• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 One win-ter day
 How Tom-my and the ba-by saw...
 Af-ter Christ-mas
 Two ways
 Peep-sy's sto-ry
 Go-ing to bed
 Miss Pink Toes
 Al-fie
 Lit-tle name-less
 Back Cover






Title: Play room book
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00065520/00001
 Material Information
Title: Play room book
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: D. Lothrop and Company
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: [1880?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1885   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1885   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1885
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
General Note: Date of publication based on binding indicating publication in the 1880's.
General Note: Contains prose and verse.
General Note: Bound in decorated cloth.
General Note: Some illustrations are silhouettes.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00065520
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002228481
notis - ALG8792
oclc - 71145045

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Page 1
    One win-ter day
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    How Tom-my and the ba-by saw San-ta
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Af-ter Christ-mas
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Two ways
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Peep-sy's sto-ry
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Go-ing to bed
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Miss Pink Toes
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Al-fie
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Lit-tle name-less
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text
















PLAY
ROOM
"BOOK












PLAY ROOM BOOK


BOSTON
D. LOTHROP AND COMPANY
32 FRANKLIN STREET












ONE WIN-TER DAY.

IT was a grand slid-ing
place." Hard had they toiled
to get it, too-the Black chil-
dren, the Brown chil-dren, the
Green chil-dren and the White
chil-dren. Please, now, don't
think the lit-tle folks these
col-ors--they were Mr. Brown's
chil-dren, Mr. Green's chil-
dren, and so on.
These chil-dren-the Blacks





ONE WIN-TER DAY.


and the Browns and the Greens
and the Whites-all had had
new sleds at Christ-mas; gai-ly
pai n t-ed, fine-named- the
"Tel-e-phone,"and "Gen. But-
ler," and Hold the Fort," and
so on splen-did run ners,
ev-er-y one. The boys ancd
girls met at each oth-er's gates
and bragged; they might have
quar-relled had notlit-tle A-my
Green ob-served that there was
no snow.
No, none; and none came
un-til next week. Then there
was a storm. The side hill
was well cov-ered by noon.
When the storm ceased the





ONE WIN-TER DAY.


chil-dren came out and fixed
the hill. They trod up and
down and up and down, and
poured on ev-er so much wa-
ter to freeze o-ver night.
Next morn-ing the slid-ing
place" looked grand, though
the snow was blown o-ver it a
lit-tle; and the Black chil-dren,
the Browns, the Whites and
Greens, in their muf-flers and
mit-tens, got on their sleds in
breath-less haste. A beau-ti-
ful pro-ces-sion they were,
Tom-my Black a-head on the
" Gen. But-ler," naugh-ty John
Green hold-ing on to Dick
Brown's hair; and a brave





ONE WIN-TER DAY.


whoop it was when the steers-
man lay back and start-ed down
the glo-ri-ous hill. He steered
swift-ly right in-to a tree-
branch which had been blown
down and fro-zen in o-ver-
night. Hold the Fort" ran
right o-ver Gen. But-ler," and
"Gen. But-ler" drove right
in-to a snow-bank, and each
sled and its rid-er was thrown
right o-ver the fel-low in front,
and the girls screamed, and it
was "O DEAR ME!" gen-
er-al-ly.











HOW TOM-MY AND THE
BA-BY SAW SAN-TA.

LIT-TLE Tom-my had been
watch-ing all day -watch-ing
for San-ta Claus.
It was the day be-fore Christ-
mas, and he knew San-ta must
be on the way. The big cit-y
lay off to the north, be-hind the
great hill, and Tom-my felt
sure San-ta would come down
the hill road. At the sun-ny





HOW TOM-MY AND THE BA-BY
south win-dows, a-mong the
i-vies, you could see a-ny-one
com-ing o-ver the hill-road for
two miles. Tom-my knew, if
he kept a-ny kind of watch, he
should be sure to see old San-
ta at some point- and Tom-
my's eyes just shot forth spark-
les to think of be-hold-ing
the fa-mous rein-deer team.
"Just you fink, Miss Ba-by!"
he said to his wee sis-ter, swing-
ing in her blue-and-white crib,
" just you fink of four, sev-en,
eight lit-tle ho's-ses wiv horns
to their heads, and wiv bells
to 'em that go jin-gle-jin-gle-
jin-gle and Tom-my ca-





SAW SAN-TA CLAUS.


pered a-cross the floor for a
mo-ment, throw-ing up his
hands and shak-ing Miss Ba-
by's rat-tie with all his might.
Then he went back to his win-
dow a-gain.
All at once he cried out.
" Ba-by! I see him! I do fink
I see him!"
"Wa-wa ?" gurg-led Ba-by,
with her pink fin-gers in her
mouth.
Tom-my wait-ed just a min-
ute lon-ger he did see some-
thing ver-y long and black
a-way on top of the hill, and
then, with fly-ing curls and red
cheeks, he rushed away, pushed





HOW TOM-MY AND THE BA-BY
a has-sock up to the crib,
dragged Ba-by up bod-i-ly with
a long tug, and--well, mam-
ma had just time for one sur-
prised smile, and then a swift
rush-just so that Tom-my
and Ba-by did-n't pitch back-
wards --they just did-n't, and
that was all! And Mam-ma's
scream so fright-ened Tom-my
that he for-got San-ta for some
time; and when he did look the
team was out of sight. So
Tom-my did-nt see him come,
af-ter all--but come he did--
for such a fat stock-ing as
Tom-my's next morn-ing, you
nev-er saw!












AF-TER CHRIST-MAS.

Toot-a-toot-toot! Rub-a-dub-
dub! Hoo-wAw!
It sound-ed like Fourth of
Ju-ly at Mrs. Jones'; but it
was on-ly Day af-ter Christ-
mas.
Joe-y and Jim-my, with their
Christ-mas pres-ents, had been
shut in-to the "noise-room," as
Pa-pa Jones called the nurs-
er-y. They had had the run





AF-TER CHRIST-MAS.


of the house" all yes-ter-day,
for Mam-ma Jones had great
pa-tience with Christ-mas rack-
et; but this morn-ing she had
turned them in-to their own
lit-tle king-dom.
"Now make all the noise
you wish," she said kind-ly, as
she hur-ried a-way with her
fing-ers in her ears.
Then there was a good time
in the "noise-room!"
Joe-y sat down on the bed
and puffed out his ap-ple-red
cheeks and blowed his fife like
the north wind; and Jim-my
beat his drum with both sticks,
stand-ing up on the pil-lows.






AF-TER CHRIST-MAS.


All at once Joe-y sprang to
his dimp-led legs, and ran at
Jim-my. Hol'still!" he cried
fierce-ly. Lem-me shoot you
with my fife!"
Jim-my did-n't quite know
a-bout that; but Joe-y ex-
plained that the sol-diers in his
pict-ure books marched at each
oth-er and "fit-ed" with fifes
and drums.
So Jim-my came from the
head of the bed, and Joe-y
from the foot, toot-ing and rub-
a-dub-ing, and marched up,
and by, and a-round, scream-
ing and laugh-ing, un-til Joe-y
was so out of breath he for-got





AF-TER CHRIST-MAS.


to blow and stood still; and
then Jim-my called out, "I
beat!" and jumped at his pris-
on-er so hard they both fell
o-ver the edge of the bed to
the floor and laid there shriek-
ing till mam-ma came rush-ing
in to see what was the mat-ter.
I should think this was the
'noise-room!"' she cried, pick-
ing them up. "If ev-er San-ta
Claus brings a fife and drum
to this house a-gain I'll-I'll
do some-thing to San-ta Claus!
You may de-pend on that! "













TWO WAYS.
DON-NY CLARKE'S way was
one way. He had a nice don-
key a ver-y nice crea-ture
in-deed if on-ly the right sort
of boy had been his mas-ter.
But when Don-ny rode he
thought the prop-er thing was
to take a big stick a-long and
make his don-key go. But the
min-ute Don-key saw the stick,
both his ears and his tem-per
stif-fened up, and not one inch


~--~-~-~-;~~--,;-~aeL;






TWO WAYS.


would he budge-no, not e-
ven though Don-ny's broth-er,
with an-oth-er big stick, stood
be-hind and pushed with all
his might.
Lit-tle Su-sie Dean's way
was an-oth-er way. Her pa-pa
had giv-en her a pret-ty lit-tle
colt- a grace-ful but most
wil-ful lit-tle an-i-mal, whose
de-light it was to not go
where it ought. But now
gen-tle Su-sie can call it an-y-
where with a hand-ful of clo-
ver.
Will Don-ny ev-er learn
that the "come way is bet-ter
than the go way ?










~3~ ~.he~~r~34


PEEP-SY'S STO-RY.

WHAT sort of a tale do you
sup-pose naugh-ty, cun-ning
lit-tie Peep-sy Price told one
day, when she was ta-ken up
af-ter her nap ?
Her black eyes spark-led
like stars as she looked, first
at her mam-ma, then at sis-ter
Jen-ny.





PEEP-SY S STO-RY.


I will tell 'oo a 'to-ry," said
she, "an' it's true-true; for I
dweamed it my-self, and Dol-ly
was wiv me. Well, Dol-ly an'
I went to Cake-ee-land. Tall
wom-ens were bak-ing cake-
ees. An' they was all white
cake-ees wiv p'ums. An' I
said :
"' Wom-ens, give Dol-ly an'
me some cake-ee!'
An' wom-ens said:
"'It-tle girl, go home! 'Oo
own mam-ma has cake-ee in
her cake-ee jar.'
"An' I said:
"' Wom-ens, my mam ma
keeps her white cake-ee wiv





PEEP-SY S STO-RY.


p'ums, for vis-'tor folks.'
An' wom-ens said:
"' Tell 'oo mam-ma, and
here naugh-ty Peep-sy cast
down her eyes, and her round
cheeks grew just as pink as
they could be, "' that her own
lit-tle girl is more 'por-tance
than vis-'tor folks.' An' then
we cored a-way. An' this is
a true-true dweam, for Dol-ly
was wiv me and she heard what
the tall wom-ens said."
Mam-ma thought this was a
ver-y re-mark-a-ble dream,
in deed. And then, pres-
ent-ly, when she had put
Peep-sy down, she gave both






PEEP-SY S STO-RY.

her "own girls" a slice of the
vis-'tor folks' cake white
cake-ee with p'ums in it."









^--^ "y'-, "t '-'




GO-ING TO BED.

SUP-POSE, lit-tle dar-ling,
I put you to bed -
Why, dear, you know growl-ing
Is real-ly ill-bred!
Off-shoes and stock-ings!
Off-lit-tie dress!
On-lit-tle night-gown!
What a suc-cess!





GO-ING TO BED.


Here is the crib;
Here is the pil-low;
A nice lit-tle nest,
My dear will just fill, O
I'll toss you once,
I'll toss you twice,
I'll lay you down
As I toss you thrice.
Lie still, my pret-ty,
I'll tuck up your toes;
I'll tuck you up warm
To the tip of your nose.
Kiss me now, pre-cious!
No, don't lift your head--
Such a bad lit-tle daugh-ter!-
Won't stay in bed.






















~/ i


i^1-- "ii. 7-. ," ER l 10oth-ers
stoo ,.b -fr a, cau-t 1on s1
w e re ar
,,"" ',, r- t -te
stodil bf a pr~e tSt ,i -S


stood be-fore a pret-ty lit-tlc


7n : m_





MISS PINK TOES.


house that some-bod-y had
brought and set down on the
cel-lar-stairs such a pret-ty
house with shin-y wire blinds
and a bal-co-ny on the roof. She
knew it was meant for a mouse's
house be-cause there was bread
and cheese in-side, all hung up,
so hand-y, on little hooks.
Miss Pink Toes was ver-y
tired of the great un-ti-dy home
be-hind the lath-and-plas-ter;
so, that ver-y night, she took
pos-ses-sion of the new house.
It was ver-y nice the bread
and cheese hung just right to
nib-ble. A-bout mid-night her
moth-er and sis-ters passed by,





MISS PINK TOES.
taking a walk. Her moth-er
glanced in- then shrieked.
I've set up house-keep-
ing, you see come in !" said
Miss Pink Toes, kind-ly.
''Come in?" shrieked
Moth-er Mouse. In-toatrap?
You are in a trap, I say!"
A las it was too true!
Poor Pink Toes nev-er came
out a-live.















AL-FIE.

AL-FIE lives a-cross the
street. He and I are friends
and he some-times comes to
see me. I al-ways know when
he is knock-ing, for he be-gins
ver-ygen-tly, and goes on stead-
i-ly, loud-er and loud-er, un-til,
no mat-ter how bus-y I am, I
call, "come in! "





ALFIE.


We gen-er-al-ly play with the
bird-seed, "'cause you can im-
ag-ine it's most any-fing," Al-
fie says. We put down two
news-pa-pers on the floor, get a
spoon and a tin box, and turn
out the bird-seed. Al-fie says:
"Let's play it was coal. Want
a-ny coal, ma-'am ?"
I say, Yes. How much is
it?"
Then he says, It is two
cents a ton, and five dol-lars for
put-ting it in."
And I say, All right," and
pre-tend to hand him the mon-
ey, and he shov-els the coal in-
to the tin box with the spoon





AL-FIE.
We play the tin box was the
coal-bin.
Af-ter awhile I say, Let's
play it was cake." And we mix
it, and stir it, and pat it out
flat, and then cut it in-to rounds
with the tum-bler. Al-fiesays
it is "seed-cake. "
Al-fie finds it ver-y hard to
learn to count like oth-er peo-
ple, but he has a way of his
own. This is how he counts
his blocks: he puts them in
rows of three and says, Two
and an-od-er one! Two and
an-od-er one !" till he has count-
ed them all. His mam-ma
thought he would nev-er know


1





AL-FIE.


if she should put a-way six of
them, and so she tried it, but
when he count-ed them a-gain
he look-ed sur-prised. Dere
ought to be two more twos-
and-an-od-er one !"
Al-fie has one bad fault -
he runs a-way; and then he has
to stay in the house all the next
day for a pun-ish-ment.
One day he ran a-way to see
a cir-cus. An-oth-er day he got
on a street-car, when the con-
duc-tor was-n't look-ing, and
had a hard time get-ting back,
for he went far-ther than he
meant to, and hurt his leg a
lit-tle, be-sides, when he jump-





AL-FIE.


ed off. And one day he had
an ad-ven-ture. It hap-pened
in this way:
When he went out in the af-
ter-noon to play on the side-
walk, his mam-ma told him not
to go too far a-way; in fact
not to turn the corn-er. Even-
ing came and Al-fie did not ap-
pear. His mam-ma looked up
the street and down the street,
but he was no-where to be seen.
How-ev-er, just as she was be-
gin-ning to feel anx-ious, he
came run-ning in, breath-less
and im-pa-tient.
"Mam-ma, mam-ma! I
didn't run a-way dis time! Just





AL-FIE.


wait till I tell you! A lit-tle
durl met me and she said: 'Lit-
tle boy, I'm awful a-fraid of
dis dog dats fol-low-ing me,
and I wish you'd walk home
wif me.' 'All right,' I told
her, 'I will,' and I did. And
den she said : Dis is a pie I'm
car-ry-ing, and I fink de dog
smells it. What's your name,
it-tle boy?' I said, 'What's
yours ?' She says, 'my name's
Bes-sie,' and I said,' mine's Al-
fie.' Well,' she said, 'Al-fie,
I be-lieve I'm a-squsk-ing my
pie !' Den we dot to her house,
and de dog went to do in af-
ter her, and I called out : I





AL-FIE.


ain't a-fraid of him! do on,
and I'll keep him off!' and she
went in and I cored home."
Al-fie's mam-ma looked ver-y-
se-ri-ous. And how did you
keep off the dog, Al-fie ?" she
asked.
"I just said, 'do way, sir!'
and he run-ned like a-ny-fing.
Must I stay in to-mor-row,
mam-ma ? was dat run-ning
a-way ?"
His mam-ma said it was cer-
tain-ly run-ning a-way, but she
would for-give him if he would
try not to do so a-ny more.











LIT-TLE NAME-LESS.

JUST ours-that is all;
Rolled up round-y like a ball;
Red-rose face and turned-up
nose,
Cun-ning chin and pink-y toes,
Dim-pled cheeks and doubled
fist-
Sweet-est ba-by on the list.

Out from Ba-by-land he came,
What shall be this ba-by's
name?





LIT-TLE NAME-LESS.


He for-got to bring one here,
We must find one for the dear;
Some-thing odd and pure and
true,
Noth-ing else for him will do.

"What's his bus-i-ness?" Don't
you know?
Just to eat, to sleep and grow.
Mak-ing each one in the house
Meek and qui-et as a mouse.
He will rule; this ti-ny thing
Makes us sub-jects; he is king.

Not a word can ba-by say
Of his land so far a-way;
When he sleeps he smiles to
see






LIT-TLE NAME-LESS.


Things un-known to you and
me;


When he wakes he stares and


blinks--
No one knows what
thinks.


ba-by




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