• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Adam and Eve
 Cain and Abel
 The flood
 Babel
 Lot's flight from Sodom
 Abraham and Isaac
 The story of Rebekah
 Joseph and his brethren
 The finding of Moses
 The flight from Egypt
 Moses striking the rock
 The ten commandments
 Bezaleel and Aholiab
 The brazen serpent
 The passage of the Jordan
 The captain of the Lord's host
 How Jericho was captured
 Achan's sin
 The altar on Mount Ebal
 The cities of refuge
 The death of Joshua
 Gideon and the fleece
 The defeat of the Midianites
 The death of Samson
 Ruth and Naomi
 Boaz and Ruth
 Eli and Samuel
 Death of Eli and his sons
 Playing on the harp before...
 David and Goliath
 David and Araunah
 Elijah fed by ravens
 Elijah and Elisha
 The Shunammite's son
 The little captive maid
 Jonah at Nineveh
 Hezekiah and Sennacherib
 The brave Hebrew boys
 Daniel and the lions
 Esther before the king
 David and Jonathan
 Advertising
 Back Cover






Title: Stories and pictures from the Old Testament
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE PAGE TEXT
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00065491/00001
 Material Information
Title: Stories and pictures from the Old Testament
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 26 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Webb, William J., fl. 1853-1882 ( Illustrator )
Ward, F. H ( Illustrator )
D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: D. Lothrop Company
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: c1889
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1889   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1889
Genre: Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
General Note: Publisher's advertisements follow text.
General Note: Some illustrations by W. J. Webb and Ward.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00065491
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224938
notis - ALG5210
oclc - 41203020

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Page i
    Title Page
        Page ii
        Page iii
    Adam and Eve
        Page 1
    Cain and Abel
        Page 2
        Page 3
    The flood
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Babel
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Lot's flight from Sodom
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Abraham and Isaac
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    The story of Rebekah
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Joseph and his brethren
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    The finding of Moses
        Page 22
        Page 23
    The flight from Egypt
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Moses striking the rock
        Page 26
        Page 27
    The ten commandments
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Bezaleel and Aholiab
        Page 30
        Page 31
    The brazen serpent
        Page 32
        Page 33
    The passage of the Jordan
        Page 34
        Page 35
    The captain of the Lord's host
        Page 36
        Page 37
    How Jericho was captured
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Achan's sin
        Page 40
        Page 41
    The altar on Mount Ebal
        Page 42
        Page 43
    The cities of refuge
        Page 44
        Page 45
    The death of Joshua
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Gideon and the fleece
        Page 48
        Page 49
    The defeat of the Midianites
        Page 50
        Page 51
    The death of Samson
        Page 52
        Page 53
    Ruth and Naomi
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Boaz and Ruth
        Page 56
        Page 57
    Eli and Samuel
        Page 58
        Page 59
    Death of Eli and his sons
        Page 60
        Page 61
    Playing on the harp before Saul
        Page 62
        Page 63
    David and Goliath
        Page 64
        Page 65
    David and Araunah
        Page 66
        Page 67
    Elijah fed by ravens
        Page 68
        Page 69
    Elijah and Elisha
        Page 70
        Page 71
    The Shunammite's son
        Page 72
        Page 73
    The little captive maid
        Page 74
        Page 75
    Jonah at Nineveh
        Page 76
        Page 77
    Hezekiah and Sennacherib
        Page 78
        Page 79
    The brave Hebrew boys
        Page 80
        Page 81
    Daniel and the lions
        Page 82
        Page 83
    Esther before the king
        Page 84
        Page 85
    David and Jonathan
        Page 86
        Page 87
    Advertising
        Page i
        Page ii
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text












';ak, h", Z



VOWi







.4xa.












t 4 59*'









i:Ti




el-i ...




W. m PCC1P
Prj


4

























































































JACOB PRESENTED TO PHARAOH.








STORIES AND PICTURES



FROM THE OLD TESTAMENT


D LOTH
WASHINGTON


BOSTON
ROP COMPANY
STREET OPPOSITE BROMFIELD


'-'--.
- ill


rI
\















































COPYRIGHT, 1889,
BY
D LOTHROP COMPANY





ADAM AND EYE.

God made the sun, the moon, the
stars, the earth, the sea and all the
beasts, birds, insects, plants and fishes.
After that He made man, then woman.
Adam was the first man, Eve the first
woman. He planted a lovely gar-
den and gave it to Adam and Eve
to live in. There was every kind of
luscious fruits in this garden and
God was willing they should eat all
but one; this He told them they must
not even touch.
For a while they minded God and
were happy, but one day they both
ate some of this fruit. Then God
was very angry and sorry for what
they had done. He drove them out
of the lovely garden forever.





CAIN AND ABEL.

Adam and Eve had two sons, Cain
and Abel. Cain, when he got old
enough, became a farmer, Abel a
shepherd. They both brought gifts
to God. Cain's gift was fruit; Abel's
gift was the very best of his lambs.
For some reason God liked Abel's
gift, but did not like Cain's. This
made Cain hate Abel so much that
he killed him.
When God asked Cain what had be-
come of his brother he said: "I know
not: Am I my brother's keeper?"
But God, who sees everything, had
seen what Cain had done and pun-
ished him by making him wander
homeless and friendless over all the
earth.





























II ____ -


CAIN AND ABEL.





THE FLOOD.

A great many years after Cain
killed Abel-over a thousand per-
haps-the people had grown to be
so very wicked that God made up his
mind to destroy them by a great flood.
But there was one good old man Noah,
whom God loved. So He had him
build a huge boat or ark and told him
to put into it all his own family, and
two of every kind of animal on the
earth. As soon as Noah had done
this, the rain began to fall. It kept on
raining for forty days and forty
nights until everything was covered
by the water, even the highest moun-
tains. Nothing was saved except
what was in the ark.










.1*


I


ENTERING THE ARK.


. v- " -^


-_ _- --^ .-- : = ---. .'- ._ ^





-.' ; ,.. -xe ... .--
:-<- ^ **- ..- .-_- .: :,.
B -
',: -- -_


Ii


I


I -- -


tl??.


r NA
mn.a?


T THE A. K


;'f





BABEL.

After Noah's death, his sons and
their families kept traveling west-
ward. By and by they came to a
beautiful plain. They were verytired
of traveling, so theyrested a long time.
The plain pleased them so much that
they thought they would like to live
there always, and they began to build
a great city and a high tower "whose
top should reach unto Heaven." God
came down to see the city and the tower.
The sight made him angry and at
once he caused the workmen to speak
different languages, so they could
not understand one another and had
to stop building. The tower is called
Babel because God "did there con-
found the language of all the earth."









































































THE TOWER OF BABEL.





LOT'S FLIGHT FROM SODOM.

Lot lived in Sodom, a city so wicked
that not ten good men could be found
there. One evening two angels came
to Lot, to tell him that God was going
to destroy the wicked city and to warn
him to flee in the morning with his
wife and daughters. Lot and his
family heeded the angel's warning and
fled to Zoar, a city near by. Then God
rained down fire and brimstone upon
Sodom, until it was burned to ashes.
Lot and his two daughters were
saved, but Lot's wife was turned into
a pillar of salt, because she looked
back at the burning city. This the
angels had warned them not to do.
























I
'i .", ^
7t 1 ;.


LOT ENTERING ZOAR.


-


I


:


I~ 1.




ABRAHAM AND ISAAC.

Abraham was a very old man,
when his only son Isaac was born.
He loved him dearly as the child of
his old age, but he loved God more.
So when God talked with Abraham,
as He often did, and told him to take
Isaac to the mountains and offer him
for a burnt offering, Abraham made
no excuses, but went at once to do it.
He laid the wood in order for an
altar, and bound Isaac and laid him
on the wood, and took his knife in
his hand to kill him. But just then
he heard a voice, the voice of an
angel. It told him to unbind Isaac
and take him from the altar because
God did not really want him to kill
his own son, and had told him to do





































































ABRAHAM AND ISAAC.





so, only to see if he would obey.
When the voice was silent Abraham
looked up and saw a ram caught in
the bushes by its horns. This he
offered up to God instead of Isaac.




























































































REBEKAH GIVING DRINK TO ABRAHAM'S SERVANT.


''
~I
.





THE STORY OF REBEKAH.

When Isaac had grown to be a
man, Abraham wanted him to take
a wife, but he was afraid to have him
take one of the women of Canaan, for
they worshiped idols. So he called
his oldest servant and sent him with
ten camels to the land where his own
people lived to get there a wife for
his son. When the servant came to
Nahor, he made his camels kneel
down outside the city by a well where
he saw the women drawing water.
Then he prayed God to help him
choose well, saying: Let it come to
pass that the damsel to whom I shall
say 'Let down thy pitcher, I pray
thee, that I may drink,'and who shall
reply, Drink, an1d I will give thy




























































































REBEKAH JOURNEYING TO ISAAC.





camels drink also.' Let her be the
one Thou hast chosen for Thy servant
Isaac." Even before he had got
through his prayer Rebekah, a beau-
tiful girl, came along and let down
her pitcher into the well. The ser-
vant ran up to her and begged a drink.
"Drin-, my lord," she said. Then
she drew water for the camels. The
servant knew God had heard his
prayer, so he went to her father's
house and asked for "Rebekah."
Father and mother said yes, for they
saw that God had sent him. So the
very next morning Rebelkah set out
for Canaan and a little after became
Isaac's wife.






























































I --
..- -- ...r'~ -__ .- -


THE MEETING OF ISAAC AND REBEIKAH.


:1


L_~




JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

Jacob had twelve sons. The two
yomi est were Joseph and Benjamin.
He loved these two more than all the
rest, because Rachel was their mother.
So he gave them a great many pres-
ents that he did not give to the older
sons. For one thing he gave Joseph
a coat of many colors. This made
the older brothers hate him, for they
thought they ought to have bright-
colored coats too.
When Joseph was seventeen years
old, and began to take care of his
father's sheep, he had some strange
dreams. He told these dreams to
his brothers. It made them hate
him more than ever because they
themselves never had such dreams.




















































































- 9~ _


JOSEPH BEFORE PHARAOH.




So, when, a little after this they
were taking' care of the sheep a long
way from home, they thought it would
be a good thing to get rid of Joseph.
At first they were going to kill him,
but instead they tore off the hated
coat and threw him into a deep pit.
Afterward they sold him for money
to some merchants who came along
on their way to Egypt. When the
merchants were gone they dipped
Joseph's coat in blood and carried it
to Jacob. Jacob thought some wild
beast had torn Joseph in pieces. He
was getting to be an old man, and it
almost broke his heart.
Joseph was taken into Egypt and
there God helped him so much that
he became almost a king. One sea-
son many years after Jacob lost his





son, he had bad crops and was with-
out food. Se he sent his sons to
Egypt to buy some. Joseph knew
his brothers. He was kind to them,
gave them plenty of food and sent
for his old father and all his family
to come to Egypt to live. They came.
So Jacob found Joseph again alnd
was happy.




THE FINDING OF MOSES.

In time there came to be so many
Israelites in Egypt that Pharaoh be-
gan to be afraid of them. So he issued
an order that all boy babies should
be put to death. But one mother
hid her baby boy three months.
Then she made a little boat out of
rushes, laid the baby in it, and put
the boat in the water near the shore.
A little while after she did this one
of Pharaoh's daughters came down
to the river to bathe and saw the little
boat. She had one of her maids wade
out and get it. When she saw the
little boy, she felt so sorry for him
that she took him for her own son.
She named him Moses, which means
"drawn out of the water."

























































































































































_~__





--=--=--1------=--=c--e _
-
-;- ---- --- -- ---
---
__ _
---__
I
----
~-3~s~-~- -- --.
~-~__ __~_ -~_ _. ~--_L.~__,


THE FINDING OF MOSES.


------ --


~_-__ ~~


~T-~-~


---=------


~i ~-------



,-I~--~--~--~ ---~
-~--~-~-~--

--~- ~-


Li- --~-~-- -
~~-~~-~- -
L~l-~-i





THE FLIGHT FROM EGYPT.

Pharaoh made the Israelites work
very hard and treated them cruelly
in other ways. God was sorry for
his people, so he came to Moses and
told him to go to Pharaoh with his
brother Aaron and order him to let
the Israelites go away from Egypt
to a land He had made ready for
them. But Pharaoh did not care
anything about what God told him
to do and would not let the people
go. So God sent dreadful plagues
upon the Egyptians. Still Pharaoh
was stubborn and held out against
God until the tenth plague came,
which killed the eldest child in
every Egyptian house. Then he
sent the Israelites out of the land.




















































































SPRININKLING THE H1100).





MOSES STRIKING THE ROCK.

After the Israelites had been away
from Egypt quite a long time, they
came into a dry, stony country called
the Wilderness, where there were no
springs of water and no rivers. They
got very thirsty, but could find noth-
ing anywhere to drink. This made
them angry with their leader, Moses,
so anrgy that they were going to
stone him to death. But Moses asked
God to help him, saying: "What
shall I do unto this people? they be
almost ready to stone me." God told
him to take his rod and strike a cer-
tain rock on Mount Horeb. Moses
did so. At once a clear stream of
water burst out of the rock, enough
for all the people.































































































STRIKING THE ROCK.





THE TEN COMMANDMENTS.

When the Israelites came near
Mount Sinai, God said that in three
days from that time he would come
down upon the mountain. But none
of the people except Moses and
Aaron were to touch the mountain.
If they did, they would die. They
could come up into the mountain and
be with Him. God did as he prom-
ised. There was a thick cloud all
about Him, and fire and smoke, and
thunder and lightning, so the people
could not see him. And the mount-
ain shook and the voice of God was
heard like the sound of a trumpet,
giving to them the Ten Command-
ments. And the people were afraid
and drew back from the mountain.




















-- -







... = .. II -" I
'. '*\. 'f I i L ,' ---










6 :'. '"'" J. V II


I 1 11 71
JIl II I. i rL' : i'i. l ,.nl ,,[

II t ,'ir .1 l. il.ll 1-1 t ,T i Ii | Jn
IV IDIu

I V


I riA n -h 4

'i i. ri Tkiil 1h II l Wil,
'1 flO JILf'l ti' 'ql h itl.
it, r it "iI. i'. L, ,

.-aL' -i-ti. iL -,. ri
l'.I% V-1 rw I i ,


THE TEN COMMANDMENTS.





BEZALEEL AND AHOLIAB.

After God had given the Ten Com-
mlandments, Moses went up into the
mountain and stayed with God forty
days and forty nights. God told him
that the Israelites must build Him a
house to live in which should be
called "The Tabernacle." They
must give gold, silver, brass, blue,
purple, scarlet, fine linen, oils, spices,
costly woods, jewels and other pre-
cious things, for this house. Bezaleel
and Aholiab must build it, because
He had made them wise. Moses
told the people what God had said.
They were so anxious to help that
they brought more than God had
asked for. And God's beautiful
house was soon made.


















































.1 'i


BEZALEEL AND AHOLTAB.


ly


j;

.i L


~BR~a





THE BRAZEN SERPENT.

Once, almost forty years after they
made God's House, the Israelites were
very hungry and thirsty. They said
hateful things about Moses and about
God too, which was very wicked. So
God sent fiery serpents to bite the
people. The bite was poisonous, and
many died. Then they knew this
was because they had done wrong.
They came to Moses and asked him
to pray God to take the serpents
away. Moses prayed. God told
Moses to make a brass serpent and
set it on a pole where all the people
could see it. When Moses had done
this he told the people to look. Every
one who was bitten was made well as
soon as he saw the brass serpent.































N


Ia i4


THE BRAZEN SERPENT.


1/


Nl





THE PASSAGE OF THE
JORDAN.

After Moses died Joshua led the
people of Israel. They had come
very near to the land God had made
ready for them, but there was still
the great river Jordan to cross. They
did not know how to get across, for
the water was deep and they had no
boats. But God had a way for them.
He told Joshua to have the priests of
his Tabernacle go into the water 'first
and stand there. As soon as the feet
of the priests touched the water it
stopped flowing from above and piled
up in a great heap. So the people
went across the Jordan on dry land.
After the priests left the river, the
water flowed just as it had before.





























































































CROSSING THE JORDAN.




THE CAPTAIN OF THE LORD'S
HOST.

When the Canaanites heard how
the Israelite- had crossed the Jordan,
they were afraid and shut themselves
up in their city, Jericho. The Israel-
ites had to find some way to break into
the city. Onie day when Joshua was
walking near the wall of Jericho, he
saw a man with a drawn sword in his
hand. He at once asked the man
whether he was a friend or an enemy.
The man a answered: As captain of the
host of the Lord am nowcome." Then
Joshua knew it was an angel and
fell down and worshiped him. The
angel said: "Loose thy shoe from off
thy foot, for the place whereon thou
standest is holy." Joshua did so.






















































































THE CAPTAIN OF THE LORD'S HOST.





HOW JERICHO WAS
CAPTURED.

The Israelites took Jericho in a
very curious way. Every day for six
days the armed men marched around
the city once. On the seventh day
they marched around seven times,
while the priests blew their trumpets.
Just as they finished the last march,
the trumpets gave a long blast and
all the people together gave a mighty
shout. Then that strong, high wall
fell down flat, and they went in and
took the city and burnt it and every-
thing in it except the silver and gold
and vessels of brass and iron. The
rest of the people of Canaan were
greatly surprised when they heard
how Jericho was captured.

























































































THE FALL OF JERICHO.




ACHAN'S SIN.

Ai was a city not far from Jericho.
Three thousand Israelites went to take
it. But some were killed and the rest
got frightened and ran away. Joshua
felt so badly that he went and told
God all about it God said that the
Israelites had been beatenbecause one
of them had kept for his own some of
the silver and gold taken from Jeri-
cho. God pointed out that Achan was
the man who had stolen these things
and that he had hidden them in his
tent. When they looked in the tent
they found them buried in the ground.
Achan and all his family and all that
he had were stoned and burned and
a great heap of stones raised over
them as a warning.
















~'


II


-'4~


jPU 1\


ACHAN CONFESSING HIS SIN.


Iii ~~


1.1-





THE ALTAR ON MOUNT EBAL.

After Achan had been burned, the
Israelites captured Ai and hanged its
king on a tree. Then Joshua built
an altar to God on Mount Ebal ofwhole
stones that had never been cut. On
the altar he put burnt offerings. On
the stones of the altar he wrote the
laws that Moses had given to the peo-
ple when he was alive. Then he got
all the people together, men, women
and little ones, and read to them God's
promises of the good things that would
happen to them if they did right, and
the bad things that would happen if
they did wrong. The people listened
carefully to the reading. Joshua did
this because he had promised Moses
that he would just before he died.






















I-



la, i .-,-. ., .


THE ALTAR ON MOUNT EBAI..





THE CITIES OF REFUGE.

In those old times, when one man
killed ilnoter, the friends of the dead
man had the right to kill the mur-
derer. But sometimes it happened
that one per,:son i ed another with-
out meaning to do it. C' course it was
not right that he should be killed for
w.hat .L Le could not help. God saw that
there ought to be some way of saving
him. So he told Joshua to name six
cities to which such a person could flee
and where no one could touch him.
These cities were called Cities of Ref-
uge. Three of them were on the west
side of Jordon and three on the east.
Some say that all the guide posts
along the way had "Refuge!" "Ref-
uge!" written on them.


























































































FLEEING TO T1HI CII'Y O1" REFUGE.




THE DEATH OF JOSHUA.

A long time after the fall of Jericho,
when Joshua was an old man, he made
all the Israelites come into one place
so that he could talk to them, before
he left them, forever. He asked them
to count over the good things God had
done for them, and promised that He
would do even more for them than He
had already. He told them to be
brave, to do as Moses had wanted them
to do when he was alive, and never
to have anything to do with people
who worshiped idols. If they did,
God would punish them. When
Joshua had instructed the Israelites
in all the good ways, having said all
that was on his mind, he died He
was one hundred and ten years old.





















I II
'liii'''
I,,
'I'll'''
II'' I


r r



.44
r 4A
_^,,, -.

^ % .. .. > .. .






K. ,,*' , ^ ,,,



SI'ii ,, i


.4,


WI
I'.. \ ~

j'y~


JOSI-1HA EXHORTING TIHE PEOPLE.


^-"^i '-;





GIDEON AND THE FLEECE.

After Joshua died, the Israelites for-
got God and worshiped idols. So God
punished them as Joshua said. The
Midianites came into the land and
the Israelites had to hide from them
in dens and caves. Gideon, a mighty
man, wasthreshing corn one day when
an angel came to him and told him to
go and save Israel. Gideon was will-
ing to go, but asked God to show him
some sign thathe wouldbeat the Midi-
anites. So one night God made a
fleece that Gideon put on the ground
wet with dew while all the ground was
dry, and the next night he kept -the
fleece dry while all the ground was
wet. Then Gideon knew that God
would be on his side.






























































































EXAMINING 'THE FLEECE.





THE DEFEAT OF THE MIDI-
ANITES.

Gideon got together a large army,
but God told him that only a part must
fight. So Gideon picked out thethree
hundred bravest men and divided
them into three companiesof onehun-
dred each, and put a trumpet in each
man's ha nd and an empty pitcher and
a lamp inside the pitcher. About the
middle of the night they came to the
camp of the Midianites and blew
the trumpets and broke the pitchers
and held up the lamps and cried "The
sword of the Lord ad of Gideon."
The Midianites were afraid and ran
about and cried out and killed one an-
other. The Israelites ran after them
and drove them out of the country.













2:-








..:. ..K ...
77
-- -
, I'

--. r -P- ,

-- .


r1tc A5
~~-)

I N-s-
t. At


"THE SWORD OF THE LORD, AND OF GIDEON."


~- ~--~-~
~~~ ;; :'~T~-"

;=--~-~-~-~--~I I
;-=--~---

'
1~"~1 ~




THE DEATH OF SAMSON.

Samson was the strongest man that
ever lived. At one time he tore a live
lion apart with his hands, at another
he killed one thousand men, and at
another he carried away the gates of
Gaza, a city of the Philistines. But
the very last thing that he did was
the most wonderful of all. The Phil-
istines had cruelly put out his eyes.
At a feast where there were over three
thousand of them, Samson got a boy
to show him the way, and then putting
his hands upon two pillars that held
up the roof, and praying God for
help, he pressed upon them with all
his might. The pillars broke, the
roof fell. Samson himself and the
Philistines were killed.

























































































SAMSON AND THE PHILISTINES.





RUTH AND NAOMI.

Naomi's home was at Bethlehem.
But one year, because there was no
food there, she went to Moab with her
husband and her two sons. Both the
sons took wives in Moab. The wives'
names were Orpah and Ruth. After a
little time Naomi's husband died, then
both the sons. Naomi started to go
back to Bethlehem, and Orpah and
Ruth started with her. But Naomi
did not think they ought to leave
their homes and advised them to stay
in Moab. Orpah stayed. But Ruth
said to Naomi: "Whither thou goest,
I will go, and where thou lodgest I
will lodge; thy people shall be my
people and thy God, my God." So
Ruth and Naomi came to Bethlehem.



























































































RUTH AND NAOMI.




BOAZ AND RUTH.

Ruth and Naomi were poor. So
Ruth went out to pick up the grain
which the reapers let fall at their
work. The field into which she went
belonged to a rich man named Boaz.
He was pleased with Ruth, and let her
eat and drink with the reapers. He
told her never to go anywhere else,
but always to come to his field, and
he made the reapers let fall some
grain on purpose for her. So when
she came home to Naomi at night, she
had a very large bundle. Ruth went
to that field all through the harvest.
Afterward she became the wife of
Boaz.
So you see Ruth did not lose
anything by staying with Naomi.






















































S- : ~ _,3 --e- -..- ~-'.: '- -' '.-.. :" '-











BOAZ SHOWING KINDNESS TO RUTH.





ELI AND SAMUEL.

Once a year Samuel's mother went
to see him and always took with her
a little coat. One night, when Samuel
was asleep he heard his name spoken.
He thought Eli called him, and ran
to see what he wanted. But Eli said
he had not called him. So he went
back to bed. Again he heard "Sam-
nel," and again he ran to Eli. But
Eli had not called him. Still again
he was called and ran to Eli. Then
Eli knew that God had spoken and
told him to say, "Speak, Lord, for
thy servant heareth," next time he
was called. Samuel did this, and
God told him of something terrible
that was going to happen to Eli
and his sons.













































SAMUEL AND ELI.


I


^ "sSS j-- ------- -
^^^^^"-l~I~-i:


::_= -- -- - -.___: --- _
_ ,-A2,
l ---:.' .-- -.-- ",. .. ..





DEATH OF ELI AND HIS
SONS.

A little while after God spoke to
Samuel, the Israelites fought against
the Philistines. They were beaten.
Then they took the ark of God from
the tabernacle and marched against
the Philistines. At first the Philistines
were afraid of the ark. But they
fought bravely. The Israelites were
again beaten. Eli's two sons were
killed and the ark of God was taken.
Eli was then ninety-eight years old.
He was blind. He was sitting on a
bench by the roadside when he heard
the sad news. He was so overcome
by the intelligence he fell over back-
ward and brake his neck. That was
what God told Samuel would happen.


















































































































ELI RECEIVING THE NEWS OF THE DEATH OF HIS SONS.


I





PLAYING ON THE HARP
BEFORE SAUL.

Saul was the king of Israel. David
was a shepherd boy, the son of Jesse.
He had a happy, ruddy face that made
everybody like him. Besides he was
very brave. Once he killed both a
lion and a bear that came to eat up the
lambs in his father's flock. He knew
how to throw stones with a sling and
could play on the harp beautifully.
One day King Saul was feeling very
sad and wanted somebody to play to
him. He thought music would make
him feel better. His servants told him
about David. So he sent for him.
David came and played so nicely on
the harp that Saul forgot all about
his trouble.
































































































































DAVID PLAYING ON THE HARP BEFORE SAUL.


~





DAVID AND GOLIATH.

The Israelites and Philistines were
at war. Goliath was a Philistine
giant. He used to come out in front
of the Israelites every day and dare
any one to fight with him. He was
so big and strong that all the Israelites
were afraid to try. One day David
came to the camp on an errand, and
when he saw Goliath he made up his
mind to fight him. So he chose five
smooth stones out of a brook and put
them in his shepherd's bag. Then
with sling in hand he went toward
Goliath. Goliath laughed at him, but
David did not mind that. He threw
a stone with his sling. It hit Goliath
on the forehead and he fell to the
ground. Then David cut off his head.














A.


I ,


.1g


V7


1


DAVID.


Am




DAVID AND ARAUNAH.

David was not a bad man, but he
sometimes did wrong and then God
had to punish him although He was
very fond of him. When he had been
king many years he had the Israelites
counted. This displeased God and He
sent a plague upon Israel. Thisplague
killed many thousand people. David
felt very sorry to have his people die
for his sin and prayed God to stop
the plague and punish him instead.
God told David to go to oo the threshing-
floor of Araunah and make an offer-
ing. David went. He bought the
threshing-flooor and some oxen and
wood. Then he built an altar and
made the offering. God stopped the
plague.





























































































































































DAVID AND ARAUNAH.


~-~--- -------
~-.~ ------~-~-------
--=-~r- ----~----~---~
---

---~--;

-r=---;-


~BI-


r.-



~as~
--




ELIJAH FED BY RAVENS.

Ahab was a very wicked king, more
wicked than any that came before him.
He took a wife who worshiped idols
Sand built an altar to a heathen god
and worshiped this god. So God
sent Elijah to Ahab to say to him:
"As the Lord of Israel liveth there
shall not be dew nor rain these years."
Ahab was so angry at Elijah that he
had to flee and hide himself by the
brook Cherith near the river Jordan.
The brook gave him all the water he
needed, but there was no food there.
But God would not let his prophet
starve. He sent ravens to feed him.
These ravens brought him bread and
meat twice every day; in the morn-
ing and in the evening.















I, ~ -


" -





















ELIJAH FED -VENTS-
E.JA FED RAVES. ..
4~~~~~ ~~ ' "- '..-'.

o ,i _. -

'k .. .

,_. i i_ ,.

'-- ", .
" ..k ~ ~~-'- '



-' .,k.A .:i..-
" .:,, ,. --. / '!:




__JA 'E _P .. _2 ,. -


I"


I -, -_-.-c:
i


-MI
i


,.~""-~




ELIJAH AND ELISHA.

One day Elijah was traveling
through the land, when he saw twelve
men ploughing with twelve yoke of
oxen. One of these men was Elisha.
When Elijah saw Elisha, he knew
that he was the man God wished him
to take for a servant. So Elijah
threw his coat on Elisha as he went
by. Then Elisha ran after Elijah
and said: Let me, I pray thee, kiss
my father and mother and then I
will follow thee." He killed a yoke
of oxen and made a feast. Then he
said good-by to his father and mother
and went away with Elijah. After-
ward God took Elijah up to Heaven
in a chariot of fire. Elisha was with
him at the time.
















I_-- --


Pt- -r 0

7 .'- .: -- ,- ,-l _- -
.,. 1*1;"



*--"z .i -.. ..- -


I .
2, .,2 , ;, .. ,, .,, . ;-
r--.
;, ', i A. j '
' .r. ,-, ,,-(ww I
tk, V" A -, -" - 'L


PLOUGHING IN CANAAN.


- '
-I-:_




THE SHUNAMMITE'S SON.

A kind Shunammite woman who
liked Elisha made for him a little
chamber on the wall. She made it
cosey with a bed and table and stool
and candlestick. Elisha used to come
to this little roo whenhe e got tired.
Now this goodwomn~a had a little boy
whom she dearly loved, for he was her
only child. One morning the little
fellow was running about in the field
with the reapers. All at once he felt
a pain and ran to his father, crying,
"'My head! my head!" When the
father saw his little son was not feel-
ing well, he had him taken home to
his mother. She held him in her lap
till noon. Then he died. Elisha
brought him back to life.



























































































THE SHUNAMMITE'S SON RESTORED.





THE LITTLE CAPTIVE MAID.

Naaman was a great Syrian general,
who had beaten the Israelites in bat-
tle. He was very wretched because
he was a leper. Now Naaman's wife
had a little Israelite girl to wait upon
her, who had heard of the wonderful
things Elisha had done. This little
girl had told her mistress that Elisha
could cure Naaman. So Naaman
went with his chariot and horses to
see Elisha. Elisha told him to wash
seven times in the river Jordan.
Naaman would not do this at first, it
seemed such a little thing. But
he finally changed his mind, and
washed in the Jordan and was cured.
You see how much good one little
girl can do.






























































































-$-0- -


THE LITTLE CAPTIVE MAID.





JONAH AT NINEVEH.

God told Jonah to go to Nineveh
and warn the people that their city
would be destroyed because they were
so wicked. But Jonah ran away to
sea. There was a terrible storm on
the sea, and the sailors threw Jonah
overboard. They thought he was
the cause of the storm. But he was
not drowned, for God sent a great fish
to swallow him. Jonah was inside
the fish three days and three nights.
Then God made the fish throw Jonah
up on the dry land. After this
God sent Jonah to Nineveh. But
the people were so sorry for their
sins that He took pity on them and
did not destroy the city.




























































































JONAH AT NINEVEH.





HEZEKIAH AND SENNA-
CHERIB.

Hezekiah was the best king Judah
ever had. The Bible says no king
ever served God so well. When Heze-
kiah had been king fourteen years,
Sennacherib, the king of Assyria,
marched against Jerusalem. He sent
a letter to Hezekiah, telling him to
give up the city because his God could
not help him. Hezekiah took this
letter up into the temple. He spread
it out before God and prayed Him
to save Jerusalem. God heard his
prayer. That night His angel went
into the Assyrian camp and killed one
hundred and eighty-five thousand
of the Assyrians. Soon after this
Sennacherib's two sons killed him.































































































IIEZEKIAI- LAYING THE 11.E'TTER BEFORE GOD.





THE BRAVE HEBREW BOYS.

Daniel, Haananiah Mishael and
Azariah were four Hebrew boys who
were prisoners at Babylon. They
thought it was wrong to eat the meat
and drink the wine the king sent,
and refused both when offered them.
They asked for plain food and pure
water instead. But the servant was
afraid they would grow thin if he
gave them nothing else. Then the
king would be angry at him and he
would lose his life. Daniel told him
to give them plain food and water
for ten days. He did so. At the end
of the ten days they seemed so much
better than those who ate the meat
and drank the wine that the servant
was glad to do as they wished.































I r


.,
-
II~I


if
`'111 '*
:I
fi
,I"'
2.
ir,


THE BRAVE HEBREW BOYS.


~~


! 'f~l
.',\`


-s .


I:il

;. .~..
-- -


'ill I .--. .;,.


1 1.-,
.,!,,,
^ihi')'^,




DANIEL AND THE LIONS.

When Darius was king at Babylon
he liked Daniel so well that he made
him the chief officer in his kingdom.
This made the other officers hate Dan-
iel. They got Darius to make a law
that every man who prayed to any
one except Darius himself should be
thrown into the den of lions. Daniel
kept on praying to his God three times
a day. When Darius heard that Dan-
iel prayed he was very sorry he had
made the law. But he could not
change it, so Daniel was thrown into
the lions' den. That night Darius
could not sleep, he felt so bad. Very
early next morning he ran to the
den. But Daniel was safe, for God
had shut the lions' mouths.































































































DANIEL AND THE LIONS.




ESTHER BEFORE THE KING.

Ahasuerus was king of Persia.
Esther, a Jewess, was his queen.
Haman was next to the king. He
was a cruel man, and hated the Jews
because one of them, a servant of the
king, would not bow down to him.
So he got the king to make a law that
all the Jews in his kingdom should
be killed. Esther felt very sorry for
her people. She made up her mind to
save them if she could. But first she
spentthree days in fasting and prayer.
Then she went to the king and beg-
ged him to save the Jews. The
king loved Esther so much that he
did what she asked. So the Jews
were saved from the cruel decree of
the king Ahasuerus.





ESTHER BEFORE THE KING.


ir' ,~U




DAVID AND JONATHAN.

Saul loved David at first. Then he
hated him and tried to kill him twice
by throwing his spear at him. David
escaped and hid himself. Now Saul
had a son named Jonathan, who
thought a great deal of David. It
made him feel very bad to see his
father trying to kill him. Jonathan
thought that Saul night get over his
anger in two or three days and take
David back. But when he was sure
that Saul really meant to kill David,
he went to his hiding place and
told him how he might get away.
After they had wept and kissed each
other and promised always to be
friends, David fled and Jonathan
went back to his father.





















































































































DAVID AND JONATHAN.


I___~ii_~i_~_ ___ ~~









Wide Awake loo
111/0
into
The brightest of the children's magazines."
-- Sir:igfiel{ Repfulican, Jin e, '89. next year.

1890 will be a Good Year for the readers of WIDE AWAKE, and, with
all that is wise and practical and helpful, for broad education and character-
building, there will be so large an element of sport and mirth-making and
gay surprise that it is sure also to be memorable as the Merry Year.
The famous serials of recent volumes by Trowbridge and Margaret Sidney
and Susan Coolidge and Talbot and Harriet Prescott Spofford and
Sidney Luska will be honorably replaced by the following brilliant five:
THAT BOY GID. The rugged reticent boy of the farm, with his red
blushes and rough hands, has found an admirer, a friend, a
serial champion, an explainer, in William O. Stoddard (also author of
The Talking Leaves," Dab Kinzer," etc.). Young and old are
going to follow Gideon's adventures on his father's acres with the
The breathless sort of feeling they have hitherto bestowed upon the ex-
story of ploits of daring sailors and soldiers. Gid's parents and charming
a rough sister and the village people are characters to remember for a life-
boy. time. Full of humor and common sense. Illustrations by W.
Parker Bodfish from studies on the farm.

THE NEW SENIOR AT ANDOVER. The literary world will be on the
qui vive for this serial, the first written by its author, Herbert D.
serial Ward, to whom it will be remembered that a favorite WIDE AWAKE
contributor, Miss Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, was married recently.
The story is a complete contrast to Mr. Stoddard's, and the only
serial ever written of school-life in the famous town of Andover -
a life as unique in its way as school-life at Rugby. The boys, the
A professors, the boarding-houses, the lodgings, the fun, the school-
great work, all are drawn from the real Andover. Nothing approaching
school
school it has been done as a picture of American school-life, except in Dr.
Holland's Arthur Bonnicastle. The New Senior is a fellow one
is glad to know. The illustrations will be made at Andover. (Mrs.
Ward also has a story in hand for WIDE AWAKE.)

"THE SONS OF THE VIKINGS," a short serial by the poet-novelist
Hjalmar Hjorth Boyesen, is neither mythology nor early history;
serial instead, the genial Columbia College Professor has written a right-
S down jolly story of modern Norse boys an open-air tale of daunt-
less lads and their doughty deeds.







WIDE AWAKE PROSPECTUS.


BONY AND BAN, one of the best of the Mary Hartwell Catherwood
serials, is a story of the Middle West, where the author is most
erial delightfully at home. It is full of natural pathos and deep interest,
S of the sort that has made the author beloved by children.
SEALED ORDERS, by Charles Remington Talbot, is an amusing story
of "wet sheets and a flowing sea," jolly young officers, the most
Serial astounding adventures, wild surprises. WIDE AWAKE readers of
S his previous serials need not be reminded that in this sort of high
comedy Mr. Talbot is not surpassed.
CONFESSIONS OF AN AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHER. By
Alexander Black. Photography has been domesticated as a
universal art, and a lively interest in these half-dozen practical and
six humorous articles is insured at the start. They will be strikingly
camera and beautifully illustrated. They will give vividly the Sensations
Chapters. of the First Plunge," Trials and Triumphs in a Domestic Gallery,"
Adventures Out of Doors," Forbidden Fruit (detective cam-
era), Deeds in a Dark Room," etc.
TALES OF OLD ACADIE. This series will include a dozen powerful
Land stories by Grace Dean McLeod, a Canadian author, gathered up
of from old Canadian records and the remembrances of old French
Evangeline. and Indian families. (In C. Y. F. R. U. Readings.)

THE WILL AND THE WAY STORIES. By Jessie Benton Fremont.
Mrs. Fremont's contributions this year will not be articles," as
heretofore, but genuine "stories," about men and women of her
"L Where there's
a will acquaintance who resolved to do some great, or hard, or self-
there's a way sacrificing thing, and did it in the face of seeming impossibilities;
strong, ringing tales, every one. The first is about General Frd-
mont's old friend, romantic Kit Carson, the famous guide.
L. J. BRIDGMAN, whose Court Calendar" has been found irresistible by
Fu young and old alike the past year, promises to be no less amusing
in the future. Just what the fun will be is still a secret.
BUSINESS OPENINGS FOR GIRLS AND YOUNG WOMEN.
A dozen really helpful papers by Mrs. Sallie Joy White of the
$ $ $ Boston Herald, President of the New England Woman's Press
in Association. Mrs. White has made it in her way for years to see
Town what women were doing in business, how they did it, why they
or failed, why they succeeded; these kindly papers are the outcome
Country.
of this observation, sympathy and reflection. The first will be
"Cash Girls and Saleswomen." (In C. Y. F. R. U. Readings.)


ii








WIDE AWAKE PROSPECTUS.


LUCY PERVEAR. First of a series of most charming character sketches
by the author of Five Little Peppers. The background is the
Life sky country" of western North Carolina, where Margaret
at the Sidney has passed much time "getting the local color." The
South. sketches are full of fun and deep tenderness, and abound in de-

lightful descriptions of that picturesque region.

THE DAISY-PATTIE LETTERS, by Mrs. Ex-Governor Claflin, will
be continued. Teachers, schoolgirls and parents alike pause to
thoughtfully read them; rarely have articles upon Behavior com-
Behavior. manded such respectful attention; it has been said of some of the

letters that "they should be framed and hung in the halls of all
Schools for Girls."

TWELVE STORIES OF SCHOOL AND PLAYGROUND. Each
of these stories will be of particular interest and value to all
Postal-Card teachers and all pupils. The first tale will be "LAMBKIN;

Was He a Hero or a Prig?" by Howard Pyle the artist
LAMBKIN" is a Lady-and-Tiger kind of story, a live boys' story too. The author
himself is in doubt whether Lambkin was a Hero or a Prig. Every reader of WIDE AWAKE
Cash is invited to send in a postal-card vote also his or her reason. A $25.00 cash prize will be
Prizes. awarded the most "telling" argument on the Hero" side. A $25.00 cash prize will be
awarded the most telling argument on the Prig" side. Vote and reason limited to a
postal and not more than ioo words.

SHORT STORIES, after all, are of first interest with most magazine read-
ers, and the WIDE AWAKE supply, sifted from thousands the past
twelvemonth, is unusually original and readable. They include:
Of Christmas. SANTA CLAUS ON A VEGETABLE CART. Charlotte M. Vail.
Shows how the Good Saint contrived that everybody should bejolly in spiite of circumstances.
RIJANE. William Preston Otis.
A story of a hero in pinafores.
HOW TOM JUMPED A MINE. Mrs. H. F. Stickney.
A Boston boy's adventure in Colorado.
Of every-day. THE RUN OF SNOW-SHOE THOMPSON. Lieut. F. P. Fremont.
White muscle vs. cop6er-colored cunning.
POLLY'S VISIT TO THE BOOK-KITCHEN. Delia W. Lyman.
Some curious but convenient culinary arrangements.
CRAPS." James B. Cable.
A story of Nesu Orleans streets.
of adventure. LUCY'S ESCAPE. C. S. Messenger.
A story of New York streets.
CLEON. Mrs. Adeline A. Knight.
A story of the Imviortal Charge.
TRAILING ARBUTUS. Hezekiah Butterworth.
A story ofearly Plymoutdh.
of romance. APPLE-BLOSSOMS. Mrs. Bernard Whitman.
For Eastertide.
GOLDEN MARGARET. James C. Purdy.
A story of the Civil IUVar.
HOW MY LITTLE GRANDPAPA FOUND HIS GRANDMAMMA.
Frances A. Humphrey.
Of history. A story of 18,2 and the hgh seas.
PEGGY'S BULLET. Kate Upson Clark.
The war-romace of /a .!, /e'-reair-chi








WIDE AWAKE PROSPECTUS.


HOW SIMEON AND SANCHO PANZA HELPED THE REVO-
of war. LUTION. Miss Risley Seward.
A forefaticers' story.
THE LITTLE FIFER. Helen M. Winslow.
The boy who went to General Washhfigton's assistance.
POOR LADY URSULA. Lucia Beverly.
A story of Ciits Island and Old Kitery.
"ONE GOOD TURN." Harriet Prescott Spofford.
A thrilling war-story of both sides.

ILLUSTRATED ARTICLES, on a wide range of novel and important
subjects, will be given monthly, including some that could not
be completed for '89, among the latter, DOLLS OF NOTED
WOMEN," by Miss Risley Seward. We may also mention:

of sports. HOW TO BUILD A MILITARY SNOW-FORT. By an Old West-
Pointer.
To be followed by an article telling how to besiege it.
"THE BEAUTIFUL EMILY MARSHALL." F. A. Humphrey.
The famous belle of old Boston.
"TWENTY BUSHELS OF ROSES." Amanda B. Harris.
Of biography. One of Nature's fairy tales.
A NOBLE LIFE. Florence Howe Hall.
Knight of a better era,
Without reproach or fear,
Said I not that Bayards
And Sidneys still are here ?"
Of places. IWhittier.
HOW THE COSSACKS PLAY POLO. By Madame de Meissner.
The original warrior sport.
"WHAT'S IN A NAME?" W.J. Rhees.
IVit/h three portraits of a great man.
ALL AROUND A FRONTIER FORT. Lieut. F. P. Fremont.
Of army life. The reality of the popular romance.
THE HOME OF RAMONA. Charles F. Lummis.
IWith many illustrations from photographs.
HELEN'S TOWER. Harriet Schultz.
A beautiful and muique chapter in the young life of a statesman.
A QUILT EXPEDITION. Rev. Henry Cleveland Woods.
Of art. A homely housewife pa/er.
A RABBIT ROUND-UP. Joaquin Miller.
A 7t episode in Fresnofarm-life.
JAPANESE FIGHTING KITES. J. B. Bernadon, U. S. N.
How Yankee boys can make them.
CHILDREN'S PORTRAITS IN THE LOUVRE. E. F. H. Moore.
Of natural history. Withl beautiful pictures by famous painters.
CAPTURING A SEA COW. A. D. Hurd, M. D.
A natural history experiment.
A PARTY IN A CHINESE PALACE. E. R. Scidmore.
Visiting among the Mandarins.

MEN AND THINGS will continue to be rich in original anecdotes.
TANGLES will offer many novel knots for untying. THE
POST-OFFICE, at the service of bright children, will be full of
bright letters. The C. Y. F. R. U. department will do good
Chautauqua work. The Art features and Poems will be notable.

WIDE AWAKE is $2.40 a year. The new volume begins with December.

D. LOTHROP COMPANY, BOSTON.


iv




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs