
yard sprint.

PKY 7................ BOLLES 13
Bolles beats the Blue Wave on a freak TD in
another exciting game ... Stephens and Horne
look good. an offense defensive play is
much improved and well rounded.

PKY 0 ...... .. LAKE BUTLER 21
Home, Wiles, and Swilley run well but team
lacks a scoring punch blocking is poor
. 'Bostick and Owens play fine game .
Bostick, N. Mathis, Melton, Owens, Swilley,
and Woods play last game next year???


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ART


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Those people who have scheduled their third and sixth
periods for Art have found this an exuberating course.
For those in the sixth period there is an inspiring, and re-
laxing class awaiting them at the end of the day. Many
people find that their talents are very adequately ex-
pressed in some form of art. Pottery, weaving, painting,
sketching, and sculpture are attempted successfully. Many
of these young artists exhibited in the Young Artist Group
at the Recreation Center on March 4.
Miss Davis, the art teacher guides and encourages
potential artists.



















By the time a student
reaches his third year in
high school, he is ready to
accept a great deal of re-
sponsibility towards his class
and his school Some ex-
amples of this "new respon-
sibility" are evidenced-in the
Junior Play and the Junior-
Senior Prom, both of which
are run by the students
themselves.


Juniors


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11th grade Core Teachers this year are Mr. W. Land and Mr. P. Adams


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ART EDITORIAL


"Creative expression is the need of my soul."-Archle
One can find a lot of ways to creatively express himself in Art I or
Art II taught by Miss Davis in the "far wing" of P.K. So if any of
you "cats" see Archie the Cockroach roaming around send him way out
to Miss Davis.
While everyone had a good time this year, the staff of the art
department (Miss Davis) is looking forward to a banner year next year
in the "new plant." You should see the new "goodies" they have
down there: an air brush, a potter's wheel, and loads of other "ex-
pressive media" to use a Col. "of Ed" expression.
Please note also that now that the program has been shifted
around a much better selection of courses in Fine and Applied Art is
available.
Art is no longer treated like a stepdaughter of the great god
Science, we hope
If one can learn to express himself there may be no need of
weapon builders


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INTERNS


PARTICIPANTS
AND
OBSERVERS










Office Staff




The biggest place in the whole school is
the office. Our office is run by Mrs.
Crago, Mrs. Parrish, and Mrs. West. It
acts as the nerve center for the whole
school; all orders, red tape, and money
go through it. Student assistant is Alan
Sh Johnson. The high school assistants are;
is Helen Brogdon, Bruce Gibbs, Kenny
SPalmer, Dwight Bell, Pat Powers, Steve
McVoy, Gene Tedder, Ardie Streit, Sam
Kates, Ed Mayton, and Tony Swilley.







College of Education PLAN OF NEW P.K. YONGE SCHOOL





The very reason for our existence
The place from which all comes: I
observes, participants, interns, and V
even teachers .. ..
The head of the COL' OF EDUCATION '
is Dean White, who is all right,
a rhymel
Three cheers for the COL' OF EDUCATION

























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BASKETBALL


The P.K.Yonge basketball five, finishing with a 18-7
Record against high school competition, surprised everyone
and turned out to be a real threat. What appeared to
be a dismal (as far as P. K. basketball goes) season before
the first game, due to the inexperience of the players,
turned into one of the more pleasing ones as the boys
put everything into the sport.
The team started off fairly well and in the Santa Fe
Invitational Tournament, they .lost a heartbreaker to a
strong G.H.S. team in the first game. The next night,
nevertheless, they bounced back and easily won third
place by stomping Santa Fe.
After New Year's, the boys won three out of five, losing
only to Seabreeze and Bishop Kenny (both contenders for
the state title) after staying even with them much of the
time. Then, they knocked off nine straight opponents.
Included in this streak were three Keystone Conference
Tournament games which gave us our first Keystone Con-
ference championship. (Boy, that Bolles game was a
squeaker, wasn't it?)
Even though they lost a couple of tough games after
this, the team entered the Class A, Group 2 Tournament,
in which P. K. was seeded fourth, and really put on a
terrific performance against Lake City. The next night,
however, they had a fatal (in tournaments) off-night and
lost to G.H.S.; who played one of their better games
against us.
All in all, Coach Whittington's lads never gave up,
regardless of the odds, and they gave good ole P.K. a real
fine representative in the basketball wars. Nice going
boys!i


P.K.Y. 55-Lake Butler 43 P.K.Y. 67-Haines City 63 ..,

P.K.Y. 44-Bronson 40 P.K.Y. 55-Ocala 48
P.K.Y. 36-North Marion 38 P.K Y. 60-Fernandina B. 43 ..
P.K.Y. 36-North Marion 38 P.K Y. 60-Fernandinal B. 43 *';*'''.*: ,*-' '


P.K.Y. 63-Florida Frosh 89
P.K.Y. 53-Lake Butler 38
P.K.Y. 55-G.H.S. 57
P.K.Y. 63-Santa Fe 32
P.K.Y. 57-Santa Fe 38
P.K.Y. 53-Williston 50
P.K.Y. 32-Seabreeze 45
P.K.Y. 44-Starke 40
P.K.Y. 55-Bishop Kenny 65
P.K.Y. 47-Williston 44

Name
Gene Sadler ..........
Stan Livengood ..........
Frank Sadler ............
Sid Cherry .............
Louie Echols .............
Denver Stevens ...........
Lanny Lastinger ..........
Thaxton Springfield ......
John Hudson ............
Buddy Burch .............
TEAM


P.K.Y. 50-Starke 35
P.K.Y. 58-G.C.S. 30
P.K.Y. 44-Bolles 40
P.K.Y. 49-Starke 39
P.K.Y. 57-Santa Fe 34
P.K.Y. 38-Seabreeze 45
P.K.Y. 39-Ocala 51
P.K.Y. 64-Florida Military 35
P.K.Y. 59-Lake City 47
P.K.Y. 47-G.H.S. 57


Total
Games Points
.26 406
.26 277
.26 175
.25 157
.26 140
.23 96
.23 60
S13 20
.7 7
S11 6
26 1344


Average
15.6
10.7
6.7
6.3
5.4
4.2
2.6
1.5
1.0
0.5
51.7


Captains-Echols, Livengood and F. Sadler
AII-Conference-Livengood and G. Sadler
Best Field Goal Percentage-Livengood
Best Free Throw Percentage-Lastinger and G. Sadler
Most Rebounds-Livengood and G. Sadler


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DRAMA FESTIVAL



The Drama Festival was a new and exciting experience
for many of the actors in "Balcony Scene". "Balcony
Scene" was directed by Mrs. Francis and Mrs. Diggs. The
cast included: Ed Mayton, Steve Brewer, Gloria Beck,
Sherrie Bostain, Sonny Saxton, Lucienne Pirenian, Mernet
Larsen, David Ginn.' Pete Webber was behind the scene
as stage manager.


Those who attended the banquet were fortunate for
they saw the Florida University apprentices in action as
they presented "The Christmas Dinner".










KEYETTES 7

The Keyettes got off to a roaring
start this year with the choosing
of new members and the informal
Initiation which was held at Sara
Lynn's lake place.
Projects that were carried out
during the school year were: school
calendars, decorating the bulletin
board, giving a Valentine party
for the SunLand Training Center, 4
and collecting magazines and cards
for the SunLand Training Center.
Other activities included monthly
church attendance, a G.H.S., P.K.Y.,
Key club and Keyette banquet
given by the Kiwanis and atten-
dance at the Kiwanis luncheons.
















The officers for this school year were: 1st semester-
president, Anne Holder, Vice president, Rosemary Francis,
Secretary, Kay Baldwin, Treasurer, Milne Hendricks. 2nd
semester officers, president, Nancy Wallace, vice president,
Dagne Servin, Secretary, Jackie Spache, Treasurer, Patsy
Donaldson.






THE HONOR COURT


WI.


DEMOCRACY IN ACTION
DEMOCRACY IN ACTION


Our Honor Court is an organization unique in Florida. No other school in the
state has a similar body in its student government. l(.ie of the chief aims of the pre-
sent Honor Court is to acquaint the rest of the stale ,viin our organization).
The fundamental principal underlying the foundation of the Honor Court is the
same principal basic to any student government body; that students, given the proper
direction and organization, can lake an important a.iu constructive part in tne handling
of school affairs. Our Honor Court is merely an extension of this principal beyond the
limits which are set in most schools.
The court is run by properly elected students, with the aid of a faculty sponsor. It
prefers to work for the prevention of offenses under its jurisdiction, father than to pro-
secute offenses once they have been committed. In handling offenses, the court tries to
operate under the principal of guidance and not that of punishment.
(In attending this school, students are honor bound to observe its rules and honor
regulations. It is the function of the Honor Court to help in the observance of this
responsibility with the cooperation of each and every member of the student body, we
can set an example for the rest of our state and facilitate the spread of our system).


THE STUDENT COUNCIL

The Student Council was a very active group this year. Many of its activities were
S the routine, but time consuming, ones which receive little recognition from the student
.- .. body. Included in this group were: (1)supervising the scheduling of all school activities;
'" : *(2) planning, along with a faculty committee, the scheduling of assemblies; (3) loaning
::h to one of the service clubs and the athletic department; (4) supervising the entire home-
coming program; (5) supervising and conducting the student body elections.
| ... The Council, also, undertook other projects. It conducted a school spirit campaign
all through the year. During the football season, it sponsored buses to two out-of-town
games. Then, during the basketball season, it urged students to take pride in their
school and treat the facilities in the Florida Gym in the proper manner. Finally, the
Student Council sponsored a "Keep'Our New School New" campaign.
i At Christmas time, the student government organization sponsored a food and
clothes drive for a needy family. The student body responded nicely and the council
was able to give the family many needed items.
When this went to press, the Student Council was planning three other activities.
They are as follows: (1) give out information sheets on the new school; (2) set up a
'., school handbook for next year; and (3) set up a share holding student loan company.
Also, the Council was considering presenting the new school with a gift.
In addition to activities around the school, the Student Council was active in other
i areas. It served as the president-school of District II, F.A.S.C., and was involved greatly
in the planning and running of the District II Convention. Also, the Council sent dele-
,,. gates to the State Student Council Convention.
All in all, as you can see, the Student Council was kept quite busy during ihe year
and is to be commended for its fine work in its many activities.
President: Clarence O'Neil
Vice President: Mari Bingham
,e Secretary-Treasurer: Nancy Wallace
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9th Grade









9th grade .we're about worn out
the Medical Center Parking Lot with
Driver's Ed and you'd never guess
how many miles we put on the car .
but we're glad we got to do it .
We've gone from the skies to the sea
studying air power, sea life, and all
sorts of things in between Hypno-
tism, medicine, psychology, etc ..
And we had a great time at camp ..
We really learned how to "Clear the
Kitchen" Camp Crystal will never
forget usI...




















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KEY CLUB


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The Key Club is founded on liberty,~
democracy and fraternity, mostly frater-
nity.
The KEY 'Club is one of the largest
high school service clubs in the nation.
The officers for 1957-1958 were, Presi-
dent-Juddy Woods, Vice President-Stan
Livengood, Treasure-Sid Cherry, Secre-
tary-Steve Brewer, Lt. Governor-Bob Fich-
ter. The clubs membership includes the
maximum of thirty boys (thanks to the
faculty). These boys come from the
sophomore, junior, and senior classes.
Projects that were done this year in- 4H
cluded church attendance, school clear
up and sponsoring the safety patrol.


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ADVANCED MATH



&



TRIGONOMETRY


P.K. students can at least graduate with the feel-
ing that they have a good background in the realm
of mathematics. Due to the excellent guidance of
Mr. Phillips, we have one of the best math programs
in the state. Though the students seldom have much
homework, they develop compehension and apprecia-
tion of the mathematical world that cannot be com-
pared with the time consuming "memorization of
facts" which is readily forgotten.
After the first year of struggle through algebra,
which is generally the most difficult since it is new to
the student, each student is advised whether to
(Continued on page 44)













































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PHYSICS









This is a practical course that can aid a person in many ways. It is
useful in most of the fields of science that a person can study. Much time is
spent in explaining points which arise from material read. Physics is not an
easy subject and it takes sore hard studying to do well on the tests. The
class does some demonstrating which aids the student in understanding the
material and getting a much better insight into physics. Physics is mainly for
a person who is willing to study and do outside work to increase his know-
ledge. In many of the fields of physics outside work is essential to the
complete understanding of the subject. Some of the examples, optics, mech-
anics, Newton's laws and so forth.


Look! One finger


Listen carefully, students; hear that bell ring?








DINO



"Dino" the epitome of teenage frustra-
tion, was presented by the able seniors
in February. As might be assumed, the
seniors benefited greatly from the ex-
posure to the agony that tears the minds
of our young people today. As Mr. "
Gibson perceived we profited greatly by
this presentation. Dramatic appreciation
and understanding was not the only
thing gained from this production. A
closer relationship between the entire
class developed as a result of this- play.
We have learned to cooperate with one
another in order to produce a better
show as well as learning to become good
actors and actresses.



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MUSIC

Under the excellent direction of Mr. Adam and Mr. Baggerly, we have a music depart-
ment we can really be proud of. The chorus gave several assemblies, an Opereta
(The Fortune Teller) and participated in the state music festival. The band marched at
games and parades, and gave several programs. The orchestra participated in Religion
and Life Week as well as accompanying the Operetta and giving programs.










Y CLUB


"Are you going out again tonight'" "Yes. "where"? "Y-club."
"again' ? "The last meeting was two weeks ago?" "Why can't you meet
after school? When I was in high school I had homework every night,
from every single class. What's wrong with that school anyway, Don't
you ever learn anything? Who was Shakespeare?" Uh, Shokesbber?
Why, I don't know. He must not have been very important. At P. K.,
we learn to be well-rounded pupils and Y club teaches us how to do
all sorts of things, we learn how to set up intramural schedules and
how lo plan and carry out bake-sales. We earn money so we can
help sponsor all kinds of services for the school Why, last year we
bought a beautiful mirror for the girls' gym, and this year we put
Stanwick Air Purifier there for the out of town football players."


INTRAMURALS
















SEVENTH GRADE


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The seventh grade class has been very
busy this year.
In mathematics we've been working
with decimals and percent. We find
these quite easy, compared to diagram-
ing sentences, which we are learning in
Language arts. In social studies we are
studying the history of Florida. In spell-
ing it's the same old routine; study the
words for the test and do the additional
study. Of course, there's the writing lab
which is due each week.
Almost everyone enjoys the activity
period. For the first semester, there was
*7 a choice of music, Spdnish, shop, or art
When typing was added to the list, in the


second semester, music and Spanish were
dropped.
This is the first year of taking physical
education, and most of us enjoy it very
much. Through the year we've learned
and practiced such sports as tennis,
tumbling, basketball, and football.
This was the first year our class has
had the opportunity to put a skit in High
Tide. We put a lot of work into oui
skit, and even though we didn't win, it
was well worth the work we put into it.
To celebrate Valentine's day we had
a dance party in the gym, with drinks
and cookies. We didn't have much time
for the party, but we had fun.


Over the Christmas holidays, the room
mothers sponsored a skating party. Most
of us hadn't skated in years, and had a
hard time getting started. Soon every-
one was out on the floor skating quite
well. After the party we had hot dogs
and drinks. Everyone had a good time.
We always enjoy our annual trip to
Sarah Margaret Deck's summer home on
Kingsley Lake. There's a good swimming
area, and plenty of room to play. Every-
one gets a sunburn, but they hove fun.
We feel we've had an interesting and
worthwhile year and we look forward to
going into the eighth grade.


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CHEMISTRY & BIOLOGY


Which came first the chicken or
the egg?
While biology does not attempt
to answer the question it covers
the broad field of "life" and how
it moves along.
This is probably one of the most
interesting science courses a student
with a "scientific bend" could take.
Mr. Krebs keeps well ahead of his
classes making sure that the class
does not bog down in petty details.
One of the most interesting
phases .of work in the course is
the term project which each stu-
dent participates in. This term
paper consists of original research
in some area of biology such as a
S study of malnutrition among?
Conclusion: The course is well
worth the extra effort required to
make this course a success.


Equation: H202+H2 S04=2H2 O+02 --SO3

This equation is a seemly unanswerable riddle to the
average high school student, but not to a chemistry stud-
ent. This equation tells a whole story about the death of
Hydrogen Peroxide and the liberation of Oxygen. No
where else can one find so much drama in so few symbols.
Take chemistry and learn about the life and loves of
Atom and his soul mate Proton.


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.unreal, a creation of
man, and that geome-
"',. try is based on a pos-
S tulate-that by accept-
%ti ing geometry we are
committing an act of
:' faith-nothing can really
be proven. It is most
awe inspiring,
:'.~-r The next year, in
second year algebra
S ':,. and trig., he is taken
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ADVANCED MATH & TRIGONOMETRY.


back to the world he
left two years ago; he
once more has to deal
with ratios and equa-
tions. He becomes very
familiar with X,Y axis,
and learns many new
terms, such as loga-
rithm. The second sem-
ester he becomes in-
trigued with triangles,
realizing the value of
the Pythagorean Theo-
rem and becoming ac-
quainted with tangents,
secants and their co-
workers.
During his fourth
year, he really begins
to realize how little he
knows, as compared to
what there is to know.

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He is familiarized
th e third dimens
figures and get!
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ional
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ing calculus.
By the time the stu-
dent has finished these
four years, he can feel
well assured that he is
well prepared for any
math course in college
. whether he goes to
college or not, he can
feel enriched by the ex-
posure to a realm that
is completely unique
and different from any
other field.






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(Continued from page 36) (ll
continue in geometry, trig, and ad-
vanced algebra, or whether per-
haps his aptitude lies in some other
field, in which case he is advised i
to take a year of general math,
which will be useful to him in daily
life. If he chooses to continue his
high school math career, he em-
barks upon one of the most interest-
ing facets of all math-geometry.
Here he deals with second and
third dimensions, studying the pro-
perties of triangles, cubes, and
spheres. He is also exposed to
theorem after theorem and has to
know why each of them are im-
portant. He learns our mathema-
tical system is imaginative and


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Home Economics 1


and Family Living

After being under the capable hands of Mrs. Ingle for nine months, I'm sure
the thirty girls who took Home Ec. I are much better acquainted with the arts
of homemaking.
The fashion show was about the biggest event of the year. The girls
really look nice, even if they suffer from a little stage fright at first.
After the excitement of the fashion show, the class proceeded to divide
up into four "families" to learn the technique of the old saying, "The way
to a man's heart is through his stomach."
We know all the girls who took Home Ec. I are really looking forward
to taking Home Ec. II in the new school.



P.K. Yonge.has a family life preparatory course, Family Living. The students
learn through practical experience. Students sew, cook, learn money man-
agement, to plan a home intelligently, and to cope with many of life's
problems.











SOPHOMORES





During our year in the tenth grade we
have found ourselves moving rapidly
from childhood to the new and exciting
world of adulthood.
As for our education at P.K. we are all
engaged in Mr. Krebs biology class. Half
of us are learning about the bodies of
our little friends, the birds, earthworms,
and other less complex forms of life this
second semester, while the other half of
our class is being entertained with the
study of our bodies.
Many of the members of our tenth
grade class are studying the science of
Geometry this year but I doubt that many
of us could tell you the difference be-
tween a chord and a diameter.
Core "A" has found themselves study-
ing language arts where they learned
more about oral expression and the
presenting of plays. Their most recent
topic of study has been on Russia. They
have been learning about Russian in-
dustry, education, family, life, etc. Eng-
lish is often studied in this tenth grade
class.
On the other hand ten B' has
studied atomic fallout and our American
Heritage, including the Civil War, the
Revolutionary War, and the causes of
each. They have also chosen individual
topics of interest and made studies of
their chosen subjects to share with the


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TRACK


Track is one of the hardest
sports. It takes endurance, speed,
coordination, and a will to win, to
be good in track. A person must
really put himself into the sport.
Track calls for physical endurance
beyond that of most other sports.
To be good in track is a real ac-
complishment. This sport is very
ably coached by Coach MacDon-
ald. Members of the Florida Track
Team aided the coach in creating
an excellent track team for P.K.Y.




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DANCE BAND


One of the more aesthetic and original assemblies
presented this year was the Dance Band. The jazz playing
while the curtain slowly rose was quite effective. Many
people were pleasantly surprised to hear the band pre-
sent its fruitful performance. For those who were not
informed of the intent of the assembly, there was surprise
at the revealed talent of the members. The band was


made up of G.H.S. and P.K.Y. students, and university and
P.K.Y. Faculty members, directed by Mr. Baggerly. Bob
Fichter gave a sophisticated introduction to each song
played.
The J.D.'s were invited to appear in the program.
Those in this were from both local High Schools. The
J.D.'s received a very enthusiastic applause from the
P.K.Y. audience.


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MAJORETTES


Our Majorettes, Anne
Holder, Milne Hend-
ricks, Woodine Brown-
ing, Nancy Hord, and
Nancy Jo Ginn have
led an active year. Be-
sides their regular per-
formances at football
games, they have per-
formed in the Christmas
Parade, the Homecom-
ing Parade, High Tide,
and several other
events.. Drum Major is
Tommy Bostick.


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HOT RODS





SHot Rods were once the steam valve of teenage rebels. Now, with the
aid of mass communications "Hot Rods" have become "legal". We have
several fine examples of Hot Rodding here in this school; this page
shows only two. These fellows are not black leather Jacket boys,
they are fine high school students in general. How sad; the passing
.. of another frontier.



















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BASEBALL PRACTICE
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TIDAL WAVE


The school needed a paper so
. some people got together,
organized it, and called it the
TIDAL WAVE. This was more than
a year ago and now it's better than
ever. Sponsored by Mrs. Parrish
and edited by Bartlett and Powers,
the TIDAL. WAVE usually turns out
to be more than eight pages long
and is issued about once a month.
Extra on Rockets very good.


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SECOND PERIOD SPEECH CLASS


P. K. Yonge's second period speech class taught by Mrs.
Diggs, is an almost perfect example of what a good
special subject class should be. Any outside observer could
trace the progress of the individual student on a nicely
proportional line graph.
He (the observer) would note the increasing eagerness
of the student to stand before the class, delivering a
forceful speech, while shaking.
Speech courses, as they are taught at P.K. are not, the
observer would find, "cry" or guaranteed "A"' subjects.
He would quickly learn that the speeches are made after
long, tiring hours of research and organization, and that
it is really worth the effort for a satisfying result.


SPEECH CLASSES IN ACTION













ECONOMICAL AND POLITICAL PROBLEMS




This is a lecture discussion course in which most of the work is
done in the classroom and very little outside work is required. This is
an advanced course for accelerated students. Some of the things that
have been studied so far this year have been, Our Culture, Great Men
of Economics and Politics, a study of News Commentators., a study of
what propaganda is, and current periodicals. One of the field trips
that everyone enjoyed was the talk made by Dean Atcheson. After the
talk it was most interesting to discuss his speech .and his forum. This
class holds the interest of people who like politics and economics.











SThe Rocket Club



On March 15th, 1958 six ninth
Graders from P.K. Yonge launched
a three foot, five inch long rocket.
SThe boys were: Steve McVoy, Gene
Tedder, Pat Trujillo, Butch Smith,
Gay Cooper, and Kerry Hinckly.


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"Everybody"


8TH GRADE


8th grade we're seniors too ..
of Jr. High of course Mr.
Bashaw a great teacher .
with history the main subject .
We're busy with math, science, Eng-
lish, Art, Band, etc. also We
have lots of fun playing basketball
and other sports We've learned
a lot of things in the past eight
years, and now we're ready for
highschool the first class of
freshmen in the new P.K.


Coach & Jonnie


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Parent-Teachers Association







WHAT-The P.T.A.

Regardless of what you may have thought, those
letters stand for the Parent-Teacher Association.

WHO-All parents and all teachers working together.

Your parents probably belong unless, of course, you
forgot to take home the notice and they didn't even know
there was a meeting.

WHY-To promote the welfare of the children and youth.

This may sound slightly silly, but since it's the funda-
mental objective there isn't really any other way to state
it. Your parents definitely are interested in you. If they
weren't, they certainly could find other things to do with
their time besides spending it on more meetings.

HOW-The parents, teachers and students try to cooperate
and produce a better home, school, and community. This
can be done in various ways: by having interesting in-
structive and thought provoking programs, by sponsoring
the high school Christmas party, the Senior Reception and
other special projects; class plays, operettas and by
planning the festival-aimed at promoting fellowship,
school spirits, and a good time by all. Money for extra
things that were not in the budget were also bought.
(choir robes, a projection film strip, cabinets and books
for the -library.) This can also be accomplished by just
getting together and getting to know each other better.
This year the extra special project is the privilege of
having an open house in May which will give us an oppor-
tinity to "show off" our new school to the whole com-
munity and county.


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SPANISH 1


Spanish I had a gbod time this year. Several
mornings a week people could be seen in the halls
singing and one wondered whether it was a chorus
class or a Spanish class. These songs (in Spanish)
were sung to the elementary. Senor Trujillo took
much time lugging the tape recorder and record
player to our class. By the time the year was over
he was a real pro in the use of these two items.
They were a very big help in the instruction of our
class and much was gained by use of these two
instruments. Part of the year was spent by making
money which was saved for a trip to Ybor City. Dues
were charged and many bake sales were held for
this purpose. So, all in all a good time was spent
and much Spanish was learned. (?)
Adios-


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World History is one of those
classes where one can cover every-
thing from Attila the Hun and New-
Sthe political situations of today and
'-.. i yesterday which include kinds of
governments, presidents, wars and
so forth.

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The most valuable things that ''
a student could get out of these .
two fine courses, taught by Mrs.
Richards and Mr. Gibson, are facts
and ideas. One could truthfully
say that if World History gave any-
thing to a person it was a "world
consciousness."


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WORLD HISTORY


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AMERICAN LITERATURE




At last some students at PK.Y. are beginning to
delve into the deeper workings of man-or' so it
seems in the American Literature classes which always
are intrigued with such philosophers as Emerson,
Thoreau, Whitman, and Dickinson.
The students, under the direction 'of Mrs. Diggs
and Mr. Gibson, (in separate classes) discuss these
writers and compare opinions with them.
They also enjoy the lighter novelists, such as
Lewis, Tarkington, London, and Twain, as well as
learning to appreciate the poetry of Parker, Lanier,
and others.
The teaching techniques used in these courses
encourage the students appreciation and enjoyment
of literature, as well as increasing their understanding
of life.











CHEERLEADERS


The eight girls that led the cheers for
the P.K. Yonge Blue Waves this season
were: Sandra VelDink, Dottie Parker, Lee
Ann Black, Gloria Beck, Nancy Wallace,
Charlotte Ford, Fran Douglas, and Sara
Lynn Alday.
These eight girls worked very hard to
promote and arouse school spirit and
have real loud pep assemblies. They
sponsored dances after football games
and after the basketball games. These
girls really worked hard but they enjoyed
it just the same.


The B Squad Cheerleaders are: Linda
Gertner, Elaine Carson, Marion Stal-
naker, Pam Spache, Marcia Mase, and
Carolyn Thomas.


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LUCIENNE PIRENIAN


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MARY HESTER


RICHARD MELTON


BARBARA MARSHAL


ELLIOT OWENS


HELEN BROGDON


NELSON MATHIS


ROSEMARY FRANCIS


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LEWIS WRIGHT


DORTHY LAING


JIMMY TRIMM


PATRICIA BLEDSOE


NICK NICKELSON


SHARON BOSTAIN


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STEPHEN BREWER


TERRY SNEERINGER


SAM KATES


JOSEPHINE SOBCZYK


ROBERT BERNS


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FRANK SADLER


ELEANOR SHEFFIELD


WAYNE STROTHER


FERRIS HOLBROOK


ROBERT FIGHTER


ROBERT W. BOSTICK


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Bob Fichter

Art McVoy

Mernet Larsen

Ferris Holbrook

Scott McVoy

Mari Bingham

SPatricia Bledsoe

Gail Bronson

Lee Ann Black

Al O'Neill

SBob Burns

S Elinor Sheffield

Elaine Sheffield

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Sharon Bostain

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Helen Brogdon

Louie Echols

Stan Livengood

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Milne Hendricks

Rosemary Francis

Darlene Dunn

Mr. Krebs

Miss Davis

Delmar Penley

Caryle Morris

Cody

Mr. Gibson

MODELS

McEntee

Livengood

Cherry

Bingham

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P.K. YONGE
ALUMNI- ASSOCIATION, INC.
1080 .S.W. 11 STREET
GAINESVILLE, FL 32601-789




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