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 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Index
 Music and words
 Back Cover






Title: Little songs for little singers
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00065500/00001
 Material Information
Title: Little songs for little singers
Alternate Title: Little songs
Physical Description: 93 p. : ; 15 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Mason, Lowell, 1792-1872 ( Author, Primary )
Perkins, Henry ( Publisher )
Boston Academy of Music ( Consultant )
Perkins & Marvin ( Publisher )
Kidder and Wright ( Stereotyper )
Publisher: Perkins & Marvin
Henry Perkins
Place of Publication: Boston
Philadelphia
Manufacturer: Stereotyped by Kidder & Wright
Publication Date: 1840
 Subjects
Subject: Children's songs   ( lcsh )
Religious poetry, American -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1840   ( lcsh )
Hymns -- 1840   ( rbgenr )
Songs -- 1840   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1840
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Hymns   ( rbgenr )
Songs   ( rbgenr )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Lowell Mason ; published under the sanction of the Boston Academy of Music.
General Note: With music.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00065500
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002233982
oclc - 50802248
notis - ALH4399

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Index
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Music and words
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
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        Page 25
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        Page 28
        Page 29
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        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
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        Page 91
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        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text



































IThe B41dk UnLlbhaIY

I, f~rnEJ3


CI ii I I "- II
II








LITTLE SONGS FOR LITTLE SINGERS.






BY LOWELL MASON.





PUBLISHED UNDER THE SANCTION OF THE BOSTON ACADEMY OF MUSIC.








BOSTON:
PERKINS & MARVIN.
PHILADELPHIA
HENRY PERKINS.
1840.












Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1840,

BT PERKINS & MARVIN,
in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the District of Massachusetts.

Stereotyped by Kidder & Wright, 32 Congress Street.







MosT of the following Songs are designed for small children, and are suitable for the
Family, or for the Primary School.
In a few instances the words have been taken from My Little Hymn Book," or other
similar children's books ; and a small number of the tunes will be recognized as popular and
well known melodies 5 but much the greatest part of the work is new, consisting either of
original sones, (music and words,) or of translations from the German, with the original music.




7


INDEX.


Autumn,
Awake, .
Be careful in play, .
Bird song,
Call to singing, .
Care not for the morrow, .

.. see how happily, .
Cradle song, .
Doing right,
Early to bed and early to rise,
Lii. ..
E .. .....


Herald of spring,
Hour of singing,.
I'd be a bird, .. .
I must not teaze my mother, .
Like evening breezes, .
Little Robin,
L... .-. and pleasing God,
31 .: .I up,
1 .. i.terrily sing,
Ai ,Il y,
M,.. .... .
Morning, .
M ..,. ..; : call, .
~I *..,,,. song, .
7 I, .
I|,I,'1.. 1- ., table pt. 1. .
Multiplication table pt. 2,. .
HT ,,i. garden, .
l1, 1iii. I arden, .
Of songs I know full many, .
Our Father in Heaven, .
Prayer, .
Rosy on the heather,
Saturday evening, .
School is begun,
Shepherd's song,
S i.'. praise,
-. r the night watch,
... .I the seed corn,


'4


42
S82
93
. 65
65
S
.44
30
S91
75
S94
48
9
73
33
38
.24
36
87
68
53
80
S59
83
S79
41
*25
32
29
12
85
.46
47
.45
39
S63
61
. 8
20
. 13
54
S69
26
. 6
88
S11


: :






iv INDEX.

Stars that on your wondrous way,. .
The Bear, .........
The boy and his flower, ,
The brook, .
The cage for the little bird, .
The chatter box, .
The corn flowers, .
The cow, .
The day and night flower, .
The daisy, .
The flowers,
The good scholar, .
The kind heart, .
The Lambkin,.
The Linnet, .
The little child's go to bed song,
The little disaster, .
The little girl and the robin, .
The little star, .
The lily,. ......
The menagerie, .. .
The moon, .
The moon is very fair and bright, .
The pigeon, 4.
The .
The sand man .
The seasons, ..
The sheep, .
The snow drop, .
The sparrow, .........
The spider and his wife, .
T he .... .. I bell, . .
The wasp and the bee, .
Tit for tat, .. .
To the nightingale, .
Try again, .
Violets, .
Wake! wake tis day! .
We all love one another,. .
W hat shall I love, . .
What's the matter with you Mary ? .
Why do ye sing, ye little birds ? .
Winter, .
Winter's departure,
Work away, .


81
40
14
10
.27
92
S56
18
57
16
76
51
S 96
17
95
31
71
22
23
55
77
37
66
34
52
60
19
7
78
.74
86
S50
35
62
84.
.49
43
S28
64
.21
67
70
72
S15
90











LITTLE SONGS FOR LITTLE SINGERS.





CALL TO SINGING.




Join ye in our sing- ing, Share it one and all;



--- -- -- ------- --

Let our voi ces ring ing, E cho through the hall.
2
Brother, thou belongest
To the tuneful throng;
Thou thy nature wrongest
By neglect of song.
3
Wake we, then, our measure !
'Twill our youth prolong;
Oh! what strains of pleasure
Flow from cheerful song.





SONG OF PRAISE.


NAGELI.


Ye hap py ones, Who step so soft and light-ly, While youth's fair

~~ -

s-u bai-FN-- r m- - --r--ht- 0 p t Lor- ahe-

sun Is beaming warm and brigily; 0O praise theLord, O praise the Lord.


2
The joyful sound,
From youthful voices swelling,
Shall upward bound
Where purest joys are dwelling;
0 praise the Lord.


3
To thee, O Lord,
We bring our cheerful praises,
We love to join
The music Heaven raises;
O praise the Lord.


4
Our life we'll spend,
With love our pathway strewing,
'Till life shall end
In virtue ever growing;
0 praise the Lord.





THE SHEEP. 7


Lyp tmha. a-t -

La zy sheep, pry tell hy, I
La zy sheep, pray tell me why, In the plea- sant fields )ou lie,


- sides whiteFro the morning i t
- sies white From the mor ing 'till the night ?


--S --4- ---4-- --'..
e -y- thi--n-gca- some -thi--go, wha -d- -if ,say-o-- --i-

E v r a in of u a you
Eve ry thing' can some-thing do+ Bt what kind of use are you.


2
Nay, my little master, nay,
Do not serve me so I pray,
Don't you see the wool that grows
On my back to make your clothes ?
Cold, Oh, very cold you'd be
If I did not give it thee.
4


3
Sure it seems a pleasant thing;
Nipping daisies in the spring;
But how many nights I pass
On the cold and dewy grass,
Or I get my dinner where
'All the ground is brown and bare.


Then the farmer comes at last
When the merry spring is past,
Cuts my woolly coat away,
For your clothes in wintry day.
Little master, this is why
In the pleasant fields I lie.






8
i Slwy


r


-:-:=[= -A-------0L-


2
O thou who dwell'st above us,
Beneath, on every side;
Thou showest thou dost love us
In signs a child may read.

3
What boundless thanks we owe thee!
How safe to trust in thee!
When, Father, shall we know thee,
And all thy glory see ?


PRAYER.
I I I ,


~-----------~----


nl *


U


0 God we come be fore thee, The chil dren of thy










love, With faltering words a dore thee; Yet are they heard a above.

^=~rir~~-== ==~== -=I3 -






ELLEN. 9




What, El len, dis o bey mamma ? You're ve ry much to






blame; Your dear mam-ma, who loves you so, Oh sis ter, fie, for shame.


2
Why once you were a little babe,
And laid upon her arm;
And every hour she guarded you
From every thing like harm.
3
She washed and dressed you every day,
To keep you sweet and clean,
And sung you many a pretty song,
With many a kiss between.
4
If you were sick at any time,
Or if you cried with pain,


5
How patiently she led you round,
That you might learn to walk;
And spoke words o'er and o'er again
In teaching you to talk.
6
She taught you little songs and hymns,
To make you kind and mild;
And how to pray that God would love
And bless her little child.
7
And can you, Ellen, be unkind
To one who loves you so ?


She kindly watched you night and day, I think you'll try to please her now,
Till you were well again. In every thing you do.


Ir





THE BROOK.


2
Fresh and fair the flowers are springing,
Where thou windest thro' the glade;
Little birds as gaily singing,
Where thou seek'st the forest shade.


3
Not the foaming angry torrent
Be the emblem of my life;
But the softly murmuring current,
Peaceful, mild, and far from strife.


FRED. SCHNEIDER.






SONG OF THE SEED-CORN.


11


"- .. .--------- --- -- --

Thie sow-er scat-ters from his hand,His seed-corns o ver loosened land; And





won de ful each lit te grain Which e has dropped, springs p a gain.
won der ful! each lit tie grain, Which he has dropped, springs Lp a gain.


2
It shivers there, so small to view,
And longs for sunshine and for dew;
The friendly sun looks from on high,
And will not let the poor child die.

3
But soon there comes the frost and storm,
And man and beast seek shelter warm:
The plant, it to the spot is tied,
And wind and weather must abide.

4
The tender thing no harm shall know,
The skies shall cover it with snow,
Safe folded to the earth's warm breast,
Through all the winter there 'twill rest.


5
Now winter's dreary night is gone,
The lark soars high, upsprings the corn,
And waving far in beauteous green,
The corn, the cheering corn is seen.

6
Now full of cars, so tall and fair,
The bristling stalks stand mustered there,
A sea of green, their heads inclined,
They run m waves before the wind.

7
Then from his dazzling, lofty throne,
The sun upon the field looks down,
Where earth in silent spendor, dressed,
With golden autumn-wreaths doth rest.


8
The corn is ripe; the sickle rings
'Mid rustling sheaves; and gaily sings,
The reaper sings, both loud and long
With gratitude the harvest song.





MORNING SONG.


Now hath morn ing bright Chased a way the night;







Joy's in spir ing call Sounds a loud o'er all.


2
Joy, too, smiles on me,
Therefore, thanks to thee,
Thou, who hast me kept,
Safely while I slept.


3
Give me daily food,
Make me truly good;
Guide me through the day,
Safe in virtue's way.


GILCHER.






SATURDAY EVENING. 13



IP--a
1. Now the week is end ed, And its work is done;
All is still and peace ful, As the set ting sun;
thoughtss of God and hea ven Eve ry breast con trol.





D.C.
--- ---S--4-- 7-=--------



Earth ly joys de part ing, Leave the tran quil soul,
______ o. c.ii



2
Welcome! sacred evening!
Sweet is thy return;
High in every bosom
Holy feelings burn;
May our nightly slumbers
Gentle be and blest;
May we see another
Day of sacred rest.





THE BOY AND HIS FLOWER.


Yes ter day a flower was sent me, Which doth please me and con tent me;


2
Sun, O shine upon my flowret,
Clouds, forget ye not to shower it;
Flower, look up, with brightly cheer,
Nought hast thou, my flower, to fear.


3
O my mind to patience harden
Daily go I to the garden;
Daily ask I: Flowret say:
" Flowret, wilt thou blow to day ?"


4
See the sun shines on my flowret,
Clouds have not forgot to shower it;
Each has bravely done his part,
Now it grows, and glads my heart.


14





WINTER'S DEPARTURE. 15




Win ter, a dieu! Your time is through: Partings they say are sad,






Yours makes me tru ly glad; Win-ter a dieu! No time for you.

2
Winter, adieu!
Your time is through,
Gladly I thee forget,
Care not how far you get,
Winter adieu!
No time for you.

3
Winter, adieu!
Your time is through.
Get thee gone speedily,
Spring birds will laugh at thee;
Winter, adieu
No time for you.






ivety. TN N N AIS .



m pret-ty lit-tle thing, Always coming with the spring, In the meadows I am





gj I
found,Peeping just above the grbund,And my stalk is covered flat,With white and yellow hat.

1
I'm a pretty little thing,
Always coming with the spring,
In the meadows I am found
Peeping just above the ground,
And my stalk is covered flat,
With a white and yellow hat.

2
Little lady, when you pass
Lightly o'er the tender grass,
Skip about, but do not tread
On my meek and lowly head;
For I always seem to say,
Chilly winter's gone away.


16


THE DAISY.






THE LAMBKIN.


ANSCHUTZ. 17


u i,s--'i ---i-- zt -i-~-fc -- ----_-----r- i- ----i-- --


In the gras sy pla ces, Where fresh flowers are seen,






Lit tie Lamb kin gra zes, On the ten der green.
Lit tle Lamnb- ki gra zes, On the ten der green.


2
On the grassy heather
Merrily she springs ;
Feels, like me, the pleasure
Which the spring time brings.


3
Where bright birds are blinking,
To the brook she goes;
And when she's done drinking,
Then she seeks repose.


4
Joy to thee, sweet creature!
Joy thro' thy short day!
But all things in nature,
Soon must pass away.


[2]





18 THE COW.

-- I -F -- - -- F --F F- i"-- -- -r -V -- -
*/ / I c / I / I I l I ""
Thank you, Pret ty cow, for you have made Pleasant milk to soak my bread;


-P-- C'~= -~-P gp


Thank you! eve-ry morn-ing, eve-ry night, Fresh and warm and sweet, and white.


Thank you! Eve-ry morn-ing, eve-ry night, Fresh and warm, and sweet, and white


Thank you 1 Eve-ry morn-ing, eve-ry night, Fresh and warm, and sweet, and white
1
Thank you!
Pretty cow, for you have made
Pleasant milk to soak my bread;
Thank you!
Every morning, every night,
Fresh and warm, and sweet, and white.
2
Thank you!
And how thankful should I be,
Unto him who cares for me;
Thank Him!
Every day he gives me food,
Watching over me for good.





THE SEASONS. 19

g __ I I b _b = I
--s~-

Four sea sons make up all the days of the year; If you'd


-----y- --]- _-- ----- -- ---- j- --1-
i 0-v 0m 1 I
know what they are then come hith-er, and hear, How in order they pass, and what



. -- I'-- --P--
pre sents they bring, The Sum-mer, the Autumn, the Win-ter and Spring.
2
When the young leaves just peep from their buds on the spray,
When the primrose and thorn-blossom blow by the way,
SWhen the thrush and the lark are beginning to sing,
Then know 'tis the season, the season of spring.
3
When the lily shoots up, with its beautiful flower,
When thejassamine hangs in thick wreaths on the bower,
When the moss-rose is blooming and scenting the air,
'Tis summer, sweet summer, and sunshine is there.
4
When the last corn is housed, 'tween the showers, on the hill
When the flowers are all gone, and the evenings are chill;
When the leaves one by one, fall away from the trees,
Then autumn is come, with his clouds and his breeze.
5
When the snow-flake skims down, and the stormy winds blow,
And the icicles hang o'er the streamlet below;
When the woods are all bare, and the birds sing no more,
'Tis winter, cold winter! the last of the four.





ROSY ON THE HEATHER.


--- -#z--_-------t- , _ -p- -,---

Ro sy, ro- sy, ro -sy red, Ro sy pn the heath er!
2
Says the boy: "I'll surely break thee,
Rosy on the heather!"
Says the rose: If so I'11 prick thee,
So that thou shall not forget me,
When thou seest me wither,
Rosy, rosy, rosy red,
Rosy on the heather."

3
Then he broke, I know not why,
Rosy on the heather!
Rosy lifts a thorn so sly,
Pierced him quick, and made him cry,
Then to droop and wither,
Rosy, rosy, rosy-red,
Rosy on the heather!


HEARING.






WHAT SHALL I LOVE?


----- -- P-- j ------... .
S ,_,I, ", r

I loved a song-bird of the spring, I loved its war-bling


la-B--y-- -ie---s-p-read his win--- ^-g,-Andr-o-se-a-s---oared a---w-.



lay! But ah! my sing er spread his wing, And rose and soared a way.


2
I loved a butterfly so fair,
With pinion golden bright;
Among the tulips rich and rare,
It wandered from my sight.


3
I loved a rose,.I loved it best
Of all I yet had found;
But when the sun had reached the west,
Its bright leaves strewed the ground,


4
What can I love that takes no flight
Nor fades with breeze or blast ?
Oh, love the truth! the truth both bright
And beautiful will last.


21





22 THE LITTLE GIRL AND THE ROBIN.


4- 6 = I |- -
"-~

There came to my win dow, One morn ing in spring, A



---m-- -- -- 1T- - -"-- -- r iu -T -- - r -- -1
-_ 0 F
sweet it tie Ro-bin, She came there to sing; The tune that she sang, It was


l N I 1 2


pret ti er far Than ev er 1 heard On te flute or gi tar.
2
Her wings she was spreading
To soar far away;
Then resting a moment
Seemed sweetly to say :
"Oh happy, how happy
"This world seems to be;
"Awake little girl,
"And be happy with me."
3
But just as she finished
Her beautiful song,
A thoughtless young man
With his gun came along;
lie killed, and he carried
My Robin away:
She'll never sing more
At the break of the day.





THE LITTLE STAR.


H_ h
+] -_ --,---,--^-----_-w-- o-+-j-J-j---T-j---o--^-r---+--

i. 1 7"
Twin kle, Twin lde lit tie star How I won der what you are;


2 3


When the blazing sun is gone,
When he nothing shines upon;
Then you show your little light,
Twinkle, twinkle all the night.
Twinkle, twinkle little star,
How I wonder what you are.


Then the trav'ller in the dark,
Thanks you for your tiny spark,
He could not see where to go,
If you did not twinkle so.
Twinkle, &c.


4
In the sky above you keep;
In my windowoften peep;
For you never shut your eye
'Till the sun is in the sky.
Twinkle, &c.


23





24 HERALD OF SPRING.

T"T
--F--- --- - r -r F-r
Cue-koo I Cuc-koo Bra vo how clear! Let us be sing-ing,




a-i pri-- Srig-ti, Srig-tie s b h-
Danc-ing and spring-ing; Spring-time, Spring-time soon will be here.


2
Cuckoo! Cuckoo! Bravo! sing on!
We'll to the meadows,
Chasing the shadows;
Spring-time, Spring-time cometh anon.


3
Cuckoo! Cuckoo! Bravo! I say!
Thou hast foretold it,
SNow we behold it;
Winter, Winter hastens away!


4
Cuckoo Cuckoo! Bravo! how clear!
Let us be singing,
Dancing and springing,
Spring-time, Spring-time, now we have here.









-- .. .. -, -- -

Fa their 'tis thy kind -ness Gives us milk to drink,







Milk, how plea sant tastes it, Ve ry good, we think.


2
In the cup or basin,
It is white as snow:
Plenteous as the flowers
In the green fields blow.


3
Yes it is thy kindness,
Ever great and good,
Gives the milky treasure,
Children's sweetest food.


4
Milk the red cheek freshens,
Makes the mind serene,
Beautifies the sunshine,
Brightens all the green.


5
Father, may we never,
Be denied this food;
Nor seek after other,
While this is so good.


MILK SONG.


25





SKATING.


spring, For the ra cing steed and the light-ning's flash


fling. la, la, la, la, a, l a, la, la, la, la, .la, la.
2
Away, away o'er the glassy stream,
We will speed our airy flight;
And we'll laugh at the car with its hissing steam,
And will spurn at its boasted might.
La la la la &c.
3
Away, away o er the slippery field,
Like the birds in calm blue sky;
And declare to the winds that we never will yield
As we go quickly dashing by.
La la la la &c.






THE CAGE FOR THE LITTLE BIRD. 27





The lit tie cage is rea dy,Where is the lit te bird? That here his pret-ty






sing ing, And ring-ing, And spring -ing May all clay long be heard.
sing ing, And ring-ing, And spring-ing May all day long be heard.


2
The little cage is ready,
Where is the little bird?
Come, come, and do not fear me;
Stay near me,
And cheer me
With pleasant songs, my bird !


3
The little cage is ready,
Come, come, my pretty bird?
How can you care to wander,
Out yonder,
Far fonder
I'll keep thee, on my word.


4
The little cage is ready,
What says the little bird ?
Wilt stay out on the trees there ?
And freeze there ?
The breeze there
Is wintry cold, my bird.





WAKE! WAKE! 'TIS DAY.


--rv-r-
Wake wake! 'tis day, Ye who in slumbers lay; Awake to see the morning bright, A





- wake in spi rit free and light, Wake, wake,' tis day, Wake! wake 'tis day.



Wake wake 'tis day,
The hours fly swift away;
We scarcely think that it is noon,
v When evening comes, alas! how soon;
Wake! wake! 'tis day.

3
Wake! wake! 'tis day,
Pursue your steady way!
Put forth thy strongest, noblest powers,
To usefulness devote thy hours;
Wake! wake! 'tis day.


28





MORNING CALL. 29




A-wake,wea- ry sleep er! A wake to my song Al rea- dy the




i T l- i-.-

reap er Is hastening a long; Some speed to the mountain, Some



iv-
-- --- ... r -r--7- -
work by the fountain, And all with the morning Their la bors pro -long.

2
Thou know'st not how stealeth
Each moment away !
Yon laborer feeleth,
New strength with the day!
The breeze freshly winging,
The lark gaily singing,
Call us from our slumber
And chide our delay.





COASTING.


1 get your sled,And away let s haste To thetop of the hill There is no time to waste.


Pre- c- c-6--rF-F-r-w -W 10

It is cap ital coasting, The snow is so deep, It is frozen so hard And the hill is so steep.

p- S_ -S-r.-,-- -- --l- 9-T -9--9--ry-r-r -a^ T~.&B-T --


LI r r Er F 1l; -
It is cap i-ta coastinghe ow is so deepIt is frozen so hard, And the hill is so steep,
It is cap i- tal coasting,The snow is so deep, It is frozen so hard, And the hilt is so steep,


2
The boys are all ready
And waiting to go,
And we all have determined
No snow balls to throw;
We have made this agreement
When coming from school;
And all those who are there
Must not break from the rule.


3
There's a time and a season
For all things you know,
And the boys who are coasting
No snow balls must throw;
So away for your sled,
There's no time to stand still,
And hurrah for a coast
From the top of the hill.


4
John minded his brother,
And run for his sled,
And he took it in haste,
From its peg in the shed;
Then away they all scampered
To th' top of the hill;
And for aught that I know
They are coasting there still.





THE LITTLE CHILD'S GO TO BED SONG.


[WINTER EVENING.]


--g -i- r--r -. -z _-4 -

The moon is high; The a zure sky Is soft and clear;





The air is chill, The night is still, No sound I hear.

1
The moon is high,
The azure sky
Is soft and clear;
The air is chill,
The night is still,
No sound I hear.
2
The evening star
That blinks afar,
Is in the west;
And I must lay
My toys away,
And go to rest.


31





32 MORNING.


-- -----..--,'------------------
Morn ing is corn ing! Stars fade a way,




r -- r -
i-" -F- "i-_-I----

Far on the hill tops, Glim mers the day.


2 3
Feathery songsters Silvery dew drops
Gaily resound ; Gleam on the grass;
Flowrets are spreading Bees to their labor
Odors around. Hum as they pass.

4
Morning I hail thee
After my rest;
Grateful emotions
Swell in my breast.





FLIGHT OF TIME. 33



---------- ---------v- ----
Pluck the rose while now it blooms, Now 'tis fresh and bright-;






Wait not 'till the mor-row comes, Time is swift in flight.


2

Do thy deeds of kindness now,
'Ere to-morrow's light,
What may chance thou can't not know,
Time is swift in flight.


3
Would'st thou true enjoyment find?
Then do what is right;
Ever bearing in thy mind,
Time is swift in flight.


[3]





THE PIGEON.


2
And so may we ever all try
And be very civil and kind;
And not to be pettish and cry,
Though all cannot be to our mind.
Coo, coo, &c.

3
Coo, coo, pretty pigeon, coo, coo,
Coo, coo, to your children all day;
We learn while we listen to you,
To do all things that you say.
Coo, coo, &c.






THE WASP AND THE BEE.


*y---^~@--I----I--Q- -&--^--0--e------:-w-t---~----~-------_-9--

A wasp met a bee that was just buz-zing by, And he said, lit tile cous-in, can


4-r
you tell me why You are loved so much bet- ter by peo- pie than I.



Bz .......... You are loved so much bet -ter by peo pie than I.
2
My back shines as bright and as yellow as gold,
And my shape is most elegant too, to behold,
And yet nobody likes me for that, I am told.
Bz. And yet, &c.
3
Ah Cousin, the bee said, 'tis all very true,
But were I even half as much mischief to do,
Then I'm sure they would love me no better than you.
Bz. Then I'm, &c,
4
You have a fine shape and a delicate wing,
And they say you are handsome, but then there's one thing
They can never put up with, and that is your sting.
Bz. They can, &c.
5
My coat is quite homely and plain, as you see,
But yet no one is angry, or scolding at me,
Just because I'm a humble and innocent bee.
Bz. Just because, &c.
6
From this little story, let people beware,
For if like the cross wasp, they too, ill-natured are,
They will never be loved, though they're ever so fair.
Bz. They will never, &c.


35





36 HOUR OF SINGING.


I 1 1 1 J / i

We love to make sweet mu- -sic, To make our voi-ces ring; And





we are al ways hap py When comes t hour to sing.
we are al ways hap py When comes hour to sing.


2
Oh! come and let us sing, then,
Like birds that fly away;
And look as bright as dew drops
In warm and sunny May.


3
We'll sing of love and kindness,
We'll sing of home, and school;
We'll sing of morning, mid-day,
And evening breezes, cool.


4
And while we sing so cheerful,
We'll better grow each day;
And then:our songs of pleasure,
Will never fade away.






THE MOON.


37


Larghetio.




How thou shin est, love -ly moon, Ev er si lent, calm and





e of nigt 'mid s .ry si, T u d er c m my es

lone, Queen of night 'mid star ry skies, Thou dost ev er charm my eyes.


2
Softly sailing thro' the sky,
Ever smiling from on high ;
When thou pourest floods of light,
Ocean glimmers in thy sight.


3
O'er the lonely pilgrim's way,
Thou art shedding light like day;
Cheerfully thou bid'st him roam,
And thou guidest to his home.


4
Pleasant is thy face to me,
How I love to gaze at thee,
When thou shinest lovely moon,
Ever silent, calm and lone.


C'





38 FLOWER FOUND.


jfeg 1;1-r^ wTa|= ^-FI= 6

As I was walk ing In sha dy wood, In





rch- T bd or gd.

search of noth ing, That's bad or good.


2
I chanced in looking
A flower to spy,
As bright as star-light,
Or glistening eye.


3
I went to break it;
It murmured low,
"Ah! must I, must I,
Be treated so?"


4
But up I dug it,
Stem, roots and all,
And in my garden,
Close by the wall,


5
There in a corner
I planted it;
'Tis green as ever,
And blossoms yet.





MY LITTLE GARDEN. 39


__-- __ --- ... -- ---- 0l

Of all my joys I prize the most, My lit tle gar den




heo -y
here; mat ter how much pains it-- -- cost, 'Tis on y sti more dear.---
here; No mat ter how much pains it cost, 'Tis on ly still" more dear.


2
I nurse and watch it day by day
With tender love and care;
And well it does my pains repay
With flowers and fruit so fair.


3
And every pretty plant that springs,
However small it be;
Each little bud and blossom brings
A sweet delight to me.


4
I love my garden more and more,
And when my task is done;
And when the hours of school are o'er
I to my garden run.





THE BEAR.


,---- -P -P- ~ ---B
P7 Ip I I i .

spurs the man's ad van ing, To keep the erea-ture dane-ing: I




hear the drum and pipe so shrill, To keep the crea-ture dane-ing still.


2
The stupid bear! from day to day,
Full half his life he sleeps away;
And when oppressed, by eating,
He gets a thoro' beating,
With awful noise he howls and roars,
Like billows on the rocky shores.


3
And then the bear so dainty too -
He hunts for honey fresh and new;
The bees fly out and sting him,
And many pains they bring him;
He pays a dreadful, dreadful price
For honey, which he thinks so nice.


4
The bear! the bear! the stupid bear!
'Tis foolish thus at him to stare;
So now your nature knowing,
Mr. Bear, we will be going:
We will be active every day,
Nor sleep, like you, our life away.






MERRY MAY.


Gladness plays and spares o ver all, Plays up-on the far blue mountain,



I P T

Sparkles in the glas sy fountain, Gladness plays and sparkles o ver all.

2 3
Mirth is singing, shouting far and near! Join we all the merry dance of May!
On the grassy flowery meadows Hark! I hear a sweet new-comer;
Children chase the flying shadows, Cuckoo coos: look out for summer!
Mirth is singing, shouting far and near. Soon is past the spring's fair holiday.


1 2
Joy is hovering-smiling all around! Gladness soundeth, shouteth far and near!
Hovering o'er the sunny mountain, O'er the flowery meadow straying,
Smiling in the glassy fountain, Lambs are feeding, frisking, playing;
Joy is hovering-smiling all around Gladness soundeth, shouteth far and near!
3
Up and join the merry dance of May !
Hark! the cuckoo, sweetly singing,
O'er the moor and meadow winging,
Up and join the merry dance of May!


REICHARDT. 41







- ---- ---j------.-.--7------\-*-e--'------- --t_---- ---r----_P_ ------T


The Autumn breeze Sweeps thro' the trees, And shakes all the leaves from the





thicket The swallows fly,The storks move by,And hushed is the chirp of the crick et.


2
The moon shines clear,
Through forests drear,
And calmly, and coldly looks o'er us;
While through the air,
The branches bare,
Are waving so sadly before us.

3
The autumn breeze,
Sweeps thro' the trees,
The bees they have silenced their humming,
The swallows fly,
The storks move by,
And tell us that winter is coming.


42


AUTUMN.





VIOLETS.


---6
--e
E- --- -


many For to twine in our hair,And in wreaths we will wear them,Lovely flowers so fair.

2
Far away in the vale,
With the soft breathing gale
There so lovely and lonely;
There they rest on their bed-
Come and pluck, quickly pluck them.
Lovely flowers of the glade.

3
Let us rove where they grow;
Let us cherish them now,
For too soon o'er the wide earth,
They will all disappear!
Yet we will not forget them,
Lovely flowers, so dear.





44 CARE NOT FOR THE MORROW.



-7
AftW 7 0 _

To en -joy life's beau -ty, Heaven has sent us here,






Why make care a du ty ? Why should grief be near'


2
We will never sorrow,
For there is no need,
Since each little sparrow,
God doth daily feed;


3
Since each plant and flower,
Springing fair and lone,
Brightens with the shower,
Blooms beneath the sun.


4
Banish then thy sorrow,
Drive distrust away;
Live not for the morrow
Walk in virtue's way.


5
To enjoy life's beauty,
Heaven has sent us here!
Let us do our duty,
Then we need not fear.





MY FUTURE GARDEN.


H-d

Had I now my pret ty gar den, 0 how hap py should I
Had I now m3; pret-ty gar-den, 0 how hap- py should I


2 3


White and blue with green around them,
Hyacinths shall bloom again;
On the trellice where I found them,
Fragrant roses I will train.


I will place in yonder bower,
Thee, my white auricula!
Spend thy sweetness every hour!
Say, is not my garden fair?


4
When the nightingale is singing,
With the earliest beam of day;
Let me to my garden springing,
Greet my flowers in bright array.


45






46 MULTIPLICATION TABLE.
FIRST PART.




Three threes are nine, three fours are twelve, Three fives will make fif -






- teen; And three times six are just, eigh-teen, As they have al-ways been.
2 4
And three times seven are twenty-one, And four times four will make sixteen,
Three eights are twenty-four; If you will count them o'er;
And three times nine are twenty-seven, And four times five have always been
You'll find they make no more. Just twenty, or a score.
3 5
Three tens are thirty, and three elevens And four times six are twenty-four,
Will make just thirty-three; Four sevens are twenty-eight;
And three times twelve are thirty-six, And four times eight are thirty-two.
And more they cannot be. Four nines are thirty-six.
6
Four tens are forty, we repeat,
Four elevens are forty-four;
And four times twelve are forty-eight,
And now my song is o'er.





MULTIPLICATION TABLE. 47
SECOND PART.

- ----


Five times five are twen ty five,


Five times six are their ty;


FiveQtimes seven are their ty five, And five timeseightare for --ty.
--- _i_-- f_ -r---_zzrj--_-- I--


Five times seven are their ty five, And five times eight are for ty.


2
Five times nine are forty-five,
Five times ten are fifty;
Five times eleven are fifty-five
And five times twelve are sixty.


3
Six times nine are fifty-four,
Six times ten are sixty;
Seven times nine are sixty-three,
And seven times ten are seventy.


4
Eight times nine are seventy-two,
Eight times ten are eighty;
Nine times nine are eighty one,
And nine times ten are ninety;





48 EARLY TO BED AND EARLY TO RISE.

OLD AIR.

4a-

If ear ly to bed, and ear ly to rise, You'll






be, as they tell me, both weal thy and wise.


2
If health you would keep, this counsel you'll take,
Be early asleep and be early awake.

3

'Tis good for your health, 'tis good for your purse,
No doctor you'll need, and but seldom a nurse.

4

Then early to bed, and early to rise,
If you would be healthy, and wealthy, and wise.





TRY AGAIN. 49



'Tis a les son you should heed, Try, Try, Try a gain.
SIf at first you don't sue ceed, Try, Try, Try a gain.




Thenyour cour-age should ap pear, For if you will per se- vere,




You will con-quer, nev er fear, Try, Try, Try a -gain.

2
Once or twice, though you should fail,
Try again.
If you would at last prevail,
Try again.
If we strive 'tis no disgrace,
Though we may not win the race;
What should you do in that case?
Try again.

3
If you find your task is hard,
Try again.
Time will bring you your reward,
Try again.
All that other folks can do,
Why, ivith patience, should not you ?
Only keep this rule in view,
Try again.
[4]






50 THE VILLAGE CHURCH BELL.


sol emn,When on Sabbath morning,T


2
Bell, thy sound is lulling,
When at eve thou callest:
Time to go to bed!
Bell, thy sound is mournful,
Calling us to sorrow,
When the spirit's fled.

3
Say, how canst thou mourn so?
How canst thou rejoice so.?
Thou art but a bell!
Yet dost thou our sorrows,
Yet dost thou our pleasures,
Understand full well.


FESCA.






THE GOOD SCHOLAR. 51




I love to be hear ing and learn-ing of truth, I trea sure the





fast fly ing mo-ments of youth; Just come from our teach- er, from





do ing our best, More mer ri- ly play we, more hap pi ly rest.

2
O then with what rapture we play-fellows meet,
The taste of enjoyment seems never so sweet;
Then shine with new beauty the garden, the field,
Then smiles the fair earth in her glory revealed.

3
O joy with the glad ones the gladdest to be;
While teachers and friends all approve of our glee!
I'll hie me to school then, and there do my best,
And then for my share of good sport with the rest.






THE SAIL.


By the clear-est moon light ev- er Still and joy ous ly .we row,






On the bright and wave-less riv er, Hith er, thith-er swift ly go.


2
Not for fame or earthly treasure,
On the wide sea would we ride;
Here we taste more peaceful pleasure,
In our little boat we glide.


3
Innocence to us is dearer
Than the richest earthly wealth;
To our happiness what nearer
Than the gift of peace and health.


NAUMAIN.






LIKE EVENING BREEZES. 53



Like eve-ning breez es gen tie, That come so fresh and clear, To


-- -- .. .. .. .


fan the fra-grant blos --- soms, That deck the ear ly year; So

[_ 1- T, _
7D- -- ---- -


mild and kind we all should be, And nev er, nev er dis a gree.
2
As sweet as morning sunbeams,
That kiss away the dew;
And make the early flowers
Look bright and happy too;
So we should love when grief appears
To kiss away each other's tears.
3
The child so good and gentle,
Obedient and kind,
Who loves in God and virtue
His happiness to find;
The Savior's face will surely see,
Who said "let children come to me."






54 SCHOOL IS BEGUN.
POPULAR AIR.

*- ---F- -- -F--4,--
,s .


School is be-gun, so come eve ry one, And come with smil ing fa ces For



"---Y----r--r---i,-- ..... ... -^ -i ....- : _


hap-py are they, who learn when they may So come and take your pla ces.

2
Here you will find your teachers are kind,
And with their help succeeding;
The older you grow, the more you will know,
And soon you'll love your reading.
3
Little boys when you grow to be men,
And fill some useful station;
If you should be once found out as a dunce,
Oh, think of your vexation.
4
Little girls, too, a lesson for you,
To learn is more your duty;
Or no one will deem, you worthy esteem,
What e'er your youth or beauty.
5
School is begun, so come ev'ry one,
And come with smiling faces ;
For happy are they, who learn when they may;
So come and take your places.










THEn LIY 55

A li ly looked from the mountain height, In snow-y white it was gleaming; There





--- i > -j -- i i- i-
stood not an oth er so high and bright Where'er the sun was beam ing.
2
By night the raging storm loud swept there,
The cliff by lightning surrounded;
The clouds they rolled heavily in the air,
And thunder deep resounded.
3
I looked above where I saw her shine,
The cliff, I thought it would sever;
O lily, sweet lily, I've called thee mine,
But now I lose thee for ever.
4
At morning early my way I sped,
T thought I never should find her;
But brightly my lily now raised her head,
Mid prostrate trees around her.
5
The rock was rent and the fragments gone,
The storm had swept them forever;
But there stood my lily and brightly shone,
As fresh and fair as ever.


55


THE LILY.





THE CORN FLOWERS.


_- ------- :- -

SI N I -
Now are the fields and bow ers, And eve ry reap-er's cot, Strewn




-- ----- / --9 I I I e' -"
I 94 I=- | l l I I

with the bright est flow ers, That fall on eve ry spot.


3
Who comes? the farmer streweth,
The wheat seed far and near,
And yearly as it growth,
Yon, bluest flowers, appear


4
O think what good and pleasure,
This thing alone bestows,
From smallest flowers, a treasure
There springs, the whole world knows.





THE DAY AND NIGHT FLOWER. LAUR. 57



-I .. i -

Half gold, half dark est blue, Ye deck the fields a-new And



----T-7-7-F---7 -~ rf --~-r-7-7- ----r

match with day's clear light The dark ness of the night.


2 3
Who looks and knows not well, When joyous free from care,
The lesson ye all tell? The dark blue says" beware,
Who has not felt below Nor deem thyself secure;
Now pleasure and now wo? Grief lurketh near too sure."


4
And when my heart is sad,
Thy clear gold makes me glad,
Joy comes," it says, droop not,"
And grief is soon forgot.





58 WORK AWAY. POPULAR AIR.



--- ---r t" -t -- F --r r F t r-- -

I re mem- ber a les son which was not thrown a way,

o-- rJI--- __-^'--i ... j----j--!- -I--'----i-----


"In the morn of life be use ful, don't spend too much time in



g I -
play: Work a way while you're a ble, work a way, work a way.
2
Hands were made to be useful, if you teach them the way,
Therefore, for yourself or neighbor, make them useful every day:
Work away.
3
And to speed with your labor make the most of to-day,
What may hinder you to-morrow 'tis impossible to say.
Work away.
4
As for grief and vexation, let them come when they may,
When your heart is in your labor, it will soon be light and gay.
Work away.
5
In the world would you prosper, then this counsel obey,
Out of debt is out of danger, and your creditors to pay.
Work away.
6
Let your own hands support you 'till your strength shall decay,
And your heart should never fail you, even when your hair is gray.
Work away.






LOVING AND PLEASING GOD.


i ---

- ly, 'Tis God who gives me breath to sing, Like summer birds so gai ly.


2
He is my Father, I his child,
.To love him is my pleasure;
'Tis better to obey my God,
Than have all earthly treasure.


3
O let me strive through all my life,
My God, to love and please thee;
For know, from day to day, my soul,
He ever, ever sees thee.


59





60 THE SAND MAN.

-- =------------F----- ------ --F--i_s-

Come, buy my sand, my clean white sand! And may thy,

-~~~~~~~~~~ -- ------------- ----------

heart be white; And may thy home, and heart, and hand Be

---I --:3r n- --'------ ---I- -- ---
-W7

pure, and clean and bright, Be pure, and clean and bright.

1
Come, buy my sand, my clean white sand!
And may thy heart be white;
And may thy home, and heart, and hand
Be pure, and clean and bright,
Be pure, and clean and bright.

2
And Oh remember! though so high
Thou seemest now to stand,
A few short hours, and thou shalt lie,
Beneath a hill of sand-
Beneath a hill of sand.




[

OUR FATHER IN HEAVEN. 61





Our their in heaven, Thy name be a dored, Thy



__-- --
/ _~-- I----- r f --- ----

king dom rile o'er The na tions a broad.


2
On earth may thy will,
As in heaven be done;
Our daily bread give,
And cleanse through thy Son.


3
From temptation keep,
From evil and pain,
For thine is the power,
Forever, Amen.





62 TIT FOR TAT.



SI 11 _
Chil-dren, as we some-times see, Don't a gree; They fall out, I

u Is | | |


grieve to say, In their hours of play. One of fends, and soon we learn


1 !C f

S i i
He's of- fend-ed in his turn; And they say that tit for tat. Is the rule for that.
2
Children, why such anger show ?
Don't you know,
You should not this rule obey?
There's a better way,
If each should in turn offend,
Then would quarrels never end;
There's a better way than that,
Or than tit for tat.
3
Though it was indeed unkind,
Never mind:
You should bear a little pain,
So be friends again.
Those who in this world would live,
Must forget, and must forgive;
Bear these trifles like a man,
That's the better plan.





OF SONGS I KNOW FULL MANY.


" --7 % --- N --i i -- --


Of songs w full m-ny And s what peaseth me s sweet a way as
Of songs, I knew full ma-ny, And sing what pleeseth me; 'Tis sweet a way as


AI

p-les emy mndp -o ret.-lyO ha -- I culd b- -in-'- he--7
pleasemy mind so greatly O that could t sing it thee.
please my mind so great ly S Oh! that I could but sing it thee.


2
Of late I saw a shepherd
A grassy slope down,
Where merry brooklets capered
In shining summer sun,
Beneath a beach-tree laying
Lost in a sweet dream, playing
His tune, a slender reed upon.


3
That tune, wouldd first go upward
Some three, four notes or so;
And then it would go downward
Now quick, and then more slow.
That tune to him was heaven,
Ah! gladly I'd have given
All mine, that song of his to know!


4
Thus once did he play through it.
And then he'd look away;
Then quick again, he blew it;
I saw him as he lay.
He lay just idly heeding
His lambkins round him feeding;
And so he passed the summer day.


63





64 WE ALL LOVE ONE ANOTHER.




We all love one an oth er, We all love one an oth er, We all love one an -



_r-- e--[---- r-r--r---l- - ....... ... ... ..
oth er, And we all love be-side, Our fa-thers and our mothers, Our sis-ters and our


--:- ---$:--a'----l -P-r-----r7--7- ------r

bihee F F Fr K F V -Fr r
bro-thers, And we for get not oth ers, Who seek our steps to guide.
1
We all love one another,
We all love one another,
We all love one another,
And we all love beside,
Our fathers and our mothers,
Our sisters and our brothers,
And we forget not others,
Who seek our steps to guide.
We love our school and teachers,
We love our school and teachers,
We love our school and teachers,
We love our school and teachers,
For useful things we learn:
We'll now take leave together,
We'll now clap hands together,
We'll go and play together,
But soon we'll all return.






BIRD SONG.


have no words; What can this be


6
-Ye little birds,
Ye need no words;
I love your song,
Sing all day long.




'N- -- I toh Ho swee s -h qew i Nt--n--_-.
2. "We sing to thee, Iow sweet sings she,Whom queen we hail, Sweet Nightingale."'


3
"We sing of woods,
And cooling floods,
And blossoms blue,
And meadow-dew."


4
" We sing how free,
We blithe birds be,
In freshest air,
And odors rare."


5
"Such is our song,
The whole day long;
We need no words,
We warbling birds." D. c.
wi


[5]


65





66 THE MOON IS VERY FAIR AND BRIGHT.






1. The moon is ve- ry fair and bright, And now is ris ing high
I think it is a pret ty sight To see it in the sky;





It shone up- on me where I layAnd seemed al --most as bright a-- .-------
It shone up on me where I lay,Andseemed al-most as bright as day.


2
The stars are very pretty too,
And scattered all about;
Sometimes they seem but very few,
But soon the rest come out.
I'me sure I could not count them all,
They are so bright, and very small.


3
But brighter is the sun than they,
He blazes in the skies;
I dare not turn my face that way,
Unless I shut my eyes:
Yet when he shines, our hearts revive,
And all the trees rejoice and thrive.


4
More glorious than the moon or sun
And all the stars of light,
Is He who made them every one
By his own power and might.
And when we end our mortal race,
The pure in heart shall see his face.






WHAT'S THE MATTER WITH YOU, MARY? 67
.A-j i --& -- _- __h -_ _^ -_ i_ --&. = --__


z -- _-:=_.- -.:-=: _: _--_ - ---
L r
What's the mat ter with you, Ma ry ? What can thus have made you













2
cryWh? Come, look plea- sat now, my sis ter,'sipe the matter with youfrom yourary





Wherefore should you look so sad ?
You are neither sick nor hungry,
And have much to make you glad ?
What's the matter then, my Mary?
Wherefore should you look so sad ?
3
What's the matter with you, Mary ?
Quickly drive those tears away;
Come along with me, my sister,
Come and join me in my play;
Ever cheerful, ever happy,
Let us be from day to day.





68 I MUST NOT TEASE MY MOTHER.

=---

I must not tease my mo-ther, For she is ve ry kind And eve ry thing she

mm-mI,--_T-7 =_ l---7_L--~-._-p-- -_ -

says to me, I must di rect-ly mind For when I was a ba by, And


--r"F---T-- -T - c.--------- -----I-
could not speak or walk, She let me in her bosom sleep,And taught me how to talk.
2 3
I must not tease my mother; I must not tease my mother;
And when she likes to read, I've heard my father say,
Or has the headache, I will step When I was in my cradle sick,
Most silently indeed. She nursed me night and day.
I will not choose a noisy play, She lays me in my little bed,
Or trifling troubles tell; She gives me clothes and food,
But sit down quiet by her side, And I have nothing else to pay,
And try to make her well. But trying to be good.
4
I must not tease my mother;
She loves me all the day,
And she has patience with my faults,
And teaches me to pray;
How much I'll strive to please her
She every hour shall see,
For should she go away, or die,
What would become of me P






SHEPHERD'S SONG. GERSBACH. 69


Where the fresh est flowers grow near, Where the wa ter


2
Where the brooklets, cooled by shadows,
Pour their streams along the meadows!
Go and cool you, linger not,
For the noonday sun is hot.

3
Lamblins, go and freely spread you,
Go where'er your wills may lead you!
Have no fears, because to-day,
There's no wild wolf after prey.

4
Go ye fleecy little 'overs,
Wanton in the richest clovers,
And when evening air'feels cold,
Flock together to the fold.




70 WHY DO YE SING?


--40 1 fl*-
E t = Td -___
" -, - -P-~------:--'-: -~-- ---: 7 r----,- ----

sing to him who gave us life, And taught to sing our war -bling lay.
2
Why bloom, ye fair, ye fragrant flowers,
That grow along the way ?
"We bloom to him, who gave our tints,
And made us beautiful and gay."

3
0 come with me and hear the song,
And see the sky so blue;
Come pluck the sweet, the fragrant flowers,
With gems of earliest morning dew.

4
The sky is fair, the buds are sweet,
The birds are lovely too,
But God demands, ye youthful ones,
A nobler, sweeter song from you.






THE LITTLE DISASTER. 71



Once there was a lit tie man, Where a lit tie ri ver ran, And he
#--7'-_ ---h .. P -- -iM 7 ... -
_---7o- ---P--r-~- F---- ------F--- --- -r-F---- -
I w I r- I ___
had a lit- tle farm and lit-tle dai-ry O, Andhe had a lit-tle plough, And a
@- -- --7-- ---B - -r ..r
Jr--
lit tie dap-pled cow,Which he oft- en called his pret- ty lit tie fai ry O.
2. And his dog he called Fidelle,
For le lov'd his master well;
And he had a little poney for his pleasure 0;
In a sty not very big.
He'd a frisky little pig
Which he often called his little piggy treasure 0.
3. Once his little maiden Ann,
With her pretty little can,
Wen ... ;ii ..; hen the morning sun was beaming O,
VI ... 1i, I don't know how,
But she stumbled o'er the plough,
And the cow was quite astonished at her screaming O.
4. Little maid cried out in vain
While the milk ran o'er the plain;
Little pig ran ,. .. o, gaily O,
oWhle tile 1- .l. *1. 1 .1. 1 .
For a share was much inclined,
So he pulled back squeaking piggy by the tally O.
5. Such a clatter now began,
As alarmed the little man.
Who came capering from out his little stable 0;
Poney trod on doggy's toes,
Doggy snap'd at piggy's nose,
Piggy made as-great a noise as he was able O.
6. Then to make the story short,
Little poney with a snort,
Lifted up his little heels so very clever O
And the man he tumbled down,
And he nearly cracked his crown,
And this only made the matter worse than ever O.




72 WINTER.




id b C ^ I, C *
Win ter thou art v ry cold, Cut ting are thy breez es;

-- T ._ -






Snow-drift is on sndw-drift rolled, All the wa ter free es.
-- . -... . . -- d .
|___------ -_--_ Z-'---]. _ i--- ---T--C- --iZLl


2 3
Pity, 0 my child, the poor, O how many poor there are!
Scarce a stick to warm them; How they shake and shiver!
Winds come whistling thro' the door, Like the image ofa star,
Skies-the clouds deform them. On the wavy river.

4
Yes, my heart shall pity you,
Who have sorrow daily;
For I may be wretched too,
Though I sing so gaily.






EVENING SUN.


----- r-- ---- T- I--

Gold-en sun of eve-ning, In thy splen- did car;



:---- --= -- --i ---- _-1-- -----i--l


To the west re treat-in Rc y o rs are.
To the west re treat ing, Rich thy glo tries are.


2
Sun! I love to view thee,
Since I lisped thy name;
Since I learned thy glories
From Jehovah came.


3
Often while I saw thee
Bright and cloudless shine,
Holy thoughts came o'er me ;
Thoughts of things divine.


4
Wondrous is thy beauty,
Golden evening sun!
Charming is thy radiance,
Just as day is done.


5
Thou must be extinguished,
Quenched each golden ray;
My immortal spirit
Cannot fade away.


NAGELI. 73








--=--}-E---- -- --q- - I-r-$--%-F--e-----T

Hop a bout, pret- ty spar row, and pick up the hay, And the

=1 -- 0E O __T 0----- -- "-- -

S I I *--1 I I I
twigs, and thewool; and the moss; In deed, I'll stand far e-nough



F--
-[-| --- ^ -^- .-- -- --

out of your way, So do'nt fly from the win dow so cross.
2
I do not mean to catch you, my dear little Dick,
Nor to fasten you up in a cage;
To hop all day long on a straight bit of stick,
Or to flutter about in a rage.
3
For I only just want to stand by you and see
How you gather the twigs for your house;
Or sit at the foot of the jenneting tree,
While you twitter a song in the boughs.
4
If you'd come to me now and eat out of my hand,
Oh how happy and glad I should be;
Then come pretty sparrow, while softly I stand
At the foot of the jenneting tree.


74


THE SPARROW.







- --- q-- .... ---- -----n- .....r ----,

Sleep, sleep, my ba by, sleep thou, Thy mo-ther is by thee now; She

_-7 -- -----i- ----- -- __- _---_

rocks thee and lulls thee to peaceful sleep : Is ev er near thee thy rest to keep: Thy



mo-ther how fond-ly she loves thee, Thy mo-ther how fond ly she loves thee.
2. Sleep, sleep my dear one, sleep thou,
Thy father is by thee now;
He labors and toils from the morning light,
Till evening comes and the misty night:-
Thy mother and thee to make happy,
Thy mother and thee to make happy.
3. Sleep, sleep, my infant, sleep thou,
The angels will guard thee now;
They guard thee with tenderest watchfulness,
And keep thee when in forgetfulness:-
The angels watch over my infant,
The angels watch over my infant.
4. Sleep, sleep, my gentlest, sleep thou,
The Savior is near thee now;
He once was an infant, my child, like thee,
A manger told of his poverty:-
While thou art so carefully guarded,
While thou art so carefully guarded.
5. Sleep, sleep, my baby, sleep thou,
From heaven God loves thee now;
He'll crown thee with goodness from day to day,
Till quits thy spirit its house of clay:-
Then take thee to heaven and bless thee,
Then take thee to heaven and bless thee.


CRADLE SONG.


75





76 THE FLOWERS.

j- a 1L 1- r*_ i_


How pret ty are the blos-soms, That in the val- ley smile; But






|--y---.----\---.---.-r-.--\-.--.--.--y--f--.--------.
I/--------f^--_g--:- ---9-----y--_ --------- ----

yet their charms are fad -ing- They on ly stay a while.




2
When summer days are over,
Their brightness will be fled;
And by the cold winds blasted,
Lie, withered, trodden, dead.

3
There is a transient beauty,
Which quickly fades away;
The soul shall live unaltered,
When all things else decay.






THE MENAGERIE.


Curious beasts are here for show, Full of life and mo tion Ti-gers, li- ons,
. Up and down their dens they go, Like the rest less o cean.


4-----------i -~'---'-7 f-~-- --T-;--- ---'------u- _ ----E


leop-ards, apes, Mon-keys, too, of sev eral, shapes,Birds of rar est beau ty.
2
How they stamp and shake the ground,
Flap and snort and chatter;
Men and boys come crowding round,
Wondering what's the matter;
When they see the meat they rage,
How the lion tears his cage;
Like a crazy creature.
3
Watch them closely, mark them well,
Look at every feature !
When the man their names shall tell,
Don't forget the creature,
Lest you should a blunder make,
And the pretty goldfinch take,
For a little sparrow.
4
Apes and asses, formerly,
Foreign vessels brought us;
Of the great Rhinoceros
Poetry had taught us ;
Thanks to these enlightened times,
Animals from farthest climes
We may now admire them.


77






78


THE SNOW DROP.


ME=-
t -r- I Bd

Win ter lin gers in the bow ers, Buds are locked in slum-bers


deep; Tell me, snow drops, modest flow ers, Who


Long before the snow is running,
Melted in the mountain stream ;
Tender forms! I see you sunning,
In a cold and cheerless beam.


3
And your lily lips do quiver,
Whispering we are children too;
Bloom to praise the gracious giver,
Wither, die, and bloom anew.


- breaks your sleep.
- ly breaks your sleep.


4
"'Twas a Father's care arrayed us
In the pure, and snowy white;
'Twas a Father's kindness made us,
Bloom so innocent and bright,


5
"Child be innocence thy beauty!
Strive in purity to shine,
So when ends thy course of duty,
Heavenly glory shall be thine."






MERRILY, MERRILY SING. 79

..-- --1-I- .



Im prove the passing hours, For time is on the wing, Sip hon-ey from the



-- l -l-l-- ------


flow-ers, And mer ri ly, mer ri ly sing All fol ly ends in sad-ness, For


1 1I I I 1 I I I



trouble it will bring, But wis-dom leads to gladness, So mer-ri-ly, merrily sing.

2
Repine not if from labor,
Your health and comfort spring,
Work hard, and help your neighbor,
And merrily, merrily sing.
Store not your minds with fable;
To truth your homage bring;
Do all the good you're able,
And merrily, merrily sing.






80 LITTLE ROBIN.




Come here lit tie Ro bin, and don't be a afraid, I





would not hurt e ven a feath er Come hith er sweet Ro bin, and



------r--t----------r------+- --

pick up some bread To feed you this ve ry cold weather.



I don't mean to hurt you, my dear little thing,
And Pussey Cat is not behind-me;
So hop about pretty, and put down your wing,
And pick up the crumbs and don't mind me.


3
Cold winter is come, but he will not stay long,
And summer you soon shall be greeting;
Remember, sweet Robin, to sing me a song,
In return for the breakfast you're eating.






STARS THAT ON YOUR WONDROUS WAY. 81
H. W. DAY.


Stars, that on your wondrous way, Twin kle in the eve-ning sky,

. .. _-


F-JV7TT~ Uai-~1TZ
-r-rI^
you can say To a child so small as I


rn Adagio.

ST f -- t -
Tell me, for I long to know, Who has made you spar-lde so?

F 7


Child, as surely as we roll
Thro' the dark and distant sky,
You have an immortal soul,
Made to live when we shall die;
Suns and planets pass away,
Spirits never can decay.
[6]


3
Yes, and God who bade us roll,
God who placed us in the sky,
Stoops to watch an infant soul,
With a condescending eye;
He esteems it dearer far,
More in value than a star.






A WAK E. .


SVal-ley and hill, fr- est and mount, 0 cean ad rill, riv r and



II{- __ _- -


fount, A wake A wake Now comes the king, ru ling the day

fount, .. k-- C t-- I day;
Ej





Quick from his glance the clouds flee a way. They break! They break!
~~---------

2
Like routed host, all wildly roll'd,
Scattered and tossed in robes of gold,
They fly They fly !
Lo, how they flame in eastern sky,
Bowing they shrink, from that burning eye,
That eye! That eye!
3
Lo, from the deep caverns of night,
Sends forth a beam of radiant light,
The sun! The sun!
Ocean and land, vocal may sing
With the bright band, around the fire king,
His throne! His throne.


82


H. W. DAY.






MAKE IT UP AND BE GOOD FRIENDS AGAIN. 83

-I.-
1-- -7- .--1'-t--1-~- ----
^^^i-^^~~~-^-r^ ?^^ =^---=^

1 Come, let us be good friends a gain, We both may have been wrong, Why
SOur quar-rels on ly give us pain, And should not last so long, In



I ,I r
should we let our an-gry pas-sions rise; Come, then, shake hands, be not still of-
fu-ture we will learn to be more wise


-- -- ---- p -- --- .

- fend ed, Don't disdain to smile a-gain, For all is past ad en ed.
1. Come, let us be good friends again,
We both may have been wrong;
Why should we let our angry passions rise ?
Our quarrels only gives us pain,
And should not last so long;
In future we will learn to be more wise.
Come, then, shake hands, be not still offended,
Don't disdain to smile again,
For all is past and ended.
2. All those who wish for happy days,
This truth should keep in mind,
That friends without some faults are few and rare;
And to those faults the proverb says,
We should be sometimes blind,"
For we must learn to bear and to forbear,
Come, then, shase hands, be not still offended;
Don't disdain to smile again
For all is past and ended.





TO THE NIGHTINGALE.


afar _4_^.rq^^^ ,a P , =



p, La y Night- in gale! a -wake! See how the day be gins to break I




y--5-i --'---s--

have a mes-sage for thy ear, To car ry to my sis ter dear.

2
Oh! she will greet thee o'er and o'er,
She'll call thee blest forever more,
A thousand times, sweet nightingale
She'll thank thee for the friendly tale !

3
Now get thee up, nor longer stay,
So sweetly singing on the way!
Speak softly to my sister dear
And whisper, "He will soon be here".

4
And give the pretty darlings joy,
The gentle girl and blooming boy;
And tell them each a pretty tale,
And speed thee, lady nightingale!


REIM.







Andante.



The day is here, the night is gone, The dusky shades make way for morn, The



.CFt-- ---- i--'----i-"--[--- *-- !--!--^ T i ---i --------->----


Sun lifts up his face so bright, And fills the plain with gold- en light.


2
So sweet he smileth, and so mild,
As smiles a mother on her child;
"My dearest sons," he seems to say,
"Sleep not these golden hours away.


3
"Example take you all from me,
And rise and labor busily;
And in my beaming features read,
That industry is joy indeed."


MORNING SONG


NAUMANN. 85





86 THE SPIDER AND HIS WIFE.



In a lit tie dark house a few feet from the ground, An honest old spi-der re -


-- -- ---- ---T

si ded; So plea sant and snug, and con ve nient 'twas found; That his




friends came to see it for many yards round, It seemed for his pleasure pro vi- ded.
2
He thought that the little his wife would consume,
With care he might always provide her,
Forgetting he liv'd in a gentleman's room,
Where there came every morning, a maid with a broom,
Those pitiless foes to a spider.
3
One day when their cupboard was empty and dry,
His wife, a most diligent spinner,
Said "now, my dear, go to the cobweb and try,
If you can't find the leg or the wing of a fly,
As a nice little relish for dinner.
4
He went without thinking of what might befall,
For nothing he ever denied her;
Brush came the great broom down the side of the wall,
And alas! carried with it web, dinner, and all,
And thus ended the days of poor spider.






I'D BE A BIRD.


Then a lit te bird I'd be, Fly ing where it pleaseth me.


2
O Id fly, I'd fly away
Over hill, and field, and bay,
Over fields of grass and grain,
Shady wood, and peopled plain.


3
When the earth again is green,
When the leaves and flowers are seen,
Then-ah no no bird I'll be;
As I am the world's for me.


4
Where no bird e'er sings or flies,
There my thought hath power to rise;
It can make cold winter's gloom,
Like the charming spring-time bloom.


PIIILIPP. 87





88 SONG OF THE NIGHT-WATCH.


V- 7- '-e--r :- r -r- r -----a---

Hark ye neigh-bors hear the hour! Ten is toll ing- from the tow er:





S. ---- --- -


Ten com-mand-ments God hath sealed, 0 may we o be-diencee yield.


-10-


I' I I -
All in vain the watch-man numbers,God must watch while Is rael slumbers;






ri -r -r F---r-
By thy mer cy and thy might, Send us, Lord, a hap-py night.
f ~ -== l,:_~-- ~ -~i






SONG OF THE NIGHT-WATCH.


2
Hark ye neighbors! hear the hour!
Tolls eleven from the tower:
Out of twelve eleven were true,
0 may we prove faithful too!
All in vain the watchman numbers,
God must watch while Israel slumbers;
By thy mercy and thy might,
Send us, Lord, a happy night.
3
Hark ye neighbors! hear the hour!
Twelve is tolling from the tower:
Twelve's the limit-man attend,
Think of thine eternal end!
All in vain the watchman numbers,
God must watch while Israel slumbers;
By thy mercy and thy might,
Send us, Lord, a happy night.
4
Hark ye neighbors hear the hour!
One is striking from the tower:
One thing's needful, God of grace !
May we ever seek thy face!
All in vain the watchman numbers,
God must watch while Israel slumbers;
By thy mercy and thy might,
Send us, Lord, a happy night.


5
Hark ye neighbors! hear the hour!
Two is tolling from the tower:
Two ways are before me spread,
Oh may I the narrow tread!
All in vain the watchman numbers,
God must watch while Israel slumbers;
By thy mercy and thy might,
Send us, Lord, a happy night.
6
Hark ye neighbors! hear the hour!
Three is tolling from the tower:
Cultivate the graces three,
Faith and hope, and charity!
All in vain the watchman numbers,
God must watch while Israel slumbers;
By thy mercy and thy might,
Send us, Lord, a happy night
7
Hark ye neighbors! hear the hour!
Four is tolling from the tower:
Fourfold is the gospel field,
Say doth thine the good fruit yield ?
Up, be watchful! day is dawning!
Softly steals the gleam of morning;
Thank thy God who guards the night,
And who brings the morning light


89





90 WORK AND PLAY.




Some play is good to make us strong, And school to' make us




i---s But play i---g al ways--tat s wro--- g And what we should des pise.
-se-
wise, But play ing al ways-that is wrong, And what we should des pise.


2
'There's nothing worse than idleness,
For making children bad,
'Tis sure to lead them to distress,
And much that's very sad.


3
Sometimes they learn to lie and cheat,
Sometimes to steal and swear;
These are the lessons in the street,
For those who idle there.


4


But how much better 'tis to learn
To count and spell, and read;
But if we play and work in turn,
'Tis useful then indeed.






COME AND SEE HOW HAPPILY.


t -
I0 _0
Come and see how hap pi ly, We spend the day,



&-- ----~ 0~----0--- -----------

Al ways join ing cheer ful ly In work or play


__ D. C.



In our books and sports combined, Ma ny are the charms we find.


2
We improve the present hour,
For swift it flies;
Youth is but a passing flower,
That blooms, and dies;
But with pleasing school and song,
Time with us still glides along.
Come and see, &c.


91






THE CHATTER BOX.


-r- a -v r


Some folks, do what e'er you will, They won't let their tongues lie still,






click, clack, click, clack, click, clack, click, clack, Thus they still keep on,






Ding, dong, ding, dong, ding, dong, ding, dong, Both night and morn ing.


2
But, tho' friends you live among,
Do not tire them with your tongue;
Click, clack, &c.
Soon they'll wish you gone,
Ding, dong, &c.
Then take this warning.


3
When advice you give or take,
Think before you silence break,
Once, twice, Once, twice, &c.
Think, and then you'll speak,
Twice, thrice, twice, thrice, &c.
Is thrice the better.






BE CAREFUL IN PLAY.


In your play be ve ry care ful Not to give an oth er



~-7 -'7 ---------_--- _, -
pain, And if oth ers hurt or tease you, Nev er do the like to them.


2 3
If a stone were thrown upon you, Never throw a stone or brick-bat,
And should hit your head or eye, Though you see no creature near-;
Don't you know wouldd hurt you sadly ? 'Tis a dangerous, naughty practice,
Don't you think'twould make you cry ? Which you little ones should fear.


4
God will love the child that's gentle,
And who tries to do no wrong:
You must learn then to be careful,
Now while you are very young.


93






DOING RIGHT.


0 that it were my chief de light, To do the things I





ought, Then let me try with all my might, To mind what I am taught.


2
Wherever I am bid to go,
I'll cheerfully obey,
Nor will I mind it much, although,
I leave some pretty play.

3
When I am bid, I'll freely bring,
Whatever I have got,
And never touch a pretty -*.;,_.
If mother tells me not.


4
When she permits me, I may tell,
About my little toys;
But if she's busy or unwell,
I must not make a noise.

5
And when I learn my hymns to say,
And work, and read, and spell,
I will not think about my play,
But try to do it well.


6
For God looks down from heaven on high,
Our actions to behold,
And he is pleased when children try,
To do as they are told.







., -a I e I h -a
^ w-1-^' r-1-q-a--rv-i--J-r-i---t-rmr1^ -i-L'- --- cn-t-:-- iTnr-'--i-i--vr


1 Oh, why is the Lin-net so si -lent and sad, No hap- pi er bird there could be;
SThe cold nights were gone,And we tho't it was glad, For sweet-ly it sang on the tree.



--- vr -#- I i
The green leaves were come, and no bird seemed so blest, For joy tu'd its

-S.' I, l i


notes when it sung; But some cru el boy e has


Q--- --- -T~-i--- i-- ~j-- --- --. l_-- ~

tak en its nest, And robbed the poor bird of its young.

2
Our parents we love, for they do a great deal
More for us than we can repay;
But think of the sorrow those parents would feel,
If we were thus stolen away !
I would not be guilty of such cruel wrong,
No prisoners in cages for me!
Fly away, pretty birds, and repeat your sweet song,
I'm always the friend of the free.


THE LINNET.


95






96 THE KIND HEART.




. ( Life is a school where this lesson is taught, May it be deeply impressed on n~y mind ;
Vain thro' the world is true happiness sought, If we possess not a heart that is kind.


:----W----------------ti----------- ------------- -------------------------------------

Those who de light to make oth ers un hap py, And think it fine

Sr... ..f-- .. 1,_ _7. ..


sport to cause troub-le and pain, No one will lose for their



------------------------------ ---------I
want of hu -man i ty, Hate and re sent -ment are all they will gain.

2
Life is a blessing, which if we enjoy
We ought to render a blessing to all;
Kind thoughts and actions our time should employ,
Heav'n loves all creatures, the great and the small.
Strength is not ours to be used for oppression,
And cruelty never to pow'r should belong;
Even dumb animals claim our protection,
The weak have a right to the aid of the strong.





I II I
* _























1!



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4




i


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