• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Foreword
 Dedication
 Alma mater
 Table of Contents
 Administration
 Classes
 Athletics
 Features
 Activities
 Organizations
 Advertising
 Back Matter
 Back Cover
 Spine














Title: Yongester
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00065812/00014
 Material Information
Title: Yongester
Series Title: Yongester
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: P.K. Yonge Laboratory School
Publisher: P.K. Yonge Laboratory School
Publication Date: 1948
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00065812
Volume ID: VID00014
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Front Matter
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Frontispiece
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Foreword
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Dedication
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Alma mater
        Page 11
    Table of Contents
        Page 12
    Administration
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Classes
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Athletics
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
    Features
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
    Activities
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
    Organizations
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
    Advertising
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
    Back Matter
        Page 117
    Back Cover
        Page 118
    Spine
        Page 119
Full Text




















THEp
n, N ra, F tq F PIYCI


















THE STUDENT BODY


P.K.


SCHOOL










THE NINETEEN HUND RED AND FORTY EIGHT
cz 4,
., ^^ /7^A^




























This annual is conceived not in the spirit of reminiscence,
but rather of saying, "Farewell, Senior Class. Go!----........and be a
success.
This year, as a whole, has been strenuous but thoroughly
enjoyable; and we shall leave here with deep gratitude to our
teachers from whom we have received invaluable training and
knowledge in the lessons of life; we shall leave P. K. Yonge with
new standards in our hearts and minds.
Rather than recall a successful year, which is all too vivid in
our minds, we have made it our aim to inspire in the graduating
class, and in all underclassmen, a spirit of advancement, a spirit
of the will to progress, and a spirit of achievement.






























To Vincent McGuire, we, the graduating class of
P. K. Yonge School, dedicate the nineten-hundred and
forty-eight edition of THE YONGESTER for his diligent
and untiring efforts for P. K. Yonge, and for the inspira-
tion which his character and personality have instilled in
us.
Mr. McGuire started teaching in P. K. Yonge this
year, and P. K. students greatly appreciate what he has
done for their school. We hope that he will remain teach-
ing at P. K. Yonge for many years to come.












r:1


U... % A


, "A


V


I,>
I


5~ -1


~C-LLIII~


Illlrdrs
~J~crc -u- r
*~~



5





























Hail to thee, dear Alma Mater!
Loyal school are you.
Making such a glorious standing;
Everything you do.
Hopes start memories ever ringing,
Never let them die.
We will always love and cherish-
Hail to P. K. Y.

































ADMINISTRATION
CLASSES
ATHLETICS
FEATURES
ORGANIZATIONS
ACTIVITIES
ADVERTISING
















A'




~. r. . ...-










.0
-1-







a-







'p- .. w A. ;,r

11.UD~.: 7 -' o .











1 w
IIf.
1br -











pi CA















ye

W 'j
*. I
r -.







.. C
~ "3

9- *I II
P 9- ,'



























JA4 AAA JA S1JAJ4J4 J4JA SAA J4 J4 f4



















The faculty of the P. K. Yonge Laboratory School is
drawn from 26 different states, trained in 31 different
institutions of higher learning, and holds a total of 74
degrees.
One of the aims of the faculty is to provide life
situations for P. K. Yonge students, and to assist the in-
dividual student, through guidance, to learn to make the
proper adjustments and choices in order to develop an
ability for self-direction that will serve the student in later
life. The student body and the faculty work and play
together in a truly democratic spirit.
The comradeship and genuine interest of the teach-
ers develop a spirit of cooperation and teamwork between
the student body and faculty, that emphasizes "Learn by
doing."





FACULTY


J. Hillis Miller
President of the University of Florida
University of Richmond-B. A.
University of Virginia-M. A.
Columbia University-Ph. D.
Keulla College-Litt. D.
Alfred University-LL. D.


G. Ballard Simmons
Director of P. K. Yonge Laboratory
School and Dean of the College of
Education
university of Florida-B. A., M. A.
ohns Hopkins University-Ph. D.


Harvey K. Meyer
Principal of P. K. Yonge Laboratory
School
Berea College-B. A.
Eastern Kentucky State College-M. A.
University of Kentucky-graduate work.
University of Florida-graduate work.









Robert Gilbert
Asst. Director
Phys. Ed.
Univ. of Fla.-
B. A. E.
Univ. of Fla.-
graduate work


FACULTY


Left to right
Maud C. Watkins
fourth grade teacher
Univ. of Fla.-B. A. E.
Univ. of Fla.-graduate work
Blanche Skinner
second grade teacher
Univ. of Fla.- B. A. E. and
M. A. E.
Myrna S. Hustad
Kindergarten teacher
Superior State Teacher's
College-B. 'E.
Univ. of Wisconsin-graduate
work
Univ. of Fla.-graduate work


Mary E. Mitchell
assistant teacher
Fla. State Univ.-A. B.
Univ. of Spain-graduate work
Ruth B. Peeler
first grade teacher
Fla. State Univ.
Univ. of Fla.-B. A. E.
Columbia Univ.-M. A.
Charlotte Dunn
Yankton College
kindergarten teacher
Iowa State Teacher's College
Univ. of Fla.
Univ. of Minn.-B. S.
Columbia Univ -M. A.


Eunice Z. Calhoun
sixth grade teacher
Fla. State Univ.
Univ. of Fla.-B. A. E. and
M. A. E.
Mary Elizabeth Barry
third grade teacher
Columbia Univ.-M. A.
Not pictured:
Jean Pieper Tison
fifth grade teacher
Univ. of Pittsburg-B. S.
Ohio Univ.
Univ. of Fla.-M. A. E.









'r.1 1


Qr` 2K


r
c :cIF-

*'V L;':r. -


i'
';


JAAAAt AAAAAAJAA
















SfS- HISTORY




We the class of 48 now turn back the pages of time as we make ready to leave
our Alma Mater.
Come with us back to 1945 as we make our entrance into high school as proud
freshmen.
In this our first year, we set the pattern for the years we were to spend in high
school. Here some of us were introduced to Latin and gave Caesar another battle.
In spring we gave the Freshman Hop, our first formal dance. It was given in a
gym filled with stars, for "Stardust" furnished our theme.
This year interscholastic sports were introduced and some champions were in the
making in basketball.
We then became sophomores. Despite our studies we eventually became jubilant,
for our basketball team proved to be District Champions. This year we seemed to feel
the touch of romance for we became date conscious and had quite a few crushes. We
still see some lasting effects of these. We had our first taste of dramatics as we hesi-
tantly put on the play, DON'T TAKE MY PENNY.
Then our junior year loomed up in front. We thought we were mighty important.
Our Junior-Senior Banquet and Prom furnished talk for the entire year one way or
another. John Allen, as ring master, led the CIRCUS with all of us performing in the
rings. We had our annual hayride to Gold Head Branch Park and ended up riding
home in the rain. We did look like a drenched crew. Football was introduced to P. K.
to the joy of everyone. Our six-man team became our pride and joy. This new feature
brought on our first Homecoming, which proved to be a gala affair.
Then the fall of 47 rolled around and we became seniors-maybe not dignified,
but making up for that in other respects. The faculty held many new members in store
for us, one of them we were lucky enough to draw for sponsor, Mr. McGuire. Under
his "heave" and "ho," we gave our class play, SPRING GREEN, and put across another
issue of THE YONGESTER. We had our difficulties, but oh, what knowledge we
gained!
In this the second year of football, we gained recognition as Conference Cham-
pions as well as State Champions.
We look back with no regrets and look forward with eager anticipation.
THE END









n Allen
a; entered P. K. Sophomore
S46. Don't Take My Penny;
r Hearts Were Young and
; President of Junior Class,
4 Student Council Parlimen-
an, 47; Y-Club Treasurer,
; Key Club Treasurer, 46-47;
st Year Spanish Club Presi-
et, 47; Football Manager, 46;
Jsity Basketball, 47-48.
brain that makes a wit.


ne Ellen Ashly
Ed tered P. K. in Senior Year,
SDancing Club-President,
,; T% irler's Club, 47; Attend-
High School in Electra,
xas, 44-45; Band Majorette,
-6; Attended High School
SShawnee, Oklahoma.
nice to be natural when you
Naturally sweet.




iy Beall
tered P. K. in Senior Year;
tor Tales; Attended Lyn-
ok HS, New York, Freeport
New York, Melrose HS,

whatever she does, she does it
i1.




Ses Bernard Bostick
Bta; Junior Class President;
,ior Class President; Sopho-
re Class President; Y-Club
esdent; Key Club; Vice Presi-
ot o Student Body; Our
.farts Were Young and Gay;
otball, 46-47.
Great men are dying-I feel
' myself.




D.glas Boyd Brooks
Be; Don't Take My Penny;
C Hearts Were Young and
S; Spring Green; Vice Presi-
de of Junior Class; Football,
Track, 47.
d workers make good men.


Shirley Elizabeth Allen
Entered P. K. in Senior Year;
Fashion Show, 48.
The quiet and bashful type?










Richard Elbridge Clapp
Entered P. K. in Senior year;
Monitor of Honor Study Hall;
Marine Corps Reserve.
Always, he is on the go.


SENIORS


Robert Coldar Beaty
Alpha; Vice President of Jun-
ior Class; Student Council, 46;
Don't Take My Penny; Foot-
ball, 46-47; Basketball, 46.
Some claim he is bashful; most
doubt it.





Ernest Edward Bradly
Beta; Football, 46-47; Basket-
ball, 46-47; Ballard's Boys.
Never in a hurry and never late.










Mildred S. Carter
Entered P. K. in Senior year;
President of the Art Club; Co-
editor of Yongester; Baton
Club.
Don't let your studies interfere
with your education.


"""
'~pPi.'d: P.` 35`
.-I






SENIORS


Charles Martin Cherry
Alpha; entered P. K. in Junior
year; Our Hearts Were Young
and Gay; Spring Green; Base-
ball with the American Le-
gion, 45.
Not afraid of work, but not in
sympathy with it.


.1


-'' i ',


Richard Elbridge Clapp
Entered P. K. in Senior -a-
Marine Corps Reserve; Monitor
of Honor Study Hall.
Action for me, I'll never be idl.


Rutledge Jesse Emerson
Beta; Basketball, 47-48; Foot-
ball, 46-47; Don't Take My
Penny; Our Hearts Were Young
and Gay; Spring Green; Y-Club,
47-48; Science Club, 46-47;
Business Manager of Yongester.
Why must life all labor be?


Mary Lucetta Foote
Beta; Our Hearts Were Young
and Gay; Don't Take My
Penny; Spring Green; Cheer-
leader, 47-48; Basketball, 46-47;
Volleyball, 46-47; Softball, 46-
47; Gator Tales; S. W. S. Club.
A happy heart makes a happy
face.




William A. Gager
Alpha; entered P. K. in Sopho-
more year; Key Club; Y-Club;
Basketball, 47-48; Softball, 45-
46; Don't Take My Penny; Our
Hearts Were Young and Gay;
Spring Green; Student Body
President, 47-48; Football, 47-
48.
I am what I am.



Polly Anna Haynes
Gamma Captain, 46; Don't
Take My Penny; Our Hearts
Were Young and Gay; S. W. S.
Club; Y-Club; Basketball, 45-
48; Softball, 45-48; Volleyball,
45-48.
Patience and gentleness is
power.


Mary Jane Emig
Gamma; Willie and the Bj
Senior Choir, 46-48; Hirs.n
Club.
She'll dance gaily through life,


Helen Katherine Foster
Alpha; entered P. K. in Seniori
year; S. W. S. Club; Gator
Tales; Attended high .school in
Miami.
Sweet, nice and concise.







Hugh Harrison Haven
Entered P. K. in Junior year;
Spring Green; Minstrel; Treas
urer of Junior Class; Key Club;
Football Sponsor.
He must have a sixth sense; wv
wonder about the other five.






Dan Edward Hornsby
Gamma; entered P. K. in Sen
ior year; Art Editor for Yonge
ster; Y-Club, 48; Basketball
48; Football, 47; Art Club.
Don't plague me with Studie
I have weightier subjects on m
mind.


'I
*^


~~






SENIORS


6 Johns
imj: entered P. K. Junior
"; When Our Hearts Were
ng and Gay; Nine Girls;
ing Green; President of S.
S. Club; Editor-in-chief of
6gester; Co-editor of Gator
Ies: Secretary of Spanish
ess 1.
Senergetic leader is she.


a Nita McLeran
:a; entered P. K. Sophomore
.r.
tie do we know what she
nks or dreams.


on Chester Morris
)ha; I'll Be All Right On the
3ht; Key Club; Secretary of
Key Club, 47; Basketball,
47.
dies pursued-studies over-
en.




n Frederick Neller
iha; Student Council, 47-48;
Club; Y-Club; Spring
`en; Don't Take My Penny;
ball 46-48; Football, 46-
[Captain, 47; Basketball, 45-
i Captain, 46-47.
ly do it today; there is al-
s tomorrow.


rules Ira Richardson
nma Captain, 44; Football,
', Basketball, 46-47; Base-
-, ; President of Y-Club,
I; Key Club, 46; Our
rts Were Young and Gay;
Wident of Sophomore Class.
not what I do that worries
it's n hen I'm caught, there's
ble.


Bettie Caroline Marks
Gamma Captain, 47; entered P.
K. Sophomore year, 45; Don't
Take My Penny; Nine Girls;
Spring Green; Football Spon-
sor, 47; Vice President of Jun-
ior Class, 47; Chairman of
Homecoming, 47; Feature Edi-
tor of Yongester, 48.
Live, laugh and love-there'll
come a time when you can't.




Mary Louise Mickler
Beta; entered P. K. Junior year;
Our Hearts Were Young and
Gay.
Not quantity do we find here
but pleasing quality.


i'.-
yFr *


Helen Elizabeth Morrison
Entered P. K. in Senior year;
Copy Editor of Gator Tales;
S. W. S. Club, 47-48; Organi-
zation Editor Yongester; Foot-
ball Sponsor, 47; Homecoming
Queen, 47; Girl's Service
League, 47-48.
I enjoy talking, that's why I
talk.



Thomas McDonald Olson
Beta; Don't Take My Penny;
Everything Will Be All Right
On the Night; Spring Green;
Key Club, 46, President, 47-48;
Student Council, 44-47; Busi-
ness Manager of Football Team,
46-47; Assistant Business Mana-
ger of Yongester.
Do not judge value by size.




Pat Nelson Riley
Beta; Football, 46-47; Basket-
ball, 44-45; Hunting and Fish-
ing Club.
Don't take life too seriously;
you'll never get out alive any-
way.





SENIORS


Tommy Lamar Rogers
Alpha; entered P. K. Junior
year; Senior Chorus.
Student, friend, and good sport..







Helen Clara Shipman
Alpha; Our Hearts Were Young
and Gay; Music Club; Basket- :-.
ball, 47-48; Volleyball, 48.
Tis laughter that makes the
world go around.


17t --
kT"


Jackie Mae Rottman
Entered P. K. in Senior year.
Whatever she does, she does i|
well.





Emily Townsed Smith
Alpha; Our Hearts Were Youl'
and Gay; Spring Green; Mak
Up and Live; Nine Girls; Sec.
retary of Senior Class, 47; Vol.
leyball, 46-48; Captain of thi
Volleyball Team, 47-48; Ba
ketball, 47-48; Senior Choru
46-48.
A smile is the trademark of i
happy soul.


Billy E. Steptoe
Alpha; entered P. K. Junior
-year; Senior Chorus, 46-47-48;
Christmas Play.
If worry were the only cause of
death, I should never die.





Sylvia Anne Strange
Alpha Captain, 48; Don't Take
My Penny; Our Hearts Were
Young and Gay; Nine Girls;
Spring Green; Secretary of Jun-
ior Class; Volleyball, 45-48;
Basketball, 45-48; Softball, 45-
47.
Leave silence to the saints; I
am but human.





Stanley Thompson
Beta; Winner in Art Contest,
47-48; Art Club.
School isn't the only place to go.


Berta Stevens
Beta; entered P. K. in Sopho
more year; Volleyball, 44; Sen
ior Chorus, 46-48.
Her voice was ever soft, gentle
and low, an excellent thing in
woman.






Susanne Thomas
Alpha; Don't Take My Penn)
Spring Green; Senior Chore
Student Council, 45-46; Volle)
"ball, 48.
She has a smile for every gii
and two for every boy.




Francis Lorena Vansickle
Beta; Our Hearts Were Youn
and Gay; Senior Choir, 46-4E
Spanish Club, 46-48; Scienc
Club, 45-46; Girls' Servic
League, 46-48; Basketball, 4(
47; Who Killed the Mikadc
Make Up Club, 45-46.
A wise and quiet spirit.






SENIORS


R.rt George Wallace
G President of Freshman
C s; Student Council, 47; Y-
C 46-48; President of Key
l -4-48; Don't Take My
y; Minstrel; Spring Green;
1'ill Be All Right On the
ht: Football, 46-48; Basket-
b ..48.
I'e the life I love.






I e hittington
ANha; entered P. K. Senior
: volleyball 47; Tumbling
Cb, -7-48.
Qet and reserved was she.







ise G. Williams
a; entered P. K. Junior year;
e Girls; Spring Green; Vice
sident of Camera Club;
tball, 47; Senior Chorus, 47-
Spanish Club, 47-48.
love, never done.


- 0


Warner W. Weseman
Alpha; Y-Club; Football, 46-
47; Jr. Varsity Football; Flori-
da Military Academy, 45-46.
Give me the woods and the
streams-and I'll ask for no
more.







Mary Will
Gamma; Softball Team, 44; Art
Club, 46-47, President, 46-47.
Her smile is as gay as the laugh-
ing wind.







John Barney Wilson
Beta; Science Clubs of America;
Don't Take My Penny; It Will
Be All Right on the Night;
Student Council, 47-48; Senior
Choir, 46-48.
His mind is his kingdom; his
will, his law.


:, 1
F
"'
'
rc;i
L''
.i i
v~;- '
,-
i'-
i"
,v rlL
:i
.?. 1
r
r-~.


1'


r: ~-
-J .*


Edward James Wilt
Beta; entered P. K. Senior year;
Christmas Play; Spring Green;
Senior Class Treasurer; Busi-
ness Manager of Gator Tales;
President of Spanish Class II;
Assist. Feature Editor of Yongester.
They say the good die young;
I will have to take care of my-
self.






SENIOR WILL



We, the members of the P. K. Yonge Laboratory School, being of a disposing
mind and memory, and realizing we are about to depart from this life do make, pub-
lish, and declare, this to be our last will and testament--hereby revoking all former
wills made by us at any time.
John Allen and Charles Richardson leave their unquestionable ability in student
activities to Jane Tisdale with hopes she will carry on the work.
Bob Beaty, wills his endless search for Suzie to Marilyn with hopes that she will
have better hunting.
Shirley Allen wills her dazzling smile to add charm to Ramona Boozer's, the com-
bination should prove terrific!
Rhesa Bostick, leaves! (All his girls to G. F. Martin)
Earnest Bradley and Pat Riley will their ability to sleep in class to Norma Whit-
tington, who is always dreaming about her true-love.
Warner Weseman and Jack Searcy bequeath their hunting ability to Ann Emerson
in her search for Tommy.
Mildred Carter and Kay Beal will their. artistic manuvers to Virginia Leps and
Mary Ann Drosey with hopes that they can draw the right conclusions.
Dick Clapp wills his hitch-hiking ability to Nancy Marks, in hopes that she always
has.a way!
Helen Foster leaves her curly hair to Mirian Mclnnis in hopes that she will leave
her rags at home (for a change).
Rutledge Emerson wills his over-flowing energy to Malcolm Traxler and Steve
Moran to the tune of "get up and go."
Bill Gager leaves his oratoratical ability to Bob Johnson-the silent one.
Mary Louise Mickler's collection of frat, pins, class rings, and bracelets is left to
Irene Blake with the hope she will have more use for them.
Edgar Marshall wills his ability to walk unnoticed from his classes to Ed Graham
and Dick Lagassee.
Hugh Haven wills his job at the Florida Theatre to Nancy Thomas who likes to
see the picture twice.
Joan Johns bequeaths her glasses to Joan Morgan in hopes she won't get lost on
the campus coming to school.
Eloise Willinam and Sylvia Strange will their talkative personality to Rosmary
McDonnell and Carolyn Slaton so they can never be speechless.
Man Olson wills his business ability to Kay Eutsler in hopes she can keep her
men straight.
LouNita McLearan leaves her great big beautiful eyes to Norma Killinger-the
better to see the G. H. S. football games.
John Neller leaves to Milly Johns his knack for looking intelligent when he
doesn't know his lessons.
Dan Horsby leaves his books, his football sweater, and all liis affection to Ann
Emerson-What more could she want?
Mary Foote and Barbara Stewart bequeath their sentimentality to Martine Glass
in hopes that she and Saunders will always sing "Day by Day."
Susanne Thomas wills her ability to scan both sides of University Avenue, as she
patrols it, to Peggy Harter.
Tommy Rogers bequeaths his way of capturing the freshmen and sophomore girls'
hearts to C. C. Gaines.
Irene Whittington leaves all her day dreaming in classes to Marion Wenger and
Charlcey Mae Will.
Dan Ashly wills his Fred Astaire ability to Arlo Shultz so that Arlo can star on
the dance floor as well as the football field.
Helen Shipman leaves her vigor and vitality to Anne Thomas and Royce Burlison
in hopes they will make the right passes!
Charles Cherry bequeathes his bright smiling and friendly face to Bill Welborn
to keep the girls happy.
Ed Wilt wills his melifluous voice to Tommy Price so he can make a hit with the
co-eds!







Lorena Van Sickle and Emily Smith bequeath their stability and backbone to
Betty and Shirley Gaddum.
Berta Stevens wills her serenity to J. B. Resch and Ted Ryan in hope that they
will put said quality into use.
Billy Steptoe leaves his job to Cooter to keep the home fires burning.
Bett Morrison bequeaths her heart and sweetness to the P. K. students, all of
whom will remember her.
Mary Jane Emig wills her "special" seat, at the Polar Baer to Margy Hornsby.
Chester Moris bequeaths his worms to Frances Boltin so she will have an excuse
to scream in class.
Polly Ann Haynes and Mary Will will their sweetness and friendly manner to
Edith Camerson and Jo Beal so they will keep it alive in the school.
Jack Wilson leaves his school books to Rollin Hogan in hopes he will put them
in as good use.
Douglas Brooks bequeaths to Frances Prescott his reserved seat in the Lyric, so
she may keep up with the west.
Bobby Wallace leaves his driving ability to Tommy Price-'nough said.
Anne Ashley leaves her seat by the window in Mr. McGuires's class to Nancy
Thomas so that Nancy can see when Jimmy's coming.
Stanley Thompson leaves his 48 Ford that was always a'coming and finally got
here.
Lastly, the Seniors leave to you, the juniors, their privilege of sitting in the front
rows of the auditorium.








P/H- PROPHECY




Gainesville, Florida
June 4, 1973
Dear Diary,
I visited home today for the first time in years. Memories begin to come back
about class friends; most of whom I haven't seen for twenty-five years.
The reason for my being here-I received a telegram saying that the class of
1948 of P. K. Y. was having a Class Reunion. While there, this is what I learned, about
those capable seniors of the class of nineteen-hundred and forty-eight.
John Allen doubled for Cary Grant while Cary made pictures in Europe.
Shirely Allen worked her way up from the "Exclusive For the Elusive Shoppe" to
the president of "Saks' of Fifth Avenue.
Anne Ashley, while singing for Spike Jones, opened her mouth a little too wide-
Spike is now without a harmonica.
Kay Beal went back to "Hawaii to learn the hula. Hear she got lost in the sway.
Dan Ashley appeared as "The Second Fred Astaire" in Believe It or Not.
Bob Beaty tied a knot in a matchbox in medical school and now is trying to untie
it.
Rhesa Bostick became Admiral of the fleet and is starting a search for Lost Hori-
zon.
Ernest Bradley has now made over 5,000 records of his crooning masterpiece, I
Wonder Who's Kissing Her Now.
Douglas Brooks, guest speaker on the radio's Leave It To The. Girls, is now a
ladies' man.
Mildred Carter, while in Mexico, was made Chief of the Sun Gods-probably
because she's so bright.
Charles Cherry has been pitcher for the Boston Red Sox the past few years. Age
will run his down soon though.
Dick Clapp, a retired Marine Sergeant, just returned from South America. He's
living in the Everglades because he just can't get use to "Civilization"-"Bingle, Bang-
le, Bongla, I'm so Happy In the Jungle."
Mary Foote is now playing in the Broadway hit I Love You Traly with ? star-
ring as her leadingman.
Helen Foster is a famous woman surgeon at John Hopkins and has never lost a
patient. She buries her mistakes.
Rutledge Emerson was the first successful pilot to reach the moon in his space
ship. I'll See You In My Dreams.
Bill Gager, president of the U. S., made a speech to his kitchen cabinet on how
not to acquire the habit of eating too much. "He Is The Best President We Ever Had."
Polly.Anna Haynes is quite a famous writer now. Her latest writing is exclusively
for the mens' Lonely Heart Club.
Hugh Haven turned to producing moving pictures. His latest success was Wait
For Me Babe.
Lou Nita McLearn is still playing the fiddle for Chloe. No Harmony yet?
Mary Louise Mickler and Paul are singing The Anniversary Song to celebrate
their Silver Wedding Anniversary.
Caroline Marks had won the title of the most proposed to girl in the world. The
old maids of the class of 48 have been seeking her recipe.
Chester Morris invented a time machine and while messing with it one day, he
disappeared.
Ed Wilt is president of the Wilted Wits Incorporation. He recently wrote an arti-
cle for Life on How To Be a Sucess.














Joan Johns has been Secretary of the National Medical Association, Editor of the
Southern Democrat, Teacher of Thoughts, and is temporarily recuperating in Chattahoo-
chee.
Betts Morrison is deciding whether or not to be Sweetheart of the S. A. E. (Sailors
at Ease).
John Neller replaced Doc. Blanchard at West Point in his dreams, and as all good
dreams do, it came true.
Charles Richardson is Physical Ed. instructor teaching the Gauchos in South
America how to play football. Taking you for a ride?
Mac Olson bet the heiress of the 5 and 10 cent stores that she couldn't answer a
simple question in 2 minutes. Mac now owns all the 5 and 10 cent stores in America.
Incidentally, he changed the store's name to Silver Dollar.
Pat Riley, alias the Lone Ranger, owns a dude ranch in Texas and sings Git Along
Little Doggies to his ever faithful pinto, Silver.
Tommy Rogers had been searching exhaustingly for years hoping to find another
like Burch. Useless, huh, Rogers?
Jackie Rottman became a radio announcer to be sure she wouldn't miss any news.
Jack Searcy, a retired business man is planning to fish around for a while. Been
hooked yet?
Helen Shipman is still taking it out on the piano with Beat It Daddy, Eight To
The Bar.
Billy Steptoe sells oranges at the California fair. Sun kiss you yet?
Berta Stephens teaches shorthand at P. K. Y. My, How time flys.
Sylvia Strange, an ideal homemaker, has just written an article on How to Wash
Dishes In a Tea Cup.
Sussanne Thomas while out West met a sad fate when her hair was taken for gold.
She now undoubtedly knows the secret to the Seven Keys to Ballpate Inn.
Dan Hornsby became hard up, as all artists do sooner or later, and he copied a
picture by Leonardo de Vinci. It was such a piece of true art that in years to come he
lives in wealth and luxury.
Stanley Thompson blew such beautiful glass vases that the Queen of England
asked him to re-decorate the place with them. I heard he is living in a glass house.
Irene Whittington is reported the youngest looking of the class of 48. Please give
us your formula before it's too late.
Warner Weseman is now competing with Frank Buck. In a few years, Warner
thinks that Frank will be his gun boy on African expeditions.
Lorena Vansickle, a kindergarten teacher, stopped teaching to raise her own kin-
dergarten class.
Bobby Wallace followed his grandfather's footsteps and is now president of the
University of Florida.
Eloise Williams slinks in to town in her mink coat and Rolls Royce every once in
a while just to see how things are progressing.
Jack Wilson won a scholarship to destination unknown. He is now in Siberia try-
ing out one of Einstein's theories.
Mary Jane Emig went to Business College to learn, but instead taught the boys
her charms.
Mary Will manages a riding academy and is expert instructor on how to lasso your
man.
Edgar Marshall was the first person to discover how to fly. Faster than a speeding
bullet, more powerful than a locomotive. What is it? It's Super Man.




#F~i r~q


rc'-J*
-. ,


U
Ig-,


I
Ft


0.


ra


Z~f~~


1


--r;g










'I


?. 3 ^ u .*, a J
.t .r


SJAAAA ALAAAA AJA 1


I.





JUNIOR


CLASS


OFFICERS


Left to Right: Bob Davidson-Vice President, Jerry Briggs-Student Council,
Tommy Price-President, Donald Vansickel-Treasurer, Marion Wenger-Student
Council, Mary Bryan-Secretary, Jane Tisdale-Student Council.





JUNIOR


CLASS


First Row, Left to Right: Betty Gaddum, Rosemary McDonell, Betty Brocken-
brough, Rose Arnold, Rosemarie Hayword, Jane Tisdale, Mary Bryan, Marian Wenger,
Royce Burlison.
Second Row, Left to Right: Bob Derrick, Jo Beal, Marie Green, Shirley Gaddum,
Anne Thomas, Catherine Parrish, Rollin Hogan, Brince Tillis, Don Hester, Orlo
Schultz, Dick Lagasse, George Becker, J. L. Wattenbarger.
Third Row, Left to Right: Donald Vansickle, Bobby Wester, Tommy Price, C. C.
Gaines, Bill Welborn, Steve Moran, Malcolm Traxler, Bob Gray, Dick Carrigan, Bob
Johnson.
Fourth Row, Left to Right: George Miller, Victor Arnette, Bob Denton, Ed
Graham.





JUNIOR


CLASS


First Row, Left to Right: Jeanette Johns, Irene Blake, Charlcey Mae Will, Mar-
jorie Hornsby, Ann Emerson, Nancy Thomas, Nancy Marks, Milly Johns.
Second Row, Left to Right: Marilyn Shollar, Mary Ann Dorsey, Frances Boltin,
Ramona Boozer, Susan Sykes, Constance Durham, Edith Cameron, Frances Prescott,
Neena Black, Mr. Wattenbarger.
Third Row, Left to Right: Kay Eutsler, Virginia Leps, Peggy Harter, Bob David-
son, Jerry Briggs, Carl Andrews, Martine Glass, Norma Killinger, Norma Whittington,
Joan Morgen.














~~t~I -*
,TS .tt
I" *

r


S.);


r

: .;


";

~ i
1. 1.-.'- :
-~1.
: :-I r.~ ~,s'.'.Z 'r
''' ~r
;P~'J~- '
...


[N'
I
K
:~Ar*sr


4:''
'c,


AtA4,t AAAAAAA A JA4 J 4


-I



'I
'1


It 4


; --J ~: :~:~iwl
" F~.,.?;r
'''

i

'?
;
: "''~ ~-',


^v-^
..^* A. I'-





SOPHOMORE


CLASS OFFICERS


Left to Right: Lois Beaty-Secretary, Ann Becker-Treasurer, Bill Welborn-
Student Council, Douglas Dickey-President, Joe Dunlap-Student Council, Paul
Lagasse-Vice President.





SOPHOMORE


CLASS


First Row, Left to Right: Ruth Ann Haynes, Carolyn Slaton, Ruth Marie Durham,
Betty Shollar, Jackie Burch, Lois Beaty.
Second Row, Left to Right: Johnny Roberts, Howard Clyatt, Billy Tillis, Billy
Wood, Jane Hogan, H. L. Feaster, Edward McEachern, James Moon, Jack Salt, Roy
Rash, Jimmy Sanders, Mr. Hamblen.






SOPHOMORE


CLASS


First Row, Left to Right: Martha White, Sara Crown, Margaret Elder, Betty Jo
Gardiner, Ann Becker, Ina Mae Sanders, Margaret Wood.
Second Row, Left to Right: Russell Middleton, Joe Dunlap, Mary Virginia Zip-
per, Geraldine Stapleton, Delores Bohannon, Margie Snell, Mary Godwin, Joan Rob-
ertson, Janet Sweeney, Peggy Woods, Tommy Jenkins, Cyril Peckrin, Mr. Hamblen.
Third Row, Left to Right: Douglas Dickey, John Meier, Bill Carrol, Richard
Wear, Jackie Lea, Paul Lagasse, Donald Riley, Jimmy Haines.









































*.'r'. -, -v


* ''i.X


s JAAAAA JAJA JA AAA


i;tw





.~.1'
..f 1 ^ ';
*' "^ '


tdt
A..'~


I.


S .* .4


. r 7-


/
D
-~ c '. '..C
::





FRESHMAN CLASS


OFFICERS


First Row, Left to right: Nancy Knight-Secretary, John Dampier-Vice President,
Jane Arnold-President, Billy Schultz-President, Betty. Latemer-Vice President, Rosemary
Sawyer-Secretary, Hunter Black-Student Council.
Second Row, Left to Right: Bobby Haar-Treasurer, Jimmy Stringfellow-Par-
limentarian, Charles Parrish-Executive Board, Gordon Smith-Student Council, Billy
Hill-Parlimentarian, Andrew Graham-Executive Board.






FRESHMAN


CLASS


First Row, Left to Right: Beverley Black, Diane Chamberlain, Corita Bradley,
Jessie Foster, Marion Clyatt, Eula Crider, Nancie Knight.
Second Row, Left to Right: George Will, Harold Lankford, Mary Jane Jenkins,
Jackie Zierjack, Pete Burns, Hunter Black, Louis Howell, George Beers, Jimmy Emerson,
Mr. Kitching.
Third Row, Left to Right: John Newcomer, Henry Harris, Billy Mansfield, John
Dampier, Billy Hill, Billy Schultz, Dallas Deyarmond, Herbert Crowson, Carlos Jones,
Andrew Graham.






FRESHMAN


CLASS


First Row, Left to Right: Carolyn Bridges, Glenda Garrison, Pat Steadham,
Rosemary Sawyer, Carmen Jenkins, Edith Dennison, Joan Zinn.
Second Row, Left to Right: Mary Owen, Barbara Dell, Jane Arnold, Betty
Latimer, Norma Freeman, Edwina Hill, Susan Cone, Marilyn Bridges, Mr. Kitching.
Third Row, Left to Right: Dana Quade, Billy Weseman, John Eshleman, Allie
Cone, Gordon Smith, Bob Haar, Steve Schnell, Tommy Evans, Jimmy Stringfellow,
Charles Parrish.






EIGHTH GRADE


First Row, Left to Right: Carolyn Yeats, Mary Frances Ayers, Burrows Dolheare,
Earnest Moon, Virginia Price, Richard Karr, Shirley Jones, Patty Smysor.
Second Row, Left to Right: Buddy Edge, Johnny Arnette, Mary Alice Myers,
Pat Howell, Margie Hogan, Keith Stanley, Gerald Bishop, Btddy Bishop, Buddy
Brockenbrough, Mrs. Green.
Third Row, Left to Right: Lee Schultz, David Anderson, Billy Miller, Alray
Howard, Ralph Guy, Bill Saunders, Aden Moon, Weston McDonnell.
Absent. Pam Duke, Jenny Wallace, Paula Dressier, Patty Canfield, Loral Lowry.






SEVENTH GRADE


First Row, Left to Right: Jean Robertson, John Maines, Sally Schnell, Jo Anna
McKinney, Billy Boltin, Wesley Larson, Martha Dressier, Ellen Buckhannon, Betty
Lou Morratto.
Second Row, Left to Right: Billy Derrick, Patsy Lee Miller, Carolyn Jo Knowles,
Mary McClamrock, Margaret McClamrock, Lois Neller, Rebecca Hill, Diane Williams,
Marjorie McInnis, Mrs. McEachern.
Third Row, Left.to Right: Hal Batey, Miller Merchant, Arthur Godwin, Jimmy
Strange, Caldwell Marshall, Gilbert Thompson, David Fouts, George Hill, Robert
Wood, Hurbert Comminge, John A. Murphree.
Absent: Dan Cox, Jimmy Dell, Mary Dressier, Kenneth Morris, Christina Timpas.

















.1-


N


-r -


F


:;
r::
r


JAAAAAAAAAAAJA





CHAMPS OF 1947


Dan Hornsby


Orle Shultz


/J
/ John Neller


rE~q


Pat Riley Rhesa Bostick


Bob Beaty


The Baby Gators inaugurated the '47 football season with a crushing 24-0
victory over Cedar Keys, and completed their regular schedule with a record of nine
victories and no defeats.
Running from a 'T' and a single-wing formation, the Baby Gators showed power
both on the ground and in the air by rolling up 352 points to the opponents 71.
Averaging 39.1 points per game to the opponents 7.9, the Baby Gators earned
title to the Central Florida Six Man Football Championship, as well as garnering the
unofficial State Championship. Seven players from the powerful Baby Gator aggrega-
tion were picked for ALL-CONFERENCE honors. John Neller, Pat Riley, and
Rutledge Emerson were named on the first team, while Steve Moran, Bob Beaty, Orlo
Shultz, and Dan Hornsby were picked on the second team.
Leading the individual scoring was Orlo Shultz with 90 points, followed closely
by Dan Hornsby with 86. Other scorers were: John Neller 60, Charles Richardson 54,
Steve Moran and Bill Welborn 18 each, and Bobby Wallace, Malcolm, Traxler, Pat
Riley, and Ernest Bradley with 6 points apiece.
At the close of the season, John Neller was elected Captain by his teammates.






THE FOOTBALL TEAM


Left to Right: first row, Paul Lagasse, Tommy Evans, Orlo Shultz, Ernest
Bradley, water boy Buddy Edge, Brince Tillis, John Neller, Edward McEachem;
second row, Coach McGriff, Dan Hornsby, Bill Welborn, Bob Beaty, Rutledge
Emerson, Steve Moran, Bob Wallace, Charles Richardson, Bobby Johnson, Coach
Gilbert; top row, Manager Jerry Briggs, Richard Sykes, Malcolm Traxler, Rhesa
Bostick, Pat Riley, Bill Gager, Douglas Brooks. Coach Williams.

SEASON'S RECORD
P. K. Yonge Opponents
24...-..-....- ........... Cedar Keys 0.. ..............
12........................ Sum m erfield ................................ 0
58........................ Crystal River ..........-...............-....- 6
55.......--.......-...---. Reddick .--........-.....-.....---.....------- 13
30........................ W hite Springs .-.........--. --.........- 0
26 ....................-- Anthony ...............-------.............--- 0
78........-............... Anthony .................... ...........------ 6
22.............- ....-.-- .. W aldo .................----........--- ....... 14
52.................-..... Reddick -----.......... ..- ...-....... 31
352....-- ................... Totals ...............-........-....... 71



















Malcolm Bobby
Traxler Wallace


Steve Bill
Moran Welborn


Ernest
Bradley


Tommy
Evans


Bobby
Johnson


Douglas
Brooks
,'T


Jerry
Briggs


Kutledge
Emerson


Richard
Sikes


irnnce
Tillis


p-I


Paul
Lagasse


Buddy
Edge






BASKETBALL TEAM


Left to Right: first row, John Neller, Victor Arnette, Joe Dunlap, Douglas
Dicky, Orlo Shultz, Don Hester; standing, Coach McGriff, Manager Jack Salt,
Malcolm Traxler, Rutledge Emerson, Jerry Briggs, Steve Moran, Bobby Gray,
Manager Dick Carrigan, Coach Gilbert. Not shown: Bobby Wallace.



SCORES IN GAMES


P. K. Yonge Opponents
20 -------...-.. Reddick -................-.......13
26 ..--..---.... .. Leesburg ........ .. ............. 17
41................ Alachua ..-............. 27
25.......-- ..... Crescent City ........... 23
24 ............... Leesburg ..... ...... 37
28 ............... St. Leo -...................... 46
79 ..-.....--.. Alachua --------35


P. K. Yonge Opponents
29 ............... Ocala ...------............--53
27...---...-..... Gainesville High .-- .. 29
40...--......-..- Palatka ..--.........--.... ..-----33
44.--......--.. Crescent City ..........-.. ..-- 47
40..-...---.. Ocala -...... -..-...-..... .. ..... 56
29 --....----. Gainesville High --.......-..50
34.8.----...... Averages .- ---............ .35.9











Coach McGriff giving the team
pep talk before the game.
With three games remaining on
he regular schedule, the team has
a record of six wins and seven
losses.


Action shot taken during the P.
K. Yonge-Alachua game which
the Baby Gators won 79-35.
Identified players are Malcolm
Traxler (12), John Neller (3),
Jerry Briggs (11), and Victor
Arnette (14).










The first year P. K. Yonge had
an interscholastic baseball team,
they ended the season with a record
of five wins and one defeat. The
only defeat was to Palatka, whom
they had beaten earlier in the sea-
son.
One victory was a 20-9 win over
Gainesville High School.


Tom Price at bat during the
Waldo game at Harris Field.
Price played left field and was
elected captain at the close of the
season.


With nine lettermen returning
this season and six prospects, a
good season is in store for the
coaches.
The only lettermen not return-
ing this year are Bernard Palrher
and Charles Richardson.


:1 77.-r C













SHUFFLE
BOARD


TRACK


HANDBALL





THIRD YEAR INTER SCHOLASTIC BASKETBALL
FOR GATORETTES


GIRLS TEAM


The school year of nineteen hundred and forty-eight started oft with high promises
for a good team as we lost few players the previous year.
We were off to a good start early in the last part of November right after our
prosperous volley ball season.
With Miss Martha Twitty, as Coach, working with us and backing us up all the
way, we began making progress and showing steady improvement soon after the
Christmas holidays.



































TENNIS


TUMBLING


SOFTBALL












* .' A. i














SENIOR VOLLEYBALL TEAM
The Senior Volleyball team won Volleyball Sports Day. For the third year we
were host to the teams of the county and ninteen hundred and forty-seven was our
second year to win. The team was chosen by secret ballot of all those going to ten
or more practices. We hope that P. K. will see many more of these very successful
Volleyball Sports Days.






SThe Intermediate Team was
chosen from the Ninth and Tenth
grades and won their place in
Volleyball Sports Day this year.




INTERMEDIATE TEAM




The Junior Team was chosen
from the Seventh and Eight grades.
They lost to Hawthorne in the
finals but are looking forward to
the annual event next year with
S" eager anticipation.


JUNIOR TEAM




SOFT3ALZ,


.. -A 1 .^ '


k .
-??* '* r .!* *'* '*. -

'Ji^JM^Bl


\


TUAJ.L NG


^\


...


KL. .



























ItY J~bIA JA JA JA JA JIA JA JAIJA JAJA






FACULTY


Margaret Boute lle
Co-ordinator of
English
George Peabody Col-
lege-B. A., M. A.
Columbia Univ.
graduate work
University of Flor-
ida-graduate work


Caroll F. Cumbee
School Psychologist
Young Harris College
Univ. of Fla.-
B. A. E., M. A. E.
Univ. of Chicago-
graduate work


Robert S. Herndon
Instructor of Mathe-
matics and Science
Stetson Univ.-B. S.
Univ. of Fla.-
M. A. E.
graduate work


John A. Brown
Instructor of
Business Educa-
tion
Univ. of Fla.-
B. A.
Univ. of Fla.-
graduate work


Mary S. Fawcett
Lunch Room Man-
ager
Univ. of Fla.-
B. A.


Kelsey H. Ingle
Instructor of
Home Ec. Ed.
Washington State
College of Ed.-
B. A. E.
graduate work
Univ. of Fla.-


Margaret B.
Buckhannon
School Nurse
Indiana Univ.-
R. N.


W. L. Goette
Instructor of
science
Baldwin Wallace-
B. A.
Univ. of Fla.-
M. A. E.
George Peabody-
graduate work


L. E. Jones
Coordinator of
Student Teaching
George Peabody
B. S., M. A.


Max W. Cheney
Instructor of
Industrial Arts
Univ. of Fla.-
B. A.
Univ. of Fla.-
graduate work


Eleanor K. Green
Sponsor, Eighth
Grade
Univ. of Fla.-
B. A. E., M. A. E.
Univ. of Fla.-
graduate work


Kenneth P. Kidd
Instructor of Mathe-
matics
Maryville College-
B. A.
George Peabody-
M. A., Ph. D.


Alt







SEN


SUPER


Joan Johns and Jack Wilson


Emily Smith and Ed Wilt


I -


OR


LATIVES


-c.
...
'I.e
;I?.f 1~~-ii.
!~


























HumterBlrK t.l



4li




'7195)ic5


47
48







HOME


ECONOMICS


,eYoe


=740u
















"Inauguration Ceremonies"


"Oh Well, We Ran the City
for a day."


.-004,Yco


la%-















FOOT B A
ELKS


LL HONORS
BANQUET


AND
SIX MAN TROPHY














YONGE CHEERLEADERS








































Philip Keyes Yonge
1850-1934
Dr. Yonge was born in Marianna County, Florida, May 27, 1850. He engaged
throughout most of his life in large business affairs, was splendidly equipped for
public service by birth, education, and training.
He held three degrees from the University of Georgia and completed his career
there with great distinction, earning membership in Phi Beta Kappa and Phi Kappa
Phi. Subsequently, the University of Florida conferred upor him the Degree of
Doctor of Laws: He prepared himself for a public career, following his under-
graduate and graduate work in arts with a Degree in the College of Law.
The P. K. Yonge school at Pensacola and the P. K. Yonge Laboratory School
at the University of Florida, both dedicated to his memory, are but evidences of the
respect and appreciation in which Dr. Yonge was held by his fellow citizens and his
colleagues on the Board of Control. In 1932 by the concerted action of his friends,
portraits of Dr. Yonge were unveiled at the University of Florida and the Florida
State College for Women as slight marks of appreciation for his services rendered to
these institutions.





































THE DIRECTOR


Dr. G. Ballard Simmons is noted for his alertness to current
educational trends and his never ceasing interest in the P. K. Yonge
Laboratory School. He is constantly building for the future. Despite
his numerous duties, "the Dean" is never too busy to lend a helping
hand to faculty and students alike. His advice will long be remembered
by those who have known him.


~sPZ~~.

;~ ;~P


"77~;












































THE PRINCIPAL


Mr. Meyer is a man of many accomplishments. His well-rounded
educational background and wealth of experiences have -contributed
greatly to the "living knowledge" of P. K. His dynamic energy and
"know how", combined with his amiable personality, makes the "pal"
in principal really stand out.








XMAS


~? ITII itsif
.W '. u


PARADE































ABOVE: The fighting senior
team and an action shot.

Cheered by their sedate cheer-
leaders (attired in 1890 costumes)
and rendered first aid at every pos-
sible time, the P. K. Yonge faculty
amazed a crowd of close to 800 by
taking a 43-41 decision from the
seniors.
With such stalwarts as Dean G.
Ballard Simmons and Dr. R. L.
Johns in the starting line-up, the
faculty forged into an early lead
only to see the hard working sen-
iors come from behind to gain a
half time lead of 25-20.


Tired and dejected seniors


SEN


V


FA


C




z
"
...
:::I: I
r;

nr,


S



a


ABOVE: A grim and eager
faculty and another action shot.

Bolstered by Principal Harvey
K. Meyer and professors Watten-
barger, Herndon, Kitching, Mc-
Gurie," Brown, McGriff, Gilbert,
Hamblen, and Cheney, the faculty
fought back and won the decision
just before the whistle blew.
Never giving up hope, the sen-
iors displayed many noble efforts
to down the pedagogues. Seniors
seeing action included: Wallace,
Haven, Allen, Hornsby, Emerson,
Clapp, Wilt, Morris, .Marshall,
and Neller.


A tired but elated Faculty


IOR



ULTY


ULTY






S-DRA

-,




SEN




P PL
f i






w -;





MA


IOR
AY


A













PAIR


TREE


I"'










,- .

. A i- I


a
t C'h
*1 3D
<'j r;J4


'VP ~,&t*

t / 1
4* t~flr%1


St;


2x, ''


,Ot JAJA JA JAJA4JAJA A AAAA 4


lil IY IU


-;
L
~-:'-
;. .-..,


(OU

























JUST CHECKING UP


P. K. ESCALATORS??


THREE WHOLE MINUTES!


~c;e
~



















I MEAN WHAT I SAY!


A FRIEND IN NEED IS A FRIEND
INDEED


C~s,

r
~s=,~







S
K
I
L
L
S


MANUAL ARTS


ART


TYPING









HONOR STUDY HALL


CHEMISTRY


CORE CLASS


K
N
0
W
L
E
D
G
E






S
SN
HU
OR
SS
LE


The primary functions of the school nurse are to promote individual health
practices and to insure general good health for all students.
Folders are kept which contain data concerning students' health, physical growth,
and development. Health histories are obtained from parents when pupils enter the
school for the first time. A complete physical examination is given each student at
the beginning of each fall term, and certain immunizations are required.
At present complete records of height and weight on students in kindergarten
through the eighth grade are on file. In addition telebinocular survey of the entire
school is now being conducted.














MAURICE HINSON


SCULPTRESS


A
S
S
E
M
B
L
I
E
S


















E


E
C















The theme of the homemaking department
is "Healthy, Wholesome, Happy Living." Not
only the regular courses in clothing and food
preparation are offered, but the students also.
study such courses as; Home Management,
Marriage and the Family, Child Care, Market-
i*g, and Home Decoration, and Furnishing.
."Axiannual fashion show climaxes the cloth-
ing units, which constitute most of the first
semester work. The students write clever skits
for the performance, in which they model
the clothes they have made.















STUDENTS' LIBRARY


The reader in the P. K. Yonge library finds himself in an attractive
environment. The well-lighted rooms with tables and chairs for work,
easy chairs for the pupil who forgets himself in his book, alcoves filled
with the best of books, old and new for reading and reference, a few
well chosen pictures and statuettes-all these impress the boys and girls
who use it daily. In the Y-room, books for the primary and elementary
grades are found on low shelves which are accessible to each child.
Story hours-and special library periods give the librarian opportunity
for introducing the books to the students.








CURRICULUM


LIBRARY


L

B
R
A
R
I

S
































MR. WATTENBARGER'S DESK


CONFERENCE WITH STUDENT TEACHER
























Placement Tests


Taking the Telebinocular Test


Working on Individual Reading Problems


At P. K. Yonge, students who experience difficulty with reading
receive individual diagnosis upon which a program of instructions is
carried on either by a reading specialist or by the classroom teacher. With
each student the objective is to provide instruction which meets his
particular needs and interests.




9
r
a
m
a


S
C
h
0
0
L


r





K ,


N

D
E

R


A


:-.s~ :8
YI' ''I
~;;;;~





C
A
F
E
1r
E


A

TIME FOR LUNCH


PREPARATION OF FOOD








A


fiR
T













The activities of this department in-
clude a great variety of types of art.
Units are prepared in developing crea-
tive art, and sketching models and land-
scapes which are painted in transparent
and opaque water colors. Imaginary
drawings are made into stencil designs
for luncheon sets, head scarfs, wall hang-
ings, curtains, aprons and sport materials.
Special designs are often developed for
decorating trays, and boxes and leather
goods.
This past year, the use of available 1
native resources for crafts has been em-
phasized. Many practical objects such as
hand bags, table mats, sandals, fans, cos-
tume jewelry and even attractive hats .
have been made of our native palmetto.
Gourds have been turned into attractive
jewelry boxes, rhythm band instruments,
and jack-o-lanterns. Corn husks have
been used for door mats, whisk brooms,
brushes, bags, sandals, and dolls.

^^p.... -i.B^, 1"^

^^^^^X^^^^B













AFA








A''


193
Ilk-


















-a;-
I've









vr
Vi ~ ~ y







rr~c~w























l~~rL.; .

i~ .P'
e

- r


i. .'.
7.




1; .
~ ~' e

'- i
:!7. '


Ii,
* 44dj


JL'


- F.- ~ ; ~ m ~ ~ 1 S
I~?p _~. .de
j,' -f ~~~L


X. t ,
. ij.


4 JAJ4AJAA JAJAJA JAJAJAJAJA4


Fd i,L j
t-J.";


~~
,,


''L
,,I
:;5;~






STUDENT COUNCIL


Student Government at Work


Vice-president Rhesa Bostick


FULL YEAR REPRESENTATIVES
First row: Bill Welborne, Jerry Briggs, Mr. William Hamblen (sponsor).
Second row: Richard Karr, John Neller (secretary), Gordon Smith, Wesley Larson.





STUDENT


COUNCIL


FIRST SEMESTER REPRESENTATIVES
First row: Joe Dunlap, Jack Wilson, Tommy Price, Douglas Dickey.
Second row: Hunter Black, Jane Arnold, Jane Tisdale, Virginia Price, Jo Ann
McKinney.


SECOND SEMESTER REPRESENTATIVES
The center of Student Goverment, the Student Council, again in 1947-48 served
the Laboratory School well, as it led the way in planning and developing a more
beneficial school for all.
Led by Bill Gager and sponsored by Mr. William Hamblen. the council showed'
its efficiency through such acts as managing Homecoming Day, clearing the halls of
stray books, and sponsoring Mayor's Day.
Throughout the year the council was a group that recognized and gave clear
thinking to solving school problems.





YONGESTER


Joan Johns
Editor-in-Chief


STAFF


Mildred Carter
Co-editor


Rutledge Emerson
Business Manager


Mary FoFote
Snapshot Editor


i
Caroline Marks
Feature Editor


Dan Hornsby Sylvia Strange John Allen
Art Editor Girls' Sports Ed. Boys' Sports Ed.


Mac Olson Polly Haynes John Neller
Asst. Business Sports Assist. Sports Assist.


Emily Smith
Snapshot Assist.


Ed Wilt
Feature Assist.


Bett Morrison
Organization Editor







GATOR


TALES


First row: Tommy Price, Bett Morrison, Betty Shollar, Ann Emerson (Editor-in-
Chief), Joan Johns (Co-editor), Marjorie Hornsby, Mary Ann Dorsey.
Second row: Marilyn Shollar, Constance Durham, Jo Beal, Martine Glass, Helen
Foster, Marian McInnis, Polly Haynes.
Third row: Mr. James Wattenbarger (adviser), Bill Carroll, Bob Davidson,
Dick Carrigan.
PAPER COMPLETES FIRST PUBLISHING YEAI


WATTENBARGER TELLS LIFE STORY


It was on May 2, 1922,
in Cleveland, Tennessee,
that James L. Wattenbarger
began life. His education
started in West Palm
Beach, where he went to
school all twelve years.
Attending the W. Palm
Beach High School, he was
an active member of the
Key Club, managing editor
of the newspaper, and par-
ticipant in all of the school
plays. After graduating in
1939, Mr. Wattenbarger
went two years to the Palm
Beach Junior College where
he was on the track team and
was manager of the basket-
ball team.
At U. of F. he pursued
his studies and received his
B. A. in education in 1943.
He was a member of the
Delta Tau Delta Fraternity.


WILSON COMPETES


While in high school he John Wilson better known
met Marion Swanson, drum to his fellow students as
majorette for the band, who Jack, was one of two seniors
graduated in his class. They elected by the class to com-
were married ( cont. pg. 4) pete in the Pepsi-Cola Schol-
arship Contest, which be-
gan in early fall.
Jack came through the
first round with flying
colors and was preparing
MAKING UP THE PAPER PAGES rnn, no


Starting to print a weekly
newspaper with lots of ex-
perience and no capital
sounds like an impossibility,
but when a group of de-
termined P. K. Yongesters
set out to do it it was in the
bag.
The first issue came out
with question marks across
the front page. This couldn't
continue; so one morning
while the hub-bub of the
copy room was raging the
staff formally dubbed the
publication GATOR TALES.
Thirteen issues were put out
during the first semester
with two six page editions.
The Homecoming copy
boasted four cuts, which
was indeed a big step for-
ward.
Throughout the year the
staff strove to keep P. K.
well informed and they did
a good job.








GIRLS'


Y CLUB


First Row: Bety Shollar (treasurer), Jo Beal, Sylvia Strange, Mary Foote (vice-
president), Betty Brockenbrough (president), Norma Killinger (secretary), Nancy
Marks, Millie Johns.
Second Row: Mrs. Gladys Laird (sponsor), Polly Haynes, Ruth Ann Haynes,
Jackie Zierpack, Rose Arnold, Margaret Wood, Peggy Woods, Mary Bryan, Miss
Martha Twitty (sponsor).
Third Row: Pat Steadham, Pat Smysor, Shirley Jones.
For the first time letterwomen, as well as lettermen,
have their own Y-Club, an organization for the girl ath-
letes of P. K. This has long been the dream of the girls
who take part in varsity and intramural play.
Chief activities of the club members are, of course,
sports-usually volleyball and basketball. All girls in sen-
ior high who had earned letters previous to this year auto-
matically became charter members of the club.
Holding meetings at night in their homes the girls,
aided by Miss Martha Twitty and Mrs. Gladys Laird,
planned the functions of the organization, wrote their
constitution, and selected a pin. The pin is silver and blue,
representing the school colors.






BOYS'


Y CLUB







I Organized in 1946 for the lettermen of the
school, the Boys' Y-Club continued its efforts
This year to create better sportsmanship and
school spirit and to bring those participating
in athletics closer together.
Any boy in senior high school who has won
a letter in varsity or intramural play and who
meets the high personal standards of the club,
Sis eligible for membership.


The club, under the supervision of Coach
Jack McGriff, sets the requirements for win-
ning letters and helps to plan and carry out the athletic program. During the basketball
season initiates worked in the concessions stands to raise athletic funds.
Together with others of the football squad, the Y-Club presented Coach with a
football clock trophy and assistant coaches Bob Gilbert and Broughton Williams with
silver footballs in appreciation for their tireless efforts in turning out a conference
winning team.


First Row: John Neller, Bill Gager, Tommy Price (secretary), Charles Richardson
(president), Coach Jack McGriff (sponsor), Bob Beaty (vice-president), George
Becker (treasurer), Jerry Briggs.
Second Row: Warner Weseman, Rhesa Bostick, Malcolm Traxler, Steve Moran,.
Rutledge Emerson, John Allen, Bobby Wallace, Arlo Shultz.







't 2ezae 2e-aue


First Row: Peggy Harter, Polly Haynes, Edith Cameron, Jo Beal (president),
Betty Brockenbrough, Catherine Parrish, Norma Whittington.
Second Row: Lorena Van Sickle, Rose Mary McDonnell, Pat Steadham, Constance
Durham, Jesse Foster, Mary Owen, Edith Cameron.
Third Row: Carita Bradley, Frances Prescott, Rose Arnold, Mildred Carter, Bett
Morrison, Nina Black.
"Service to School, Community and Nation" is the motto of the Girls' Service
League. It is for this purpose that girls in both junior and senior high school join.
Though the organization is not affiliated with any larger civic or national club,
it works with all the civic and charity organizations in the city. The girls carried on
their annual work on the tuberculosis seal
drive and the under-priviledged children's toy
shop. They added a Thanksgiving and Christ-
mas basket collection and a knitted afghan to
go overseas to their list of accomplishments.
As in many of their other activities the girls
gained, as well as gave something. By making
the afghan, many of them learned to knit and
others perfected the art.
Beginning only two years ago, the girls
have already become an established unit of
extra-curricular activities in the school.
































- W 1W -_ --- .U
First Row: Virginia Price, Virginia Leps, Mary Foote, Frances Boltin, Betty
Brockenbrough, Betty Shollar, Norma Killinger.
Second Row: Margy Hornsby, Ann Emerson, Jane Arnold, Bett Morrison, Joan
Johns, Helen Foster, Mary Ann Dorsey, Polly Haynes.
Meeting each month in a member's home, the members of the S. W. S., a creative
writers' organization, read their contributions for the suggestions and criticisms of the
group, and have programs dealing with literary topics. Mrs. Margaret Boutelle, libra-
rian, is faculty adviser to the group.
In order to become part of the S. W. S., one must be in senior high school and
must submit some of his work. The name of the club, which is known only to active
members, is told to the new member when he is formally accepted.
Mrs. Ruby Lea Hall, author of the
Great Tide, spoke to the girls at their
December meeting on how she wrote the
book. A trip was later taken to Rollins
College for "Animated Magazine," a
program presented by celebrities from
all over the world.
A collection of the short stories,
poems, and essays submitted is kept in
the library by Mrs. Boutelle.


S.W S.


&ai$






SENIOR


Above: The final scene in the production A Light to Lighten


The Senior Choir at work rehearsing
for a production. Classes are held twice
a week during the regular schedule.


C


HO


Above: The Manger Scene in the choir presentation of the Christmas pageant
A Light to Lighten.

The Senior Choir, directed by Kenneth Coghill the first semester, presented the
program "A Light to Lighten." This Christmas program was written by Mr. Coghill
and the students supplied the costumes and acting. Rutledge Emerson was responsible
for the excellent lighting, which was an outstanding feature of the entire production.
The second semester the choir acquired a new director, Dr. E. W. Walbach and
completed the year under his direction.

































First Row: Paul Laggassee, George Martin, Tommy Rogers, Bobby Wallace, Mac
Olson, (president), Dick Carrigan, Joe Dunlap, Bill Gager.
Second Row: Chester Morris, Roy Stocksfill, Dick Laggassee, Bill Welborne,
Douglas Dickey, C. C. Gaines, Malcolm.
Third Row: John Allen, Rhesa Bostick, Douglas Brooks, Steve Moran, Don Van
Sickle, Bobby Johnson.
Sponsored by the Kiwanis Club, the Key Club has the motto "We Build, too,"
which comes from the sponsor's motto "We Build." The purpose of this organization,
for boys in the sophomore through senior classes, is to better the school, community,
and the members of the organization.
The dub, under the guidance of Mr. James Wattenbarger, faculty sponsor, and
Kiwanians O. N. Harper and C. R. Foster, planned and carried through many school
and community projects and held a number of
socials. Flowers were placed in the library
and library equipment was repaired by these
busy boys. They were responsible for the polio
drive in P. K., Christmas baskets for the un-
fortunate, and the sale of tickets to the Sigma
Nu-Phi Delt charity football game.
Each Tuesday two members attended the
Kiwanis dinner meeting. Two official dele-
gates were sent to St. Petersburg to the State
Convention of Key Clubs, and plans were
made for representatives to be sent to the
national convention in Memphis.
Initiation week saw pledges hunting for
needles in a haystack and wearing blue ribbons
with white keys.


I % t


&4d






























First Row: Billy Mansfield, Tommy Bronson, Perry Foote, George Beers, Wes-
ley Larson, John Eshleman, Robert Little, George Hill.
Second Row: Willard Wolfe, Ancil Payne, Bobby White, Joe Brunet, Walter
Godwin, Vance Powell, Chester Lanster, Mr. Eugene Kitching (adviser).
Rain or shine a life is always at stake and regardless of weather conditions, the
group of boys who make up the-Safety Patrol go on duty each morning and afternoon.
The Safety Patrol was first organized in 1946 by Mr. Charles Partin, then assis-
tant principal. It carried its activities through June 1947 and in September was again
organized under the faculty sponsorship of Mr. Eugene Kitching. Members come from
grades six through nine.
Along with the responsibility of guarding lives, the Patrol is also in charge of
raising and lowering the flag of the United States.
A highlight of the first half of the
year was a weiner roast given in Novem-
ber by the Police Department and the
Lions Club for all patrols in the city.
Uniforms are essential to the carrying
out of the purpose of such an organiza-
tion. The sale of stickers has been bring-
ing in revenue for the purchase of the
needed uniforms. When secured, the
boys will be one of the best uniformed
groups in school.


S~


.OAvz




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs