Title: Yongester
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00065812/00006
 Material Information
Title: Yongester
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: P.K. Yonge Laboratory School
Publisher: P.K. Yonge Laboratory School
Publication Date: 1944
Copyright Date: 1944
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00065812
Volume ID: VID00006
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text



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THE

YONGESTER

YEARBOOK
OF THE
P.K. YONGE LABORATORY SCHOOL


1944


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We dedicate this Yearbook to

THE FACULTY

Jesse Armstrong
Margaret W. Boutelle
Loris R. Bristol
Cleva J. Carson
Alfred Crago
C. F. Cumbee
Sarah G. Dickinson
Charlotte Dunn
Eleanor K. Green
W. L. Goette
Marion K. Harris
Lillian P. Hough
L. E. Jones
Margaret B. Kingman
Gladys O. Laird
Lillian Maguire
James A. Martin
Ida Ruth McLendon
Ingorie V. Mikell
John H. Moorman
Julia W. Moorman
H. E. Nutter
Ruth B. Peeler
Jean Pieper
Kathryn E. Reed
Patricia H. Ringenbach
Elizabeth H. Rusk
G. Ballard Simmons
Alice Spivey
Grace A. Stevens
Thomas W. Strickland
William C. Strickland
Felicia W. Traxler






























EDITORS AND
CONTRIBUTORS

Irene Rogers, Eula Lole
MacPherson. Mary Alice
Moratto, Gladys Harn,
Sue Wise, Don Bradshaw,
Bill Husa, Mary Walker,
Mary Graham, John Snow,
Joe Wilder, Suzanne
Thomas, and Jane Tisdale.

Club pictures were made
by Bob Stevens and
Jimmy Martin.













JOHN RICHARDSON
President
Attended Poplarville, Miss., High School, '41, '42;
Entered P. K. Yonge, '43; Football team, '41, '42;
Class Secretary, '41; 4-H Club Vice-Pres, '41, Pres.,
'42; Class Vice Pres., '42; Achievement Medal, '41;
Hi-Y, '41, '42, '43, '44; Stage Committee,
That Uncertain Age, 143; The Last of the Martin Family,
'41; When Johnny Comes Marching Home, '42; Seventeen,
'44, Who Killed the Mikado, '44; Alpha.



EMILY PHILIPS
Vice President
Pirates of Penzance, '41; May Day Program, '42;
That Uncertain Age, '43; Home Ec. Fashion Show, '43;
Spanish Fiesta, '43; Seventeen, '41; Who Killed the
Mikado, '44; Patience, '42; Choir.
Beta






MARGIE MACK
Secretary
Class Secretary, '42; Library Staff, '43, '44;
Camera Club, '42; Make Up Club, '44; Gamma captain,
144; Who Killed the Mikado, '44; Choir.







GEORGE A. PERRINE
Treasurer
Entered P. K. Yonge, '42;
Choir, '42, '430

















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IRENE ROGERS
Student Council Representative
Attended North Toronto Collegiate Institute, '41;
Student Council Representative, '42, '43, '44;
That Uncertain Age, '43; Seventeen, '44; Patience, '42.
Beta






GLADYS HARN
Student Council Representative
Prompter, That. Uncertain Age, '43;
Prompter, Seventeen, '44;
Alpha






EULA LOLE MACPHERSON
Student Council Representative
Entered P. K. Yonge, '41; Baby Gator Staff,
copy editor, '43, '44; Library Staff, '43;
Vice Pres., X-Rays, '43; Spanish Fiesta, '43;
Home Ec. Fashion Show, '42; Alpha captain, '43, '44;
Seventeen, '44.






FREDERICK ARNOLD
That Uncertain Age, '43;
Class Treasurer, '42;
Acapella Choir
Model Airplane Club















MILDRED AYERS
Beta-captain, '41; Choir, '42, '43;
Library Staff, '44;
Beta








RUTHMARY BLISS
Reporter and editorial writer, Thumb Tack Tribune;
Home Room President, '43; member of National Honor
Society; member of Student-Faculty Cooperative Assoc.,
Chairman of Guidance Committee; Reporter, Northeaster,
Entered P. K. Yonge, '44, Choir,. '44.







VELMA BRATLEY
Library Staff; Pirates of Penzance, '41; Patience, '43.
Alpha








RUDOLPH CRIDER
Entered P. K. Yonge, '41
Properties Committee, Seventeen, '44;
Who Killed the Mikado, '44;
Beta.













MARY JO CURRIE
Class treasurer, '41;
Sergeant-at-Armsa '42;
Camera Club, '43; That Uncer.tain Age, '43;
Beta






SAUL FRUTCHMAN
Class President, '44; Class Sargeant-at-Arms, '43;
That Uncertain Age, '43; Seventeen, '44; The Great
Allowance Battle; bulletin announcer.
Alpha







LEAL HAYWARD
Class Treasurer, '44; Hi-Y Pres., '44;
Seventeen, '44; Who Killed the Nikado, '44;
Choir, '44;







ELOISE JOHNS
Athletic Board, '41, '42; Choir, '42;
Library Staff, 142, '43, '44;
That Uncertain Age, '43;
Beta
































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MARY ALICE MORATTO
Class Secretary, '42; X-Ray .resident, '42;
X-Ray Treasurer, '43, '44;'Buvsiness Manager,
Seventeen, '44; Library Staff, '42;
Who Killed the Mikado, '44; Chbir;
Spanish Fiesta, '41.
Gamma.






JOE SHAW
Entered P. K. Yonge, '44
Gamma








NELL SPEAR
Entered P. K. Yonge, '42
Alpha








ANNIE JUANITA TOWNSEND
That Uncertain Age, '43; Seventeen, '44; Baby Gator
Staff, Senior Silhouettes, '44; Chairman, Red Cross
Poster Committee, '44; Kid Day RecreationfCommittee,
'44.
Beta














BILL TURNER
Seventeen, '44; Who Killed the Mikado, '44;
Choir; Alpha.







LOIS WATKINS
Entered P. K. Yonge, '42. Baby Gator Staff, '42;
Girl's Sports Editor, Baby Gator, '43, '44; Class
Reporter, 143, '44; X-Ray President, '44, Seventeen,
'44, Who Killed the Mikado, '44.






JOHN DAVID WILLIAMS
Stage Committee, That Uncertain Age, '43;
Stage Manager, Seventeen, '44;
Who Killed the Mikado, t44;
Games captain, '44.






GEORGE YATES
Entered P. K. Yonge, '41
Properties Committee, Seventeen, '44;
Building Committee, Who Killed the Mikado, '44;
Gamma.


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SENIOR CLASS PROPHECY


The Future is What You Make It

There have been many prophecies before, dealing with matters
strange and wondrous, but I believe that you will agree with me that
this, the prophecy of the class of '44, is the most remarkable one yet
published, not because of the skill of the writer oh, no!- but because
of the wonderful ability of the students to make their desires and am-
bitions come true in such a marvelous manner. I shall tell you how I
happened to discover the occupations of my senior companions of '44
about ten years after my departure from P. K. Yonge Laboratory School.
One day as I was reading a very old book about the ancient
Romans, I came upon a faded piece of yellow paper, wrinkled and
discolored with age. It took me quite a time to decipher this Latin
document, but I finally managed to make out the substance of it:
"Whoever uses this formula and burns it at
midnight, when all is dark and everyone has
retired to rest, will be able to see the
image of the person who is called out of the
smoke, and will be able to know his position in
the world and the workhe has accomplished."
I shall not be able to write the formula, as I lost it in the
excitement of seeing my old school chums again.
That same night I followed the directions to a "T" and as I was
waiting for something to happen, my room was suddenly filled with a
bluish smoke, and I became like one in a trance. Out of the smoke
came, one by one, my old school mates as I called their names.
First comes Mildred Ayers, whom I can plainly distinguish making
Campbell soup.. It's the same little Mildred, only a little older and
now wearing a wedding ring.
Next come Juanita Townsend and Mary Jo Currie, who, lo and
behold, are posing for ads on how to become thin by exercising. Juanita
poses for the picture before taking exercises and Mary Jo for the one
after taking exercises.
Emily Philips wanted to be an opera singer, but what is she doing
now? Why, she is calling stations between Jacksonville and Miami on
the Orange Blossom Special.
And how is Mary Alice Moratto? She wanted to be a nurse, but,
behold, she is now a tap dancer on Broadway, nursing the footlights.
I see Frederick Arnold, who wished to be a doctor, but Frederick
is now an officer in the Navy, and is much admired by the ladies.
Next I see Irene Rogers who really wanted tobe a teacher, but
ended up by writing a book called 'How People Become Crazy'
What's this I see? A graveyard? Why, look there is the grave
Qf Saul Fruchtman, whose greatest ambition was to get China on the
radio; when he finally succeeded, he died of the shock.














SENIOR CLASS PROPHECY


I n.^earn that John Richardson and John David Williams have
died fro er-:tudy in a college.
El s now appears in my vision. She is now trying for
a position etary to George Perrine, who has been elected inter-
national preside. of Belk-Lindsey's Department Stores.
Next Lole Pherson, who became tired of life and jumped in
Newnan's Lake, b as rescued by a moving picture company and is now
playing in horror tures.
Why here co ell Spear, who wanted to be a dress designer,
but the women wea ch scant clothes now that she has turned her
talent to designing s for bathing beauties.
Velma Bratley a s next. I remember typing was her ambition,
but she's married now tells me her husband is just the right type.
Now I see Bill T :, who didn't want to do anything in par-
ticular and still doesn't, in spite of the fact, he's a prosperous
lawyer.
Joe Shaw now appears wished to become an artist, but he
painted a picture of a vegetab tat looked so real he tried to
eat some of it, became ill with pa c, and has not yet recovered.
Now Lois Watkins enters. tired to be an actress, but
alas, Lois has become fat, and i fat in the circus.
Here comes Ruthmary Blis ach English at
Vassar, but is now teaching Y. proper method of
eating peas on their knives.
Next Leal 'ayward, who was. As a sheik. He went into
the movies and is now a world-famo impersonator.
Rudolph Crider now appears on ene. He wanted to be an
electrical engineer, but Rudolph's gift of powerful speech made him a
great salesman. He now seems to be trying to persuade an Eskimo to
buy a fur-lined bath tub.
I see now Margie Mack, who just wanted to fall in love with
someone. She now operates a matrimonial agency finding darlings for
unfortunate men.
Last comes George Yates, and would you believe it? He's become
one of the few to learn the words to Mairzy Doats.
Suddenly the bluish haze became thinner, and I saw a hand writing
in gold letters these words: "The Future Is What You Make It". Then
it disappeared and I came out of my trance and sat very still and
thought and wondered at what I had seen and heard.


-Lole MacPherson









THE LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT
of the
CLASS of '44


We, the graduating class of P. K. Yonge Laboratory School, in the
year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and forty-four, bh of sound
mind and body, since we have recovered from measles imps, flu,
toothache, and cat fever, do declare this to be our last wi stament,
and we do hereby appoint as executors Mrs. Margaret Bo H. E.
Nutter, and Dean G. B. Simmons. We commission the t that all
provisions are carried out to the last jot and titt the penalty for
failure being the sentence to live forever with the *niors in another
world.
Item 1: Irene Rogers wills her straight "A" aver to Jimmie Martin
and Bessie Dees.
Item 2: Mildred Ayers wills her ability to la one man to Jane Snow
although she seems to be doing all t for herself.
Item 3: Gladys "champ" Ham wills her outstj ng tennis form to Erma
Jean Schoch and her beautiful voice Jim Clayton, who must
run no risk of losing the vibrant es exhibited in Who Killed
the Mikado.
Item 4:. Frederick Arnold wills his b iful eyes to Cynthia Merrin,
the better to watch parad
Item 5: Joe Shaw wills hi, to Marion Graham to help her
cover more territoiD Fred Hampton in case he runs
out of gas ons ,~i mechanical genius to Robert Bless.
Item 6: Leal Wa olfish outlook on life to Donald
Brad who are fast acquiring that well
known
Item 7: Juanita Town 'large appetite to Pat Mounts who
claims that sh d it, but we know better.
Item 8: John DavidWil I s that certain Swing and Sway of his
to Mary Louise Si
Item 9: GeorgePerrine wills his extra pair of eyes to Betty West and
Priscilla Carter the better to see the Air Cadets from safe
distances.
Item 10: Mary Jo Curriewills her towering height to Anne Hughes and
Bill Husa.
Item 11: Saul Fruchtman wills his political genius to Donald Swan in
the hope that it will help him realize his political ambitions.
Item 12: Ruthmary Bliss wills her sweet and even temper to Blake
Moran for the teachers' peace of mind.
Item 13: Rudolph Crider wills his aggressive personality to Bob Stevens
and George A. Dell to help them overcome their inferiority
complexes.
Item 14: Lois Watkins wills her red-headedtemper to Henri Douglas and
Sue Wise, goodness knows she has enough for both.
Item 15: Emily Philips wills one half of her everlasting chewing gum
to Allan Tisdale to help him with his stamp collection and
the other half to Evangeline Johnson to keep her from talking
so loud.




















STAND TESTAMENT
. of the
S of '44


Item 16: Mary Alice Moratto wills her curly hair to Marjory Beville
and Hellice Ryan.
Item 17: .Eloise Johf's wills her beautiful thick hair to John Martin
so he will be able to use a comb and brush instead of a
wash cloth.
Item 18: John Richardson wills the senior class presidency to anyone
who doesn't have anything else to do next year.
Item 19: Lole MacPherson wills her extra weight to Vivian Whiting
and Ann Mikell although they can't use it very well.
Item 20: Bill Turner will: his promptness to Henry Zeigler and
Aubrey Vail.
Item 21: Velma Bratley wills herKay-dets toMyrtice Saunders, Margaret
Bird, and Betty Giege? to add to their own collections.
Item 22: Margie Mack wills her soothing voice to Jim Dailey to help
him charm Mr. Goette. '
Item 23: George Yates wills his beautiful handwriting to Kenneth
Palmer and his artistic hands to Elizabeth Becker.
Item 24: Nell Spear wills the glint of gold in her hair to Juanita
Graham and Mary Jo Taylor.

To the Junior Class we will Room 226. May you have in it as
many good times as we have had. To the teachers we will the memory
of a class noted for its brilliance, for its promptness, its perfect
deportment, and for the outstanding good looks of every member. We
beg them, however, not to hold us up too often as examples. Other
classes might become envious. To P. K. Yonge we will all good wishes
and the assurance that we shall return to these dear old halls as often
as possible.

-Lois Watkins



*A
























WHO'S WHO AMONG THE SENIORS


Most
Best
Most
Most


likely to succeed-
all round-
intellectual-
popular-


Best dancer-
Best dressed-
Most athletic-
Biggest flirt-
Prettiest, most handsome-
Cutest-
Best figure, best physique-
Kindest-
Most cooperative-
Most loyal-
Laziest-
Biggest eater-
Shyest-
Always late-
Most optimistic- .
Biggest baby-
Biggest grouch-
Most lady-like,
most gentlemanly-
Most garrulous-


Irene Rogers
Irene Rogers
Irene Rogers
Emily Philips

Gladys Harn
Emily Philips
Margie Mack
Juanita Townsend
Eloise Johns
Emily Philips
Lois Watkins
Ruthmary Bliss
Mary Alice Moratto
Lole MacPherson
VelmaBratley
Juanita Townsend
Mildred Ayers
Mary Jo Currie
Mary Alice Moratto
Lois Watkins
Mary Jo Currie

Nell Spear
Juanita Townsend


George Perrine
Fredrick Arnold
Fredrick Arnold
Leal Hayward
Joe Shaw
Leal Hayward
Fredrick Arnold
John D. Williams
Leal Hayward
Joe Shaw
Joe Shaw
John D. Williams
Rudolph Crider
Raymond Campbell
Raymond Campbell
Bill Turner
Bill Turner
George Yates
Saul Fruchtman
Bill Turner
John Richardson
Bill Turner

John Richardson
Joe Shaw


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ELEVENTH GRADE


Log of U. S. S. Scholar-Ship

Anchors Aweigh!! On August 31, the newly christened U. S. S.
Scholar-Ship set sail once more on the rough Sea of Knowledge. A few
members of the crew were transferred to foreign duty and others were
promoted to the rank of Lieutenant Senior Grade; however the majority
of the crew were commissioned Lieutenant Junior Grade. At the helm
was Admiral Rusk, assisted by newly appointed Wave West.

On October 9, a large task force of scholarly sailors from the
U. S. S. Scholar-Ship established a beach-head at Stevens' Seaside
Saloon. Rations were served in the form of hard tack and tea. Yo
Ho Ho and a bottle of teat!!

Passes were issued for Christmas leave. Various admirals gave
stiff exams to test the crew's nautical knowledge. U. S. S. Scholar-Ship
was almost sunk. Midterm mutiLy overthrew West's staff and Tisdale
took over the wheel.

The ship's U. S. O. company entertained the entire fleet on
March 3 with a dab of doubtful drama. Landlubbers packedthe show-
boat. Navy Cross awarded cast and director

Lieutenants Junior Grade and Lieutenants Senior Grade assembled
in the official mess hall to devour victuals and spin yarns. The
crew shook their sea legs in a hilarious hornpipe.

In May the entire ship's company plunged over-board for a water
drill. Gobs gobbled gobs of grub.

The U. S. S. Scholar-ship docked for much needed repairs and a
three months' rest. Full crew expected to be present when ship sets
forth on what will be its last voyage (we hope!!!)


-Marion Graham

















A
ALLAN TISDALE
President


M. L. SMITH
Vice-President


PAT MOUNTS
Secretary


YRTICE SAUNDERS
Treasurer


JIM CLAYTQN
Parliamenta%an


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DON BRADSHAW


SUE WISE

STUDENT
COUNCIL
MEMBERS


BILL HUSA


OFFICERS


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ALLAN TISDALE
President


M. L. SMITH
Vice-President


MYRTICE SAUNDERS
Treasurer


- $1 '
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DON BRADSHAW


SUE WISE


STUDENT
COUNCIL
MEMBERS


PAT MOUNTS
Secretary


JIM CLAYTQN
Parliamentaifn



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BILL HUSA 9


OFFICERS


* 1Th








ELEVENTH GRADE





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Priscilla Carter, James Dailey, Bessie Dees, George A. Dell
Henri Douglass, Betty Geiger, Juanita Graham, Marion Graham


















Fred Hampton, Anne Hughes, Evangeline Johnson, James Martin
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et Gh Mi -raham















Elizabeth Becker, Marjory Beville, Margaret Bird, Robert Bless
Priscilla Carter, James Dailey, Bessie Dees, George A. Dell
Henri Douglass, Betty Geiger, Juanita Graham, Marion Graham
Fred Hampton, Anne Hughes, Evangeline Johnson, James Martin


-S *









ELEVENTH GRADE





...... .".. .

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John Martin, r errin, Ann Mikell, Blake Moran
Kenneth Palmer, len Powell, Hellice Ryan, Et Jean Schoch
Lyle Smith, Jane Snow, Bob Stevens, Don Swan
Mary Jo Taylor, Aubrey Vail, Betty West, Vivian Whiting, Henry Zeigler













I
TENTH GRADE


After the clanging of the bell on the first day of school, there
assembled in one certain room, a group of "yonge"people known publicly
as the syncopated sophomores. These swingsters, who are definitely in
the groove, under the baton (rod to you) of Mrs. Traxler piped to the
tune of history, English, and what have you.

Not being able to stand up under the strain of "reading, writingg
and 'rithmetic" they declared a holiday, and early in the year "dug a
ditch" in the music room refreshing themselves from time to time with
such nonsense as could be forced "down the hatch".

But those that have rhythm don't live the "life of Riley"; on a
Friday night in February, 1944, these "happy go lucky" girls and boys
struggled to make the second "Yonge Open House" entertaining as well
as successful.

On March 25, this party of "Yongers" whooped into the Austin
Carey Memorial Park, dashed into their bathing suits, and took a
plunge into the solar heated lake. "Now dry up, you're all wet," were
remarks heard as the blissful "yonge" people lazed away.

These sophomo-res are entertaining people. To prove it, there
are the plays, Mak6bRoom for Rodney and The Ghost Story, to be given in
assembly. To "put the icing on the cake", old Glen Springs offered
its restful looking waters and blistering sun.

The class of '46 is sane, too, sometimes, for the Red Cross
and Tuberculosis Drives each received a generous donation.

At the beginning of the second semester, the president, Bill
Bryan, was re-elected. Joyce Johnson, the secretary, made way for
Rachel McInnis to take over; Bobby Johnson slipped into Frank
Wakefield's position as Vice-President while Frank in turn, took the
office as treasurer which was formerly held by Tom Crews. The
parliamentarian, Ken Eshleman, remained as such. (Poor boy)

Finishing a groovy run, the syncopated sophomores "lindy"
happily off into the summer.


-Nell Crider




















BILL BRYAN
President


RACHEL McINNIS
Secretary


BOBBY JOHNSON
Vice-President


FRANCIS WAKEFIELD
Treasurer


MARY WALKER
Student Council
Representative


MARY GRAHAM
Student Council
Representative


OFFICERS


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TENTH GRADE


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Clark Asbell, Marjorie Beaty, Hilda Carpenter, Rodman Carter
Kathryn Carroll, Margery Anne Campbell, Doreen Cogdill, Palmer Craig
Ken Eshleman, Billy Evans, Bob Firth Bob Goette




TENTH GRADE


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leon Gray, Dorothy Gunn, Harry Hamilton, Charlotte Jacobs
Joyce Johnson, Jimmie Johnston, Fal Johnson, Donald Kokomoor
Jim Leukel, Gerald McCoy, Marcelle McQuaig, Conrad Marshall
Tommy Miles, Louise Moratto, Virginia Morgan, Darrell Murray


-i













TENTH GRADE





































Mary Ann Otte, Ann Parrish, Alton Rape, George Steele
Richard Thomas, Doris Thompson, John Thrasher, Carletta Van Sickle
Jack Waters, Virginia Wilson, Betty Jo Williams


















JANE
HAMILTON
President


PATTY RODMAN
Secretary


EVALYN SIMMONS
Vice-President


M. A. LYNCH
Treasurer


NANCY WELCH
Advisor


JOE WILDER
Student Council
Representative


JOHN SNOW
Student Council
Representative


OFFICERS


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NINTH GRADE




















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Richard Anderson, Curtus Baglien, rruman Bigham, Iris Bishop
Hubert Buckley, Louine Brown, Hilliard Cameron, Eleanor Copeland
Carroll Cumbee, Marsden Earle, Clyde Ellis, Elizabeth Feaster
Marilyn Gaines, Elva Goodbred, Hurd Haines, Jeanne Hill


0 F


4







NINTH GRADE
































Jimmy Jacobs, Carolyn Jones, Janette Jones, Myra Luce
Russell Martin, Billy Munson, Foster Olroyd, Bernard Palmer
Esther Powell, Virginia Reeves, Byron Sherouse, Alonzo Smith
Bettie Smith, Sara Smith, Fred Strinffellow, Milton Stubbs
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Eettie Smith, Sara Smith, Fred Strinp-fellow, Milton Stubbs










NINTH GRADE





























Alice Marie Thomas, Perry Thompson., George Tillman,
James Turlington, Lorena Van Sickel, Jo Ann Walton


NINTH GRADE


The class of '47, under
Goette, started off our annual
Buckley's last fall. We all had
playing games,and dancing to the


the guidance of Mr. Bristol and Mr.
program with a hayride at Hurert
a jolly good time roasting weiners,
latest records of the maestros.


Each of us tried to do his part toward the war effort this year.
We auctioned small articles donated by the class for War Stamps. Thus
we raised about one hundred dollars.

In March our second party was the annual Freshman Hop which we
gave on St. Patrick's Day.

Our last function was our customary picnic and swimming party
at Glen Springs.

-Carolyn Jones
Louine Brown
















.f1e


JOHN FOX
President


JACK SEARCY
Vice-President


-.. ,r--


CHESTER MORRIS
Secretary


BILL HARTER
Treasurer


SUZANNE THOMA:
Student Council
Representative


OFFICERS


EIGHTH GRADE









EIGHTH GRADE


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Charles Richardson, Pat Riley, Sidney Robertson, Dorsey Sanders
Mary Louise Slagle, Carolyn Sherman, Jessie Smith, Emily Smith
Elaine Smysor, Stanley Thompson, Robert Wallace, Daphne Wood
Warner Weseman, John Wilson


04 -o. I








EIGHTH GRADE


tI


Richard Bashaw, Bob Beaty, Martha Blake, Nita Nell Bohannon
Jane Bonacker, Mary Anne Canova, Molly Duke, Rutledge Emerson
Mary Foote, Edward Garris, Patty Ann Haynes, Maurice Hinson
Edgar Marshall, W. J. Matherly, Jane Nelson, Mac Olson


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EIGHTH GRADE

As Secretary of the Eighth Grade, I have attended all meetings
of the class and have kept a record of what the class did. The two
most important meetings of the class concerned the dance that the Eighth
Grade is planning to have. It was voted to hold the dance in the
Twentieth Century Club. Students from other grades through the Ninth
Grade may attend. The class voted to allow W. J. Matherly, Bob
Beaty, and Chester Morris to sell Coca-Cola at the dance for ten cents
a bottle. Bids for the dance will be ten cents a piece, and both stag
and date bids will be sold. John Fox, thePresident of the class, named
Maurice Hinson chairman of the Decoration Committee, and Maurice ap-
pointed W. J. Matherly, Bobby Wallace, Jane Nelson, Carol Lou Sherman,
and Molly Duke as assistants. Bids for the dance are to be printed and
sold by Rutledge Emerson, Emily Smith, and Mary Anne Canova. The
Entertainment Committee is to be headed by Jane Bonnacker.

Since our class has been unable to do much this year, the Secre-
tary has not a great deal to report.


- Chester Morris
















DONALD HESTER
President


EDITH CAMERON
Vice-President


ROSE ARNOLD
Secretary


MARY BRYAN
Treasurer


FRANCES BOLTIN
Reporter


JANE TISDALE
Student Council
Representative


OFFICERS


SEVENTH GRADE







SEVENTH GRADE








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George Becker, Irene Blake, Gerald Briggs, Betty Brockenbrough
Bobby Derrick, Mary Anne D(r sey, Constance Durham, Ann Emerson
Mary Jane Emig, Kay Eutsler, Betty Gaddum, Shirley Gaddum
Nartine Glass, Margaret Harter, Rollin Havan, Marguerite Hughes







SEVENTH GRADE




























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Jeanette Johns, George Martin, Rosemary McDonnell, Miriam Mclnnis
Stephan Moran, Catherine Parrish, Tom Price, J. B. Resch
Theodore Ryan, Orlo Shultz, Nancy Thomas, Brince 1. Tillis
Malcolm Traxler, Robert Waters


















SEVENTH GRADE

During the school year of 1943-44 the Seventh Grade's first
activity was a tea for their parents, on Friday, December 10, at three
fifteen. It was held in the Music and Home Economics Rooms. The
first numbers on the program were Christmas carols sung by the Seventh
Grade, and a solo sung by Miriam McInnis. Then a play about India
was given. The name of the play was "A Dare to Defy the Hindus",
written and directed by Miriam McInnis andFrances Boltin. After the
play the parents were invited to go to the Home Economics Room for
tea, cocoa, and cookies made by the Seventh Grade Home Economics
class. Everyone had a very good time.

The Seventh Grade's next activity was an assembly program
during the month of February on a Friday afternoon during the Fourth
Period. It was a talent program in which students from each grade in
the high school participated. We also had a guest, Miss Thelma Ann
Boltin, who gave us a comical reading. Jane Tisdale was in charge of
the program. Miriam McInnis read a story that she had written and
Frances Boltin read a poem that she had written. The program was
very entertaining.

The Seventh Grade's next activity was formal dance held Fri-
day, March 17, in the Music and Home Economics Rooms. The refresh-
ments were cookies and punch. Besides dancing, there were games.
The games were bingo, cards, and chinese checkers. Everyone had a
good time.

The last, but not least, of the Seventh Grade's activities was
a very enjoyable picnic held Saturday, April 28. It was held in the
yard of Rose Arnold's home.

Miriam McInnis
Frances Boltin
Malcolm Traxler









iI ti"


SPOR TS,
CLUBS AND
A C TI VI TIES.




















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1


THE STUDENT COUNCIL


Suzanne Thomas, Eula Lole MacPherson, Sue Wise, Mary Walker
Joe Wilder, Gladys Harn, Donald Bradshaw, Bill Husa
Jane Tisdale, John Snow, Mary Graham



The objectives of the Student-Faculty Representative Body are
the service of the school and furthering of understanding between the
faculty and the students through discussion of school problems. The
Council is composed of twelve representatives elected from the high
school and of a faculty sponsor.

This year the Council has arranged for assembly programs (Marion
Graham was the first semester chairman of this committee; Don Bradshaw,
the second), sponsored the sale of defense stamps and bonds, and sold
them in all classes. It has been in charge of a service record of the
school's alumni, and has published this yearbook.

The sponsor has been Mr. James A. Martin. Second semester
officers were: President, Irene Rogers; Vice-President, Gladys Harn;
Secretary, Sue Wise; and Sergeant-at-Arms, Don Bradshaw.


-Irene Rogers


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THE STUDENT COUNCIL

Suzanne Thomas, Eula Lole MacPherson, Sue Wise, Mary Walker
Joe Wilder, Gladys Harn, Donald Bradshaw, Bill Husa
Jane Tisdale, John Snow, Mary Graham
'*L V 'earn


























*r ~The objectives of the Student-Faculty Representative Body are
the service of the school and furthering of understanding between the
: faculty and the students through discussion of school problems. The
Council is composed of twelve representatives elected from the high
school and of a faculty sponsor.

u' This year the Council has arranged for aso iseb programs (larion
Graham was the first semester cha irman of this comi a te; Don Bradshaw,
the second), sponsored the sale of defense stamps and bonds, and sold
-. them in all classes. It has been in charge of a service record of the
school's alumni, and has published this yearbook.

"-' The sponsor has been Mr. James A. Martin. Second semester
Officers were: President, Irene Rogers; Vice-President, Gladys Harn;
Secretary, Sue Wise; and Sergeant-at-Aras. Don Bradshaw.


-Irene Rogers





























BABY GATOR STAFF


LIBRARY STAFF







THE BABY GATOR


Ken Eshelman, Bob Goette, Frank Wakefield, Johnny Martin
Nancy Thomas, Rosemary MacDonald, Donald Bradshaw, Fred Hampton,
Priscilla Carter, Jim Dailey, Bob Stevens,
Martine Glass, George Steele, Elizabeth Becker, Cynthia Merrin,
Evalyn Simmons, Marion Graham, Rachel McInnis, Tom Crews
Robert Bless(editor), Marjorie Beaty, Lole MacPherson,
Lois Watkins, Mary Louise Smith, Ann Parrish, Juanita Townsend
Patty Rodman, Joyce Johnson, Allan Tisdale (editor)

The school year 1943-44 has proved to be most successful for
P. K. Yonge's new up-and-coming monthly newspaper, the "Baby Gator".
During this time, the paper had one of the largest working staffs in
its history approximately twenty students. Under the very able
sponsorship of Miss Elizabeth Rusk, the staff produced work of such
quality that it resulted in a great increase in circulation. True, we
have not quite reached the circulation of the New York Times, but we
are fast approaching it, as over one thousand copies of the paper were
sold during the year an increase of approximately 100 percent over
last year. As any student of Mrs. Laird can calculate, if each year
the circulation is doubled, the metropolitan dailies would be left be-
hind as soon as the present kindergarten graduates.
In conclusion, the present editors feel that a word of advice
should be given to those aspiring to rule over the destiny of the "Baby
Gator". Don't take it, brother it's a job!
-Robert Bless


STUDENT LIBRARY STAFF

Nell Crider, Henri Douglas, Elizabeth Feaster, Margie Mack, Foster
Olroyd, Bill Husa, Mildred Ayers, Eloise Johns, Hilliard Cameron,
Esther Powell, Sara Smith, Virginia Reeves, Marguerite Hughes,
Ann Campbell, Harry Hamilton, BillyEvans, Betty West, MaryL. Smith,
Hilda Carpenter, Jessie M. Smith, Catherine Parrish, Mac Olson,
Jo Ann Walton, Jeanne Hill, Jane Bonacker

The Library Staff is made up of volunteers from the.junior and
senior high school. The qualifications for membership are: the
capacity to do accurate work, the ability to follow directions, and
the desire to be.helpful. This year's staff has consisted of from
twenty to twenty-five members throughout the year.
The activities of the staff are varied. Helping with the daily
routines of loaning books, planning and executing displays, the Book
Week program, writing articles about books and other library materials
and services for the BABY GATOR are among the most common activities.
A special activity of this year was the undertaking of a library project
for the Chiefland School. The project was requested by the Sloan
Foundation's Project in Applied Economics. Miss Dickinson, the
librarian, and members of the staff planned the library room and
furnishings, compiled a manual of routines for the librarian, and a
staff manual for the student assistants, and spent one day in the
Chiefland School helping them to get started with the organization of
the book collections and the preparation of the new quarters for the
library.
-M. L. Smith










THE HI-Y CLUB


Joe Shaw, Leal Hayward, Henry Zeigler
Bob Goette, Robert Bless, Bill Bryan, Leon Gray
Ken Eshleman, Marsden Earle,. Allan Tisdale

Hi-Y Club started off the year in P. K. Yonge with the follow-
ing officers: President, RobertBless; Vice President, Allan Tisdale;
Secretary, Bill Bryan; Treasurer, Bob Goette; Chaplain, Leon Gray.
As quite a number of Hi-Y members had graduated the year before, the
club inducted at the first of the year two new members, Ken Eshleman
and Robert Brettel. The first project of the year was the collecting
of food, clothing, and games from the students for needy families of
Gainesville. This drive proved to be very successful as eight boxes
of articles were gathered.
At the beginning of the second semester the club elected the
following new officers: President, Leal Hayward; Vice President,
Bill Bryan; Secretary, RobertBless; Treasurer, BobGoette; Chaplain,
Leon Gray.
Sponsoring the infantile-paralysis drive was the next project
of the club. Conducted in the high school only, the drive netted over
twenty dollars for this fund. The Club also sponsored the sale of
drinks at the second school dance. During the year, interesting, in-
formative programs were given at the regular meetings.
In this semester, the organization inducted three new members:
Joe Shaw, Marsden Earle, and Henry Zeigler.
Graduating members of Hi-Y are John Richardson, AllanTisdale,
Leal Hayward, Robert Bless, and Joe Shaw. Bill Bryan, Bob Goette,
Ken Eshleman, Henry Ziegler, and Leon Gray remain as members for
the coming year.

-Robert Bless



THE X-RAY CLUB

Vivian Whiting, Mary Alice Moratto, Ann Campbell, Henri Douglas,
Erma Jean Schoch, Mina Jo Powell, Sue Wise
Elizabeth decker, Eula Lole MacPherson, Mary Louise Smith, PatMounts,
Cynthia Merrin, Hellice Ryan, Betty West
Marjory Beville, Evangeline Johnson, Louise Moratto, Jeanne Hill,
Dorothy Gunn

The X-Ray club is composed of girls from the ninth, tenth,
eleventh, and twelth grades. It was organized by girls in the class
of '43 with the purpose of aiding each member in achieving a pleasing
personality. This is done with the aid of magazines, pamphlets, talks,
and truth courts. Meetings are held every other Tuesday in the home
of a member A sponsor from the faculty is chosen by the girls.


- M. A. Moratto






























THE HI-Y CLUB


THE X-RAY CLUB





























THE CLASS OFFICERS CLUB


THE CAMERA CLUB












THE CLASS OFFICERS CLUB


Jack Searcy, Pat Mounts, Mary Walker, Don Bradshaw, Bobby Johnson,
Mary Graham, AllanTisdale, Bill Bryan, KenEshleman, Sue Wise,
Mary Louise Smith
Rose Arnold, BillHarter, M. A. Lynch, Jane Hamilton, Evalyn Simmons,
Emily Philips, Rachel McInnis, Myrtice Saunders, Margie Mack,
Patty Rodman
Frances Boltin, John Fox, Mary Bryan, Donald Hester, Edith Cameron,
Chester Morris

The Class Officers Club, consisting of all class officers of
grades seven through twelve and two representatives from the Student-
Faculty Council, was organized, (1) tomake more effective the work of
individual class groups, (2) to secure greater articulation and coopera-
tion in the work of the total school group, (3) to aid other organiza-
tions and clubs in carrying out their purposes, (4) to initiate and
execute some project or projects of total school value.
During the year the Class Officers Club has worked with the
Student-Faculty Council in its projects, has promoted attendance at
special school functions, and is now working through a committee on a
constitution. The sponsor for the club is Mrs. Boutelle, assisted by
Mr. Bristol.


THE CAMERA CLUB

Truman Bigham, Marsden Earle, Byron Sherouse, Palmer Craig
Alonzo Smith, Jim Dailey, Bill Bryan, Carroll Cumbee, Hurd Haines
Bob Stevens, Mary Louise Smith, Jane Snow, BettyWest, Milton Stubbs

The Camera Club, under the sponsorship of Mr. Goette, has been
divided into three smaller groups the Alpha, Beta, and Gamma Clubs.
Two of these clubs have had to meet after school because there is no
activity period during which they could meet.
The clubs are made up of boys and girls who are interested in
photography and want to learn more about it.
Meetings are held once a week, usually in the dark room, and
members learn to develop, print, enlarge, and take pictures.
The Camera Club has made itself available to the school and
several extra activities have been carried on this year for the school.
Upperclassmen of the Camera Club made pictures for the Annual. Pic-
tures were also made for various groups and members of the faculty.
The members of the Camera Club have found the work very interest-
ing and photography may well become a fascinating hobby for many of
them.


- Mary Louise Smith











THE BASKETBALL TEAM


Jim Martin, Fal Johnson, John Martin, Robert Bless, Allan Tisdale
Darrell Murray, Bill Bryan, Fred Hampton, Harry Hamilton
Bob Stevons, Jim Clayton, Don Swan, Billy Evans
In a short six-week period the students of P. K. Yonge saw an
untrained group of boys transformed into a victorious fast-moving basket-
ball squad. Under the able direction of Coach A. E. Hayes, the team
quickly smoothed off its rough edges and settled down to work.
On February 1 the so-called Baby Gators met Melrose, their first
opponent. Led by center Fal Johnson, the Gators steadily pounded the
Melrose defense and won the game, 37-32.
Just three days later the Gators downed the Archer squad to
the tune of 20-18. This time the Yonge School right forward, Harry
Hamilton led in the scoring. In this game the Gators' second team
did most of the playing.
After a week of concentrated practice, the P. K. Yonge team met
Archer for the second time on February 11. The score throughout the
game was nearly tied, and it was only in an extra three-minute playing
period that the Archer team scored the winning basket. This game, the
Gators' one and only defeat, ended with Archer ahead, 19-17.
As evidenced by their next game, the Baby Gators really buckled
down and practiced. The Yonge squad met and defeated the Melrose
five for their third victory on February 15. Overpowering the Melrose
cagers from the first, the Gators rolled up a 15-7 lead in the first
half and later added 11 more points to down the visitors 26-9. The
high scoring honors this time went to center John Martin, who accounted
for 13 of the Gainesville team's points.
For their final game, the Yonge School Baby Gators played the
High Springs squad on February 25. After two periods of fast play,
the Yonge team lead by the substantial margin of 15-8. During the
second half, however, the High Springs five staged a come-back and
tied the score at 16-16 until the last seconds of play. A free shot by
Harry Hamilton won the game for the Gators, 17-16.
At the close of the season letters were awarded to seven players.
Given according to the amount of playing time, the letters went to the
following boys: Forwards Bill Bryan, Harry Hamilton, and Darrel
Murray; Centers Fal Johnson and John Martin; and Guards Fred Hampton
and Robert Bless.
-Robert Bless



INTRAMURAL CAPTAINS

John David Williams, John Martin, Erma Jean Schoch
Richard Thomas, Rachel McInnis, Eula Lole McPherson, Margie Mack
Bill Bryan, Harry Hamilton, John Snow, Joyce Johnson
Richard Bashaw, Edgar Marshall, Sidney Robertson, Mary Ann Canova,
Jane Bonacker































THE BASKETBALL TEAM


INTRAMIR AL CAPTAINS




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