• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 The opening year
 Winter flowers
 With dog and gun
 Skating and sleighing
 Cold February
 Snow castle
 A merry party
 The snow man
 First day of spring
 Sowing and digging
 The inundation
 Poor April fool
 April walks
 Spring flowers
 The month of flowers
 Squirrels
 Butterflies and bees
 Sheep washing
 The cherry orchard
 A night in June
 Haymaking
 Animals and their young
 The rainbow
 Field and forest
 Bathing and swimming
 A summer storm
 Harvest time
 Harvest home
 A day in the woods
 The village feast
 Apple gathering
 Going to school
 Autumn days
 Kite flying
 The vintage
 The bee-hives
 The threshing floor
 The grand hunt
 Early frost
 A hard frost
 Carrying wood
 Christmas eve
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Pleasure book of the year
Title: The pleasure book of the year
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00065527/00001
 Material Information
Title: The pleasure book of the year
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: George Routledge and Sons ( Publisher )
Publisher: George Routledge and Sons
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: [1870?]
 Subjects
Subject: Country life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry, English   ( lcsh )
Seasons -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1870   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1870
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: in words and coloured pictures.
General Note: Board book.
General Note: Baldwin Library copy pages are stiff but not cardboard.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00065527
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002219874
notis - ALG0063
oclc - 40258630

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents
    The opening year
        Page 1
    Winter flowers
        Page 2
    With dog and gun
        Page 3
    Skating and sleighing
        Page 4
    Cold February
        Page 5
    Snow castle
        Page 6
    A merry party
        Page 7
    The snow man
        Page 8
    First day of spring
        Page 9
    Sowing and digging
        Page 10
    The inundation
        Page 11
    Poor April fool
        Page 12
    April walks
        Page 13
    Spring flowers
        Page 14
    The month of flowers
        Page 15
    Squirrels
        Page 16
    Butterflies and bees
        Page 17
    Sheep washing
        Page 18
    The cherry orchard
        Page 19
    A night in June
        Page 20
    Haymaking
        Page 21
    Animals and their young
        Page 22
    The rainbow
        Page 23
    Field and forest
        Page 24
    Bathing and swimming
        Page 25
    A summer storm
        Page 26
    Harvest time
        Page 27
    Harvest home
        Page 28
    A day in the woods
        Page 29
    The village feast
        Page 30
    Apple gathering
        Page 31
    Going to school
        Page 32
    Autumn days
        Page 33
    Kite flying
        Page 34
    The vintage
        Page 35
    The bee-hives
        Page 36
    The threshing floor
        Page 37
    The grand hunt
        Page 38
    Early frost
        Page 39
    A hard frost
        Page 40
    Carrying wood
        Page 41
    Christmas eve
        Page 42
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text






THE


PLEASURE


OF THE Y


BOOK


EAR.


IN WORDS AND COLOURED PICTURES.


GEORGE


LONDON:
ROUTLEDGE
BROADWAY, LUDGATE


AND SONS,


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CONTENTS.


THE OPENING YEAR.

WINTER FLOWERS.

WITH DOG AND GUN.

SKATING AND SLEIGHING.

COLD FEBRUARY.

SNOW CASTLE.

A MERRY PARTY.

THE SNOW MAN.

FIRST DAY OF SPRING.

SOWING AND DIGGING.

THE INUNDATION.

POOR APRIL FOOL.

APRIL WALKS.

SPRING FLOWERS.

THE MONTH OF FLOWERS.

SQUIRRELS.

BUTTERFLIES AND BEES.

SHEEP WASHING.

THE CHERRY ORCHARD.

A NIGHT IN JUNE.

HAYMAKING.

ANIMALS AND THEIR YOUNG.


THE RAINBOW.

FIELD AND FOREST.

BATHING AND SWIMMING.

A SUMMER STORM.

HARVEST TIME.

HARVEST HOME.

A DAY IN THE WOODS.

THE VILLAGE FEAST.

APPLE GATHERING.

GOING TO SCHOOL.

THE YOUNG MARKSMEN.

BOYS' PLAY AND GIRLS' PLAY.

AUTUMN DAYS.

KITE FLYING.

THE VINTAGE.

THE BEE-HIVES.

THE THRESHING FLOOR.

THE GRAND HUNT.

EARLY FROST.

A HARD FROST.
CARRYING WOOD.

CHRISTMAS EVE.



























locked in mantle of dazzling uhite,
With short dull day and with lengthy night
January again is here:
Rough rude month that opens the year.
In the furrow the seed-corn sown
Slumbers out in the fields Wlone.
Resting under its robe of sno),.
Till with spring it shall rise and grow.
Icy winter hath laid his hand
Far and wide over all the land,
But the seeds, in their cloak -wa warm
Snugly sleeping, are safe from harm.



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Spring and summer for flowers, we say.
Ere winter cometh, they fade awny; -
And now the garden lie. all forlorn,
With never a blossom to ipluck at morn.
Not ii tlhe garden are flowers, 'tis true.
But winter bringeth us blossnirs too;
He paints our windows with might and main.
And rattles the panes till they shake againiu;
And where on the window his breath doth Ireeze.
Are wonderful forms of flowers and trees.


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._ W i hen snow lies deep on all the ground.
.K.' 1 And hides the country tar around,
The huntsman boldly forth must go.
.i A&.;: \ And face the winds that willy blow.
With gamebag, pouch and gun he'll wend
Till the short winterday dtoth end.
SHe seeks throughout the silent wood.
The beasts that serve mankind for fo:,d,
; And those whose fur, when well prepared.
.... The wearer from the cold will guard.
The faithful dog will be his guide,
To show where hares and rabbits hide;
For Rover searches all the place,
And aids his master in the chase.
f: The thrifty maids, meanwhile, within
..t Sit by the fire to knit and spin.
For now's the time the housewife chooses.
To spin the flax for summer uses.


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It has been freezing all the week.
It snowed last night, I see;
And now th.- ice is tirm and thick.
Anl safe as ice need be.

Now good Jack Frost he never waits
For any lazy one;
So up my boys, put on your skates,
Before the ice is gone.

And bring me out our tine new sledge,
To whisk us o'er the snow;
Now. ladies, not too near the edge.
Sit tirm -- nld If' Wf we oi!


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He hinds with iron frost the ground
And iue and snow he strews around;
He plagues us oft with hitter cold,
And ri.htly saith the proverb old:
-When February's days grow longer,
The wintry cold is fierce and stronger.*
Now comes the time to pile the fire,
And warm us to our hearts' desire.
Good grand-sire by the fire now stays,
And warns him at the cheerful blaze,
But young ones must be brisk and bold,
And in the fields defy the cold.
Into lhe torest forth go they,
To bring the heavy logs away.
Which Jack the woodman, long before,
Has piled up for the winter store






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Hu:rrah! turn out, turn out, hoys.
The clock has just struck one.
We'll give a lusty shout, boys,
For now the school is done.
Go, muster in the garden
Briae soldiers, all a-row,
The snow will cake and harden,
Hurrah, we love the snow.
We take up our position
IUpon snow-castle wall;
We've store of ammunition,
S.We're gallant soldiers all.
Then let our foes attack us.
And pelt us from below.
We've merry troops to back us,
We'll gi\e them throw for throw.
See, here our foes are coming,
Then meet them with a shout,


I hear their drummer dniuming,
Hurrah. brave boys, turn out!


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Cold without and warmth within,
Wintry silence, and jovial diu;
Darkness without, in the wintry night,
l Mirth within, an'd a blaze of light -
Now there's plenty of fun and sport,
Where king Laughter doth hold his court.
Here in hall assembled you see
A very worshipful company.
Soldiers who never fired a gun,
Monarchs with subjects never a one,
Peasants who cannot do harvest work,
Black mau and white man, Indian anid Turk
What's the meaning of all this rout?
Guess for a week and you won't find out.
Why are we dressed in garments bright?
Our grand Charade is acted to-night.


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rThe snow will hold, the snow will hold,
TIc0 build our snowman ast;
Now lose no time, for ere the night.
The frost may all be past.
So bear a hand now, ev'ry one.
And set him up to stand
With two black coal-eyes in his head
And a big stick in his hand
Tlie build him up, and pile him up.
And set about it straight,
For work that should be done to-day,
l Miv not till morning wait.
So beraI'n ow ryoe


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REARY winter now, departing,
Leaves the world to beauteous spring.
Now the year is newly wakened,
S Songs of birds through woodlands ring.
See the crocus, hardy flow'ret,
In the sheltered glade peeps forth,
And the snowdrop in the hedgerow,
Hiding from the searching north.
Now the brooks and streams are purling,
Freed from all their icy load;
And the beetle, waked from slumber,
Roams through all the woods abroad.
Rouring winds, and rushing breezes,
Tinged buds on ev'ry spray -
Like a lion, March is coming,
Like a lamb, he'll wend away.


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Who looks for harvest in autumn,
In spring must sow his lands;
'N; He cannot expect a blessing,
Who slothfully folds his hands.
The bee is seeking for honey,
; He never his task will shirk,
The birds their nests are all building,
And March is a month for work.
Abroad in the fields the sower,
-- To scatter the seed doth go;
The gardener now is busy,
SWith spade, with rake and with hoe;
The labourer in the vineyard
Must carefully tend the vine;
Labour and toil in the spring-time.
And autumn brings corn and wine.

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When on the mountain melts the snow,
The brooklets run, the streamlets flow,
The mighty river, next, set free,
Rolls grandly onward to the sea.
But when, beneath the sun's warm ray,
The snow too quickly melts away,
Then angry floods cause wild alarm.
And bring much danger, loss and harm.
The brooks, now changed to torrents wide,
Rush down the rocks in roaring tide,
No river in its banks remains,
The headlong current whelms the plains.
The fields are spoiled with sand and mud,
And houses sink beneath the flood.








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) boy may think himselff so wise,
l Because he gets his tasks at school,
S.. D~ [ne by a boy of sma1lr size -
Poor April fool.
A girl Day think that all is done.
SIf she is only dressed to rule,
And has tine silks and satins on -
Poor April fool.
Boys of their strength and wit may prate,
S- And try by boasting th find tools,
S'.:, The truth will come out, soon or late -
Poort April fools.
selfish greedy boy we see,
,.Who wonders wine his friends grow cool,
,,yf -- 'And why they shun his company -


Poor April fool.


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Now the trees are thick with blossom,
White and pink the twigs are crown'd;
And the sweet refreshing showers
Soft are falling all around.
Now the trees must well be tended,
SFreed from vermin ev'ry shoot,
.'i Well they will repay the trouble,
When they bend neathh autumn, fruit.
-.LL. Now from dusky streets emerging
Come the good folks from the town;
Glad to tread the fragrant meadow
i With its carpet soft as down,
'See the children gaily singing,
Walking by their parents' side,
Spring has brought them buds and flowers,
All the meads are well supplied -
E'en the poor old broken soldier
With his crutch walks forth to day;
SYoung and .old rejoice in April,
And expect the coming May.


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.^ ._ The Spring has fairly now begun,
A nd the leaves are on the trees,
The blust'ring wild march-winds are done,
Nuw comes the mild April-breeze.
The violet.peeps from its mossy home,
The primrose looks forth from its bower.
SThe butterfly over the felds doth roam,
Enjoying the nuootide-hour.
S April is come with a merry call,
And its treasures the spring discloses, -
The boys bowl the boop, and toss the ball,
.i While the girls seek flowers for posies.
.-And see, on the rooftree. I declare
SMaster Stork once more doth appear;
All solemn and grave he is standing there,
iAnd he knows that the spring is here.


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S -M., ( FhFlowers ,f snowy whiteness.
May time is here -
S (ardens bloom in trcshnos,
rooks ginltly tlow,
h 3ses blush in richness
G gardens all a-glow.
S Niw the little swallow
i nce more is conmle
Many more will follow.
May brings them home.
_.Bus, lives they're leading,
Little birds all,
i'-1i; Iluingry nestlings feeding
BNy the old Wall
SJ ciSo,. the hrft:thorn tiusliiig
Pink, bright and gay
tSee the rloses llushiLng,
t Hlhil, lovely May!


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1 7Look at the pretty bIrown squirrel ,
'v^ Twri-e o(n thp tree d<-th he sit,
His, litti, hl.1k eyes turning quickly
ik a Illw with plenty of wit.,
SHe skips up the old trel so nimbly.
And sits as upright as a mian,
1, And s?-nms to be snueily saying,
SJust catch me. my boY., if yol Cni.
And he Is a proident creature, -
~.,,.' For wlhe the Warmt stimlner has flown.
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Sol" children, relmtt er tlrl squirrel.
le skips up the old tree so nimbly.





eAn sites as ulesofrit nas a man,
And seems to Ibe saucily saying.
12.. ,Jusl catch m'x my Iy b, if youl can.,
.; An lie is a provident creature, -
P ', '" He'll hnte a good store fo~r tie wiut,,r

Laid up in a house of his own
::" .5)o, children, remember th,. sqluirrel.
Here's a lesson for many a mau;
"'- If you would have food for the winter,
S Be sure and work hard while you can.


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Now the gnats at. evening dancing
; *- Hover neathh the setting sun.
Now the butterflies are glancing
i i Through the garden, one by one.
Now the eager boys are watching,
Where the painted insects roam,
-.-' In their nets the choicest catching.
For their cabinets at home.
Now the bees abroad aro humming
t-;nth'ring fast their balmy store,
For they know the days are coming
When the flowers will bloom no more
Now should children, wisdom learning,
From the busy thrifty bee,
lUse the time that, ne'er returning
cl- Must not he spent slothfully;
Only he who hath employment
In the school or in the tield
Ever tastes the full enjoyment
Holidays and play-time yield.


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The merry mouth of May
May be time for sport and play.
As many of our poets tell
But this is likewise true,
It brings us work to do.
And it must have its work done well
There are sheep that must he washed
There is linen must be bleached,
There's a task to be done ev'ry day
Then early we'll begin,
That each task he fitted in,
And nothing left undone in May


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Yonder in the tree
Shaking down the cherries
Won't you think ot mn-'t

I've a little sister
S Lies at home in bed,
She's so weak and sickly
Sho can't lift up her head.

S-. G;ive. me bright red cherries,
I'll take them to her soon.
That she may rujiicep in
The gifts of houinteious Jlunie.


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In June we have the longest day
The longest night in Decenmber.
The loudest gales in blust'ing M-Irirh
The thickest fogs in November.
July brings frequent thunderstorms.
May makes the flowers to grow.
September brings us ripening fruit
And February snow.


In August, we see the harvest cut.
In October the tield is turned
At Christmas we may all enjoy.
What we though the year have earned
The evening is fair and calm and bright
Now in the leafy June,
And the mower sits anld hammers his scvthc
In the light of the beauteous mooni


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S '- With scythe and with rake
S .tild our way we take,
""- ;-'' At early morning's call,
Merry haymakers all.
.- Ill The mower cuts the grass,
." .- .... Then onward we must pass
", / j With our rakes, all a-row,
S.. "-o toss it to and fro;
"" '. -- In thl, field when it hath lain
.0 .... \VWe load it on the wain,
S --- And in the home field
.-, v A mighty stack we build.
And when we've stored our hay,
i t.)Our grateful thanks we pay,
< '- '-< To Him, who;e county yields
-. A blessing to our fields.


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u-ring all the sultry day -
"i Hot lnth fallen the sunny ray.
But ere afternoon was past,
.Rain was pouring thick and ;fst.
Then the sunbeaus bright and fair.
Burst through heavy rainclnuds there.
Sudden in the sky did glow,
S% 1 Large and full the blessed how,
With its radiant colours spread,
Bright and fair it shone o'erhead.
Emblem of a promise given,
*" By the Lord of Earth and Heaven,
S That the world should ne'er again
SBe o erwhelmed with floods of rain, -
A That so long as earth should hold,
Night and day, and heat and cold.
SSpring and harvest should not cease
And the Rainbow sign of peace,
Shineth in the heavens overhead,
i 1: When the rains on earth are shed
SThus we see it still endure -
Child. God's promises nre sure





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Th, corii, ihe splendid yellow corn
'-' '' Is rip'ning in the sun

p. When tiim est may be liegun --
Th- he-irl,,C barlh-y ir,.w waves hi11g
,i Aui" I And slhalkes in the sumnirer lbreezr,
And as tih reaping tiLne draws iigh
Tho little birds take their '*.ase -

IF .Thr-l' voir ng n olet can fly alone.
rnd ol ,.l anil young are hovering o'er
Sh,- field. % here the corn is grown
"Amnmi,?g tie ,irii-cars tall and long
P ,: ..Thl.-v tlult-r and tl, all d:iy,
For lhiw lshoiil little hirds knnw 'tik rurng
STo steal thie curn :Iway'' -
SSo th? farmer limakes the scaro-rnw stantl
SIn the cornfield high in view -
Biut what ho: is worth they iumri.rstand
S Alter a dny i0 two


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bathing 1 and Stuinuninq


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Beautiful limpid river.
How quietly glides it hy.
('ool and inviting ever. *
All through the hot July
How in the sultry weather
Rippling it seems to say
S .,Comre little bj.ys, come*" hither.
Who's for a hath todaye?-
Stand not debating gr;ively
In with -onu one aud .all,
Plunge in and strike nut hravilv,
SBoys should not mind :a fall.
E'en should the stream strik-e oldlly

'Tis but a plunge and it's done.
In with you all, then, boldly,
In with you, every one


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SFor weeks it has been ot and dry
SHot weather even fr .July.
S- Thi air is heavy. calm, nri- still.
The clouds are gathering o'ei t luhill.
The catle seeCin but ill at ':a;.
_. *, :
I Th.e toss their heads, and sluiit thi Ir'eze,1
Tli-e lucks aiid eeesc a f oisy c rew.
M Wero cackling all thic fiarmyard thlrougli.
And Rover lolls with rongue distplaie'rl.
And tries to cool hmt in ttr shaill1
Sudden there incomes a ivivil tinhli.
And their, a mighty thunder crash,
And straight the gusty wind doth blow
S As though the trees wouldd oveirthrow
Nown flash I'i tiash thhe lightn)ingR' sihdl.
The thunder rolleth i;rnid o'erLeaid,
&*if. And nowv the forest cru-akc alil hindi
,And "now thie flash the oaktre-e rniid;
,llBut In! I ainid the thunder roar
4 Ad1 The welrconig ra.in doth downward olwlr
Aunl by the ool refrestilung Hlood.
X- All nturel' hi-ity -serns i iioewe\ d









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hen August comes the corn-ears stand
Smiliug o'er all the pleasant land;
They nod their heads, and seem to say:
-The harvest can begin tod:y.-
The farmer now may hope to see
Return ior all his industry;
Nor pains nor labour hath he spared
And all things now are well prepared.
The reapers, 'miid the bearded grain,
Now with the sickle toil amain;
Till dewy night at work they keep,
Who sow iu spring, in autumn reap.


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JIrcivt time







S;tre it home


With thi last waggon load
(Onward we come;
IGily we now -hall hold
Our harvest home
Through the hot summer ,liv
Blithely we wrought;
See, uow the blessed shea:ves
Hom we w hae brought.
Twine the bright hormesr, wreath,
Sing the glad soug
Now the ean;Ird h:s ci'o'.
W'nited. lfor, Inn.
Ahd let u1 s Il- neer forget
Whence this is given;
Blessing .and increase are
Go1i'd gifts from Heavei


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he uwoodtl in gust


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The Stag in August, with the doe,
Proud through the leafy woods doth go:
He now looks fat, and richly fed,
With brauching autleis on his head.
From forest green he'll sometimes break,
And through the fields his way he'll take:
His trampling doth the corn destroy
And gives the farrier much annoy -
Then, in the leafy covert green,
The stout wild hoar is sometimes seen;
He trotR along with heavy pace,
Nor thinks that ;ntumn brings the chase


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In the warm August weather
We've stowed all our corn away,
And now we may meet together,
- There's time now for sport and play.
Still it is bright warm summer,
Hedges and fields still gny, -
Welcome we every comer,
Hold we our feast to day


Now in a crowd advancing,
See, all the village throng;
Now doth begin the dancing
Mingled with mirthful song.
So, with a welcome hearty,
Call we our neighbours in;
Now comes a joyful party,
Now shall our sports begin.


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he tree the boys love best to see,
It is the good old apple tree,
That hangeth now its branches down,
Laden with fruit from branch to crown.
SThe harvest in the fields is o'er;
SBut now there comes one harvest more,
- A harvest that the children wait,
SWith song and shout to celebrate.
For all the leafy orchard now
Doth with the ruddy apples glow,
And purple plum and golden pear
In ripened fulness too are there.
We now with poles and baskets speed,
And bring the ladder forth with heed:
Right carefully it must be set,
Or some a fall may chance to get.
The branches shake, be ready now,
And guard your heads, you boys below,
Else you may find the falling fruit
May give you but a rough salute;
Now bear your baskets brimming o'er
With apples ripe, for winter store,
And see how from the rising pile,
The jolly fruit doth seem to smile; -
No wonder children love to see
The hearty kind old apple tree.


Al


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(ioing to school


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Holiday time is over,
All joys of earth niust end;
Therefore each merry rover,
Back to Ins school rust wend.
Holiday time brought pleasure
All the bright August through,
And in no stinted measure,
Have ve enjoyed it, too.
We've climbed up Imany a mountain,
We've rested by many a lake,
We've drunk at. many a fountain,
And wandered through bush and brake.
Now this gay journey's over,
No earthly joys can last,
Back comes each merry rover,
Holiday time is past.


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Autumn d;iu

















." .'....ys of Autiunm, fruitful. time,
Show'ring gifts on e'ry clime,
Lt'." ( Glad and grateful we receive
All the gifts that thou dost give.
S", Apple-gath'ring hardly done,
it -Now another crop comes on,
Walnuts in their cradles green
Peep, the russet leaves between.
Now with stolIte and sticks, our boys
Pelt the tree, 'mid gleeful noise,
-r "- Welcoming with joyful shout,
Each new nut that tumbles out.
- Qh -Bitter is the thick green sldu,
Sweet the nut that lurks within,
j.. Just like,learning: First take pains,
Afterwards you reap the gains.,,






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\ //The autumn winds are blowing loud,
The dull days shorten fast,
Y The storks are flying southward all,
STo stay till winter's past;
And now's the lime to fly our kites,
'$ While brisk the breezes blow,
i We'll fly them all together, boys,
SAn d see how high they'll go.
Nuw, you all know, a paper kite
S Is very apt to stray, -
But l;r the string that holds it back
It soou would fly away
l Just so when we would quit our tasks
For some light, pleasing thing -
*e Then industry doth stetioy us,
Just as the kite the string,
Aid seems to tell us, eT'ry one,
M' y boy, there's wok that must bo done.


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The grapes of green or purple hue
S Have rip'-cned all the sununer through,
trh4 And even through the autumn day
~Are warmed by many a sunny ray;
; The bunches that haug thickly there
R.ichll repay the vintner's care.
I With tubs and baskets see him come,
For now begins his harvest home:
SThe grapes in large round vats are placed,
And in the winepress next. are pressed,
Then crushed, they yield, for man's delight
The sparkling wine, both red and white -
The children all rejoice to hear
SThat vintage time is drawing near
And now right sumptuously they fare,
With purple bunches for their share.


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0,0oor bee1)


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Now that t lnl- summer i; over,
N.,w that the bhi'-ht days ihai f'ied,
And mists lie r.'uli. on the chilly wold
And the y.ar'f- bright tf'.wers are dead, -
The beet wirouight through the summer, -
'T'e wrought to iijre,;-se their store,
Flying each hlir I'rtmn flower and flower, -
In tle fields t liy find i io more.
Aund nojw c*'les the b.ee-keeper
Anii takes Idottwu each well stored hive,
To sell fo:r money. he wants tle bhney,
Whlereon the p,.,.'r Ilees should li\t e;
With smok-e of sulphur he kills then,
Placed neathh each hive by turns;
AloT! poor bee hot each one, jou see,
Enijys the food he earns.


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The flail should be lifted,
.. Brought round with a swing,
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hen down on the straw, till

'A'o "My merry young threshers
l. Keel) time good an, trre;
I ". My honest young readers
ILj ., Here's something bfor you; -
0 3 'i-. Remember the lesson
S,-: ---- That's told here in rhyme
All work, to be well donor,
SHere' someing for ou;
"V '..- Re -e-ib"r the le --sou
4 A orL to _, e -. l o;l&
6-M ust be done in time.


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ihe grand hunt








Already the snow has fallen,
The trees their leaves have lost;
Already the year gives warning,
With tokens of coming trost;
Our huntsmen now are ready,
'I And forth to the fields are gone,
I"- To seek a store of venison
,/ ,' V For Winter is coming on.
.',, The stags are all astonished
,... To see such a tribe of men,
S The wild boar trots forth grunting
From out of his quiet den;
2 Rabbits and hares are scudding
As fast as they can run,
I Flying before the rifles,
S In mortal fear each one.
'-'I !- They fly for life, poor creatures,
But run they as they may,
S Our huntsmen skilled and cunning
SWill nW many low today.





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Here's an early frost boys,
Winter scarce begun,
SAnd rivers frozen over,
And windows closed, each one.


Let us have our game, boys,
SQuickly while e we may, -
S Throw the hearty snowball,
S Ere it melts away.
On the. frozen river
Cut we out the slide,
S In a merry line, then,
Quickly o'er it glide.
But while gay and merry
ij Thus we sport and play,
Much the poor must suffer
Through the wintry day.
Let us not forget them, -
Ev'ry one should do
What he can to help them,
All the winter through.


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ealo:,us woik and cheerful play,
Duties varying day by day,
/l Now have brought us through the year,
$ \ i Till our old December's here.
He this year has ushered in
^ VSuch a frost as ne'er was seen.
See, the waggon with its load
S<''W" Rolls along, as on a load,
-- ij \\' Where, until the frost began,
SSwift the rapid river ran.
I. 'I Now the skater shows his skill,
SNow the hare from copse and hill
Timid yet must venture down
To the gardens near the town,
For the snowclad frozen field
SNot a scrap of food will yield.
S- -- Now the silver stars at night
,; Twinkle with a frosty light.
,' In the house the tires are stirred,
--- ." ... And at evening now are heard
S-" .' Stories of the olden time.
S'':: Wonders of the foreign clime, -
.' .... ? ". ;t- '. ', Told to children's great delight,
-- Round the winter tire so bright.


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The wood that was felled in autumn
Is joyfully n'ow brought in;
We pile it high on the waggon,
For winter doth now begin:
The little birds at the window
Are fluttering round the crumbs,
We strew for them ev'ry morning.
When the cold season comes.
It's good to be kind and ready,
It's good to remember the poor.
From the little bird at the window.
To the orphan child at. the door.


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ThrirstnaM tue


The year is nearly past and gone, The Christmas tree, with blaze of light.
The best of all its days comes on, Now in the cheerful room burns bright,
The day that comes in old December With presents, more than I can tell,
The day whereon we all remember For all the children who've done well.
How once our Saviour Christ was born, iJ The idle naughty boy, they say,
How here he suffered pain and scorn Is by a rough man driven away,
Salvation to this earth to bring None of my friends may this befall.
And now He rules in heaven, our king. And so, a fair good night to all.




I




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