• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Seeing the world
 The rogue of the house-hold
 Dread-ing win-ter
 Bob-by Shaf-to
 Fan-ny
 How Tom-my and the ba-by saw San-ta...
 The lit-tle chief
 Pet-tum's kiss
 The sto-ry of a lamb
 May-day sports
 A ver-y naugh-ty lit-tle girl
 Miss Lunt's school
 Three travellers
 Fanny
 The true story of Dick's dolla...
 What is this?
 What I saw in Boston
 Beauties
 Mary's journey
 What if?
 What happened in a garden
 Charlie's rabbits
 Jack roll-eth the snow-ball
 Slate pict-ure for ba-by to...
 Pig-gy gets in
 Slate pict-ure for ba-by to...
 A nest to let
 Plum Sant-a Claus
 What Bob saw at "Gwam-pa's"
 True incident in the life of Mr....
 What Ben-ny taught Clar-ence
 A sum-mer Christ-mas
 Phi-le-na
 Learning to read
 Od-dy Wad-dle
 Dol-ly's wings
 The queen's coach
 Plant-ing a pus-sy
 Mint-ie's cross day
 Pinkie-winkie's mamma
 A morn-ing ride
 Slate pict-ure for ba-by to...
 Play-ing pa-pa and mam-ma
 Slate pict-ure for ba-by to...
 Who scratched the ba-by?
 Af-ter Christ-mas
 What blue eyes and black eyes saw...
 What the lit-tle Lees did
 Two ways of be-ing washed
 Ba-by's rich-es
 Good news for the baby
 A piece of rubber
 A queer little builder
 Back Cover






Group Title: Children's holiday : stories for little folks
Title: The children's holiday
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00065493/00001
 Material Information
Title: The children's holiday stories for little folks
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: D. Lothrop Company
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: c1889
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Holidays -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1889   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1889   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1889
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: illustrated.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00065493
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223104
notis - ALG3352
oclc - 24302687

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page i
    Frontispiece
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Seeing the world
        Page 1
        Page 2
    The rogue of the house-hold
        Page 3
    Dread-ing win-ter
        Page 3
    Bob-by Shaf-to
        Page 4
    Fan-ny
        Page 4
        Page 5
    How Tom-my and the ba-by saw San-ta Claus
        Page 6
        Page 7
    The lit-tle chief
        Page 8
    Pet-tum's kiss
        Page 9
    The sto-ry of a lamb
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    May-day sports
        Page 13
        Page 14
    A ver-y naugh-ty lit-tle girl
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Miss Lunt's school
        Page 17
    Three travellers
        Page 18
    Fanny
        Page 19
    The true story of Dick's dollar
        Page 20
    What is this?
        Page 21
    What I saw in Boston
        Page 22
    Beauties
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Mary's journey
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    What if?
        Page 30
    What happened in a garden
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Charlie's rabbits
        Page 35
    Jack roll-eth the snow-ball
        Page 36
    Slate pict-ure for ba-by to draw
        Page 36
    Pig-gy gets in
        Page 37
    Slate pict-ure for ba-by to draw
        Page 37
    A nest to let
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Plum Sant-a Claus
        Page 43
    What Bob saw at "Gwam-pa's"
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    True incident in the life of Mr. Thomas Gray
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
    What Ben-ny taught Clar-ence
        Page 52
        Page 53
    A sum-mer Christ-mas
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Phi-le-na
        Page 56
        Page 57
    Learning to read
        Page 58
        Page 59
    Od-dy Wad-dle
        Page 60
    Dol-ly's wings
        Page 61
    The queen's coach
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Plant-ing a pus-sy
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Mint-ie's cross day
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
    Pinkie-winkie's mamma
        Page 69
    A morn-ing ride
        Page 70
    Slate pict-ure for ba-by to draw
        Page 70
    Play-ing pa-pa and mam-ma
        Page 71
    Slate pict-ure for ba-by to draw
        Page 71
    Who scratched the ba-by?
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
    Af-ter Christ-mas
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
    What blue eyes and black eyes saw in It-a-ly
        Page 79
    What the lit-tle Lees did
        Page 80
        Page 81
    Two ways of be-ing washed
        Page 82
        Page 83
    Ba-by's rich-es
        Page 84
    Good news for the baby
        Page 85
    A piece of rubber
        Page 86
        Page 87
    A queer little builder
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text
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WIDE AWAKE FOR 189o.
This favorite People's Pictorial proposes to celebrate fitly the making of its "
Thirtieth Volume.


A large cciliSpay its readers and friends have been on its subscription-list from the issue
of-tlistst.n t i ustndsa:of young people who took WJDE AWAKE in their sehooldays
.l fo'iC tid. s? ia'i.he beads of families, in their own homes, and propose tobe life-
is. (' tiI-they say, young and old, that they cannot find anywhere else teadi &
tzitekre Si4Wf-ories and -recollections of a lifetirvme by .
U .S. 'JESSIE BENTON FREMONT, .
,de" Wries for no other periodical,)
I.d40t and to celebrate the loyalty of-te public, every number of
S'" WIDE AWAKE FOR 18go
*d tf h.ier *eortiations are on foot for several
S..,- ARKABLE SERIALS,
e3t ofd the Short Stories and ArtiVies sea.nd through the
1tcK'RATUkE PRIZE COMPION,
for treats and feasts by .nirea .recs; among the
".-.by Mrs. General Froa pe~~ry mnaier; Auo. there
n.iosta.c aic cadian series which .a 'ier been in print, but
.:.W.inq 4tAxWKE bly a writer in Canada.
4'ie this. anouameit.and set it down in their plans that the

NW DCAWAO -o Rgo. A 'Ago 0
H&& the De&. zafinklr.
W.- : LOTWROP COMPANYI'- BurSHERS, BOSTON.
A r: i,7b:


'iAgczi .s jor. Youn Piojie and ('Family. .
SWide- Awi k
^ '.:::" *, ..... ,. .. :; "
MiYpSO2ele Iqtalgazines .I There alh eightyagrU veY y month -nwl if you count the
lasI, crowded with pictures, the beast or swo stories, serias, poems, practical articles
d. ways to 4o .thigs everything that is gbod for young folks to know and do,
S mda ode n wonder"-and so it is. And best of all, there is nothing i i0:
a ng folks, nothing but what is ood for their growth to useful, successful, honor-
W 4C. I2.40 a year..


d e specially for Sunday as well as week-day reading. Pasy" herself is the editor.
to ly tw ere is no similar magazine that can compare with this. MUay short stories and
als by Pa..y, and othpr favorite writers. Tales of travel at home and abroad, adventures,
.pfr n d' over .the seas, and stories illustrating the Internatonal Lessons. It circulated
bo" .f 4 denominatiaonsh as it i Anoa-ectarian. The Pansy is full of pictnrea.many of them
. rpageo owpthly. j too a yer. Very liberal terms made to Sunday-choot.
*. Babyland.
tgl ies, si tIs : te~lpysferImbaby. If baby is five or six, he is not too old for Badpitd; no:
n he crdws witi deliht at the sight of pretty pictures.
i..Tp a nile many time when baby Is tired with play, or fretful, or wanting something t ew.
; .it his own little magazine to enjoy; and happy mother, who is wise enough to avail bemseuf a i such
irny pictures and very large type. Eight pages a month. Fifty cents a year.
:-. .. .. Our Little Men and W omen. .
S. .. ,, ', : .... .. i "'.


readers. SEvrything made entertaining and told in simple lagngt; all 4 y1 littl
dl. .ElBtgtures ae remy i- large and small. Think of seventy vle C 'es
.I'ta t ofr.ur Zit Moe Wad Women : .. ; .-
type 1"ge, amdd ttenty-four pages every month. lt.oo. a y1q). ,

I The Bald


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THE CHILDREN'S HOLIDAY



STORIES FOR LITTLE FOLKS


ILL USTRA TED




BOSTON
D LOTHROP COMPANY
WASHINGTON STREET OPPOSITE BROMFIELD


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a


COPYYIGHT, 1889,
BY
D. LOTHROP COMPANY.


v







THE


C


CHILDREN'S


HOLIDAY.


SEEING


THE WORLD.


" Do see those beans run up


the poles !"


said


little Miss Pumpkin Vine.


She was speaking to Mr. Bumble Bee.


He had


come to make a call.


" Oh, that is nothing new "


" Well," said Miss


ways thought the


said Bumble Bee.


Pumpkin Vine, I have al-


ground was good


my pretty, yellow blossoms.


enough


for


Certainly, then, it is


good enough for those mean little bean flowers."


"There wouldn't be room enough for everybody


if everybody had to live


in the same place," said


Mr. Bumble Bee.


Then, with


a cheerful


buzz, he flew


Miss Pumpkin Vine looked after


wishful


over the


him with


eyes.


She thought it would be pleasant to have wings.


" Oh dear!"


said she,


"I would like to see


more of the world.


bad that I must stay


It is too


down


/cf~~~


&I


fence.


A'


114


~c~y
'' ''


,a,
----
~-~-----


t.i


-1.


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here on the ground.


I'm tired of it!"


She threw out her arms.


There she staid three or four days.
Her head ached.


The tips


of her green


fingers


touched one of the poles.


How surprised


little Miss Pump-


Her back ached.
Her arms ached.
For the pumpkins


grew


heavier


kin Vine was !
She at once
the beans.


began to climb like


every day.
She did not like to own that she


had made a mistake.


She climbed for many days.


But she did say to herself,


one


tip top


of


the pole.
It is grand to see so far," she said
to herself.


day, that possibly it was not the best
place for pumpkins on the tip top of
a pole.


At last, Jack


Frost took pity upon


" I should be very happy and


glad


if my head did not feel so heavy and
bad."


her.
One cold night he helped her down
to the ground.


Her yellow blossoms


had been


Next day, as


Sir Bumble Bee flew


growing all this time into pumpkins.
It was hard for her to hold these
pumpkins up there in the air.
I wish I could lie down and


take a nap,"


said she. I am


really


by he


heard Miss Pumpkin


Vine


talking.
The best place for pumpkins is
down on the ground," said she.
I am sure of that.


very, very tired.
But she could find no place on the


tall pole


to lie down comfortably.


"The beans may climb


as many


poles as they like.
I have seen enough of the world."


A chubby little sister
Was rubbing at her tub;
A chubby little brother
Came up to help her rub;


The chubby little brother,
Fell down in with a cry;
The chubby little sister
Then hung him up to dry.


At last she reached the


4






OF THE HOUSE-HOLD.


H, I don't think
it is fair to call


me the
of the


ma and pa-pa
when they want


rogue
house-


hold! I on-ly
do what big
folks do. Mam-
look at books
to. and sis-ter


Anna goes to the cake clos-et


1 1


r


wnen she wants a piece of
cake, and they all pick flow-ers
any time. But if I get cake
or jam, my-self, or have the
books on the centre table, or


pick a po-sy -
such a rogue!
stand it!


why then I am
I don't un-der-


DREAD-ING


I,


~d~r;Y
"
(
~
Z
T
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We're two lit-tie birds
As sor-ry as can be
That win-ter is com-ing,
For don't you see


WIN-TER.

In the great snow-storms
There'll be naught to eat
In field, or gard-en,
In yard, or street ?

If we were chil-dren
And you were birds,
We'd set-tle this mat-ter
With no more words.

If we had the loaves,
You should have crumbs-
Remember this, dears,
When the wild snow comes!


ROGUE


f


THE






OF THE HOUSE-HOLD.


H, I don't think
it is fair to call


me the
of the


ma and pa-pa
when they want


rogue
house-


hold! I on-ly
do what big
folks do. Mam-
look at books
to. and sis-ter


Anna goes to the cake clos-et


1 1


r


wnen she wants a piece of
cake, and they all pick flow-ers
any time. But if I get cake
or jam, my-self, or have the
books on the centre table, or


pick a po-sy -
such a rogue!
stand it!


why then I am
I don't un-der-


DREAD-ING


I,


~d~r;Y
"
(
~
Z
T
'C
-/
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We're two lit-tie birds
As sor-ry as can be
That win-ter is com-ing,
For don't you see


WIN-TER.

In the great snow-storms
There'll be naught to eat
In field, or gard-en,
In yard, or street ?

If we were chil-dren
And you were birds,
We'd set-tle this mat-ter
With no more words.

If we had the loaves,
You should have crumbs-
Remember this, dears,
When the wild snow comes!


ROGUE


f


THE








BOB-BY


SHAF-TO.


BY M. E. B.

CAP up-on his curl-ing crown,
Trying on his pa-pa's frown,
Cun-ning Bob-by Shaf-to!
Boots up-on his ti-ny toes,
Glass-es on his lit-tle nose,
Fun-ny Bob-by Shaf-to!
And a meer-schaum in his hand!
Doesn't he look gay and grand?
Jol-ly Bob-by Shaf-to!


FAN-NY.


'' WHERE'S


my


1 **


blank-et ? "


said Fan-ny, as she stood in


her sta-ble, m


of hay,


af-ter


warm meal.
dark,- and
drow-sy.


shi


*


uncn-mng a wisp
her sup-per of
It was grow-ing
e be-gan to feel


She turned her head this side


and that.


She looked


down


on the floor of her stall, and in
the man-ger.


"What


can


Tom have done


with it ? A pret-ty i-de-a, I de-
clare, to leave me all night
with-out it! They call it spring.
To be sure the nights are not
the cold-est, but it's chil-ly


e-nough
blank-et.


yet, and I want my
I won-der if he


thought I didn't need it a-ny
lon-ger. Won-der how he'd
like to have the blank-et left


. ..








BOB-BY


SHAF-TO.


BY M. E. B.

CAP up-on his curl-ing crown,
Trying on his pa-pa's frown,
Cun-ning Bob-by Shaf-to!
Boots up-on his ti-ny toes,
Glass-es on his lit-tle nose,
Fun-ny Bob-by Shaf-to!
And a meer-schaum in his hand!
Doesn't he look gay and grand?
Jol-ly Bob-by Shaf-to!


FAN-NY.


'' WHERE'S


my


1 **


blank-et ? "


said Fan-ny, as she stood in


her sta-ble, m


of hay,


af-ter


warm meal.
dark,- and
drow-sy.


shi


*


uncn-mng a wisp
her sup-per of
It was grow-ing
e be-gan to feel


She turned her head this side


and that.


She looked


down


on the floor of her stall, and in
the man-ger.


"What


can


Tom have done


with it ? A pret-ty i-de-a, I de-
clare, to leave me all night
with-out it! They call it spring.
To be sure the nights are not
the cold-est, but it's chil-ly


e-nough
blank-et.


yet, and I want my
I won-der if he


thought I didn't need it a-ny
lon-ger. Won-der how he'd
like to have the blank-et left


. ..





off his bed! Heigh-ho! I'll
find that blank-et yet if it's in
the sta-ble! Ah! there it is!"
The stall was only board-ed
up on one side as high as Fan-
ny's shoul-der. The blank-et
lay a-cross this fence. Fan-ny
found it, but how put it on?
The lit-tle horse felt cold,
and did not like it. It was too
ear-ly to leave off her blank-et.
She turned her head as far
as she could, took the blank-et
in her mouth, and threw it on
her back, just as it was. She
could not spread it out, and it
was not much for her com-fort
to have it in a roll on her back.
But next morn-ing her mas-ter


found it so when he came to
feed her. She had told him

.. i / -' ',
'/ / *


by her ac-tions, as she could
not in words, that she was cold
and need-ed her blank-et.
He thought she was a wise
lit-tie horse. Don't you?


AF-TER THE (;(OO-NIGHTS" ARE SAID






HOW


TOM-MY


AND THE


BA-BY


SAW


SAN-TA


CLAUS.


LIT-TLE
watch-ing
for San-ta


Tom-my


had been


all day watch-ing
Claus.


* It was the day be-fore Christ-
mas, and he knew San-ta must
be on the way. The big cit-y
lay off to the north, be-hind the
great hill, and Tom-my felt
sure San-ta would come down


the hill road.


south
i-vies,


At the sun-ny


win-dows, a-mong


the


you could see a-ny-one


com-ing o-ver the hill-road for
two miles. Tom-my knew, if
he kept a-ny kind of watch, he
should be sure to see old San-
ta at some point- and Tom-
my's eyes just shot forth spark-
les to think of be-hold-ing
the fa-mous rein-deer team.
"Jutst you fink, Miss Ba-by !"
he said to his wee sis-ter, swing-
ing in her blue-and-white crib,
"just you fink of four, sev-en,
eight lit-tle ho's-ses wiv horns


to their heads, and wiv


bells


to 'em that go jin-gle-jin-gle-
jin-gle and Tom-my ca-
pered a-cross the floor for a


mo-ment,


throw-ing


hands and shak-ing M
by's rat-tie with all his
Then he went back to.


dow a-gain.
All at once he
" Ba-by! I see him!
I see him!"


Wa-wa ?"
with her pin
mouth.


gurg-
k fin-g


Tom-my wait-ed j


up
1iss


his
Ba-


might.
his win-


cried out.
I do fink

led Ba-by,
,ers in her

just a min-


ute lon-ger he did see some-


thing


ve-ry


long


a-way on top of


then, with
cheeks, he
a has-soc


and black
the hill, and


fly-ing curls and red
rushed away, pushed
k up to the crib,


dragged Ba-by up bod-i-ly with
a long tug, and well, mam-
ma had just time for one sur-

















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prised smile, and then a swift
rush-just so that Tom-my


and Ba-by
wards-- th(
that was all


did-n't pitch back-
ey just did-n't, and


And Mam-ma's


scream so fright-ened Tom-my
that he for-got San-ta for some


time; and when he did look the


team


was out


of sight.


So


Tom-my did-nt see him come,
af-ter all--but come he did-


for


such a fat stock-ing


as


Tom-my's next morn-ing, you
nev-er saw!


THE


L1T-TLE


CHIEF.


I'm my moth-er's
I'm the Chief of


Little
all the


Man,
clan,


d


-~--.-


Though there's Ned
and Ted,


If you please,
Head.


and Fred


sir, I'm


the


They like their play,
you see,
Who's left to be the


me ?
My moth-er knows


one
To do that thing that
done.
I sweep the walks, I


and


so,


man but


I am


must


the


be


tend the


door
I go her er-rands to the store-
0, a-ny day I'd run a mile
To see my Dret-tv moth-er


sJ mA
smile!


You need-n't laugh because I'm
small!


Just be-ing big, sir, isn't


all-


I'm much a man as any man


If I do ev-e-ry-thing


I


can!


1


..... ---






Chan-ti-cleer flut-ters and flaps
his wings ;


One, two,


three, then up he


springs,
Opens his mouth, and,
oh! oh !


oh!


"Yer- urr--urrrr !" just hear
him crow.


PET-TUMS' KISS.


Fair Pet-tums was robed in her
dain-ty night-gown,


Just read-y to go to
lit-tle nest.


he


I been hav-ing th
est frol-ic in town;


And now


I will tell


r white

e jol-li-


you


the


rest :


"Come!


Pet-tums,"


that rogue of a


I said
miss,


to


"'Tis time now, to kiss me
good-night."


So she put up her lips as
thought for a kiss,


I


But in-stead, she just gave me
a bie !


Look at my ba-by
Sound a-sleep!
You nev-er would


think


How fast she can creep,
Or how cun-ning and sly
She will hide and peep!


We'<






THE


STO-RY


OF A LAMB.


Pa-pa
som had
ters. TI


and Mam-ma
three lit-tie


here was E-va


som, and A-da
Ni-na Blos-som.


They were lit-tle


Blos-
laugh-
Blos-


Blos-som, and


coun-try


girls, and, be-ing strong and
well, they ran out of doors and
played so hard, and were so
noi-sy, that Mam-ma Blos-som
said she feared they would
nev-er be as gen-tle and sweet
as she wished.


So Pa-pa Blos-som


would


said he


buy them some ca-na-


ries and some gold fish and a


lamb to take care of,


and that


would make them thought-ful.
That was the way they
came to have a lamb.
And this is the way they
came- to near-ly not have a


lamb:
One morn-ing Pa-pa Blos-
som brought in a ripe straw-
ber-ry when he came from
driv-ing the cows to pas-ture.


The three young Blos-soms
jumped up and down at the
sight.
"We will go straw-ber-ry-ing,
this day!" they screamed.
"No," said mam-ma, "this


day will be rain-y."
It was rain-y. Pa-pa and
mam-ma went to town in the
car-riage, and the lit-tle daugh-j


ters were left to keep house.
But alas, and alas! W1


do you sup-pose they did ?
They all three put on their
hats and went down to the big
mead-ow by the woods; and


Snow, the lamb, went too.
Snow, the lamb, went too.


always did.
While hi


He
3


s little mis-tress-es


were down on their knees ir
the wet grass, Snow thought
he would take a small trot in
the woods. I


It was a small trot, for al-
most the first thing he did
was to trot one leg in-to a deep
hole, and a big stone rolled in


at























































\1


'i '-

".,,~ .. ,,


,' ,-- ._o__ , .'x


u


*1


>'A


POOR LIT-TLE SNOW. "


b



r,
--


*** \ I


-1.


I'M
"\^' ,l ;|j'/* '7 ;1
, ,,i ..





af-ter the leg and held him fast.
He bleat-ed for his lit-tie


mis-tress-es.


They came to


him; but oh, the little white leg
was sprained. They got him
out, but could not car-ry him.


That night when


Mam-ma


what did they see out by the


bigo
girls


Pa-pa and


ning from their hat-brims, and
tears from their eyes.


Of


course


pa-pa


went for


Snow-and pa-pa and mam.
ma doc-tored the poor lit-tie leg,
and Snow got well; but he
al-ways walked with a limp.
Mam-ma said she thought that


Slimp
daugh-te
deal of


kept her three
rs out of a
mis-chief.


lit-tie


great


"Where have
you been, you
naugh-ty cat ?"
says the cat's
lit-tle mis-tress.


"Guess!"says
kit-ty.
Have you


--- been catch-ing
birds, bad cat?-tell me and
I'll take you down."


No," says kit-ty.
Have you been chas-ing
but-ter-fly?"


" No," says kit-ty.
"You are all wet,"


a


says the


lit-tie mis-tress, feel-ing his fur.
"You have been hunt-ing for
baby mice, or scar-ing rob-ins."
"No," says kit-ty. "Guess
some-thing good now."
Kit-ty's mis-tress takes him
up un-der her dim-pled chin,
and bur-ies her white nose in
his wet fur.


says she,


"'Ah,"


"I


have


smelled it out-you have been
a-sleep in your lit-tle nest un-
der the cat-nip!"


" Yes,


purrs kit-ty,


"and


I


want to go in and have some
milk now."


Blos-som drove up,


gate? Their three lit-tie
drip-ping wet, wa-ter run-




























GOING A-MAYING.


MAY-DAY

How pleasant the early spring
days are !
Now the bees come out of their
hives, and hum, and look about.
What are the bees looking for?
Do the bees know that it is time
for the flowers to be here ?
Oh, yes! the little green plants
will soon peep up through the old
dry grass; and the early flowers


SPORTS.

will bloom when the weather is
warm enough.
Then the children, and the bees,
and all other flower-lovers, will go
into the fields and woods to seek
flowers.
Many people always go out the
first day of May to gather flowers.
They call it "going a-May-
ing."






English people do this oftener than
Americans.
English children often have May-
day parties.
They choose one little girl for a
queen. The others crown her with
flowers and dance around her.
They wait upon their queen, and
try to please her in every way dur-
ing the party.
Sometimes they set up a pole and
hang ribbons and wreaths of flow-
ers upon it.
They call this pole a May-pole.
Hundreds of years ago the grown
people too, all over England, used to
celebrate May-day,
They went out early in the morn-
ing to gather flowers. They brought
them home and trimmed the doors
and windows of their houses with
them.
They carried boquets to their
friends.
In every village stood a May-pole.
It was as tall as the mast of a ship.
All the young people met to-
gether and hung wreaths of flowers


upon this pole, and danced around
it.
They built a throne for their queen
under a bower of green branches.
She sat on her green throne and
watched the rest while they played
merry games.
The milk-maids put on their best
caps and aprons and drove their
cows about the streets.
The cows wore garlands of flowers
on their horns.
The village people spent the
whole day in feasting and dancing.
Sometimes the King and Queen
of E )gland went a-Maying, too, and
joined in the common sports.
But this was several hundred
years ago.
After a time these things went
out of fashion, and the May-poles
were taken down.
May-poles are not often seen ii
England now.
Yet many people in both Englan
and America still go out to gathd
flowers early on May-day morning.
--X N. H.






A VER-Y



This is the pi
augh-ty lit-tie gi
-way from school
n her big sis-ter


NAUC



ct-ure c
rl who
1. She
*'s hat


A LIT-TLE RUN-A-WAY.


iawl o-ver
t-tle bare
ait-ed for
Broth-er


her short dress
legs, and ne
break-fast at al
John-nie ran a


GH-TY


LIT-TLE


GIRL.


BY S. E. F.

f a her as fast as he could, but he
ran couldn't catch her. Towser
put ran and barked, and he could-
and n't catch her. And all the
chick-ens and rab-bits ran and
hop-ped in the yard, and they
could-n't catch her. E-ven
mam-ma's sweet voice at the
door could-n't bring the naugh-
ty lit-tie girl back.
This naugh-ty lit-tie girl had
nev-er been to school, but on
and on she ran and ran to find
the school, all a-lone. At last
the lit-tle feet be-gan to ache
from so much run-ning, and
Sshe could-n't find the big house
with the lit-tie girls play-ing in
the yard.
And then oh, oh, two
big tears rolled down o-ver the
and brown lit-tie cheeks and fell
v-er right down on the ground be-
1! fore her. Then they came
f-ter fast-er and fast-er un-til she sat





down on the green grass and
tried to cov-er her face all o-ver


with her
hands.


two chub-by lit-tie


Then she for-got to cry a-ny
more and went to sleep and
dreamed she was lost. She
dreamed she was a lit-tle beg-
gar girl sit-ting out in a great


snow storm.
that mam-ma
cried and T(


She dreamed
cried and pa-pa
)w-zer cried and


Bun-nie ran in-to his cor-ner
and hid his face way down in
the straw and cried and they
all be-gan to cry loud-er and


loud-er till she thought all the
world was mak-ing a loud noise;
and all the while she sat there
a poor lit-tle beg-gar girl, bare-
head-ed and bare-foot-ed in the
snow storm.


All at once she o-pened he
eyes and there was big shag-g
Tow-zer com-ing af-ter h
with great bounds and bark!
and, be-hind him, broth-I
lu


THE LIT-TLE GIRL SHE DREAMED SHE WAS.

John-ie to carry her back hoi
She was ver-y glad to go hd
with them to mam-ma. C


de-ter-mined nev-er,
run a-way a-gain.


nev-er;


I


(a

T.





Fc
nt
Mi
ir
h

hi


They talked and


they


talked,


By the hour to-geth-er:


" Fine weath-er!"


said he,


And she said, Fine weath-er!"


loI
n
Sw


n r(


Fhc


S r(


i






MISS LUNT'S SCHOOL.


Miss Lunt was a school-teacher.
She taught school in her own
use.
The school was in her pretty par-
i where she played on the piano.
The pupils sat on the bright chintz
tas, and in the pretty chairs.
hfhere were pictures on the walls.
there were flowers on the tables.
'wo bird-cages hung in the large
Window.
tFen large girls came to Miss
Into's school.
Four small girls came to Miss
int's school.
Miss Lunt was very fond of her
ir small pupils.
5he did many pleasant things for
Little class.
r here was a small room next the
1lor.
fn this small-room there was a low
k with soft pillows.
When the four small girls grew
od or sleepy, she sent them into
s room.
[hey could run about and play in
s room, or they could lie down on


the low bed and take a nap.
There were blocks, and games, and
toys in this room.
There was also a low table with
bright blue plates and cups.
The small girls could sit at this
table and eat their lunch.
The small girls could bring their
dolls, if they chose, and play with
them in this room.
They could not take the dolls into
the school room.
Sometimes Miss Lunt wished the
four small girls to sit near her in a
row on a low sofa.
Then she let each one take a pic-
ture-book while she heard the ten
large girls recite.
Any one of the four small girls
who did not whisper while she sat in
the row, nor touch the next girl, nor
move her feet, had a good mark.
That good girl could wear a lovely
blue ribbon bow on her shoulder for
a whole day.
If that good girl wished to bring a
flower, Miss Lunt would wear it in
her hair all the morning.






One day there were three good
girls.


The next


day


Miss Lunt had to


wear a sunflower, a pink and a rose.
It was a very pretty class when


told her girls stories about animal,


and her girls told her
pets at home.
The four small girls


about the,

and the td


stood up in a


row.
Once two of the ten large girls
did not study their lessons.
Miss Lunt put those two tall idle
girls into the small girls' class.
But the small girls did not want
any tall idle girls in their class.
Then Miss Lunt put the two
tall idle girls in a class by themselves.


Then they were ashamed


and


studied their lessons.
Once in two weeks Miss Lunt had
a story morning."


On "story morning "


Miss Lunt


TT .-I M \LL CLASS IS SPOILED.

large girls always enjoyed "st
morning."
Not one of Miss Lunt's fourth(
girls was ever unkind to any anin


THREE TI

Three funny little travellers
Set out to leave the town
And all they wore to keep them warm
Was one white, ruffled gown.


RAVELLERS.

I asked these little travellers
If far they meant to roam.
"Oh, no," they all together said
We'll not go far from home.'


the four small girls


I


1
t


I:
v


b





FANNY.


"WHERE is my blanket?"


said


She turned her head as


far as she


Fanny.
Fanny stood in her stable, munch-
ing a wisp of hay, after her supper of
warm meal.
It was growing dark, and she felt
drowsy.
She turned her head this side and
that.
She looked down on the floor.
She looked in the manger.
What can Tom have done with
my blanket ? said she.
I hope he does not mean to leave
me all night without it I
I wonder if he would like to have
his mother forget to put the blanket
on his bed.
"Well, I must find that blanket
myself.
I hope it is in the stable some-
where!
"Ah! there it is!"
The stall was boarded up on one
side as high as Fanny's shoulder.
The blanket lay across the top
board.
Fanny had found it.
But how should she put it on ?


could.
She took the blanket in her mouth.


FANNY DOES THE BEST SHE CAN.


She pulled it down on her back,
just as it was.
She could not spread it out.
It did not make her much warmer
to have it in a roll on her back.
But she had done her best.
Next morning her master found


the blanket rolled upon her


back


when he came to feed her.
He thought she was a smart little
horse.
Don't you think so, too ?
Every night now Fanny is care-
fully blanketed.






THE TRUE


DICK was a boot-black.


The only
old cellar.


home he had was in an


Sometimes nobody seemed to hear
him.
But one day there came a shower


Here he slept


every night with


of rain, and


Dick had just as much


Tim, the news-boy.


work as he could do.
One after another


the five-cent


pieces dropped into his pocket.


At last it was so heavy


turn it in
When
pieces he
Why,"
dimes ma
dred cent:


he had to i


side out.


he counted


the five-cent


found he had twenty.
said Dick, twenty half-
:e the same as one hun-


And a hundred


cents


make just one dollar "
Dick felt rich.


He and


their room


Tim had paid the rent of
that morning. He had a


4-,


whole loaf of bread at


home.


He


thought he had plenty to wear, al-


though he was barefoot and
elbows and knees.


Yes, he could do


out at


what he chose


was close by a large


depot.
Have a shine, mister ?
cents a shine !"


That was what Dick called out as
the crowds went by.


Only five


with that dollar.
I will tell you what he did -for
this is not a make believe" story.


It is true.


Dick is a Boston


black.
Dick took his pile


of


boot-


five-cen


DICK.


Dick's stand


OF DICK'S


DOLLAR.


STORY





pieces to the kind gentlemen who
were getting up the Poor Children's
Excursions."
I want you to take this dollar,"


said he, "and
real jolly day
as you did me


give some little boy a
in the country -just
last year!"


WHAT


Boys, what is this ?
" A head," says John.
' A rabbit's head," says Will.
"The head of a hare," cries Dick.
Yes, it is a head. It is much like
rabbit's head.
But Dick has answered right. It


IS THIS?

is the head of a hare. The hare is
the tig cousin of the rabbit.
He is usually lighter in color. He
is often white. But the wild rabbit is
brown.
Like the rabbit, the hare has very
long ears; they are often longer than
the head itself.
Like a cat, hares hear the least
sound.
The hare is timid. If he hears
any strange noise he runs away very
swiftly.
SBoth rabbits and hares have long
whiskers like a cat's.
Both live in the woods.
Rabbits have homes underground.
Their big cousins have only nests
in the bushes.
Some kinds of rabbits are kept as
pets. These tame rabbits vary in
color from white to black. It is
harder to tame and keep a hare.







~ .' rq r ,
. I \ "'.
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,. :. .
.~ : r i .l,.
; ',

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-p i
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. ... P.~ -., Pl - .-
.*- r.,r-- : '. k
:-.p~i :. '-v ..
-- ::r. ..
; .. -.;+ ,,c
" : ... .. .. ,... r
'.. ,, ur r .--'
-'" -
*.~r~2


THE LITTLE GERMAN CHILDREN.


WHAT


I SAW


IN BOSTON.


What do


you think I saw one


Emigrants


are people


who leave


morning


last winter, as I walked


down Washington Street?


I


saw three children


and their


father.


their own country and go to
country to live.
German emigrants come
country called Germany.


another


from


a


Oh, they were having such a good
time I
I stopped and looked at them.


There were two little girls and
little boy.


The little girls wore brown dress


They were fat,
children.
Their father


rosy-cheeked little


es, long-sleeved aprons and


sacques.


was fat and


rosy-


They


fadf.c


both had red hoods


The little boy wore trousers,


cheeked too.
They looked like Germans.
I think they were emigrants.


he had a big-sleeved apron


girls.


like th


He had a very shabby


fu


cap.


--.5 -
- -C
.~--i. i
"muiq


a


bt






Do you want to know about the
good time they were having?
Perhaps y.ou would think it was
very poor fun.
But the German children did not.
They laughed and chattered until
their cheeks fairly shone.
They were at the drinking foun-
tain in front of Franklin Square.
Here is a high stone trough for
the horses to drink out of in sum-
mer.
In winter it is covered with a stone
plank.
The emigrant children were stand-
ing on this plank.
Their father must have put them
up there, for it was too high for them
to climb.
He would spread out his arms,
and the children would jump into


them just as fast as he could catch
them, and set them down on the pave-
ment.
Then he would lift them up, and
the fun would begin again.
I think the man enjoyed it as much
as the children did.
It looked very funny to see a
whole family amusing themselves in
that way in the streets of Boston.
But they did not seem to know that
anyone was watching them.
Yet nearly everybody who passed
stopped to smile at the pretty sight.
I never saw any of them again.
But I would like to know more
about them.
I am sure there are no happier
children in Boston than those little
Germans.


BEAUTIES.


Fritz always opens his eyes wide
when he goes out-doors.
He likes his picture-books.
He likes to hear mamma read
stories.
But he likes real things better.


Yesterday he saw some birds that
had just arrived from the South.
Fritz said he should like to know
their names so that he could speak
to them when they met.
Then mamma said, Mrs. Robin,






Red Breast, this is my son Fritz."
Mr. Oriole, Master Fritz."
My son Fritz, Mr. Blackbird."
Fritz said he liked to be introduced
to birds and flowers.
Then he saw some pretty creatures
with great spotted wings.


By-and-by the worm is covered all
over with the fine white thread.


Then mamma cuts off


the twig.


Fritz knew th
were beauties."
to speak such a
terflies."


He asks mamma


em. He said they
Fritz is too little
long word as but-


to-day


where


"' beauties come from.
Then mamma shows him some-


thing on the twig


of a tree,


makes him step back,
It is a great green worm.


that


A BEAUTY."


She carries it in the house.


This worm is as long
chubby little hand.


as Fritz'


She lays it,
tle box.


worm and all, in a


It is bigger around than three
his fingers.


of


Next summer, Fritz will open
box.


Fritz sees that this fat green worm


is spinning a fine white


thread all


about itself.
The little head goes back and forth


so swift, spinning
fine white thread.


and winding the


Instead


of a worm he will


i


handsome beauty with great


ted wings.
Then he will
flies come from.


ind a
spot-


know where butter-


lit


the








rC'-. _--r..-.- --

,,|
-- --- -III I

r <1
A i
jriflfk Irll 'IL' P.


MARY STARTS IN THE COACH-AND-FOUR.


MARY'S

CHAPTER I.-MARY GETS ARABELLA
READY.
When Mary Green was six years
old her mother took her to visit an
aunt.
This aunt lived sixty miles away.
Mary thought this was a very long
journey.
She was busy one whole afternoon
in getting ready. She packed her
little travelling bag with all sorts
of things for Arabella's comfort.
Arabella was going with her. Ara-


JOURNEY.

bella was her large and petted doll.
Mary packed a thick sash for
Arabella to put on if it was cold.
She packed a blue and white
afghan to spread over Arabella
when she took a nap.
She packed a small book which
Arabella could hold in her tiny
hand if she should wish to read.
She packed a lunch for Arabella.
This lunch was ten small pieces of
bread an inch square, and a pep-
permint lozenge. This lunch was


ii
K1


Pr'-----~------~






neatly tied up in thick white paper.


CHAPTER II. MAMMA GETS
READY.


MARY


Mary's mother also was busy one
whole afternoon in getting ready.
She packed a little trunk for Mary.
With what, do you guess ?
Nice white dresses trimmed with
lace ? "
Ever so many sashes of all
colors ? "
Kid shoes and slippers of black
and white, blue and pink ? "
Mary's best hat with a plume,
and her play hat of brown straw?"
No, all your guesses are wrong.
.Little Mary went on her journey
thirty years ago. Little girls dressed
very plainly then.
Mary's mother put into the little
trunk one white dress of plain muslin
with a tiny ruffle around the neck.
This was Mary's best dress. It
was only worn to church, or when
Mary made grand visits.
No sash was put in. There were
narrow strings of white muslin to
tie the dress around the waist.
Six long-sleeved gingham tiers


were laid in the little trunk.
Two gingham sunbonnets were
also laid in.
These tiers and sunbonnets were
for Mary to play in.
Then, wrapped in paper, her thick
shoes were laid in, some handker-
chiefs, some under clothing, her comb
and brush, and her needle case and
thimble.
A plain blue wool dress, her best
morocco shoes, and a straw bonnet
with a blue ribbon on it, were laid
on the bed. These were for Mary to
wear on the journey.

CHAPTER III. -THE STAGE COACH.

After breakfast, next morning, the
bag, the lunch, the trunk, and Ara-
bella were brought out on the piazza.
Mary sat there too, to watch for
the stage.
By and by she heard the merry
stage horn. The stage driver was
blowing it.
Then she heard the wheels rattle.
Then they saw the great high
stage with its four horses coming
down the street.
The driver, away up on top, made





a big flourish with his whip, and
drove up to the door in fine style.
The four horses looked very gay
and held their heads very high.
The driver had put a bunch of
lilacs on the head of each horse.
Mary thought this looked very
pretty. She wondered if the horses


MARY IN HER GINGHAM SUIT.
liked the smell of the flowers.
Mary and her mamma entered the
coach. They said good-bye. They
threw kisses to papa and George.
The driver gave his whip another
flourish, and away the four horses
went.
The big coach tipped up and


down, forward and backward. Mary
thought the motion was perfectly
delightful.
0, mamma," she said," I wish we
were going a hundred miles instead
of sixty."


CHAPTER IV.- THE NEW PASSENGERS.

By and by they stopped at a
country tavern and had dinner.
When they got in the stage again
they found some new passengers.
There was a lady with two chil-
dren.
The two children were about
Mary's own size and age.
They were a boy and girl. They
were twins and looked exactly alike.
They had bright black eyes that
sparkled with fun.
Their heads were round as apples.
Their black hair was cut very close.
Their cheeks were like roses.
Their mouths looked ready to laugh
all the time.
They both were as fat and round
as babies.
Their mother called them Dick
and Dolly.
Every time Dick looked at Dolly






she laughed in great glee.
If Dolly spoke a word to Dick he
laughed.


If their mother spoke
laughed.


They made friends
about five minutes.


They all were so jolly
driver wished they were
with him.


So he stopped


they


with Mary


both


in


that the
up there


the horses.


asked them if they would like


He
to


ride on the outside for a while.
Their mothers said they might.

CHAPTER V.- ON TOP OF THE STAGE
COACH.


The three children were


jollier


than ever when they all were perched
up on top of the coach.
See the bossy calf in that field! "
cried Dick.


" See the little colt over


there! "


Then there was a cry


from all three.


Arabella


of delight!
would have


said Dolly.
Hurrah! there are some lambs! "
shouted Dick.


" 0, those lovely


white geese! "


said Mary.
See that bantam cock! isn't it a
beauty?" called Dick.


\WHAT THEY SAW FROM THE STAGE COACH.
shouted too, if she could.
There, on the stone wall, stc






somethingg very beautiful indeed.
Mary had never seen one before,
out she knew from pictures that it
aust be a peacock.
His long tail came down to the
-round.
It was all golden-green and blue,
nd how it shone in the sun !
The peacock seemed to know they
rere looking at him.
He spread his tail as wide as he
)uld and walked along on the wall.
I never saw anything so pretty
Sthe world!" said Mary, and Dick
id Dolly clapped their hands.


All at once Mary cried out again.
She saw houses and church spires.
"Are we there, mamma?" she asked.
Yes, Mary was at her journey's
end.
She said good-bye to the jolly
little twins. They went on with the
stage.
She thanked the driver for her
nice ride outside.
And than she was very glad to
take Arabella and go up the long
walk to her auntie's house, for she
was a very tired, sleepy little girl.
-S. -. S.








SWINGING


WF


THE THREE LITTLE BOYS WHO WORRIED.


ON THE GATE.










SHUT!



IAT IF?

] But out on the grass lay white


flakes;
The April clouds
takes.


were making


miI

I


" Now you don't suppose," says Dicie ,


Dear,
" That perhaps there won't be flow<
this year? "


" Oh, nobody
Jinks,


knows,


says Tom


THREE little


boys


on the door-step


sat.


All three were rosy, and
fat.


fair, and


" Nobody


knows what


the weatl


thinks !

" If no one knows," cries Hop-o'-


Thumb.


his


0 tj


I


rin


Als


I






f no one 'knows


what's


going to'


come,

Fhe rose may be brown instead of red,
ut, sir, if she is, off goes her head I "


nd then the three, as quick as
whiff,


egan to sob,


a


" What if! What if!"


"Tommy Jinks said Oh I" and Dick
said oh "
And Hop-o'-my-Thumb, he, too, said
so.


They meant to weep;
came out,


And off they
shout.


ran with


WHAT


HAPPENED


IN A GARDEN.


IN FIVE CHAPTERS.


I. THE WEED.
IT was many hundred years ago.
It was in a king's garden.
The queen and her little princes


sed to walk in


:easant day.
The sons


of


this garden every


queens


are called


rinces.


All sorts of


beautiful flowers grew


a this garden.
There was a high wall all around
iis garden, and in one corner, close
) this wall, there sprang up a plain
ttle plant.
This plant looked like a common
'eed.


For


a long


palace knew


time


no one


that the weed


in the
was in


the garden.
The flowers were not kind to it.


The bright


red roses would


not


look at it.
The tall white lilies felt that it had
no right to be in a king's garden.
But the little weed staid there, and
grew and grew.

II.-- THE WORM.

One day, when the plant had grown
to be quite large, a small ugly worm
crept up its stem.
The rose and the lily both shook


but the sun


a happy







me off," said the


woTrm, so


come to you.
What do you want of me? "
the weed, in a kind voice.


I have eat,"


said


though
eat."


" Poor


aid the
I must


thing,"


" A place to rest, and something to am sorry for you


worm.


" I feel


have something


said the weed,
.See, I have plenl




*4I


" I, .


d


IN THE KING'S GARDEN.


of leaves.
you want.'


Take just


as many


as


So the hungry worm began to nib-


ble the


fresh green leaves.


good they tasted!


Hlow


It ate and ate.


By and by the worm grew sleepy.


shake the tired


creature


off.


The worm stayed many days,


the kind weed did not like to se


away. It grew very plump and re


as it ate all the time.


It was


prettier color; one could almost


The kind weed


.f


' -*
'. .; ~'


did not try to


through it.


,,~~ ,
~rl





III.-WHAT THE WORM


DID.


At last the worm began to spin a
:b around itself and from leaf to
if.
The weed wondered what this
"ange visitor would do next.
The worm spun round and round
elf without stopping.
The threads came out of its mouth.
They grew finer and whiter, and
5 web thicker and thicker.
in shape this web began to look
e a bird's egg.
' I do believe it is building itself a
le house," said the weed, "and
rans to stay here always."
By-and-by the worm was shut up
the soft little house it had spun
itself.
There was no door, no window.
The worm came out no more.

[V.-WHAT THE LITTLE PRINCE
FOUND.
A few days after this the queen
s walking up and down the garden
the shade of the high wall.
One of the little princes was with


To-day he saw the weed in
-ner. He ran to pull it up.
There must be no tall weed


the

like


that in his father's beautiful garden,
As he put out his hand to pull it-
up, he saw a curious white ball among
the leaves.
What could it be?
He picked it off carefully.
He carried it to the queen.
She had never seen anything like
it before.
She shook it up and down in her
hands.
Something seemed to rattle inside
the ball.
She was standing on one of the
pretty bridges in the garden.
As she turned to go back to the
palace, the soft little ball rolled out
of her hand.
It dropped into the stream of water
below.
The little prince ran down the bank
to find his pretty plaything.
He waded out into the water.
He caught the tiny ball before it
floated out of sight.
But something had happened to it.
Had the water opened it ?
There was now a hole at one end.
There was a long fine thread hang-
ing out at the other end.
This thread began to unwind just
like his kite string.






'Then a pretty little 'utterny came
,)ut.
it brushed against his hand.
It must have been fast asleep in-
side the ball.


The little prince


ran up the bank


and told his mother.

V.-THE GREAT DISCOVERY.
The wonderful ball was taken to
the palace.
Wise men from far and near came
to see it.
It was the first silk worm's cocoon
that had ever been unrolled.
This worm was a silk worm.
The thread it spun into the web
was a silk thread.
Such a web is called a cocoon.







^ V' V'---- -'


You can see cocoons in the Nat-i
History Rooms in Boston.
There are about thirteen thousai
yards of silk thread in a cocoon.
In a few years the whole gard,
was planted full of weeds like t
one that had fed the hungry si
wormi.


This weed was a young
bush.


It had no beauty
the lily.


mulberl


like the rose a:


Its fruit was not worth much.
But its leaves were the right ki
of food for the precious silk spinne
So the proud roses and lilies h;


to move out and


make room for tl


useful weed.


-B. E.,


TAKING A BATH,


=T~Z~I1~







CHARLIE'S RABBITS.


Charlie had four baby rabbits.
Two of them were pure white.











". MMMI.A, WH.1' SHALL WE DO?"

One was black, with a white collar
and one white ear.
SThe other was white, with black
spots.
They staid with their papa and
mamma in a box in the wood-house
chamber.
Their papa's name was Dick.
He was a bad, disagreeable rabbit.
Their mamma's name was Minnie.
She was a cross, selfish rabbit.
For a while Minnie took good care
of her four baby rabbits. Then she
got tired of staying with them.
She and Dick would go off and
stay for hours.


The four baby rabbits sometimes
got very hungry.
Charlie did not know what to do.
He could not get Minnie or Dick to
go to them. Minnie bit him when
he tried to carry her to her babies,
and he let her go.


























thought of his poor hungry rabbits.
thought of his poor hungry rabbits.
















Jack roll-eth the Snow-ball.


The Snow-ball roll-eth Jack.


Pict-ure for Ba-by to Draw.


Slate
















Jack roll-eth the Snow-ball.


The Snow-ball roll-eth Jack.


Pict-ure for Ba-by to Draw.


Slate














I


PIG-GY GETS IN -


BUT CAN'T GET OUT.


Slate Pict-ure for Ba-by to Draw.


~r~ ~-T---
-c~ _- ,--z














I


PIG-GY GETS IN -


BUT CAN'T GET OUT.


Slate Pict-ure for Ba-by to Draw.


~r~ ~-T---
-c~ _- ,--z







A NEST


TO LET.


BY AUNTIE KINNIE.


had stood


emp-ty all win-ter.
It was built up-on the brack-
et of one of the ve-ran-da


up at it, and hoped some bird
would come and rent it in the
spring, it would be so han-dy,
a nest read-y-made !
One morn-ing in A-pril she
was wa-kened by some-thing
sweet-sweet as a kiss not
on her eyes, nor cheeks, nor
lips, but on her ears. She
had heard the notes of a


bird --just a dear lit-tie


Be-fore Jean-ie was
she had seen them, a


twit-'


dressed
pair of


lit-tie com-mon brown birds.


They flew a-bout


the lo-


custs and li-lacs all day.


To


Jean-ie's


great


joy she


saw


them, more than once, up-on
the brack-et, look-ing at the
read-y-made nest. How she
hoped they would take it!


The next morn-ing


nest


lay


the old


on the ve-ran-da


floor, bot-tom side up.
lit- tie land- la-dy was


The
much


grieved. She felt ver-y anxn
ious. But the brown birds


had not gone.


Be-fore noon


she saw them build-ing a nej
nest on the brack-et. Per
haps the old one need-ed to,
many re-pairs; the roof leaked


or the chim-ney did


not draN


well.
Jean-ie watched them brini


twigs, and dried grass,
hairs, and moss, all day.
put out a nice din-ner


ani


Sh
ad


THE lit-tie nest


pil-lars.


Jean-ie oft-en looked


ter.






















I,/


2/


Ai; ~


Nc
N----
-\ N.
N"
N.J


If


'N


I:
I:


-- II%'IA
nix
I'


I _r


t\
t
i


I/


l F v


rw I


1






sup-per for them on tne ve-
ran-da floor.
At last the nest was done.
The Browns moved in.


One morn-ing


Jean-ie fan-


cied she did not see her ten-
ants in the nest, or a-ny-where.
She ran out with but one shoe


on. She car-ried a chair.


climbed up.


She


She could just


reach to the nest.
It was emp-ty!
As she was get-ting


down,


her eyes full of tears, she saw
a bird ly-ing on the ground.


Ah, it was the young wife,
pret-ty, mod-est Mrs. Brown,
stiff, cold, dead !
Mr. Brown was no-where to
be seen.
Some cat, sure!" Bridg-et


said.
cat,


But why, if it was a


did he


not eat both


birds?
It has been a sad sum-mer


to the lit-tle land-la-dy.
new nest stands emp-ty.


The
Since


the mys-te-ri-ous trag-e-dy all
birds shun the ve-ran-da.


~.'-- *-
- \. d --
27 ^1%-'< %
M^ .


^
IC"' -"~ Z7-
II.. 1 1, P-


t'"~ ~ `,.`-. .", ".' --::'- -:,--_- *
f ~w

























Il


A-CROSS the sea there were
once two wee birds, with bright
eyes, and their bright eyes
turned this way and that way,


just as our birds turn
bright eyes. These two
rows were fly-ing a-bout a
town.


their
spar-
large


~I


I






Saitl one wee bird to the


oth-er, What


bad boys live


here in Ken-na-way town "
Said the oth-erwee bird, I
hope when they die they will
go where there is noth-ing but


sticks


and stones, and


must throw them


day !"
Said


the first


they
_-j1


nignt aniu

wee bird,


" Pray do not you, my
dear, show the same cru-el
it as these boys."


And the good


own
spir-


bird, turn-ing


her bright eyes this way and
that, saw, down be-low, a


church, with


pen.
hap-py
Be-low


its win-dows


0-


Said she, I have a
thought, my own dear.
us is a Ho-ly Place.


In a Ho-ly Place no boy dares


throw a stick or stone.
win-dows are o-pen.


fly down


swift


The fierce wee bird sat clown
on the door of a pew to rest.
The good wee bird flew a-way


up, and


a wVay


down, and


stepped on the or-gan.


" My


own dear," she called, this is
the great bird with many voices
that men praise God with."
She kissed it and flew down-
ward and kissed her mate, and
then flew up-ward a small way,
and stepped on the Bible.


" My
" this
which


own dear,


" she called,


is the Ho-ly Book
We are spok-en of."


She kissed it, and
a-round and a-round.


in


flew all
All at


once she lit up-on a carved
this-tie which or-na-ment-ed the


top of the pul-pit.


" Oh, my


own dear, come and see!"


she


The I called.


Let us


and sud-den,


and en-ter."
So they flew down swift and
sud-den, and en-tered.


In the Ho-ly Place it


was


si-lent, and cool, and love-ly.


The oth-er wee bird flew up


and looked.


The cup of the


this-tie flow-er was


hol-low.


Then both wee birds sang a
song of praise, and lined the
flow-er with soft grass, and went
to sleep safe in the Ho-ly Place


._* ^L 2






SANT-A


IF I was Sant-a Claus' lit-
tle dirl I'd be Plum Sant-a
Claus," said Plum one win-ter
morn-ing, (it was the morn-ing
of the twen-ty-fourth of De-
cem-ber which you all know is
the day be-fore Christ-mas)
"an' I don't want to be a-ny-
bod-y's lit-tle dirl. but my own
mam-ma's, but I wish I was
some re-la-tion, a aunt, or a
broth-er-in-law, or some-thing."
Why? asked mam-ma,
drop-ping her sew-ing and look-
ing straight in-to Plum's pret-
ty gray eyes.
"Oh! 'cause then I could
put nice fings in-to poor dirl's
stock-ings, an' some boys-the
kind that lives in aw-ful dir-ty


pla-ces where Sant-a Claus
can't go with-out det-ting his
new shoes mud-dy, an' then
how they'd laugh on Christ-
mas morn-ing!"
"Bless your lit-tle heart!"


said he]
I think
Sant-a
Sant-a


r mam-ma. But Plum,
you can be a ti-ny Plum
Claus wiit-out be-ing
Claus' aunt, or broth-


er-in-law, and I will tell you
how."
"Oh! joy-ful," said Plum,
hop-ping on one foot, tell me
right a-way, su-gar mam-ma."
"Well, sup-pose I knew
Sant-a Claus meant to put a
bright, new, sil-ver half-dol-lar
in your stock-ing to-night ? "
"Is he?" cried Plum, "Oh!
good-ey-good-ey-good."
"And sup-pose I lent you a
half-dol-lar to-day to buy some
pres-ents for two or three ver-y
poor chil-dren and you gave
me to-mor-row the one Sant-a
Claus leaves for you ? Then
you'd be a Plum Sant-a Claus."
Plum thought a mo-ment.
" It's a good deal of mon-ey to
div' away," she said at last,
"but I dess' he'll div' me lots
of oth-er fings.- I'll do it,
mam-ma-an' I'll buy a wee-
wee doll for the lit-tle black
dirl that lives 'round the cor-
ner, an' a whist-le for the wash-
er-wo-man's ba-by boy, an'-
an


"A pa-per


of can-dies


for


CLAUS.


PLUM






the small girl that brinl
milk," said her mam-ma.


the


No, I won't. She crimped
her nose at me yes-ter-day when
I had on my new dress, an' said
I fought my-self some-thing
great- I'm mad at her."
But, Plum, you must not be
mad at a-ny-bod-y Christ-mas
time; Sant-a Claus for-gives
the naugh-ty girls and boys."
"Does he?" said Plum.
"Then I will too. Oh! an' a


soup-
dog
day.


mas,
An'
noon
an' bi
Ar


day
of


bone


gs


uy
Id


the ings.
they did, and the


two lit-tle girls, and a
a boy, and a poor,


next
mite


(


old, I


shag-gy dog, were made hap-
py by gifts from lit-tle Plum
Sant-a Claus.


t


WHAT


BOB


SAW


AT "GWAM-PA'S."


BY CHARLES STU-ART PRATT.


"Gwam-pa's house." Go-ingto
" Gwam-pa's house" to spend
Christ-mas.


Now "Gwam-pa's


house


was miles and miles a-way,


and Bob


had nev-er been


there, though this


was the


morn-ing of his sixth Christ-
mas. But the night be-fore


he had lis-tened with


eyes to


House was up-side


down, for Bob was go-ing to


the sto ry of


"iron horse "that ate coal, and
puffed out steam and smoke,


)1


wide
the


rag-man's:


that comes past ev-er-y"
Ie'// want some Christ.-
too, poor old fel-low.(
we'll go out this af-ter
when the ba-by is a-sleep
-1 1


1


v


for the





and which was to car-ry us to
vis-it Gwam-pa."
"Wead-y, pa-pa," Bob shout-
ed, just as the sun winked us
good-morn-ing, "all wead-y!"
And be-fore noon the iron
horse stood still for us to get
out of the cars near Gwam-
pa s.
As we went up the walk to
the great square house that
was as "old as two gwam-
pa's," Bob strut-ted grand-ly
a-head. His first rail-way jour-
ney, his new ul-ster, and his
red-topped boots, were. ev-i-
dent-ly al-most more than my
lit-tle man could car-ry.
Grand-ma met us in the hall
and gave us a wel-come of
hugs and kiss-es and Mer-ry
Christ-mas-es," such as on-ly
coun-try grand-mam-mas give.
But Bob's bright eyes were
al-read-y peer-ing bold-ly about,
"Gwam-pa's house" and sud-
den-ly he broke a-way with a
bound, leav-ing Gwam-ma"
stand-ing with o-pen arms and


the puck-er of a kiss on her
lips.
Bob's bound land-ed him
be-fore a quaint old look-ing-
glass, over which blinked the
green eyes of two pea-cock
feath-ers. On tip-toe he peeped
in.
Pa-pa, oo, pa-pa!" he cried,
" I have gwoed! Come quick!
thee how big !"
"Big, or lit-tle -which is
it you have 'gwoed'? laughed
"Gwam-ma." "Can you tell
now ?" and she faced him
a-bout in front of an-oth-er
mir-ror.


This is what he saw.






Bob's round face length-
ened. Twin tears rolled down
his cheeks.


To think he should go


to


"Gwam-pa's house" and be a
lit-tler boy than be-fore! And
that, too, when he thought he


had grown so large!


It was


ver-y fun-ny, but he would not
be com-fort-ed till we took him


to Gwam-ma's"


own dress-


ing-case and showed him by
the mir-ror there that he was
the same Bob as be-fore.


But he was puz-zled.


" Pa-


pa," said he, I fink thum of
Gwam-ma'th look-ing-glath-eth
telled thto-rith."
O, no; it was just be-cause


the glass-es were not flat.


The


first was con-vex, like half your
foot-ball; the oth-er was con-
cave, that is, it was hol-low,
like a bowl."
Bob tried to look ver-y wise;
he wink-led his fore-head,


he thrust


his fists in-to


trows-ers pock-ets.


his


" 0, yeth,


thee; there wath a


'cave' in it, and I wath way
back in it," and he was off witli
a shout af-ter the black cat.


O, it was a won-der-ful day
for Bob! So ma-ny rooms
and such lots of queer things
he had nev-er seen! Ev-er-y
few min-utes we could bear his


" O,


oo! 0,


oo "-now in


the hall, now in the par-lor,
and then a-way up-stairs.
And up-stairs he found two
more of Gwam-ma's" aueer


old-fashioned


was


not much


mir-rors.


I


He


be-wil-dered


now, and so en-joyed huge-ly
the fun-ny faces he saw in them.


pa-pa, I





One was tall and hol-low,
ind this, too, had a "cave" in
it, and the face was "jutht like
a wub-ber doll'th it wath all


thtwetched up.


The
round -


oth-
ed


er was long
out, and from


ind
it


grinned the jol-li-est great fel-
low you ev-er saw, with a flat


head, and a big wide laugh


of


mouth.


To-ward night there was a


lull in the se-ries of "oo's."
We all won-dered if it meant
mis-chief-when sud-den-ly a
lit-tle shriek of de-light from
'a-cross the hall tickled the air.
We harked.
There was a queer scratch-y


more shrieks of


de-light from Bob, and then
a yelp of fright from Gwam-


ma's" pet poo-dle Pep-per.
I stepped across the hall
with a scold in my mouth -
but what I saw was so com-ic-
al that the scold popped out
in-to a heart-y laugh.
On the par-lor ta-ble Bob


had


dis-cov-ered a sil-vered


globe that was full of queer
crook-ed fac-es; and he was


show-ing
poo-dle.


these fac-es


to the


Pwep-per," he said, "you
fink it ith thum over dog, but
it'th all be-cauth the glath ith


sound, two


I ;

i





not flat. My pa-pa thaid tho."
But pa-pa didn't say that
Bob should fr;ght-en Pep-per."


" 0, pa-pa," cried


Bob, and


he was a-bout to be ver-y sor-
ry, and would, no doubt, have


kissed t'he an-gry Pep-per,
pac-i-fy him, had not his r
less eyes wan-dered to


win-dow.


The one tear


lost in a laugh-ter-dim-ple,
this is what he saw.







TRUE INCIDENT IN THE LIFE


MR.


THOMAS


GRAY.


"B3oo! Hoo!"
And then what real-ly I
nust call a howl.
There's no doubt a-bout it,
:here was troub-le in the nurs-
r-y. It was the voice of Mr.
Thom-as Gray, aged five years
and six months, al-though it
0sound-ed ev-er so much old-er.
Then Mr. Thom-as Gray
:limbed in-to his mam-ma's lap,
Out both arms a-round her neck
.ind said :
"Please, mam-ma!" and it
twas a ver-y long and touch-ing
please," too.
Not to-day, Tom-my; see
how it is snow-ing "
Then Mr. Thom-as Gray,
aged five years and six months,
did some-thing -I couldn't
ex-act-ly make out what be-
cause he was so quick a-bout
it; but I think he tumbled
two full sum-mer-saults,"and


then rolled o-ver four times on
the floor; and when the ta-ble
leg stopped him he be-gan to
kick the poor ta-ble leg, and
cry so hard mam-ma had to
leave the room.
Think of it! A young gen-
tle-man five years and six
months old act-u-al-ly roll-ing
on the floor and kick-ing a-
poor ta-ble leg un-til the paint
came off! O, it was hor-ri-
ble, and I'm glad as I can be
that I have on-ly heard of one
oth-er young gen-tle-man of that
age who ev-er did such a thing
in his life. Do you know him ?
I hope not.
By and by Mr. Thom-as
Gray stopped kick-ing the ta-
ble leg. Then he looked up.
Mam-ma gone !
I don't care!" said Mr.
Thom-as Gray. What's the
use of San-ta Claus and sleds


OF






a-ny-way, if you can't use 'em ''
The sled real-ly was a per-
fect beau-ty. On the seat there
was a pic-ture of two lit-tie


!J'l i~ .1i
N i I


thought for a long, long tim
Sud-den-ly he saw his mn


mIa s
so-fa.


cut-tin -board un-der
What do you think
did ? He went a


put the end of


board


a-gainst


edge of the so-fa, le
ing the oth-er end
the floor. Then 1
Thom-as Gray, ag
five years and
months, mount


the so-fa,


drew


sled up af-ter hi


and tried
down the


to sli
e cut-tir


board. But the sl


stuck.


It would


dogs coast-ing down hill on
shin-gles, and there was a rope


and ev-er-y-thing.
Mr. Thorn-as


Gray


went


and sat down on the dogs, and


e-nough,


1,


go at all, al-thoug
there was a first-rat
hill.
Mr. Thom-as Gra
was a phi-los-o-pher
" It isn t slip-per
said he, and, lear


ing the sled on top of the so
fa, he went down the bac
stairs, and in-to the pan-tryi
with-out Bridg-et's see-ing him


I


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There was a but-ter-plate near-
ly full, and, seiz-ing it, Thom-
as made his es-cape.
There was nev-er the slight-
est hes-i-ta-tion a-bout Mr.
Thom-as Gray, when his mind
was once made up; so when he
took the sled in his lap and be-
igan to but-ter the run-ners, it
was on-ly do-ing just what he
!got the but-ter for. Once the
Sbut-ter-plate up-set on the car-
pet, but that was a ver-y small
thing to Mr. Thom-as Gray;
and by and by the sled was
a-gain bal-anced on top of the
cut-ting-board, and Thom-as
a-gain sat down on the dogs,
and let go with his heels.
"Did it go ?"
Go? It was the fast-est
coast-ing you ev-er saw in your
life for a-bout two feet, and
then -well, then, the sled
stopped. But Mr. Thom-as
Gray didn't; and he wasn't
but-tered so ver-y much ei-ther.
He went right a-long all by


him-self, leav-ing the dogs
stand-ing on their heads at the
bot-tom of the hill.
Just then the door o-pened
and mam-ma came in.
Mam-ma nev-er faint-ed in
her life, but she came pret-ty
near it then; for there was Mr.
Thom-as Gray all doub-led up
a-gainst the fend-er; and there
was the but-ter-plate up-side
down on the new car-pet; and
as for the so-fa, why-you could
have fried the so-fa, I am sure,
in the but-ter there was in the
but-ton-holes.
That night Mr. Thom-as
Gray's bed-room was ver-y
strong with ar-ni-ca, and his
face was done up in two pock-
et-hand-ker-chiefs; but he told.
his mam-ma soon af-ter he came
up out of his lit-tle bath-tub
that he wouldn't do so a-ny
more if he lived to be sev-en-ty
years old -and I really do
be-lieve that mam-ma kissed
him!






WHAT


BEN-NY


TAUGHT


CLAR-ENCE.


ONE day Pa-pa Bell said to
Mam-ma Bell, My dear, you
are mak-ing a sweet lit-tle girl


my son.
Now Clar-ence Bell did not


look like a lit-tie girl.


He


was a fair-sized boy, and wore


a "tru-ly


vel-vet coat,


and


"tru-ly" trow-sers, and tru-ly


boots.


But his fore-head was


ver-y white, and his fin-gers
were love-ly, and his throat
fair, and his cheeks a dain-ty


pink.
wood
books.


He sat be-fore a rose-


desk,


cov-ered


His gov-ern-ess


with
sat


near. It would be wise, sir,
to send your son to the pub-lic
schools," said she.
I won't go," said Clar-ence.
" The boys are rough. They
throw snow-balls."
But the next week Mr. Bell


and his son went


coun-try.
a-lone.


in-to the


Mr. Bell came home
Mrs. Bell was sad.


and smiled.
good for him,


" Think


dressed
bea-ver


of


in rou


cloth!"


" Ben-ny will
"he said.


my lit-tle boy
gh frieze and


sighed


mam.


ma.
But Clar-ence ad-mired his
rough clothes, be-cause they
were like his cous-in Ben-ny's.|
He en-joyed the long, snow-y
road to the fun-ny red school-
house be-cause he went with
Ben-ny. Ben-ny was full of
fun. He e-ven en-joyed snow.
ball-ing Ben-ny when they were
a-lone in the back-yard.
One noon, at school, he rode
down the long hill in front of


Ben-ny on the bob-sled.
times Ben-ny tipped


Three
the sled


o-ver pur-pose-ly, and rolled
the lit-tle cit-y man in the
nice coun-try snow.
Clar-ence staid near-ly all


win-ter.


When he went home


he was not at all like a sweet


But Mr. Bell rubbed his hands lit-tie girl."


of











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VIWHAT BE\NY T1 A'G0! CL(\RENCE.


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\\
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A SUM-MER


CHRIST-MAS.


BY AUNTIE KINNIE.


FAIR lit-tie Grace Grey lives
in a land ma-ny thou-sands of
miles from here. In that dis-
tant land Christ-mas day comes
when the woods are green, and
the coun-try is all in flow-er.
Her pa-pa and Aham-ma are
mis-sion-a-ries, and pret-ty lit-
tle Grace was born in that
warm land o-ver the sea. She
has nev-er seen an-y snow, nor
an-y ice, for she has nev-er been
" home." Like pa-pa and mam-
ma, lit-tle Grace calls A-mer-
i-ca home." She looks in her
A-mer-i-can pic-ture-books at
the win-ter pic-tures, where the
ground is all white, and the
chil-dren are skat-ing, and she
thinks it is so fun-ny that the
dark, wet rain can change and
come down white and dry, and
in the shape of small feath-ers,
and so ver-y fun-ny that the
cold can build a floor on the
wa-ter so sol-id that a lit-tie
girl can run a-cross it.


The A-mer-i-can ice an
snow are Grace's fa-vor-it
fair-y-sto-ry.
Lit-tle Grace was a Christ
mas ba-by. She was born o
Christ-mas, so her birth-day
ev-e-ryone, come on Christ-ma
day. On that day she wear
her love-li-est white frock, and
sits out un-der the trees in
camp-chair, and holds an od(
lit-tie birth-day re-cep-tion.
The black chil-dren all
the na-tive peo-ple in that land
are black-dear-ly love the
lit-tle white Mis-sy Gra-cy."
They nev-er tire of look-ing at
her rose-tint-ed cheeks, nor of
touch-ing her fine soft gold-en
hair; and on her birth-days
they bring her flow-ers, and
fruit, and shells, and birds
And on that day the lit-tie
white Mis-sy" gives each:
black cheek a kiss, and says,
" Be good, so that I can al-
ways love you !"


































'Ir i


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~~


A SUMMER CHRISTMAS.


.7.'
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PHI-LE-N


ONE day a lit-tle girl called
out in great dis-tress, Til-ly!
Til-ly! what shall I do? Phi-
le-na is ver-y sick-do come
and look at her!"


Til-ly, be-ing
must have been


Sue's


sis-ter,


Phi le na's


aunt; and she came in much


haste.


Phi-le-na, who was a


large wax doll, lay in Sue's
lap. As Til-ly bent o-ver her,
Sue said, I knew this morn-
ing she was go-ing to be sick,
for she just lay and stared at
me, and I put on her wrap-per
so as to be read-y. Just see
how stiff her back is! Would
you put her feet in wa-ter?"
Til-ly laid her hand on Phi-


le-na's


fore-head.


"I should


go for Doc-tor Lee.


" I wish you


would,"


said


Sue, for what is mon-ey to a
child's life ?"
So Til-ly went for Doc-tor
Lee, who lived next door.
He and Til-ly en-tered the


sick-room ver-y soft-ly.
one was moan-ing. 0


Some
n tip-toe


he ap-proached. Be com-
posed, my dear mad-am," he
said to Sue. Then he placed


his hat in a chair, took out his


watch, and lift-ed


hand


in his.


Phi-le-na's
\h! pulse


two-forty," he said.


"Oh,


dear," shrieked


Sue


and Til-ly.
Hush! do not dis-turb the
pa-tient," said the doc-tor, tak-
ing out some pow-ders.
What do you think the dis-
ease is?" asked Til-ly.


" Well,"


said the doc-tor,


glanc-ing a-round grave-ly,
" it's my 'pin-ion you keep too
man-y flow-ers in the room.
But I will call a-gain," and he
bowed him-self out.
The flow-ers were put in the
next room; and when Doc-tor


Lee came again, he


found his


pa-tient well, and dressed to go


I to a con-cert.


A.




























'A


- Ia


'AH I PULSE TWO-FORTY."


I


I


:







LEARNING TO READ.
BY E. F.

ONCE there was a lit-tle girl, and her name was Kit-ty;
There was a lit-tle cat, and her name was Kit-ty, too.
Ev-e-ry-bod-y thought the lit-tle girl was pret-ty,
Ev-'ry-bod-y thought the lit-tle cat was pret-ty, too.

Well, this lit-tle Kit-ty-cat was as nice as could be,-
She nev-er mew-mewed, and I know she was no thief;
She kept her yel-low sat-in fur just as it should be,-
Her on-ly troub-le was with the A-B-C leaf.

Kit-ty-cat could-n't read -she could-n't, or she would-n't, -
And lit-tle Kit-ty-girl said 'twas "a ded-ful shame
That a bright cat, wiv such gwate, big, gold-en eyes, should-n't
A-ble be to spell, out her own short lit-tle name."

So ev-'ry day, to have her read, her name was print-ed
Big and bold, C-A-T," let-ters three, big and bold;
And ev-'ry day was she brought, and she sat and squint-ed
At the marks, and she smelt them all, and heard them told.

But to say that C-A-T" was Cat!" she knew bet-ter!
And what .do you think that Kit-ty-cat at last did do ?
One day she raised her back, and squalled at ev-'ry let-ter,
And with her i-vo-ry claw she tore them right in two!






























\. 'Nv'


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SO


"ONE DAY SHE RAISED HER BACK, AND SQUALLED AT EVERY LETTER."


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I


OD-DY


BY LITTI

His mam-ma called him


" Ol-i-ver


Wen-dell,"


af-ter a


wise and wit-ty man who lived


in Cam-bridge.


WAD-DLE.


.1


LE FLOY.

the look-ing-glass had a dread-i
ful so-ber face, and he went'
" wad-die, wad-dle, wad-dle"


But the lit- Iwhen he walked.


tie ba-by man was al-so wise
and wit-ty, and he called him-
self Od-dy Wad-die," af-ter
a fun-ny lit-tle fel-low that


lived in


the look-ing- glass.


This fun-ny lit-tie fel-low in


One day Od-dy


Wad-dle's


mam-ma was sick. Ev-er-y-
bod-y was gone, even old Rose, i
the black cook. So Od-dy:
sung his mam-ma to sleep, and
then he went down to make


---------_ -- ----7 ~- -u-- __ --






TT ,


)me rIULII. t pUL SUIlC
iilk in the sauce-pan and set
on the stove. He was ver-y
rd by that time: and he


:pped to rest.
e said, Od


Pret-ty soon
y Wad-die,


)ok at 'oo pod-dies!
irn brack, like ole I


o cooks,
0on't love


- yen
0oo0


00


'Oo'll
(o-sy, if
mam-ma


He did not fin-ish the broth,
but still mam-ma's lit-tle boy
had be-come black al-most all
o-ver be-fore she woke, chin,
cheeks, nose, e-ven the front of


his frock


had be-gun to turn.


In fact, they had to scrub him
sound-ly be-fore Od-dy Wad-


die was
a-gain.


a


lit-tle


white


man


DOL-LY'S


WINGS.


BY LAURIE LORING.

IAM-MA BID-DY, look up here.
ee my dol-ly; ain't her dear?
.oveyour chick-ies? So does I.
Vish my dol-ly'd learn to fly.


'A,
~ ~/'i-.


iam -ma
wings ?
luy 'em
things ?


Bid -dy,


how


get


with the ped-dler


!uess I'se got free
two;
lam-ma Bid-dy,
do ?


cents and


von't


that


1'- -- -


____


r1


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-d


























THE


QUEEN'S


COACH.


BY FANNY PARKER.


Now the queen is
ride,


go-ing out to


Run, men, run and clear the
cit-y !
Tell the com-mon folks to stand
a-side,
Queens must-n't see what is-
n't pret-ty.


Blow, lit-tle driv-er, blow yot
horn!
Tell the queen the coach
read-y !
" Miss Queen, I fed your hor


some corn,


So he,
stead-y


may-be,


won't g






Toot toot! how the trump-et
blows,
While the queen steps in her
car-riage ;
Tuck her dress in, and a-way


she goes,
To at-tend


her daugh-ter's


mar-riage.

How the tall out-rid-ers prance!


How the hoofs go,
clack-ing!
How the hat-plumes
dance!
How that frisk-y
back-ing!


click-ing,


nod


and


horse


is


Smooth, smooth, rolls the char-
i-ot now!


Swift we go
stee-ple !


by


street


and


See the gra-cious lit-tle prin-
cess bow!
See the queen smile on the
pe-ople!

Round the street, and round,
and round the street,
Queen Vic-to-ri-a, Prin-cess
Al-ice !
Buy 'em both a stick of can-dy
sweet,
And take 'em to the pal-ace!


"IT IS YOU THAT GNAWS THE PLANTS, IS IT?


II__







PLANT-ING


A PUS-SY


BY LAU-RIE LOR-ING.


CARL-IE was a lit-tle rogue,
and Carl-ie's pa-pa was a big
rogue; and two rogues to-geth-
er get in-to all sorts of mis-
chief.
Carl-ie wanted a kit-ten, and
one day when he was teas-ing
pa-pa said care-less-ly:


" Plant old black


Nig,


would-n't won-der if she


up sort of
Carl-ie


with the


I


came


kit-ten-ish."


seized
and p
I 1 "


the thought,
a-pa laughed
1 1 *


De-nina nis pa-per
to see him march
out to the gar-den
big sleep-y black cat


un-der one arm and a hoe un-
der the oth-er.


But when


Carl-ie be-gan to


dig, Pussy be-gan to strug-gle
out from un-der his arm, and,
get-ting a-way, she ran for her


life. Ca
dropped
hoe and
too. T


irl-ie
his
ran
ears,


also, would have run had there
been less wis-dom in that lit-tie
cur-ly head. But Carl-ie knew
that Puss would not wait while
he mourned her de-part-ure!


What


a race that was!


Puss led him un-der fences,


through


bush-es, o-ver gates,


up trees, and, at last, through
the o-pen win-dow. Carl-ie, of


course, fol-lowed, and


what a


fall was that!


When


Carl-ie


rose, the black
cat sat calm-ly


up-on


the ta-ble.


Carl-ie


thought she act-u-al-ly laughed
at his for-lorn ap-pear-ance.


Well, he


didn't look as well


.


^=_^A


111mV






as when the race
be-gan, but his
cour-age
was still -1 I-
good; so
he re-solved to try a-gain, if
the Big Rogue would help.
So Carl-ie asked pa-pa to
hold Puss while he dug. Pa-
pa was will-ing, and the dig-
ging be-gan a-gain. Soon pa-pa
said the hole was big enough,
and he held Puss down and
told Carl-ie to cov-er her up.
But Puss thought it was time


to use claws in-stead of hoes,
so with her sharp-est ones she
made sev-er-al good marks on
pa-pa's hand, and he was glad
to let her come up, very much
as she was plant-ed-a fine,
good-sized black cat, ful-ly
a-ble to de-fend her-self.
MOR-AL:
It is prop-
er that Big
Ro g u es
should suf-
fer if they lead Lit-tle Rogues
in-to mis-chief.


St. Val-en-tine's Mail-boy.


Val-en-tine.


Lit-tle St.







M1NT-IE'S


CROSS


DAY.


BY LOU BUR-NEY.


For one whole day sun-ny
lit-tie Min-tie was cross to ev-
e-ry bod-y and ev-er-y thing -
one whole day! A long, hot
Au-gust day, too!
I don't see how it hap-pened
-she had such a great, cool,
pleas-ant room, and such a
pret-ty white bed to creep out
-)f-but she got cross some-
low, the mo-ment she crept out
)f the pret-ty bed, and at the
same mo-ment all her things
got cross too, and how they did
act! E-ven her plants, that
were al-ways so good and
sweet! One, two, three, four,
five, six pots stood on the flow-
er-stand by the win-dow. Ev-
e-ry morn-ing nurse brought in
wa-ter, and Min-tie al-ways wa-
tered and sprin-kled them be-
fore she went down stairs.
But ltis morn-ing she did-


n't like her flow-ers at all, for
when she went up to them, ev-
e-ry one of them made an ug-ly
face at her, and this made her
cross-er still, and she ran down
stairs with the cross-est ge-ra-
ni-um in her arms as fast as
she could, de-ter-mined to toss
the ill-nat-ured thing in-to the
ash-box.
It was a dread-ful day.
Min-tie made fac-es and ev-er-
y-thing made fac-es, back a-gain.
Ev-en mam-ma's smile was
sad. But when night came,
wise mam-ma went up-stairs
with her naugh-ty lit-tie girl, to
see her to bed. She turned
the gas down quite low, and
she staid a long time. I don't
know all that hap-pened-
mam-ma sure-ly did-n't spank
her, nor did she say a-ny but
nice lov-ing things, b. some-

















11,
rn,i





St




d
V
MB



ti


how lit-tie Min-tie-girl got
ver-y meek and gen-tle. And
she went fast a-sleep, at last,
ith the dim-ples on her


cheeks and chin full of mam-
ma's kisses, slept all night long,
and a-woke a good girl in the
morn-ing. Then all her things






got good-na-tured a-gain.


The


but-tons and but-ton-holes and
all that act-ed so yes-ter-day


wore one big smile.


She lik-ed


her plants a-gain, and she ran
the first thing to see them.
But, oh! oh! the leaves were
curled up and turned yel-low,


-and the earth
baked hard.


in the pots was


Oh,


row-ful they looked
Dip! dip! dip
sor-ry lit-tle girl's
the pitch-er, and


how


!


sor-


went a


hand


into


sprink-le !


sprink-le sprink-le the drops
fell fast up-on the poor droop-
ing br~anch-es. And some big


tears from a dread-ful-ly sor-r
lit-tle girl drop-ped on them toe
But there were two of he
plants which lit-tle Min-t
could not coax back to lifI
Theydied. It was ver-y queer
but mam-ma would not al-lo1
them to be tak-en a-way, al
though her lit-tle daugh-tei
beg-ged ver-y hard. They al
ways stand there, with the res(
up-on the flow-er-stand in Mii
tie's room-four beau-ti-ful-l
fresh green plants, and twi
dead, dry stalks.


r


What was mam-ma's rea-so0
SW .1 1 -


for this, think you .


"WHERE SHALL WE GET OUR CHRISTMAS DINNER ?f







PINKIE-WINKIE'S


I HEARS that doll up, o-ver-
head-
I nev-er can get any nap!
I guess I shall get out of bed,
And 'haps I'll give that doll
a slap!


Bad doll! and here
dressed!


you


is all


I knows you has-n't said your


prayers!


got up
best,


and


put


on your


And hurried, 'fas you could,
down-stairs.


knows, you mi
you though
You'd go. Po!
your curl
Vhat did I sa
caught
You with th
al-ley-girl


How dare you t
sol,
Bad doll, to
in?


nx,
rht


just


where


sy! don't shake
S!
y I'd do 'f I

ose naught-y
Is?

ake my par-a-

go a-walk-ing


You thinks,
doll,
No-bo-dy'd
skin.


be-cause you is a


hurt


your


lit-tle


O Pink-ie-wink-ie-po-sy-bell!
You is so pret-ty in your lit-
tle crib,
How can I whip but should
I tell
My dar-ling daugh-ter-doll
a fib?

My Pink-ie did-n't as she
should-
Slap! slap! one, two, three
I whips you for your lit-tle


good;
That's what


my mam-ma


says to me !


You


V


MAMMA.





















































A MORN-ING RIDE


I


-- C -C
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SLATE PICT-URE FOR BA-BY TO DRAW.


ii-


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--





















































A MORN-ING RIDE


I


-- C -C
-9 -- l


- a~ z-~-_


SLATE PICT-URE FOR BA-BY TO DRAW.


ii-


w _


--











































PLAY-ING PA-PA AND MAM-MA*


SLATE PICT-URE FOR BA-BY TO DRAW.


-- --- 2 0











































PLAY-ING PA-PA AND MAM-MA*


SLATE PICT-URE FOR BA-BY TO DRAW.


-- --- 2 0






SCRATCHED


CHAPTER I.


"Well,'
slim
Miss
Pin,
ing
down


said
lit-tle
Black
plump-
her-self
on the


pin-cush-ion,
"there's news


this
ing!"


morn-


She had just come in from
Mrs. Tom's room, much out of
breath for such a slim crea-
ture.


"An-oth -er par-ty, I
pose," said the Dia-
Hair-pin.


Miss Black Pin


school


sup -
mond

k her


head.
Per-haps," said a Com-mon
Pin, "the furs are go-ing to be
pin-ned up in cam-phor."
At this all the Com-mon
Pins looked so-ber-it meant


for so man-y of their


eight months in the close cam-
phor-y dark-ness of a trunk.
"You will have to guess


a-gain,"
Here


said Miss


Black


Pin.


Great -great-grand-


moth-er Pin spoke up; she was
a tall crea-ture with a crook-ed
back and a twist-ed toe, but
pure gold.
Humph !" said she, "I can


tell you.
A ba-by


its hands.
"It's s,
Pin. T
And, j
it for th
Tom's r
cry-a 1


There's a
! ev-er-y


baby!"
Pin raised


o," said Miss


Black


here is a ba-by !"
ust then, they heard
1em-selves, in Mrs.


oom,


a shrill


ba-by's cry.


wee


A big


mat-ron-ly Com-mon Pin sprang
up and clasped her hands.
"Bless its heart!" she said, "I
want to go to it this min-ute!"
"We shall be sent for, some
of us," said one of the young-er.
shall be, of course,


WHO


BA-BY?


fam-i-ly


THE







said Great-great-grand-moth-er


Gold Pin. I fast-en the bibs
of the fam-i-ly. Master Tom's
grand-fath-er
S wore me, and
Mas-terTom's
fath-er, and
Mast-erTom."
S- Prob-a-bly
we shall all go
in to-geth-er
on the pin-
cush-ion," said
Miss Black
C THERE A A-BY Pin.
Pin.
But they did-n't. The nurse
came bust-ling in that min-
ute.


She had a new cush-ion in
her hand, all lace and sat-in
bows. Old Mrs. Gold Pin
rose with a cour-te-sy and came
foi-ward, but the plump fin-
gers gath-er-ing up a row of
small Com-mon Pins pushed
the Old La-dy over!


Then she un-clasped a slen-
der Lace Pin, gold with blue
en-am-el. "Just the thing for
the bib!" said she.
The Old Gold La-dy was
flat on her back, her twist-ed toe
up in the air, but at this she
rolled o-ver on her el-bow splut-
ter-ing and gasp-ing.
"Oh!" said she. "Oh!
you're mak-ing a mis-take,"
said she. "I
pin the bibs!"
But the
"nurse h ad
g whisked out.
ch! lThe Old
Gold La-dy
- grew si-lent.
A strange
look set-tled
on her face.
"WILL SEE IT. Ha! not
good e-nough! Won-der-ful
child! I'd like to see it! Will
see it!"






WHO


SCRATCHED


THE


BA-BY?


CHAPTER II.


OLDmMr'SCold


Pin
the
She


him
fore


Such a stead-y


did see
Ba-by.
heard


long


be-


she saw


him, though.
zvah-wah-wak


as there was in Mrs.


Tom's


room, un-til the Old Gold La-


dy's heart ached
moth-er's !


like a grand-


" What does ail it ?"


said


Nurse at last, al-most read-y
to shake the lit-tie bun-die of
lace and lawn.


" Prob-a-bly a


Pin is prick-


ing it some-where," said M1
Tom, who had just come in.


[r.


Ba-by's mam-ma sat up and


felt care-ful-ly all


ov-er the


poor lit-tie wak-wak-ing Bun-
dle.


" He's all


right,"


I've pricked


said she,
my-self.


Such vic-ious points as these


lit-tie


pins have--they aren't


safe at all.


cush-ion,


Bring


me the


Nurse.


Mrs. Tom ex-am-ined


Pin


af-ter Pin, then tossed cush-ion
and all off the bed. Bring
me the old cush-ion out of the
dress-ing-room," she said.


Thus Old


Mrs. Gold Pin


got in, she and the whole troop


of Old Fam-i-ly


Pins with her.


Ba-by was pinned all o-ver


a-fresh


with some thick


Pins that would-n't
still he cried. As


short


slip; but
his pa-pa


was car-ry-ing him up and
down, he all at once stopped
short. "Look!" said he. I


should think he would cry!


I


told you 'twas Pins."
Sure e-nough, there was a
long red scratch be-tween Ba-
by's two wet blue eyes.
Mer-cv!" said Ba-bv's


mam-ma,


reach-ing


for him


"but






a-gain. How could a Pin
have got there!"
Yes, how ? Ba-by's eyes
were not pinned on, nor was
his nose.
All the Pins turned and
looked at the Old Gold La-dy.
She's none
too good," said
Miss Cuff Pin,
"to get up in
the night and
scratch a Ba-by
M she hates.
SHE BENT CLOS-ER. s h e h ate s.
Don't we all re-mem-ber how
she looked that day? "
The Old Gold La-dy was
shocked. She had been vexed
- but to think of hurt-ing a
Ba-by !
Next day Ba-by cried bad
as ev-er. They looked him
o-ver and found an-oth-er
scratch on his cheek.
I can get up in the night,"
said Mrs. Gold Pin to her-self,
"and I be-lieve I will; for that
is a scratch, and a Pin-scratch,


too, I do verily be-lieve!"
So that night, soon as all
was still, Old Gold La-dyrose,
and walked soft-ly up the
moon-ray to the crib.
It was near-ly morn-ing
when, sud-den-ly, she bent
clos-er O yes !--just so --
the cul-prit was caught.
Old Mrs. Gold Pin gig-gled
as she crossed the room and
bent to speak in Mrs. Tom's
ear.
What she said I can-not
say; but next day, when Ba-
by was wak-wah-ing as us-u-al,
mam-ma re-mem-bered her
dream, and stooped and ex-
am-ined his lit-tle hands. Then,
with the ti-ni-est pair of scis-
sors in all the world she cut
his sharp lit-
tle nails.
So the prob-
a-bil-i-ty is
that Ba-by
scratched him-
SHE CUT HIS SHARP LIT-TLE NAILS. sel !







AF-TER


CHRIST-MAS.


BY KIT-TY CLO-VER.


Toot-a-toot-toot Rub-a-dub-
dub! Hoo-wAw !
It sound-ed like Fourth of
Ju-ly at Mrs. Jones'; but it
was on-ly Day af-ter Christ-
mas.
Joe-y and Jim-my, with their
Christ-mas pres-ents, had been
shut in-to the "noise-room," as
Pa-pa Jones called the nurs-
er-y. They had had the "run
of the house" all yes-ter-day,
-for Mam-ma Jones had great
pa-tience with Christ-mas rack-
et; but this morn-ing she had
turned them in-to their own
lit-tie king-dom.
Now make all the noise
you wish," she said kind-ly, as
she hur-ried a-way with her
fing-ers in her ears.
Then there was a good time
in the "noise-room!"
Joe-y sat down on the bed


and puffed out his ap-ple-red
cheeks and blowed his fife like
the north wind; and Jim-my
beat his drum with both sticks,
stand-ing up on the pil-lows.
All at once Joe-y sprang to
his dimp-led legs, and ran at
Jim-my. Hol'still!" he cried
fierce-ly. Lem-me shoot you
with my fife!"
Jim-my did-n't quite know
a-bout that; but Joe-y ex-
plained that the sol-diers in his
pict-ure books marched at each
oth-er and "fit-ed" with fifes
and drums.
So Jim-my came from the
head of the bed, and Joe-y
from the foot, toot-ingand rub-
a-dub-ing, and marched up,
and by, and a-round, scream-
ing and laugh-ing, un-til Joe-y
was so out of breath he for-got
to blow and stood still; and























;1,


I


, 'I


./


i!,


.' 1
-1' jd


* 7,7 01"


1


C~
\\\\
k


r
s


1 77

^ \ A






then


rim-my


called


out,


"I


beat!" and jumped at his pris-
on-er so hard they both fell


o-ver the edge of the


bed


to


" I should think this was the


'noise-room!'"


ing them up.
Claus bring


she cried, pick-
" If ev-er San-ta


s a fif-e


and drum


the floor and laid there shriek-
ing till mam-ma came rush-ing
in to see what was the mat-ter.


to this house a-gain I'll-i11
do some-thing to San-ta Claus!


You may


de-pend on that! "


A chub-by lit-tie sis-ter
Was rub-bing at her tub;
A chub-by lit-tle broth-er
Came up to help her rub.
The chub-by lit-tle broth-er,
He fell in with a cry;
The chub-by lit-tie sister,
She hung him up to dry.


So hun-gry!


C


__ I


I





































































S-i^ --,-
i Jc!-











__ _


WHAT BLUE EYES AND BLACK EYES SAW IN IT-t-LY.


S--


4 2 1


B, D


15, L


*


^ -,, .


; ,'f ..


s
N


--4


Y


"

----,


77i


~I~ \61~1ik~








WHAT


THE LIT-TLE


LEES


DID.


There were four lit-tle


girls- An-nie
Lee, Mi-na I


Lee;
Lees


Lee, Far


Lee,


and these
al-ways r


and


N


four li
hymed


Lee
I-nie
i-na
t-tle
and


chimed to-geth-er, no mat-ter
what they did, just like their
names.
One chil-ly Oc-to-ber morn-
ing, when they ran out in the
yard to play, all four of these
rhym-ing and chim-ing and
charm-ing lit-tie Lees, at the
same moment, saw a bird. He
was walk-ing a-long on the
fence, and one of his wings
hung down o-ver his bad-y in a
queer way. He saw the four
lit-tle Lees at the same time


They saw him,


and hopped


down and tried to hop a-way.
Don't speak, and don't


stir, and I'll


catch


him," said


the lit-tle-est Lee- Nina.
But ought you to catch
bird ?" said Mina.


a


" If she don't, the


cat
;i


said An-nie.


That is so, for his win!
brok-en," said Fannie.
So the three eld-est I\
Lees stood still, and '
stepped a-long soft-ly be-I
the bird, who in try-ing to
fast-er tipped o-ver, and i


Ni-na got him.
0, how soft he


two hands!
she held him


shel-ter.
" You


"


felt in


He flut-tered,
fast in the I
don'tt !" she


are sick, lit-tie b


Your mates have
It will be fros-ty


flown so
to-night,'


you would freeze; be-sides"
cat would catch you."
They all went in to-gej
to mam-ma, who shook
head o-ver the brok-en
and the long win-ter.
But Ni-na put him in ac
and Mi-na brought him sJ
crumbs; and An-nie broad


1






and some


Fan-nie


hung


a


)th o-ver the cage so that he
uld think it was night, and
down and keep quiet and
t per-haps sleep.


Well, this bird-ie lived all
win-ter.


His wing grew strong;
O, how loud he chirped
spring came! But the


Lees began to


feel


and
when
lit-tle


ver-y bad,


WHAT THEY DID WITH THE BIRD.


id each one w
n-dow and hung


ent to the


down


her


tad.
And at last one warm flay,
*ter the bird had beat-en his
wings a whole hour a-gainst


the cage, Ni-na looked at


Mi-na


and An-nie looked at Fan-nie,
and mam-ma looked at them
all and smiled, and then-well,
you can guess by the pict-ure
what they did!


meds; an
teds; and


wa-ter


I






TWO


WAYS


OF


BE-ING


WASHED


BY KATE LAW-RENCE.


I. DOL-LY DOLE-FUL S WAY.


This is the way


Dol-ly Dole-


ful gets washed and dressed.


As soon as nurse says,
"Come, Miss Dol-ly, it is time
for you to be washed," she puts
her back up a-gainst the wall.
It is of no use ei-ther to coax
Dol-ly Dole-ful, or to scold her;
so nurse ei-ther pulls her to the


wash-ba-sin, or


brings the wet


sponge to her.
Which-ev-er she does,


screams.
She cries all


Dol-ly


the time, as


if


the nice wa-ter would hurt her!


She cov-ers her face with


her


stick-y lit-tle hands, and rubs
them in-to her eyes. Then her
face has to be washed all o-ver
a-gain.
And then her hair! Dol-ly's
hair curls, and if she would
have it kept nice-ly it would


be
says


ver-y pret-ty.
she dreads to


But


nuro


touch Do


ly's hair.


Dol-ly puts both hands o
the top of her head as soon ,
she sees nurse com-ing. Whe
nurse comes to the tan-gles, sl
just roars. She says, 0! 0
0! you pull my hair on pui
pose! I'll tell mam-ma, so i
will."
She shakes her head so th4
nurse can-not make her curl
look nice-ly.


When


she


is dressed


sh


looks so cross and ug-ly tha
you would not wish to see hel

II.---MIN-NIE MER-RY S WAY.

This is theway Min-nie Me'i
ry gets washed and dressed. I
Min-nie has no nurse to kee
her ti-dy, as Dol-ly has. Hc
sis-ter Lou-ise takes care of he


I





As soon as Min-nie gets up
in the morn-ing, and as soon as
she leaves the table, she runs
to the wash-ba-sin. She does
not like to have her face and
hands dir-ty for one mo-ment.
Now for a good bath !" she
says.
She likes to have plen-ty of
wa-ter in the ba-sin. She puts
her hands in the cool wa-ter
and lets them lie there. She
takes the sponge and wash-es
her cheeks and her ro-sy mouth.
Some-times she splash-es like
a hap-py bird.
Then- Lou-ise takes the
sponge and wash-es her thor-
ough-ly.
Min-nie says," Put on plen-ty
of wa-ter, Weed-y, dear; I love
wa-ter."
Then Weed-y combs her
hair.
Weed-y tries not to pull."
When she comes to the tan-
gles Min-nie laughs. If it
hurts much, she makes a fun-ny


lit-tle noise, "Ow! ow! ow!"
but she laughs while she is mak-
ing it.
Some-times she says, 0, you
hurt me, Weed-y, dear, but I
won't cry; laugh-ing is bet-ter
than cry-ing, isn't it ?
Some-times she says, "0,
Weed-y, I don't know but I
shall have to cry!"
Then Lou-ise combs her hair
straight down o-ver her face
and says, "Where is .your
nose ?"
Min-nie says, Lost a-mong
Sthe bush-es "
Then Lou-ise parts it and
says, Where is it now ?"
"Found a-mong the bush-es,"
says Min-nie; and she Jaughs
mer-ri-ly.
Min-nie's hair doesn't curl,
but when it is combed nice-ly,
and tied back with rib-bons,
she -looks so sweet and fresh
that. it is a pleas-ure to see her.
Which is best,. Dol-ly's or
Min-nie's way ?






































BA-BY'S RICH-ES.
BY K. L.


Ba-by has some-thing-some- It is some-thingwhite; so
ing new. thing shi-ny.
What do you think it is? Is it an i-vo-ry rat-tie?"


me-


th






Not half so big


as a rat-tie, and not so noi-sy.
It is some-thing that he nev-


er had be-fore
to be a man,
a-ny of them,
ty-two.


but if he lives


and does-n't
he will have


lose
thir-


It is a-bout as large -as a
ain of rice. It is as white


as a pearl.
guess ?


Now can't you


If you wish to see it, you
must coax him to o-pen his soft
lit-tle ro-sy mouth.
See-there it is, stiik-ing in
his lit-tie red gum.


It is a lit-tie white
Isn't it cute?


tooth.


GOOD


NEWS FOR


THE


BA-BY.


BY MRS. A. H. S.


Lit-tle Dai-sy has a box
Filled with col-ored build-ing-
blocks;


Then, to pass her time away,
Dolls has she in great ar-ray-

Rag and pa-per, wax and clay,
One for al-most ev-er-y day;

Balls and slates and pen-cils
too ;


Toys from Chi-na,

Yet she wea-ries of


Begs with

Cling-ing
knees,
Cries for"

What did
When she
new ?


not a few.

her play,


her mam-ma to stay;

to her moth-er's

Tory tory, please."

Dai-sy's moth-er do
cried for some-thing


She sent for a book of


Ba-by-land bound,


And Dai-sy is ju-bi-lant all the year round.


No, in-deed.


gr







OF RUBBER.


One day Percy's


little brother,


Robin, asked what his piece of rub-
ber was made of.
Percy could not tell.
He asked his mamma.
She told him that India-rubber was
a kind of gum that drops from trees.


Then she told


Percy


and Robin


to bring the big atlas.
She turned to the maps of South
America and Asia.


On these two maps she


pointed


in one of


the pencils is very hard.
This pencil makes fine light marks
on the paper.


out the countries where the rubber
trees grow.
"The rubber trees are very tall
trees," said mamma.
The branches are all at the top.
Early in the morning the rubber
gatherers go out and cut many holes
in the trunks of these tall trees.
Under each hole they fasten a lit-
tle cup.
By and by these cups are full of


a yellow-white sap, or juice,


which


The other


pencil is filled with soft


lead.


drops from the holes in the trees.
This juice looks like good, rich


This pencil makes broad


dark milk.


marks.


Percy says these dark marks


are hard to rub out.


The rubber gatherers often mould,
out of clay, odd little bottles, and


GATHERING THE SAP.


A PIECE






sometimes the shapes of animals.
Over these shapes they pour the
thick, gummy, milky rubber juice.
"Then they hold these shapes
over hot fires.
"The heat hardens the juice.
It also makes the color darker.
When the first coating of gum is
dry, they wet it again, dry it, wet it
again, dry it, and so on until the coat-
ing of dried gum is very thick.
When the last layer of gum is dry,
they break out the clay inside and
throw it away.
"Then the curious rubber shapes
are ready to take to market.
They are carried to the city on
the tops of long poles."
Why don't they take them in
baskets ? asked Robin.
Because they are often quite
sticky. It takes the gum a long time
to dry."
Is my piece of rubber," asked



A Y)s YES, little c
i9 'I 'll hold yo
It 's the nau
I That you sh


On a
On a


Percy, made of the pure gum?"
I think so," said mamma.
The purer it is, the better it will
rub out pencil marks.
When they wish to make the best
kind of pencil rubber they tear or
grind the gum into fine bits.
These bits are carefully washed.
"Then they are pressed together
under heavy rollers into sheets.
"The sheets of rubber that are
made in this way are very firm and
fine.
These sheets are then cut into
little blocks by great shears that
work under water.
"Then the blocks are put in long
iron trays and dried in the sun.
After this they' are sci.: to the
stores." ^
And little boys like me, who are
learning to draw," said Percy, "go
into the stores and buy them."
--E. E. B.


it, you may come and look out;
u tight and you needn't pout--
ghtiest thing I ever heard,
would wish to dine on a bird -
dear little bird !






A QUEER LIH

Dode was a New York school-boy.
He was the brightest- boy in his
class. There were ten in the class.












4^^^B


'TLE BUILDER.

who answered the most questions.
No other boy could tell so many
new things about insects and birds.
This was because Dode
used his eyes.
One day the object-
lesson was about spiders.
Each little boy told
what he knew about
spiders.
One boy had watched
a spider make her webs.
Another boy said that
different kinds of spiders
made different kinds of
webs.


One boy


said that


when a fly was caught
in the web, the spider
tied the fly up before she
killed it.


But Dode,
with the right


-*k/


THE DESPISED SPIDER.


the boy
kind of


eyes, had seen what no
other boy had seen.
He had looked at a


When his teacher gave an object spider's


web which


he found at


iron-works.


pa's




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