• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Half Title
 Violetta
 The cat and the magic
 Caged
 The cat and the magpie
 The morning bath
 So perplexed
 Welcome to the swallows
 Jealousy
 Beg
 Innocence and rapture
 A lesson in outline drawing
 The deer family
 Tom's pockets
 Swing song
 Night-time
 Punch and Judy
 Happy Jo
 A sad, sad story
 Mamma reading the story book
 Dancing the polka
 Taking care of brother
 The rain-drops
 Merrie, merrie winter
 A country church in winter
 The old-time ships
 Queen Esther
 Puss
 The owl
 At the watering-trough
 Little Dora's first birthday
 A street Arab
 Left in charge
 Rolling out the pie crust
 Ned
 The hole in the sky
 The pine apple
 Mending the doll's clothes
 Miss Midget
 Playing horse
 Away with plate and spoon
 The bear family
 Puss and the pictures
 Catching a fly
 The floral alphabet
 Mamma's birthday
 The cows of the field
 The sandman
 The bonnet grandma wore
 Dickie and Dolly
 Fancies in the firelight
 Baby's first glimpse of the...
 A glorious team!
 Little drops of water
 In the sulks
 Little Dame Crump
 Flying the kite
 Baby brother
 Just like momma
 The wind-mill
 The seal
 Making friends
 The peacock
 Puff
 The story of five little pigs
 The students
 Just little kitties
 A drink of water
 The catbird
 Good morning
 Friend and foe
 A tiny writer
 The new sled
 The new brother
 The dead bird
 Faithful Bob
 Twinkle, twinkle
 Gathering woodland flowers
 Teasing the chickens
 Peek-a-book!
 Playing doll store
 The hour for stories
 The terrible trio
 Madge and the birdies
 John Gilpin's ride
 Playing chess
 Fishermen
 French children at a puppet...
 The story of the battle
 Admiring friends
 Sheridan's ride
 The Christmas dinner
 Where is our Christmas dinner?
 A Christmas dinner for the...
 Reading the Bible
 Golden hair
 Back Cover






Group Title: Sunbeams for the little ones at home : stories in picture, poetry, and prose, merrily mingles from sources old and new
Title: Sunbeams for the little ones at home
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00065489/00001
 Material Information
Title: Sunbeams for the little ones at home stories in picture, poetry, and prose, merrily mingles from sources old and new
Physical Description: 56 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: J.A. & R.A. Reid (Firm) ( Publisher )
Publisher: J.A. & R.A. Reid
Place of Publication: Providence RI
Publication Date: c1889
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1889   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1889   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1889   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1889
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Rhode Island -- Providence
 Notes
General Note: Frontispiece printed in red.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements on back cover.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00065489
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223574
notis - ALG3824
oclc - 70919596

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Page i
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Half Title
        Page 3
    Violetta
        Page 4
    The cat and the magic
        Page 4
    Caged
        Page 4
    The cat and the magpie
        Page 5
    The morning bath
        Page 6
    So perplexed
        Page 6
    Welcome to the swallows
        Page 6
    Jealousy
        Page 7
    Beg
        Page 7
    Innocence and rapture
        Page 8
    A lesson in outline drawing
        Page 8
    The deer family
        Page 9
    Tom's pockets
        Page 10
    Swing song
        Page 10
    Night-time
        Page 10
    Punch and Judy
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Happy Jo
        Page 13
    A sad, sad story
        Page 14
    Mamma reading the story book
        Page 14
    Dancing the polka
        Page 14
    Taking care of brother
        Page 15
    The rain-drops
        Page 16
    Merrie, merrie winter
        Page 17
    A country church in winter
        Page 18
    The old-time ships
        Page 18
    Queen Esther
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Puss
        Page 20
    The owl
        Page 20
    At the watering-trough
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Little Dora's first birthday
        Page 23
    A street Arab
        Page 23
    Left in charge
        Page 23
    Rolling out the pie crust
        Page 24
    Ned
        Page 24
    The hole in the sky
        Page 24
    The pine apple
        Page 25
    Mending the doll's clothes
        Page 25
    Miss Midget
        Page 25
    Playing horse
        Page 25
    Away with plate and spoon
        Page 26
    The bear family
        Page 26
    Puss and the pictures
        Page 26
    Catching a fly
        Page 26
        Page 27
    The floral alphabet
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Mamma's birthday
        Page 30
    The cows of the field
        Page 30
    The sandman
        Page 31
    The bonnet grandma wore
        Page 32
    Dickie and Dolly
        Page 32
    Fancies in the firelight
        Page 32
    Baby's first glimpse of the world
        Page 33
    A glorious team!
        Page 33
    Little drops of water
        Page 33
    In the sulks
        Page 33
    Little Dame Crump
        Page 34
    Flying the kite
        Page 35
    Baby brother
        Page 35
    Just like momma
        Page 35
    The wind-mill
        Page 36
    The seal
        Page 36
    Making friends
        Page 36
    The peacock
        Page 36
    Puff
        Page 37
    The story of five little pigs
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    The students
        Page 41
    Just little kitties
        Page 41
    A drink of water
        Page 41
    The catbird
        Page 42
    Good morning
        Page 42
    Friend and foe
        Page 42
    A tiny writer
        Page 42
    The new sled
        Page 43
    The new brother
        Page 43
    The dead bird
        Page 44
    Faithful Bob
        Page 44
    Twinkle, twinkle
        Page 44
    Gathering woodland flowers
        Page 44
    Teasing the chickens
        Page 45
    Peek-a-book!
        Page 45
    Playing doll store
        Page 45
    The hour for stories
        Page 46
    The terrible trio
        Page 46
    Madge and the birdies
        Page 46
    John Gilpin's ride
        Page 47
        Page 48
    Playing chess
        Page 49
    Fishermen
        Page 50
    French children at a puppet show
        Page 51
    The story of the battle
        Page 52
    Admiring friends
        Page 52
    Sheridan's ride
        Page 52
        Page 53
    The Christmas dinner
        Page 54
    Where is our Christmas dinner?
        Page 55
    A Christmas dinner for the birds
        Page 55
    Reading the Bible
        Page 56
    Golden hair
        Page 56
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text
IdI
... ./..4


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lpI.
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OUR DARLING GIRL.






SUNBEAMS
FOR THE

LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


STORIES


1 PIGTURE POETRYf AA PROE


FROM


SOURCES


OLD AND


NEW.


PROVIDENCE, R. I.: *:* J. A. & R. A. REID. *:* PUBLISHERS.


THE REID JUVENILE PRESS.


































" FAR away, and yet so near us, lies a land where all have been,

Played beside its sparkling waters, danced along its meadows green.

Where the busy world we dwell in and its noises only seem

Like the echo of a tempest or the shadow of a dream;

And it grows not old forever; sweet and young it is to-day,

'Tis the land of little people, where the happy children play."


IF.


\4" BB


COPYRIGHT, BY J. A. & R. A. REID.
1889.


a




SUNBEAMS.
n I ,








aw


NEST OF THE NIGHTINGALE.





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.

bright eyes and large mouth, little suspecting that Master Thorn/is.
whom she had never liked, w as thinking what a savory breakfast
she would make a trifle gamey it is true, yet still delicious. You
might think his conscience would trouble him for wanting to eat her,
but, in his case atleast, the old proverb wastrue, which says: "An
Empty stomach knows no conscience."
You may see Thomas creeping along in the first picture.
Soon he gave a great, glad spring, thinking to hold her in his paws,
as you may see in the second picture, when off went Miss Magpie,
and something very sad and very unexpected happened to Thomas.
You may see what it was by looking at the third picture. You ~ ill
doubtless all agree that Thomas was served rightly. Just see how
mean he feels with his nice sleek fur looking very badly, and all.his
hopes of a delicious bird-breakfast ruined. Also notice how mock-
ingly Miss Margaret turns about to laugh at him.
It will be some time before Master Thomas tries to catch a mag-
pie again, and he'll be pretty sure that all his game is on dry land,
before he jumps, hereafter.

Jg ae d.
AUNTIE, did you see any real lions in the Tower of London ?"
asked Willie. "It was an awful place in the days of the old Kings
and Queens," replied his aunt. "Could the Tower of London speak,
S it could tell many tales of cruelty. As to lions, I am quite sure they
used to be kept in the Tower as objects of curiosity. I remember an
r .." old story of one which showed remarkable fondness.for a compan-
..;ion, which must have been a rebuke to the cruel-hearted keepers of
the prison.
"A black spaniel was thrown into a cage with a fierce lion.
Trembling, the little animal threw itself on its back. The huge
beast gently turned it over with its paw, and would not touch the food
his keeper brought, until the dog ventured to eat. From that time
they were friends.
"In a year the spaniel died. For sometime the lion acted as'if
he thought him asleep, and tried to waken him. When he found he
could not, he shook his cage in agony. He refused to eat, and would
not let the keeper remove the body of the spaniel.
ig"The story goes that he continued in great grief until one morn-
ing he was found dead beside his little friend."


--- '- : --1 -


Siolctta.
U.C


VIOLETTA was a street minstrel. Day after day she was com-
pelled to sing ballads along the streets and under the windows of the
elegant houses of the great city. Tired and hungry, she crept away
at night to all the home she had in a dingy attic. After awhile the
richness of her voice was recognized and she was made part of an
opera chorus. But even here Violetta did not have an easy time.
Very sad is the story of many a poor Italian girl's life. From
their homes in sunny Italy, they used to be sold by their parents for
large sums of money, to be taken far away to other countries to
become slave minstrels. But good men and women thought about
how wrong this was, and now many Violettas with their black eyes and
rich voices are being taught in schools, and have better and happier
homes.


ahe at and the Nagpie.
MASTER THOMAS, the Cat, has been out all night singing his
best at the top of his voice Such efforts has he made that he is
now very hungry indeed. He was just thinking, as he came by the
kitchen door and through the hollyhocks, that he must have at least
a morsel to eat, or starve. As he looked at his glossy gray and
brown coat he was very proud, and felt that starving was out of the
question. Suddenly, as he had passed the last large plant, he saw
on the edge of the tub under the spout of the pump, Miss Margaret
Magpie. His green eyes glistened at the sight, and he crouched --- -..-
low and crawled softly towards her. Miss Margaret, who was -....--.
l o mw han d c r a w l e so f th e r l oo k ,w ar s h e r .n d i s s M a r g a r etd g wof t h e t u b ........... "-d ........................ ... I. ... ................. ... .............. ........... .. .. .............."?'Ji .. .. .
somewhat vain of her looks, was standing on the edge of the tub, 7 1
using the smooth water as a mirror in which she could admire her CAGED.





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.

bright eyes and large mouth, little suspecting that Master Thorn/is.
whom she had never liked, w as thinking what a savory breakfast
she would make a trifle gamey it is true, yet still delicious. You
might think his conscience would trouble him for wanting to eat her,
but, in his case atleast, the old proverb wastrue, which says: "An
Empty stomach knows no conscience."
You may see Thomas creeping along in the first picture.
Soon he gave a great, glad spring, thinking to hold her in his paws,
as you may see in the second picture, when off went Miss Magpie,
and something very sad and very unexpected happened to Thomas.
You may see what it was by looking at the third picture. You ~ ill
doubtless all agree that Thomas was served rightly. Just see how
mean he feels with his nice sleek fur looking very badly, and all.his
hopes of a delicious bird-breakfast ruined. Also notice how mock-
ingly Miss Margaret turns about to laugh at him.
It will be some time before Master Thomas tries to catch a mag-
pie again, and he'll be pretty sure that all his game is on dry land,
before he jumps, hereafter.

Jg ae d.
AUNTIE, did you see any real lions in the Tower of London ?"
asked Willie. "It was an awful place in the days of the old Kings
and Queens," replied his aunt. "Could the Tower of London speak,
S it could tell many tales of cruelty. As to lions, I am quite sure they
used to be kept in the Tower as objects of curiosity. I remember an
r .." old story of one which showed remarkable fondness.for a compan-
..;ion, which must have been a rebuke to the cruel-hearted keepers of
the prison.
"A black spaniel was thrown into a cage with a fierce lion.
Trembling, the little animal threw itself on its back. The huge
beast gently turned it over with its paw, and would not touch the food
his keeper brought, until the dog ventured to eat. From that time
they were friends.
"In a year the spaniel died. For sometime the lion acted as'if
he thought him asleep, and tried to waken him. When he found he
could not, he shook his cage in agony. He refused to eat, and would
not let the keeper remove the body of the spaniel.
ig"The story goes that he continued in great grief until one morn-
ing he was found dead beside his little friend."


--- '- : --1 -


Siolctta.
U.C


VIOLETTA was a street minstrel. Day after day she was com-
pelled to sing ballads along the streets and under the windows of the
elegant houses of the great city. Tired and hungry, she crept away
at night to all the home she had in a dingy attic. After awhile the
richness of her voice was recognized and she was made part of an
opera chorus. But even here Violetta did not have an easy time.
Very sad is the story of many a poor Italian girl's life. From
their homes in sunny Italy, they used to be sold by their parents for
large sums of money, to be taken far away to other countries to
become slave minstrels. But good men and women thought about
how wrong this was, and now many Violettas with their black eyes and
rich voices are being taught in schools, and have better and happier
homes.


ahe at and the Nagpie.
MASTER THOMAS, the Cat, has been out all night singing his
best at the top of his voice Such efforts has he made that he is
now very hungry indeed. He was just thinking, as he came by the
kitchen door and through the hollyhocks, that he must have at least
a morsel to eat, or starve. As he looked at his glossy gray and
brown coat he was very proud, and felt that starving was out of the
question. Suddenly, as he had passed the last large plant, he saw
on the edge of the tub under the spout of the pump, Miss Margaret
Magpie. His green eyes glistened at the sight, and he crouched --- -..-
low and crawled softly towards her. Miss Margaret, who was -....--.
l o mw han d c r a w l e so f th e r l oo k ,w ar s h e r .n d i s s M a r g a r etd g wof t h e t u b ........... "-d ........................ ... I. ... ................. ... .............. ........... .. .. .............."?'Ji .. .. .
somewhat vain of her looks, was standing on the edge of the tub, 7 1
using the smooth water as a mirror in which she could admire her CAGED.





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.

bright eyes and large mouth, little suspecting that Master Thorn/is.
whom she had never liked, w as thinking what a savory breakfast
she would make a trifle gamey it is true, yet still delicious. You
might think his conscience would trouble him for wanting to eat her,
but, in his case atleast, the old proverb wastrue, which says: "An
Empty stomach knows no conscience."
You may see Thomas creeping along in the first picture.
Soon he gave a great, glad spring, thinking to hold her in his paws,
as you may see in the second picture, when off went Miss Magpie,
and something very sad and very unexpected happened to Thomas.
You may see what it was by looking at the third picture. You ~ ill
doubtless all agree that Thomas was served rightly. Just see how
mean he feels with his nice sleek fur looking very badly, and all.his
hopes of a delicious bird-breakfast ruined. Also notice how mock-
ingly Miss Margaret turns about to laugh at him.
It will be some time before Master Thomas tries to catch a mag-
pie again, and he'll be pretty sure that all his game is on dry land,
before he jumps, hereafter.

Jg ae d.
AUNTIE, did you see any real lions in the Tower of London ?"
asked Willie. "It was an awful place in the days of the old Kings
and Queens," replied his aunt. "Could the Tower of London speak,
S it could tell many tales of cruelty. As to lions, I am quite sure they
used to be kept in the Tower as objects of curiosity. I remember an
r .." old story of one which showed remarkable fondness.for a compan-
..;ion, which must have been a rebuke to the cruel-hearted keepers of
the prison.
"A black spaniel was thrown into a cage with a fierce lion.
Trembling, the little animal threw itself on its back. The huge
beast gently turned it over with its paw, and would not touch the food
his keeper brought, until the dog ventured to eat. From that time
they were friends.
"In a year the spaniel died. For sometime the lion acted as'if
he thought him asleep, and tried to waken him. When he found he
could not, he shook his cage in agony. He refused to eat, and would
not let the keeper remove the body of the spaniel.
ig"The story goes that he continued in great grief until one morn-
ing he was found dead beside his little friend."


--- '- : --1 -


Siolctta.
U.C


VIOLETTA was a street minstrel. Day after day she was com-
pelled to sing ballads along the streets and under the windows of the
elegant houses of the great city. Tired and hungry, she crept away
at night to all the home she had in a dingy attic. After awhile the
richness of her voice was recognized and she was made part of an
opera chorus. But even here Violetta did not have an easy time.
Very sad is the story of many a poor Italian girl's life. From
their homes in sunny Italy, they used to be sold by their parents for
large sums of money, to be taken far away to other countries to
become slave minstrels. But good men and women thought about
how wrong this was, and now many Violettas with their black eyes and
rich voices are being taught in schools, and have better and happier
homes.


ahe at and the Nagpie.
MASTER THOMAS, the Cat, has been out all night singing his
best at the top of his voice Such efforts has he made that he is
now very hungry indeed. He was just thinking, as he came by the
kitchen door and through the hollyhocks, that he must have at least
a morsel to eat, or starve. As he looked at his glossy gray and
brown coat he was very proud, and felt that starving was out of the
question. Suddenly, as he had passed the last large plant, he saw
on the edge of the tub under the spout of the pump, Miss Margaret
Magpie. His green eyes glistened at the sight, and he crouched --- -..-
low and crawled softly towards her. Miss Margaret, who was -....--.
l o mw han d c r a w l e so f th e r l oo k ,w ar s h e r .n d i s s M a r g a r etd g wof t h e t u b ........... "-d ........................ ... I. ... ................. ... .............. ........... .. .. .............."?'Ji .. .. .
somewhat vain of her looks, was standing on the edge of the tub, 7 1
using the smooth water as a mirror in which she could admire her CAGED.





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.

__________________ '_________~~~ -____________ I_ I___


THE CAT AND THE MAGPIE.- MAKING READY.


THE CAT AND THE MAGPIE.-THE SPRING.


THE CAT AND THE MAGPIE.- THE DUCKING.




SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


@o Perplexed.

I wish I knew what it should be-
Which plaything I should take with me -
t J/ My horse? Or else my bouncing ball?
I like my new hoop best of all. -
No, on my tricycle I'll ride,
Or dig my garden bed more wide.
Stay, should I pretty bubbles blow?
\ o Or else to play with Frank I'll go,
\ Or to cousin Charlie run,
He's sure to like a bit of fun !
At least I think that he could say
What toys I should bring out to-day.
But then, the last time that he came
We wanted both to use the same.
S I wish I knew what it should be -
L VWhich plaything I should take with me!





You LITTLE ROGUE, DON'T S UEEZE So TIGHT.


The Morning A ath.


One little kiss, now just one more,
Oh dear, I love you so.
How much, my dearest, best mama,
I'm sure you cannot know."

You little rogue, don't squeeze so tight !
You kiss so hard and hold so fast,
You're hugging me with all your might,
Now surely that will do at last."

Now quick! Are you ready?
A moment be steady!
Away from this splashing your clothes let .
me take.
Your fishes and boat
Are ready to float
Long, long have they waited for you to So PERPLEXED.
awake.
Welcome to the S x'alloW,.

SWhen the winter is over how gladly we welcome
The swallows again from their home o'er the sea,
/ How they twit in the eaves at the rise of the red sun
S___ And at eventide flit over meadow and lea.

Oh swallows, your old nests no longer will hold you,
--- 3 They've been spoilt by the cold winter snow and the rain.
The sparrows stayed with us, so surely they've told you.
___ You'll have to rebuild your old houses again.

S. Dear swallow, you that were with us last year,
Say where are your mate and your little ones four?
you tried, and have not won, We hoped you would bring them again when you came here
Never stop for crying; And build a fine nest for them over our door.
All that's great and good is done
We children have waited long days when 'twas snowing,
Just by patient trying. And talked of your homes on a warm distant shore;
Now the summer is here, the roses are blowing,
And the dear happy swallows are with us once more.


I




SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


@o Perplexed.

I wish I knew what it should be-
Which plaything I should take with me -
t J/ My horse? Or else my bouncing ball?
I like my new hoop best of all. -
No, on my tricycle I'll ride,
Or dig my garden bed more wide.
Stay, should I pretty bubbles blow?
\ o Or else to play with Frank I'll go,
\ Or to cousin Charlie run,
He's sure to like a bit of fun !
At least I think that he could say
What toys I should bring out to-day.
But then, the last time that he came
We wanted both to use the same.
S I wish I knew what it should be -
L VWhich plaything I should take with me!





You LITTLE ROGUE, DON'T S UEEZE So TIGHT.


The Morning A ath.


One little kiss, now just one more,
Oh dear, I love you so.
How much, my dearest, best mama,
I'm sure you cannot know."

You little rogue, don't squeeze so tight !
You kiss so hard and hold so fast,
You're hugging me with all your might,
Now surely that will do at last."

Now quick! Are you ready?
A moment be steady!
Away from this splashing your clothes let .
me take.
Your fishes and boat
Are ready to float
Long, long have they waited for you to So PERPLEXED.
awake.
Welcome to the S x'alloW,.

SWhen the winter is over how gladly we welcome
The swallows again from their home o'er the sea,
/ How they twit in the eaves at the rise of the red sun
S___ And at eventide flit over meadow and lea.

Oh swallows, your old nests no longer will hold you,
--- 3 They've been spoilt by the cold winter snow and the rain.
The sparrows stayed with us, so surely they've told you.
___ You'll have to rebuild your old houses again.

S. Dear swallow, you that were with us last year,
Say where are your mate and your little ones four?
you tried, and have not won, We hoped you would bring them again when you came here
Never stop for crying; And build a fine nest for them over our door.
All that's great and good is done
We children have waited long days when 'twas snowing,
Just by patient trying. And talked of your homes on a warm distant shore;
Now the summer is here, the roses are blowing,
And the dear happy swallows are with us once more.


I




SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


@o Perplexed.

I wish I knew what it should be-
Which plaything I should take with me -
t J/ My horse? Or else my bouncing ball?
I like my new hoop best of all. -
No, on my tricycle I'll ride,
Or dig my garden bed more wide.
Stay, should I pretty bubbles blow?
\ o Or else to play with Frank I'll go,
\ Or to cousin Charlie run,
He's sure to like a bit of fun !
At least I think that he could say
What toys I should bring out to-day.
But then, the last time that he came
We wanted both to use the same.
S I wish I knew what it should be -
L VWhich plaything I should take with me!





You LITTLE ROGUE, DON'T S UEEZE So TIGHT.


The Morning A ath.


One little kiss, now just one more,
Oh dear, I love you so.
How much, my dearest, best mama,
I'm sure you cannot know."

You little rogue, don't squeeze so tight !
You kiss so hard and hold so fast,
You're hugging me with all your might,
Now surely that will do at last."

Now quick! Are you ready?
A moment be steady!
Away from this splashing your clothes let .
me take.
Your fishes and boat
Are ready to float
Long, long have they waited for you to So PERPLEXED.
awake.
Welcome to the S x'alloW,.

SWhen the winter is over how gladly we welcome
The swallows again from their home o'er the sea,
/ How they twit in the eaves at the rise of the red sun
S___ And at eventide flit over meadow and lea.

Oh swallows, your old nests no longer will hold you,
--- 3 They've been spoilt by the cold winter snow and the rain.
The sparrows stayed with us, so surely they've told you.
___ You'll have to rebuild your old houses again.

S. Dear swallow, you that were with us last year,
Say where are your mate and your little ones four?
you tried, and have not won, We hoped you would bring them again when you came here
Never stop for crying; And build a fine nest for them over our door.
All that's great and good is done
We children have waited long days when 'twas snowing,
Just by patient trying. And talked of your homes on a warm distant shore;
Now the summer is here, the roses are blowing,
And the dear happy swallows are with us once more.


I






SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.




THERE was once a lovely lady who lived in a beautiful house in
G S Philadelphia, and she had a pug dog which looked very much like the
one in this picture. The dog's name was Fidget -Miss Fidget, she
was sometimes called. Fidget loved her mistress even better than
she did the dainty morsels she got from the table. She was very
fond of chocolate creams, sweet biscuit, preserved ginger, and salted
_almonds. Indeed she ate so often and so much that she began to
look like a big chestnut worm. Sometimes when Fidget had eaten
nearly as much as she ought, her mistress would say while holding
up the sweet-meat: Stand on her hind legs! Walk a-down Chest-
nut Street like a little lady Put out the little red tongue for her
aunty ?" And at once Fidget would stand up, walk along, and thrust
out the pink tongue in a very droll way. All the children loved her,
she was so patient and so willing to be pulled about or caressed.
In this picture the temptation is very strong, and soon the head
will be raised still higher and one paw lifted. These two friends
must have a happy time among the flowers and grass.




















DOGS are very much like men and women, or boys and
girls, in their love of notice and wish for caressing atten-
tion. If one gets more than another the other is jealous
and unhappy. It is a very unpleasant thing to see girls
and boys jealous of each other. They should try to un-
derstand that one is loved for one thing and another for
some other thing, and to make themselves content with
what attention is shown them.
The dogs in the picture are very jealous. See how
beseechingly the big fellow with long ears looks into his
mistress' face, as much as to say, "Don't you understand
that I love you best? Then why do you bestow caresses
on these other creatures?" The gentle greyhound contents
himself by licking her hand and rubbing his cheeks
against it. He loves her, too, and it hurts him to have
his mistress take into her lap the snarling little dog
Neither the greyhound nor the big dog seem to under-
stand that they are much too large and heavy to be taken
into anybody's lap. You see that the ill-natured dog is
really quite vain of being the favored one, but really the
lady loves the others better. Don't you see how affec-
tionately she puts her hand on the big dog's head, and
how she pays no attention to the snarling dog in her lap?
He is only in her lap because he jumped there and is
small enough to stay.
We should all guard ourselves as carefully as possi-
ble against jealousy, and remember that those who some-
times seem most favored are only so because they are so
very small, not because they are worthy of being favored.


BEG.






SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.




THERE was once a lovely lady who lived in a beautiful house in
G S Philadelphia, and she had a pug dog which looked very much like the
one in this picture. The dog's name was Fidget -Miss Fidget, she
was sometimes called. Fidget loved her mistress even better than
she did the dainty morsels she got from the table. She was very
fond of chocolate creams, sweet biscuit, preserved ginger, and salted
_almonds. Indeed she ate so often and so much that she began to
look like a big chestnut worm. Sometimes when Fidget had eaten
nearly as much as she ought, her mistress would say while holding
up the sweet-meat: Stand on her hind legs! Walk a-down Chest-
nut Street like a little lady Put out the little red tongue for her
aunty ?" And at once Fidget would stand up, walk along, and thrust
out the pink tongue in a very droll way. All the children loved her,
she was so patient and so willing to be pulled about or caressed.
In this picture the temptation is very strong, and soon the head
will be raised still higher and one paw lifted. These two friends
must have a happy time among the flowers and grass.




















DOGS are very much like men and women, or boys and
girls, in their love of notice and wish for caressing atten-
tion. If one gets more than another the other is jealous
and unhappy. It is a very unpleasant thing to see girls
and boys jealous of each other. They should try to un-
derstand that one is loved for one thing and another for
some other thing, and to make themselves content with
what attention is shown them.
The dogs in the picture are very jealous. See how
beseechingly the big fellow with long ears looks into his
mistress' face, as much as to say, "Don't you understand
that I love you best? Then why do you bestow caresses
on these other creatures?" The gentle greyhound contents
himself by licking her hand and rubbing his cheeks
against it. He loves her, too, and it hurts him to have
his mistress take into her lap the snarling little dog
Neither the greyhound nor the big dog seem to under-
stand that they are much too large and heavy to be taken
into anybody's lap. You see that the ill-natured dog is
really quite vain of being the favored one, but really the
lady loves the others better. Don't you see how affec-
tionately she puts her hand on the big dog's head, and
how she pays no attention to the snarling dog in her lap?
He is only in her lap because he jumped there and is
small enough to stay.
We should all guard ourselves as carefully as possi-
ble against jealousy, and remember that those who some-
times seem most favored are only so because they are so
very small, not because they are worthy of being favored.


BEG.






SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


innocence and capture.


HERE are three little puppies. They are so little they can scarce-
ly open their eyes, and they have to lap milk with their small tongues
instead of gnawing bones like big dogs. They are white, with brown
ears and black noses. Little Jane, who has made a bed of straw for
them in the wood-shed holds one gently in her arms, while Kate and
Willie look on and think it a most beautiful sight.
There is the battered old tin pan from which they ate their
breakfast. They do not care for the pan now any more than you
care for the bowl which held your bread and milk after it is eaten.
It will not be long before little Towser, and little Jack, and small
Rover for those are the names of these puppies are big enough to
trample down mamma's pet plants in the flower beds and romp with


the children on the lawn or among the daisies in the fields. They,
will be large enough by that time to wear collars and look proud of
them. Little Willie, (and Kate of course), will be very good to them
all because he wants them to love him; and no dog loves children,
that plague him.
What a pretty picture this is Just think how it would look if
colored. There would be the white and brown puppies, and the
bright yellow straw, beside Jane's blue dress and rosy face. Then
her brown hair, the gray of the tin-pan, and Kate's and Willie's flaxen
heads, all against the old wood-shed door. You would all like to see
it colored so, would you not?


3 fieson in outline Prawing.


WHAT great fun these jolly ducklings are having with Mamma
Duck and Papa.Drake, splashing in the water among the tall grass
and arrow-weed. They made such a noise with their constant quack-
quack that Master Frog climbed to the top of the stone among the lily-
pads to see what could be the matter. He thought them a silly flock
of downy things. But it is certain that Mamma Duck and Papa
Drake thought them quite the loveliest creatures in the whole world.
It is easy to see that the big swans, too, think them a foolish lot of
young things.
See how proudly the swans sail by, making the little waves


dance in the sun and the lily-pads rock on them as boats do on the
waves of the sea? What are the ducklings eating? If they -are
having fun there is no reason you should not by taking your pencil
and trying to draw the shape of them on paper or slate. You will.
have to look sharply and notice just how the swans' necks curve and
how the wings of the ducks spread. By and by, when you have
learned to copy them from this picture, you may go to the ponds
where ducks and swans swim, and there, perhaps, you can draw
a picture from life even prettier than this.






SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


innocence and capture.


HERE are three little puppies. They are so little they can scarce-
ly open their eyes, and they have to lap milk with their small tongues
instead of gnawing bones like big dogs. They are white, with brown
ears and black noses. Little Jane, who has made a bed of straw for
them in the wood-shed holds one gently in her arms, while Kate and
Willie look on and think it a most beautiful sight.
There is the battered old tin pan from which they ate their
breakfast. They do not care for the pan now any more than you
care for the bowl which held your bread and milk after it is eaten.
It will not be long before little Towser, and little Jack, and small
Rover for those are the names of these puppies are big enough to
trample down mamma's pet plants in the flower beds and romp with


the children on the lawn or among the daisies in the fields. They,
will be large enough by that time to wear collars and look proud of
them. Little Willie, (and Kate of course), will be very good to them
all because he wants them to love him; and no dog loves children,
that plague him.
What a pretty picture this is Just think how it would look if
colored. There would be the white and brown puppies, and the
bright yellow straw, beside Jane's blue dress and rosy face. Then
her brown hair, the gray of the tin-pan, and Kate's and Willie's flaxen
heads, all against the old wood-shed door. You would all like to see
it colored so, would you not?


3 fieson in outline Prawing.


WHAT great fun these jolly ducklings are having with Mamma
Duck and Papa.Drake, splashing in the water among the tall grass
and arrow-weed. They made such a noise with their constant quack-
quack that Master Frog climbed to the top of the stone among the lily-
pads to see what could be the matter. He thought them a silly flock
of downy things. But it is certain that Mamma Duck and Papa
Drake thought them quite the loveliest creatures in the whole world.
It is easy to see that the big swans, too, think them a foolish lot of
young things.
See how proudly the swans sail by, making the little waves


dance in the sun and the lily-pads rock on them as boats do on the
waves of the sea? What are the ducklings eating? If they -are
having fun there is no reason you should not by taking your pencil
and trying to draw the shape of them on paper or slate. You will.
have to look sharply and notice just how the swans' necks curve and
how the wings of the ducks spread. By and by, when you have
learned to copy them from this picture, you may go to the ponds
where ducks and swans swim, and there, perhaps, you can draw
a picture from life even prettier than this.





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOMEi


i he 4 cecr 4 amil .

Come, little children, and read about the Deer,
Family. When we go to the parks in the large cities,
and see the gentle creatures within their wire yards, we
admire them, and pity them, too, because they are kept
in such small places; for we know deer love to roam
through the forests and dells, as free as the winds.
There are many kinds of deer. Among them is
the Musk Deer, which is found in the East Indies,
a country which is a great distance from our home.
The Musk Deer is brown and white, and has very soft


York, and Chicago, and of Boston and Philadelphia, and
other cities, like to see the fawns at the parks. How
many of you children have seen them, and fed them
at your own city parks?
Another kind of deer, which is domesticated is the
Reindeer, and it is a very useful animal. In Lapland,
and in some other cold countries he is used to draw
burdens, as well as people, on sleds, over ice and snow,
and can travel with great speed. The sight and sense
of smell of the Reindeer is wonderful. The master
trusts to the Reindeer in traveling in the stormiest nights
of the Arctic winter, and accidents seldom happen.
During life, this useful animal supplies its master with


THE DEER FAMILY.


and fine -fur, and it also has a little bag of musk under
its body. A single grain of musk will perfume a
whole room for many days. Because of this musk,
&'e deer is called the Musk Deer.
The Red Deer, or Stag, such as seen in our pic-
ture, is common in America and in Europe. They are
. mild, tranquil, and innocent animals. These deer have
light and elegant forms. The male Red Deer is called a
stag. He sheds his horns, or antlers, once every year.
The mother deer is called a hind. The little deer are
called fawns. No, wonder that the children of New


labor and with milk, and when dead, the skin is made
into clothing and boots, the horns are made into uten-
sils, the sinews into thread, and the flesh is used for
food, and other parts of the body also become useful.
There are many other kind of deer, such as the
Roe-Buck, Fallow Deer, Axis, Elk of Europe, and Moose
of America. All kinds of deer are swift, and nearly all
kinds are considered game, and are hunted by sports-
men. In many countries it is necessary to use the deer
as food, but with us they are nearly always pets, and
we would not have any harm happen to them.


....... i


^ ^ ', \





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


P&6 Pocket&.




WHAT were pockets made for?
Which of you can tell?
Some are much mistaken;
Others know it well.

I was told a youngster,
When I first was breeched,
They were made for half dimes,
And for gifts were stitched.

When my friends first tipped me,
I began to think
Every one I met would
Offer me the chink.


WHAT is that hanging from the tree
And swaying gently to and fro?
'Tis our new swing, do come and see
How very, very high we go.


6"TOM."


Going on my journey,
I soon lived to learn,
Kicks as well as money
Made my pockets burn.

Pockets made for money I
Ah, yes, long ago;
They're now full of bruises,
If you want to know.

When folks try to grieve me,
I have got the sense
Not to let them see, but
Pocket the offense.


Backwards and forwards goes the swing,
Down to the ground, up to the sky:
We follow the butterflies on the wing,
There back to nurse from our upward flight.


Off flies Ellen's shoe; Sylvia, hold fast:
Right merrily they enjoy the fun.
But babies even, get tired at last.
Two kisses for toll and the journey is done.







gight lime.


EACH little bird is in his nest;
All the children are in bed;
The sun sinks slowly in the West,
A ball of fire it seems so red.


The little children softly sleep;
The long dark night creeps slowly past
While twinkling stars their watches keep,
Until the day returns at last.


The still, dark night has passed away,
The stars have vanished one by one,
The children wake all bright and gay,
And welcome back the gladdening sun.


wing- ong.





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


P&6 Pocket&.




WHAT were pockets made for?
Which of you can tell?
Some are much mistaken;
Others know it well.

I was told a youngster,
When I first was breeched,
They were made for half dimes,
And for gifts were stitched.

When my friends first tipped me,
I began to think
Every one I met would
Offer me the chink.


WHAT is that hanging from the tree
And swaying gently to and fro?
'Tis our new swing, do come and see
How very, very high we go.


6"TOM."


Going on my journey,
I soon lived to learn,
Kicks as well as money
Made my pockets burn.

Pockets made for money I
Ah, yes, long ago;
They're now full of bruises,
If you want to know.

When folks try to grieve me,
I have got the sense
Not to let them see, but
Pocket the offense.


Backwards and forwards goes the swing,
Down to the ground, up to the sky:
We follow the butterflies on the wing,
There back to nurse from our upward flight.


Off flies Ellen's shoe; Sylvia, hold fast:
Right merrily they enjoy the fun.
But babies even, get tired at last.
Two kisses for toll and the journey is done.







gight lime.


EACH little bird is in his nest;
All the children are in bed;
The sun sinks slowly in the West,
A ball of fire it seems so red.


The little children softly sleep;
The long dark night creeps slowly past
While twinkling stars their watches keep,
Until the day returns at last.


The still, dark night has passed away,
The stars have vanished one by one,
The children wake all bright and gay,
And welcome back the gladdening sun.


wing- ong.





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


P&6 Pocket&.




WHAT were pockets made for?
Which of you can tell?
Some are much mistaken;
Others know it well.

I was told a youngster,
When I first was breeched,
They were made for half dimes,
And for gifts were stitched.

When my friends first tipped me,
I began to think
Every one I met would
Offer me the chink.


WHAT is that hanging from the tree
And swaying gently to and fro?
'Tis our new swing, do come and see
How very, very high we go.


6"TOM."


Going on my journey,
I soon lived to learn,
Kicks as well as money
Made my pockets burn.

Pockets made for money I
Ah, yes, long ago;
They're now full of bruises,
If you want to know.

When folks try to grieve me,
I have got the sense
Not to let them see, but
Pocket the offense.


Backwards and forwards goes the swing,
Down to the ground, up to the sky:
We follow the butterflies on the wing,
There back to nurse from our upward flight.


Off flies Ellen's shoe; Sylvia, hold fast:
Right merrily they enjoy the fun.
But babies even, get tired at last.
Two kisses for toll and the journey is done.







gight lime.


EACH little bird is in his nest;
All the children are in bed;
The sun sinks slowly in the West,
A ball of fire it seems so red.


The little children softly sleep;
The long dark night creeps slowly past
While twinkling stars their watches keep,
Until the day returns at last.


The still, dark night has passed away,
The stars have vanished one by one,
The children wake all bright and gay,
And welcome back the gladdening sun.


wing- ong.






SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


- 4 unch and ud .

IN spite of what many people say, Punch and Judy lived a happy and
peaceable life. They had only one child, a baby six months old. I ought
perhaps to say that considerable doubt exists as to the precise age of the
baby. But both Mr. and
Mrs. Punch say it is six
: i -) months old, and have said
so for many years. And
'-' "j /j, |'!i they surely ought to know.
Mr. Punch worshiped
S .'4 the Baby, for he declared
S( that in its little face he
:: 'i', \ 1'...- could plainly trace the
\ -< features of his darling
_/ Judy; while Judy said
ANDu.'W A.tD that Baby's nose was the

PUNCH AND JUDY AND BABY PUNCH. very picture of its father's.
Though blessed with such
a nose, Baby had never been blessed with a name. Baby it always was ;
and from all that I can hear, "Baby" it always will be.
Sometimes, it must be admitted, in circumstances over which he had
no control, Mr. Punch had flung the little darling out of the window; had
knocked Judy on the head when she remonstrated; and had killed the Doc-
tor when he called to see what he could do for mother and child.
On these occasions a Constable had made his appearance, armed with a
warrant to arrest Mr. Punch. The law, however, did not appear to have
any terrors for Mr. Punch, for as soon as the Constable told him he had a
warrant to take him up, Mr. Punch replied that he had a warrant to take
him down. And without more ado, he knocked the Constable down, and
laid him motionless by the side of poor Judy.
However, these exciting scenes did not last very long, and, as nobody
bore malice, they did not much matter; and all parties lived very con-
tentedly together, all under one roof: Mr. and Mrs. Punch in one semi-
detached box, with the Baby, of course; and the Constable, the Doctor, Mr.
Ketch, and the others, next door.
Thoir landlord, the Showman, was a rough, uncertain sort of fellow,
*and led them a somewhat disturbed life; but he was exceedingly fond of
his tenants for all that, and would not have lost any one of them for a very
great deal of money. He took excellent care of them-gave them new
clothes once a year; and if he kept them rather short of paint, he put it on
very thick when he put it on at all. But the person who was fondest of
them was the Showman's little daughter, Meg. Meg would sit for hours in
the garret up among the chimneys, where the Showman lived, mending and
making their clothes.
It was in the Baby's clothes that she took the greatest delight, and when
she had mended them, and Judy was happily nursing her little darling, Meg
would almost cry for joy. Partly also, I fancy, because it reminded Meg of
her own mother and little baby sister who died last winter, when times
were bad, and the snow lay deep for weeks together.
Meg had one other especial friend, and that was Jack-in-the-Box. This
was lucky, for she was left at home for many long days, when her father
took Mr. and Mrs. Punch and company upon their travels.
He seemed quite unable to open his box himself, and would sit for
hours without moving a muscle, until you unfastened the cover. However,
when you did that, he moved quickly enough, coming up with a suddenness
.that was quite astonishing in one so old and stout; and if you did not take
care to keep at a respectful distance, you received rather an unpleasant
salute from him.
On this day, Meg's father had given Mr. Punch notice to move," and
that gentleman was busily engaged making preparations for the journey to
a neighboring town.
Mr. Punch was wrapping Baby in a shawl, for the weather was cold.
S The Doctor was folding a scarf round his neck, while the Clown was amus-
ing himself by filling the pockets of the unconscious Doctor with pepper.
Jack-in-the-Box was smoking merrily in the next room, for Meg had
bpened the cover of his box in her excitement, and Mr. Punch had given
him a well-filled pipe and a light.
Jack was accustomed to these constant farewells; in fact, he was grow-
ing rather tired of the excitement, and could hardly help smiling at Meg's
sorrow. While Mr. Punch was bidding him good-bye, Meg ran to Judy,
and almost smothered her and the Baby with kisses and many a warm hug.
Gor .-bye, you darling," she said to the Baby.

-e-Ll.


Good-bye, Meg," said Judy, speaking for both of them, and squeez-
ing her hand in a motherly way. Do try to get my new gown finished
this time, for the one I've got on is really so ragged, I'm quite ashamed of it."
Meg promised with tears in her eyes, for she knew that her father could
not afford a new dress for Judy; but she thought that by contrivance she
might spare a piece of her own Sunday gown.
Good-bye, Jack, you old stay-at-home said Punch to Jack-in-Box.
Good-bye, Punch, you old gad-about," replied Jack placidly.
And then the Showman came in. The good-byes were all said. Toby
jumped and barked, licked Meg's hands, and then trotted down stairs. Mr.
and Mrs. Punch got into their box, carefully carrying their Baby between
them. The Clown and the rest of the company were already comfortably
settled; the house began to move, and off they all went along the road they
were to travel.
By the time they reached the centre of the town, it was growing late.
The Showman shivered as he trudged along, and thought the house upon
his back had never seemed so heavy. And Toby did whimper But the mar-
ket-place and the crowds of people looked cheerful. It was fair-time, and
the Showman hoped that the people had plenty of money in their pockets.
He took up his position near an old house which overhung the street;
played a gay tune on his pipes and drum; and then, seeing that a large
crowd was assembling round him, got inside the traveling house.
Judy was trembling with excitement, for she heard the voices outside,
and she dropped the Baby twice. Toby was frisking about, and when the
curtain drew up and disclosed Mr. Punch's red brick house-front, he posi-
tively refused to sit still on the ledge at the door.
As for Mr. Punch himself, he felt, as he always did feel on these occa-
sions, .that the proudest moment in his life had come. The people clapped,
the children shouted. He bowed to the right; he bowed to the left. And
he was so carried away by his excitement, that before he had sung many bars
of his famous song Roo-ti-too," he had flung the Baby out of the window;
had knocked Judy flat upon her face; and had doubled up the Clown, and
had put him, feet foremost, over the ledge of the traveling house.
Then the Doctor appeared with his bottle of medicine. Mr. Punch
smashed the bottle, and drove the Doctor away in terror. Then the Clown
rose feebly, and tried to make a joke. But Mr. Punch knocked him down
again. Then the Constable entered with his warrant. But Mr. Punch just
served him as he had served the rest. The applause grew louder and
louder. The excitement grew apace, and every eye was on Mr. Punch.
The crowd did not care for anybody else. The more he whacked, the more
they liked it; and when at last Mr. Ketch made his appearance on the scenep.-
he was actually hissed.
All this time, Judy was hanging over the edge of the stage, her feet on
one side, her head on the other, and her arms dangling in a limp fashion.
Just at the corner of the traveling house, when the performance began,
a little girl was standing who had not joined in the laughing and shouting.
She had been watching all the scene with great wondering eyes, that were
so full of pity for the poor Baby, that they scarcely saw anything else. She,
saw it in Judy's arms. She saw Mr. Punch take it from her. She watched
him dandle it; and then-it made her blood run cold-she saw him throw
it out of the window. It almost made her cry out.
At that moment her attention was distracted, for the crowd was push-
ing and shouting, so that she did not see that the poor ill-used Baby had
fallen into the basket which she had upon her arm.
Little Nelly (for that was her name) was a poor, lonely child who lived,
in a garret close by, with one sister not much older than herself-a cripple.
They had a father, but he was seldom at home.
Both the children had seen dolls and babies. In the shop windows
they had seen the gaily-dressed dolls, and they had often gazed in wonder at
the babies in white robes in the arms of nurses. But they had never touched
a doll-a real doll. Besides, Nelly was not sure whether this was a doll or
a baby. Mr. and Mrs. Punch were certainly not dolls, for they spoke and
moved, and their baby surely must be a real baby. And yet it seemed so
much smaller than any of the babies that Nelly had hitherto seen!
Anyhow, there lay the Baby in Nelly's basket. How it would delight
poor Jenny at home. Jenny had not been out in the streets for more than
two years. She had nothing to play with but a few broken bits of old toys;
nothing to look at except a few withered flowers in the crazy window.
What a delight the Baby would be to her!
Nelly pulled her little threadbare shawl over the Baby, and stole away
out of the crowd. She thought first of her sister and her delight, next of
the cruelty of Mr. Punch from which she was saving the Baby, and .last of
herself and her own pleasure. But she did not stop to think at all whether
she was doing right or wrong.






- SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


I am afraid that is what a great many of us do. We want to do some-
thing great or good or kind, and we do not stop to think whether the way in
which we do it is right or not, or how much pain we may cause, even in our
wish to do what is good.
Before Judy had recovered sufficiently to observe the loss of her darling,
she was dragged back by the legs down into the traveling house, and in
this very unceremonious fashion found herself once more in her box with
her husband. She did not bear any malice for the blows. The success of
the evening's performance was great enough to compensate for any trifling
inconvenience or disarrangement of her costume.
The loss of the Baby, however, was a very different matter; and when
at last she discovered its absence, she did not take it in the calm way in
which she submitted to her own ill-treatment. From what the Clown who
was listening outside the box, could tell us, Mr. Punch must have had a
rather uncomfortable time of it. However, what puzzled the whole party
most of all was, that their landlord was perfectly unconscious of the loss of
the Baby.
The fact was, the Showman was indifferent to babies; and on this par-
ticular occasion, he had made so much money, that he wanted to get home
quickly, all the more because it was now almost dark, and the snow was be-
ginning to fall. But the nearer they got to the Showman's house, the more
Judy thought of her Baby, and at last she persuaded her husband to get up
and return to the town with her to look for it.
Accordingly, Punch and Judy quickly got
out of their box, and, slipping down one of
the poles of their traveling house, alighted on Il[[iD[[[
the snow.
Ugh! how cold it was. Punch, to warm
himself, threw snowballs at the back of their

notice; and Judy, in a terrible fright lest he
should turn round and catch them, hurried
her husband along in the direction of the town
which they had just left.
So on went the Showman, and back went
Punch and Judy. Once Judy sat down by a
frozen pump, for she was tired out, and Punch
lighted his pipe to keep himself warm, and
sang a little song to the moon. His voice
was not what it used to be. But, as Judy
--~dways says, "Expression is everything."


PUNCH'S SONG TO THE MOON.
When I was a little boy quite,
I looked at you over the trees,
And every night
I longed for a bite,
For you were a Big Green Cheese.
But you changed to a Lady bright
When I was a nice young man,
And I used to indite
Such songs at night
As only a lover can.


F








I

I


~z&~
III Ni- -=
I I' U

-r

I'


" THE MORE HE WHACKED, T


But now, as I look at your face,
And your features I carefully scan,
In spite of your grace,
I can easily trace
That you are an odd old man.
Then good night, you grand old man,
You may change as oft as you can;
But don't be a cheese
Again, if you please,
You elderly, odd old man!

Meanwhile the Showman was trudging home. Whether it was that
one of the snowballs had lodged in his neck, and was now melting, or
whether he felt his burden lighter, I cannot say, but he certainly stopped,
set down the house, and opened the boxes to look if his little, tenants were
all safe.
The Clown was there safe enough, an idiotic smile upon his face. The
Doctor slept, clutching the pieces of his medicine bottle; and Jack Ketch
appeared to have tied himself up in a knot with his rope. But when he
opened the box of Mr. Punch, the Showman's face was a sight to behold.
Punch and Judy gone The light of his life Punch, whom he had
painted so generously only last week! Punch, for whom he had purchased


a complete new set of fine clothes, not more than a month ago! Judy, who
had had a new nightcap, with frills, only the night before last!
Gone!
He scarcely stopped to close the other boxes. He took Toby from his
pocket, and calling, "Hi! Toby, hi! seek!" started back to town across
the bridge which spanned the almost frozen river, now gleaming coldly in-
the moonlight. There was no mistake about the Showman's heart .now.
What did it matter that his pocket was filled with the evening's earnings,'
when Punch and Judy had left him Where could they have gone ? He
certainly had seen them safe in their box before he started on his homeward
journey.
All this time Meg was sitting in her garret, waiting and wondering
what could have happened to her father. Then she sang a little song for
company's sake.
SLUMBERLAND.
When the day is over, and the fire is low,
And the shadows flicker faintly to and fro;
When I'm all in darkness, and I've said my prayers,
Comes the dear old Dustman softly up the stairs.
I have never seen him, never heard him speak,
But I feel him touch me gently on the cheek;
Then I rise and follow, and he takes my hand,
And away we wander into Slumberland.
Oh, the sights he shows me I could never tell,
Of the little cottage where we used to dwell;
Mother comes to meet me, as she used to be,
For the dear old Dustman calls her back to me."'
Sia- ~Then when I am lying on her loving arm,
S !I 'Nothing e'er can frighten, nothing e'er can harm;
". While she softly whispers, When my life is past,
'. Slumberland will lead me into Heaven at last."

Nine o'clock struck from the village
church. Ten o'clock. But he did not come.
He had never been so late before. Eleven
S, o'clock. And the child was nearly dead asleep.
''__-,. IF She looked out of the window.
Moonlight on the snow. The road went
jl. i- winding away, white and empty. There was
not a figure to be seen. She sat with her
ll face pressed to the pane for half an hour; but
4,11 ishe saw no sign.
1Z. Then, shivering, she turned to the dying
fire, put on some more coal and a few bits
-.- of stick, and fanned it once more into a cheer-
ful blaze, and then sat down and waited.
Twelve o'clock struck, and the child was asleep,
worn out with watching, and she fell to
dreaming about her little pet neighbors.
As the clock struck twelve, Jack's box
-'-- .. gave a snap and flew open.
HE MORE THEY LIKED IT." "Well, 'pon my word," said Jack, "I
thought that twelve would never strike. And
really the way that child has stayed awake is perfectly ridiculous. Chil-
dren ought to be in bed and asleep by six o'clock."
And so saying, he unhooked the wire which was attached to his coat
tails, and jumped out of his box.
Well, you are black, to be sure," remarked the Pot to the Kettle,
where they both sat side by side under the dresser. Have you been wait-
ing twenty-four hours to tell me that ?" answered the Kettle. The in-
formation is not very new. I've heard it before."
"Why, of course you have," put in Jack, and so you will to the end
of the chapter. Is it likely the Pot will call the Kettle anything el-e but
black ? "
But Meg was not the only little girl who passed a restless night.
Little Nelly, with the Baby safe in her basket, got through the crowd
without being noticed. And up she crept to her garret, with her heart all
in a flutter.
Would her father be there ? and would he scold her ?
She hardly knew. She scarcely cared. Jenny was all her thought
now, and Jenny would be wild with delight when she saw the Baby.
She listened outside the door, that she might know whether her father
was at home. No. All was silent.
Then she burst into the room.
Oh, Jenny, Jenny, here's a Baby!" she cried. "Pun h's Baby!


I '


!






SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


Judy's Baby! They flung it away, and it fell into my basket, and I've
brought it home for you."
Jenny lifted her pale face, and put out her hands eagerly, and took the
Baby.
It was ugly, certainly. Its nose was red. But that was perhaps from
the fall it had had.
Jenny kissed it. Then she gave it back to Nelly. Then Nelly kissed
it, and put it once more in Jenny's arms. The children did not speak. It is
.difficult for those who have so many playthings that they seem obliged to
break them, to realize what the delight of these children was. They were
silent for some time. And then Jenny burst out crying-"Oh, Nelly,
Nelly, you shouldn't have taken it."
Nelly stared at her. But, Jenny, they threw it away. It fell into my
basket. I thought it would make you happy."
And suddenly she stopped. She understood now what she had done.
All in a moment she had learnt the terrible lesson that she had done some-
thing wrong, and yet had done it with a good motive.
Poor Nelly!
So the children cried together; while the poor little Baby, who was to
have brought so much happiness, but had only brought so much sorrow, lay
almost unnoticed. Then Nelly crept into bed, and took the Baby on her
arm, while Jenny tried to comfort her.
"I will take it back to-morrow," she said, bravely, "and perhaps
Father will give me a penny to buy you a doll, Jenny," she said. But-
but "-and her tears began to flow again-" it can never be like this Baby.
I'm s-s-sure you c-can't get a Baby for only a penny."
Just at this moment, from the silence of the street below, came a
strange sound-
Roo-ti-too roo-ti-too "
"Oh where, and oh where is my Baby gone?
Oh where, and oh where can he be?
From his top to his toes, from his thumbs to his nose,
He's just like his mother and me.
Perhaps he's been put in a school board machine,
And, after six lessons a week,
He knows off by heart every science and art,
And argues in Latin and Greek.
But give, oh, give me my Baby back,
Just as he used to be;
For if he can speak in Latin and Greek,
He'll not be my baby to me.
Roo-ti-too roo-ti-too !
"Oh where, and oh where is my Baby gone?
Oh where, and oh where can he be ?
From his top to his toes, from his thumbs to his nose
He's just like his mother and me.
Roo-ti-too roo-ti-too "
"Jenny," said Nelly, starting, "that's Punch come back for his Baby.
Let me go at once. It's so much easier to be good, if one hasn't got to wait
to do it."
So she dressed herself hastily, and ran downstairs. Perhaps Mr.
Punch would not mind walking upstairs to fetch his Baby; and then, oh !
then Jenny would have the chance of seeing him, too.
Yes, it was indeed Mr. Punch, and Judy, too. They had trudged all
the way back to the town in search of their lost darling. Every one was in
bed by the time they reached the market-place. But the lamps were still
burning, and the moon showed them the way.
And there, in a doorway, stood a child, with a face that Judy seemed
to recognize. But what a beautiful light shone in her face If Judy had
ever seen or heard of an angel, she would have said that this was an angel.
Punch gazed at the fair face for a minute in delight; but ere long the
-thought of the lost Baby came uppermost in his mind, and his lips mur-
mured again, Oh, where is'my Baby gone?"
If you please," said the child, the Baby's upstairs-up in that garret,
.with my sister. Please to come up and see her. It would be such fun.
She never has any fun. And she lies at home all day in pain. And she's
nursing the Baby for you."
Judy's heart grew very soft, and something like a tear rose in her eye,
as she heard that the Baby was safe and near at hand.
Punch also was moved, and his voice quavered as he began to sing
again, for he was an affectionate father, in spite of his odd ways.
Taking Judy's arm, he hurried her across the pavement.
T. he child ran on before, while Punch and Judy followed her up the
. *winding, dingy staircase.



She is like Meg," said Judy.
"Much prettier, I think," replied Punch, who had an eye for beauty.
And then the door was pushed open, and they stood in the little garret.
There, on the old common truckle bed, lay another child, much more lovely.
even than their little guide.
But oh so pale and thin !
The moon shone in at the window, and Jenny's eyes looked like dia-
monds sparkling in the moonlight, and they were gazing right up into
Heaven through the crazy casement, as though they saw beyond the dark
blue sky and beyond the stars. Punch and Judy had never seen anything
so beautiful before, and, as they stole nearer, there on the bed they saw the
Baby-the precious Baby. Judy seized it and hugged it to her heart, while
Punch jumped up to the ceiling with delight. And then he kissed Judy, and
kissed the Baby, and danced, and sang Roo-ti-too" louder than ever.
Whack her," said a little voice. Whack her, please," said Jenny.
'It's the whacking I want to see."
And so he whacked her-whacked Judy up, and whacked her down-
backwards and forwards; whacked the Baby, flung it up to the ceiling, and
whacked it again, till the children cried for laughing. The poor little in-
valid had forgotten her pain for the time; and even the moon, as it looked
in at the window, laughed to see the fun.
But all this time it was no laughing matter for the Showman. He wan-
dered on and on, hoping to find the footprints of his little tenants, for by
this time he felt convinced that they had left him of their own accord. But
not a trace could he find.
On he went. The moon was getting fainter and paler, for there was a
bit of bright light breaking in the east.
And here he was at'the market-place of the town. Not a soul about!
No ? What are those two little figures yonder standing, and looking toward
him? Are they beckoning ? Yes. It must be. They are running towards
him. It is! It is!
It is Punch and Judy. And Judy has the Baby in her arms. The old
Showman dashed his hand across his eyes. It was almost too much for
him. He had given them up for lost. And there they were, safe and sound.
Punch and Judy with the Baby, ran to Toby and the Showman, and
then the happy party started home again to little Meg.
"Good-bye, good-bye," cried two little voices from a casement over-
head, as the happy group passed away through the golden sunlight of
morning.
Jenny and Nelly will never know whether they were dreaming or
whether it was all true. But
they will never forget that i
night when Punch and Judy CI
called for the lost Baby. a- ,
And so Punch and Judy
go wandering through the -'
world, as they have wan- ,
dered for years and years,// /[ s 'lim'
and as they will doubtless .l.'''./
wander for many, many I,
more, for the sake of all the
hearts who long for a smile -"(
to make life sweet. '-*i


GOOD-BYE.


HAPPY Jo, is a little black fellow, brimful of fun, and is a favorite with
his playmates, you may be sure. No little fellow with a face so bright as
Jo's, could help making the little folks laugh; so his little black face you
will always smile to see.


a^





SUN13EAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


"0, HOW shall I tell you, my dears,
Of something which happened to-day?
I scarcely can keep back my tears,
Come and listen to what I would say.

"Poor Ellen's doll, her very best,
The one Aunt Jane bought at the fair,
That she and Sylvia often dressed,
And tried to comb and curl her hair-


"Basil christened her Miss Nancy,
In truth she was a dainty dame"-
"But what has happened?" "Only fancy !
Her sad, sad end I scarce can name.

"Ellen tells me, she was lying
In the doll's bed on the floor,
When two dogs, poor Nancy spying,
Pulled her out and through the door.


gamma Reading the Story Pook.


Katie is just learning to read, and she thinks
nothing more pleasant than to have mamma read to
her, and let her look over and tell the words she knows.


She knows girl and boy, and a and the and and, and
cat and dog and horse, and a dozen more. Some-
time she will read aloud to mamma, and how they
will enjoy the books they read together.


"Ellen screamed, and Philip hearing
Something of the dreadful fray,
Hurried off, a stout stick bearing,
Nance to save from Dick and Tray.

"'Twas in vain; they bit and shook her,
First her legs, and then her head,
Till at last when Philip took her
From them both she was quite dead.


"All her pretty clothes are lying
In the garden on the ground;
And her golden hair is flying
On the bushes all around.

"Poor Ellen sits in sad dismay,
But in her grief she's not alone,
*For Sylvia cries the livelong day,
As if Miss Nancy were her own."


dancing the Rolka.

Up and down, fast and slow,
Hop and skip, and away we go;
Round and round, and jump up, oh I
And won't we dance the Polka.


2 E ad, gad Stor).
C-"is' S "i j) ^





SUN13EAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


"0, HOW shall I tell you, my dears,
Of something which happened to-day?
I scarcely can keep back my tears,
Come and listen to what I would say.

"Poor Ellen's doll, her very best,
The one Aunt Jane bought at the fair,
That she and Sylvia often dressed,
And tried to comb and curl her hair-


"Basil christened her Miss Nancy,
In truth she was a dainty dame"-
"But what has happened?" "Only fancy !
Her sad, sad end I scarce can name.

"Ellen tells me, she was lying
In the doll's bed on the floor,
When two dogs, poor Nancy spying,
Pulled her out and through the door.


gamma Reading the Story Pook.


Katie is just learning to read, and she thinks
nothing more pleasant than to have mamma read to
her, and let her look over and tell the words she knows.


She knows girl and boy, and a and the and and, and
cat and dog and horse, and a dozen more. Some-
time she will read aloud to mamma, and how they
will enjoy the books they read together.


"Ellen screamed, and Philip hearing
Something of the dreadful fray,
Hurried off, a stout stick bearing,
Nance to save from Dick and Tray.

"'Twas in vain; they bit and shook her,
First her legs, and then her head,
Till at last when Philip took her
From them both she was quite dead.


"All her pretty clothes are lying
In the garden on the ground;
And her golden hair is flying
On the bushes all around.

"Poor Ellen sits in sad dismay,
But in her grief she's not alone,
*For Sylvia cries the livelong day,
As if Miss Nancy were her own."


dancing the Rolka.

Up and down, fast and slow,
Hop and skip, and away we go;
Round and round, and jump up, oh I
And won't we dance the Polka.


2 E ad, gad Stor).
C-"is' S "i j) ^





SUN13EAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


"0, HOW shall I tell you, my dears,
Of something which happened to-day?
I scarcely can keep back my tears,
Come and listen to what I would say.

"Poor Ellen's doll, her very best,
The one Aunt Jane bought at the fair,
That she and Sylvia often dressed,
And tried to comb and curl her hair-


"Basil christened her Miss Nancy,
In truth she was a dainty dame"-
"But what has happened?" "Only fancy !
Her sad, sad end I scarce can name.

"Ellen tells me, she was lying
In the doll's bed on the floor,
When two dogs, poor Nancy spying,
Pulled her out and through the door.


gamma Reading the Story Pook.


Katie is just learning to read, and she thinks
nothing more pleasant than to have mamma read to
her, and let her look over and tell the words she knows.


She knows girl and boy, and a and the and and, and
cat and dog and horse, and a dozen more. Some-
time she will read aloud to mamma, and how they
will enjoy the books they read together.


"Ellen screamed, and Philip hearing
Something of the dreadful fray,
Hurried off, a stout stick bearing,
Nance to save from Dick and Tray.

"'Twas in vain; they bit and shook her,
First her legs, and then her head,
Till at last when Philip took her
From them both she was quite dead.


"All her pretty clothes are lying
In the garden on the ground;
And her golden hair is flying
On the bushes all around.

"Poor Ellen sits in sad dismay,
But in her grief she's not alone,
*For Sylvia cries the livelong day,
As if Miss Nancy were her own."


dancing the Rolka.

Up and down, fast and slow,
Hop and skip, and away we go;
Round and round, and jump up, oh I
And won't we dance the Polka.


2 E ad, gad Stor).
C-"is' S "i j) ^




SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


Making pare of brother.


Mamma has gone away this afternoon and left
Edith to keep house and take care of Willie. They
Splayed an hour or two, until even Frisk, who likes to
play as well as Willie, was all tired out, and Willie be-
. gan to wonder what made mamma stay so long. At
lastEdith took her embroidery, and they sat down to-
- gether in the big arm chair with Frisk underneath, and

.' q 0


Willie found it very interesting to watch
in and out and make such pretty stitches.
I think, his eyes will be shut, and he will


the needle go
Before long,
be fast asleep


when mamma comes home.
How many of you have little brothers or sisters
to care for? I wonder if you are as wise and kind about
it as Edith.





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


S -_ --
:- .-_. :
_. -,,.- s-' .:
- ^^-


"They look as though they were enjoying it."

She Bain- rops.


YOU see those two little folks in the street there, coming through
the rain under their umbrella. They look as though they were
enjoying it. They ought to enjoy it. But for the rain those two
little folks would not have been there at all, or anywhere else, indeed.
So as I want you to look as merry on wet days, shut up in the
house, as these two little bodies look under their umbrella, I will tell
you how it all came about that the rain had much to do with the
making of these little children. For I know there are little boys
who, when they can't go out, and little girls, too, who get very tired
of playing, and get cross and irritable, all because they do not know
what wonderful things are going on in a wet day, and what great
works are being done by the countless little drops which patter
against the windows, and splash in the streets, and leap and roar in
the streams that come tumbling down the side of all the hills.
Rain, rain, go away;
Come again another day;
Little children want to play,"
is the cry of these little prisoners. But they would be contented to
let the rain rain on, if they knew how very much everybody owes to
the rain.
First of all, then, down come the rain-drops out of the sky, mil-
lions and millions of them. Down and down they come, hour after
hour, picking and hammering, like clever little masons that they are,
at the rocks on the mountainheads till they have chipped and chiselled
off countless little tiny, tiny bits. Then they set off with them down
the mountain-side, banging them about, and shaking them up, and
rolling them together, till they are tinier still, not stopping till they
are landed in the valley below. While these rain-drops are little
masons chipping the stone, they are little wheelbarrows, too, filling
themselves with the chippings at the rocks above and emptying them-
selves out on the fields below.
If you go out when the rain is gone, and look along the roads
where little streamlets have gathered, you will see here and there lit-
tle heaps of these stone-morsels lying quite still, just where the rain-
drops have left them; and it is these little heaps which are the begin-


nings of little babies' bodies, because these are the grains from
which the soil is made, which feeds the roots that grass grows on.
The worms have gathered the stony morsels and put them under
the grass to make it grow, just as we gather dead sticks to put under
the kettle to make it boil and sing. So, when you hold in your hand
the little tuft of grass you pull up from the road, you can say -
"This is the grass
That grows in the soil
The rain-drops made."
If you will go into the fields you will find there the same kind
of grass growing in the very same kind of soil, and the cows eating
the grass and turning the grass into milk. Then you may see the
milkmaid come with her stool and pail, and she milks the cow and
fills her pail with white warm milk. And of the milk you can say -
"This is the milk, all frothy and warm,
That came from the cow with the crumpled horn,
That ate the grass
That grew in the soil
The rain-drops made."
Then the maid takes her white milk to the dairy; and the
dairyman takes it to the people's doors; and the nurse feeds the baby
with the milk; and the baby turns the milk into little limbs all rosy
and warm, and soft and round, and into little locks of silken hair,
and two round eyes, and one pretty little tongue which will prattle
some day, and one pair of darling lips with which it can pout and
kiss, and laugh and smile, and make the dearest mirth for all around.
So when you are tossing the dear little thing on your knee or
carrying it in your arms, you can say -
This is the babe, the best that's born,
That drinks the milk, all frothy and warm,
That came from the cow with the crumpled horn,
That ate the grass, .
That grew in the soil,
The rain-drops made."
So you see how children are raised up by the drops of rain.
Rain softens and powders stone into soil,
Soil by roots turns into grass,
Grass by cows turns into milk,
And milk makes bodies for babies."
But even that is not all the rain-drops do. If you were strong
enough to pull up an apple tree by the roots as you pulled that tuft of
grass, you would find it was growing in the soil these busy little
servants of God have made for it. They spread out the ground of
orchards and gardens; and all the fresh green peas and golden corn,
and the bright peaches and plums and grapes, all juicy and purple
and yellow and crimson, all come through millions of little drops on
rainy days. Before the fruit-shop you can say -
These are the fruits
That grow on the trees,
That live in the soil
The rain-drops made."
And the rain-drops are such wonderful little workers, that they
seem always in a hurry. The little heaps of mountain dust they
make and carry to the valley, these can lie quiet just where they are
put, but the rain-drop, little child of the sun as it is, it cannot lie still.
The minute it has emptied itself of every tiny bit of its dust, it is up
and off and away again, seeking fresh orders in the sky. And at the
word, down it comes once more, pelting and peppering the mountain-
top again, in and out, through and down old cracks and chinks, and
away and down the mountain-side again, a merry child among merry
comrades, with another little load of powdery dust to lay on the roads
and fields below.
And so, little people, on a rainy day you must remember how
much good the little rain-drops are doing by coming pelting down in
such great numbers, and renewing the earth, and doing so much to
make everything fresh and bright.


" This is the babe, the best that's born."


't W





SSUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


WHO does not love to hear sleigh bells? It means more to you
- than that somebody is sleighing; for when sleigh bells jingle there
are coasting, and snow-balling, and skating. We all love the crisp
air, the clear skies, or even the skies that are full of clouds- for
they mean fun in the big drifts and still more coasting- and the
shining icicles that hang from the eaves and bare branches. By
and by when you are men and women you will remember the clear
moonlight nights, the slides down the long hill with tinkle of bells
and "loud hurrahs as the "doubler" went dashing down. It was
well worth the long walk back. You'll remember, too, the tumbles
-in the drifts and the good-natured snow-balling. How hungry you


S dWF W^ V 0


were when you reached home and found a good hot supper that
mother had all ready !
Winter is great fun, but it would not be half as nice if Christmas
came in summer. What would winter be without Christmas?
Perhaps some of you think winter would be pleasanter if the
leaves would stay on the trees. If they should, how would you ever
know how beautiful the strong branches and delicate tiny twigs are?
And how would you ever know how large a sparrow seems when he
alights on some spray? In summer he is hidden by the leaves.
How much prettier Christmas trees are when all other trees are gray
and bare. Let us all say, Hurrah for merrie, merrie winter I


/


*


Were MIaNAerrne MA7infar





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


GOING TO THE COUNTRY CHURCH IN WINTER.


Sountrt church in iTintcr.

PERHAPS some of the little girls and boys who see this picture
have lived in the country, or visited some cousins out on a farm.
If so, I hope they took you with them to church, and may be it was
a long distance.
Some people in the country have to travel miles to go to church
and Sunday School, and it is sometimes very hard to get there in
winter, or in stormy weather. The people you see in the picture are
wading through the snow, and it is still falling, so that by the time
they are ready to go home it may be very hard to get through it.
But country people don't mind the weather, and many of them love
to go to church.
Nearly three hundred years ago some good people in England
were troubled because they were not allowed in that country to wor-
ship God as .they thought best, so they took a vessel, and, after
sailing across the ocean, they landed on the rocky shore of Massa-
chusetts one very cold day in December. They were called
Pilgrims. They came to find a place where they would be free
and could have a church of their own; so one of the first things they
did after landing, was to build a church of logs cut from the forest,
for the forest was all around them.
It was a rough building, not as good as most of our barns, but
they did not mind that. They knew God would be with them
wherever they were. They were very brave, and thanked Him for
bringing them where they could have a church of their own, if it
was not a fine one.
They had a very sad time that first winter, and a good many
died from the cold and want of food, but they were not discouraged.
They cut down the forest and cultivated the land, and in a few years
they had better times, and there were so many of them and their
children that they spread over a great deal of this country, but few
of them ever forgot the love their fathers had for their church, and
wherever they went they built churches and taught their children
to keep the Sabbath. Perhaps some of you had ancestors among
these Pilgrims ; at any rate
you ought to be good and
brave, and love to go to :--=-
church no matter what the -

remember what they did and -
suffered that we, their de- ------- --
scendants, might have free-
dom to build our churches
and worship God. THE OLD-TII


Ml


he Qld-!limne hip6.

THERE is a most interesting story about these old-time ships.
A wool comber in Genoa, Italy, had a son whose name was Christo-
pher. He was very fond of the sea, and became a very bold sailor.
Every time he came back from a voyage the thought was in his mind,-
God put it there, that there must be land on the other side of the
world. No great men encouraged him, and he was without money.
Sad and weary, this man came one evening to a convent door in a
little town in Spain. The prior of the convent was interested in his
story, and made effort to have it made known to his King and Queen,
So Columbus came to the palace, and with maps and charts explained
his plans.
King Ferdinand said No, but good Queen Isabella answered,
" I will give my jewels."
Soon, Columbus with ninety men and three small vessels, the
Santa AMaria, the Nina, and the Pinta, started across the wide
Atlantic.
Sixty days they sailed, and no land met their sight. The sail-
ors grew alarmed to think how far away from home they had come,
but their leader was brave and firm. On they sailed, till one day
there was a shout of Land Land Do you not think their hearts
beat with joy?
When the morning came they all sang a hymn of praise and
gave thanks to God. On the ships they had carried the sign of the
cross. The New World was found, and brave Christopher Colum-
bus was the discoverer.


Queen 96ther.
THIS is Queen Esthler, one of the Jews that the great Persian King
Ahasuerus took captive. Because she was very beautiful and good
he made her his queen. You should read in the Bible the wonderful
story of Esther, and her good uncle, Mordecai, and how Ahasuerus
made all the Jews happier, because he loved Esther; and hung the
wicked Haman on the gal-
lows he had made for Mor-
decai, and put Mordecai into
the place of honor held by
--Haman. Perhaps the artist,
whose name is Professor
-- Biermann, meant to show
us Q(ueen Esther just as she
appeared before the King,
E SHIPs. to plead for her people.





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


GOING TO THE COUNTRY CHURCH IN WINTER.


Sountrt church in iTintcr.

PERHAPS some of the little girls and boys who see this picture
have lived in the country, or visited some cousins out on a farm.
If so, I hope they took you with them to church, and may be it was
a long distance.
Some people in the country have to travel miles to go to church
and Sunday School, and it is sometimes very hard to get there in
winter, or in stormy weather. The people you see in the picture are
wading through the snow, and it is still falling, so that by the time
they are ready to go home it may be very hard to get through it.
But country people don't mind the weather, and many of them love
to go to church.
Nearly three hundred years ago some good people in England
were troubled because they were not allowed in that country to wor-
ship God as .they thought best, so they took a vessel, and, after
sailing across the ocean, they landed on the rocky shore of Massa-
chusetts one very cold day in December. They were called
Pilgrims. They came to find a place where they would be free
and could have a church of their own; so one of the first things they
did after landing, was to build a church of logs cut from the forest,
for the forest was all around them.
It was a rough building, not as good as most of our barns, but
they did not mind that. They knew God would be with them
wherever they were. They were very brave, and thanked Him for
bringing them where they could have a church of their own, if it
was not a fine one.
They had a very sad time that first winter, and a good many
died from the cold and want of food, but they were not discouraged.
They cut down the forest and cultivated the land, and in a few years
they had better times, and there were so many of them and their
children that they spread over a great deal of this country, but few
of them ever forgot the love their fathers had for their church, and
wherever they went they built churches and taught their children
to keep the Sabbath. Perhaps some of you had ancestors among
these Pilgrims ; at any rate
you ought to be good and
brave, and love to go to :--=-
church no matter what the -

remember what they did and -
suffered that we, their de- ------- --
scendants, might have free-
dom to build our churches
and worship God. THE OLD-TII


Ml


he Qld-!limne hip6.

THERE is a most interesting story about these old-time ships.
A wool comber in Genoa, Italy, had a son whose name was Christo-
pher. He was very fond of the sea, and became a very bold sailor.
Every time he came back from a voyage the thought was in his mind,-
God put it there, that there must be land on the other side of the
world. No great men encouraged him, and he was without money.
Sad and weary, this man came one evening to a convent door in a
little town in Spain. The prior of the convent was interested in his
story, and made effort to have it made known to his King and Queen,
So Columbus came to the palace, and with maps and charts explained
his plans.
King Ferdinand said No, but good Queen Isabella answered,
" I will give my jewels."
Soon, Columbus with ninety men and three small vessels, the
Santa AMaria, the Nina, and the Pinta, started across the wide
Atlantic.
Sixty days they sailed, and no land met their sight. The sail-
ors grew alarmed to think how far away from home they had come,
but their leader was brave and firm. On they sailed, till one day
there was a shout of Land Land Do you not think their hearts
beat with joy?
When the morning came they all sang a hymn of praise and
gave thanks to God. On the ships they had carried the sign of the
cross. The New World was found, and brave Christopher Colum-
bus was the discoverer.


Queen 96ther.
THIS is Queen Esthler, one of the Jews that the great Persian King
Ahasuerus took captive. Because she was very beautiful and good
he made her his queen. You should read in the Bible the wonderful
story of Esther, and her good uncle, Mordecai, and how Ahasuerus
made all the Jews happier, because he loved Esther; and hung the
wicked Haman on the gal-
lows he had made for Mor-
decai, and put Mordecai into
the place of honor held by
--Haman. Perhaps the artist,
whose name is Professor
-- Biermann, meant to show
us Q(ueen Esther just as she
appeared before the King,
E SHIPs. to plead for her people.





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


GOING TO THE COUNTRY CHURCH IN WINTER.


Sountrt church in iTintcr.

PERHAPS some of the little girls and boys who see this picture
have lived in the country, or visited some cousins out on a farm.
If so, I hope they took you with them to church, and may be it was
a long distance.
Some people in the country have to travel miles to go to church
and Sunday School, and it is sometimes very hard to get there in
winter, or in stormy weather. The people you see in the picture are
wading through the snow, and it is still falling, so that by the time
they are ready to go home it may be very hard to get through it.
But country people don't mind the weather, and many of them love
to go to church.
Nearly three hundred years ago some good people in England
were troubled because they were not allowed in that country to wor-
ship God as .they thought best, so they took a vessel, and, after
sailing across the ocean, they landed on the rocky shore of Massa-
chusetts one very cold day in December. They were called
Pilgrims. They came to find a place where they would be free
and could have a church of their own; so one of the first things they
did after landing, was to build a church of logs cut from the forest,
for the forest was all around them.
It was a rough building, not as good as most of our barns, but
they did not mind that. They knew God would be with them
wherever they were. They were very brave, and thanked Him for
bringing them where they could have a church of their own, if it
was not a fine one.
They had a very sad time that first winter, and a good many
died from the cold and want of food, but they were not discouraged.
They cut down the forest and cultivated the land, and in a few years
they had better times, and there were so many of them and their
children that they spread over a great deal of this country, but few
of them ever forgot the love their fathers had for their church, and
wherever they went they built churches and taught their children
to keep the Sabbath. Perhaps some of you had ancestors among
these Pilgrims ; at any rate
you ought to be good and
brave, and love to go to :--=-
church no matter what the -

remember what they did and -
suffered that we, their de- ------- --
scendants, might have free-
dom to build our churches
and worship God. THE OLD-TII


Ml


he Qld-!limne hip6.

THERE is a most interesting story about these old-time ships.
A wool comber in Genoa, Italy, had a son whose name was Christo-
pher. He was very fond of the sea, and became a very bold sailor.
Every time he came back from a voyage the thought was in his mind,-
God put it there, that there must be land on the other side of the
world. No great men encouraged him, and he was without money.
Sad and weary, this man came one evening to a convent door in a
little town in Spain. The prior of the convent was interested in his
story, and made effort to have it made known to his King and Queen,
So Columbus came to the palace, and with maps and charts explained
his plans.
King Ferdinand said No, but good Queen Isabella answered,
" I will give my jewels."
Soon, Columbus with ninety men and three small vessels, the
Santa AMaria, the Nina, and the Pinta, started across the wide
Atlantic.
Sixty days they sailed, and no land met their sight. The sail-
ors grew alarmed to think how far away from home they had come,
but their leader was brave and firm. On they sailed, till one day
there was a shout of Land Land Do you not think their hearts
beat with joy?
When the morning came they all sang a hymn of praise and
gave thanks to God. On the ships they had carried the sign of the
cross. The New World was found, and brave Christopher Colum-
bus was the discoverer.


Queen 96ther.
THIS is Queen Esthler, one of the Jews that the great Persian King
Ahasuerus took captive. Because she was very beautiful and good
he made her his queen. You should read in the Bible the wonderful
story of Esther, and her good uncle, Mordecai, and how Ahasuerus
made all the Jews happier, because he loved Esther; and hung the
wicked Haman on the gal-
lows he had made for Mor-
decai, and put Mordecai into
the place of honor held by
--Haman. Perhaps the artist,
whose name is Professor
-- Biermann, meant to show
us Q(ueen Esther just as she
appeared before the King,
E SHIPs. to plead for her people.




SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


EVERY one knows Mistress Puss, but I wonder how many of the
children know all about her sisters and cousins and aunts, and how
many different members there are to the great Cat family.
In the first place there are four great branches to this family,
and when I tell you who they are, you will agree with me that they
hold a very high and important place in the Animal Kingdom. The
name they have in common is Felis. The head of the family is
Felis Leo, who is no other than the great Lion, the king of beasts.
Then comes Felis Tigris, the strong, fierce Tiger; then Felis
Leopardus, in which branch are the Jaguar, Leopard, Ounce, Oce-
lot, Chetah, and others; and last comes Miss Pussy, whose proper
name is Felis Domestica,- the domestic or home cat. Did you
know she had so many fine relations? I have not mentioned half of
them, but you can read about them for yourselves in the natural
histories.
The Cat family are flesh-eating animals, and everything about
them is planned so as to help them catch their food. Their manner
of catching it is to creep up softly from behind and then suddenly
spring upon the poor creature they mean to kill, and put their sharp
claws into it. So their feet are very soft and make no noise, and
their skin is loose, giving the body a freedom of motion so that they
can run and jump easily. Did you ever see a tiger, and notice how
loosely its beautiful skin fitted its body ? Their teeth are very sharp
and pointed.
Most of the Cat family hunt in the dark, and their eyes are
quite peculiar, so that they seem to be able to see well in the dark.
I have read that the cat's eyes were used as clocks in China. The
black part in the middle of the eye changes its shape all the time.


-The W.

HoOT hoot says the owl, who winks and blinks by day, but
opens wide his eyes by night.
This owl seems to be standing on the fence, as if deciding if he
shall seek the dove-cot to-night, and carry off some little boy's pets
from the nest he may have carefully watched for many a day.


Towards night and in the dark it is large and round. During the
day it grows narrower and narrower until at noon it is only a black
line. So the Chinese pick up a cat and look at its eyes to see what 4
time it is.
The cat's whiskers are said to be of use to it in hunting in this J
way: They are very sensitive and like the "feelers" of an insect; ..
now the cat does not want to make any noise in her hunting, and if
these feelers strike against anything on either side, she knows she
can't get through without making a noise, so she draws back and
tries somewhere else. The whiskers come out on each side to about
the width of the head.
Did you ever notice that the ears of animals who hunt are put
on differently from the ears of those who are hunted? The ears of
cats, dogs, etc., point forward since their prey is in front of them,
and they need to gather the sounds from the front. The ears of the
sheep, deer, etc., point backwards, as they need to listen to the
sounds from behind, and try to find out if any animal is creeping up
to attack them.
There is a great deal more I might tell you of the various kinds
of cats, and ever so many stories about our own dearly-loved pussies
at home, but I think this is enough for now.





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


EVERY one knows Mistress Puss, but I wonder how many of the
children know all about her sisters and cousins and aunts, and how
many different members there are to the great Cat family.
In the first place there are four great branches to this family,
and when I tell you who they are, you will agree with me that they
hold a very high and important place in the Animal Kingdom. The
name they have in common is Felis. The head of the family is
Felis Leo, who is no other than the great Lion, the king of beasts.
Then comes Felis Tigris, the strong, fierce Tiger; then Felis
Leopardus, in which branch are the Jaguar, Leopard, Ounce, Oce-
lot, Chetah, and others; and last comes Miss Pussy, whose proper
name is Felis Domestica,- the domestic or home cat. Did you
know she had so many fine relations? I have not mentioned half of
them, but you can read about them for yourselves in the natural
histories.
The Cat family are flesh-eating animals, and everything about
them is planned so as to help them catch their food. Their manner
of catching it is to creep up softly from behind and then suddenly
spring upon the poor creature they mean to kill, and put their sharp
claws into it. So their feet are very soft and make no noise, and
their skin is loose, giving the body a freedom of motion so that they
can run and jump easily. Did you ever see a tiger, and notice how
loosely its beautiful skin fitted its body ? Their teeth are very sharp
and pointed.
Most of the Cat family hunt in the dark, and their eyes are
quite peculiar, so that they seem to be able to see well in the dark.
I have read that the cat's eyes were used as clocks in China. The
black part in the middle of the eye changes its shape all the time.


-The W.

HoOT hoot says the owl, who winks and blinks by day, but
opens wide his eyes by night.
This owl seems to be standing on the fence, as if deciding if he
shall seek the dove-cot to-night, and carry off some little boy's pets
from the nest he may have carefully watched for many a day.


Towards night and in the dark it is large and round. During the
day it grows narrower and narrower until at noon it is only a black
line. So the Chinese pick up a cat and look at its eyes to see what 4
time it is.
The cat's whiskers are said to be of use to it in hunting in this J
way: They are very sensitive and like the "feelers" of an insect; ..
now the cat does not want to make any noise in her hunting, and if
these feelers strike against anything on either side, she knows she
can't get through without making a noise, so she draws back and
tries somewhere else. The whiskers come out on each side to about
the width of the head.
Did you ever notice that the ears of animals who hunt are put
on differently from the ears of those who are hunted? The ears of
cats, dogs, etc., point forward since their prey is in front of them,
and they need to gather the sounds from the front. The ears of the
sheep, deer, etc., point backwards, as they need to listen to the
sounds from behind, and try to find out if any animal is creeping up
to attack them.
There is a great deal more I might tell you of the various kinds
of cats, and ever so many stories about our own dearly-loved pussies
at home, but I think this is enough for now.





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


*t the Watering. rough.


WHAT a lot of horses White, brown, red and black,

all pushing their soft noses towards the cool water that

has just come splashing from the mossy spout by the

flowers. Horses get thirsty, like children, and drink

and drink, until it seems sometimes as if they would

drink the well dry. They deserve all they get surely,

for do they not drag our cars, our carts, and our car-

riages every day without becoming ugly or cross ? Did

you ever hear a horse say he couldn't or wouldn't pull ?

Some are naughty at times, of course, but they only

want a kind word, or need a gentle touch of the whip

to make them good again. Just think how miserable

we should be and how much we should have to do if

there were no horses. We should have to carry each


other on our backs, or in hand-carts as they do in some

far away places. We should love horses always, and

treat them as we should want to be treated ourselves.

These horses have been hard at work, and have just

had their harnesses taken off ; then away they went,

galloping, running, neighing, and frisking like a party

of school boys just out of school. The one who gets

his nose in the water first was the best fellow. It looks

as if there were two naughty ones over there by the

pump. They are certainly biting each other, as well-

bred horses and children should never do.

How pleasant it must be to hear them and see them

move!





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


A STREET ARAB.





LITTLE Dora, daughter dear,
Queen of our hearts, you've
reigned a year;
Within our home, until to-day,
You've ruled with undivided sway.
Baby dear, with laughing eyes !
Do you really half surmise
The kindly things that we would
say
Upon our Dora's first birthday ?

'Oh! little girl with rosy cheeks,
And silvery voice that almost
speaks.
With dimpled chin and saucy nose,
And chubby hands, and wee pink
toes,
How came thee with thy comely
face,
And with thy dainty air of grace ?
Did'stthou borrow from some little
elf,
Or did fairies grant them to thyself?

Our little Dora, busy sprite !
From early morning till the night,
You're peeping here, and hiding
there
With such an artless, baby air;
Ah thus it is, that day by day,
'Mid changing moods, serene or
gay,
You hold us by thy childish arts,
And twine more closely round our
hearts.

Then, little treasured baby child,
Reign ever with love's sceptre
mild;
And may thy innocence disarm
All things in life most fraught with
harm,
* So may we, with each natal day,
Be led in loving truth to say :
That little Dora is more dear
With each and every passing year.



4 Street Wrab.


You have all heard of Arab horses,
or, as they are usually called in poetry,
" Arab steeds," have you not? They
have carried their masters miles and
miles over the deserts and up steep
heights without any hope of reward
except kind words and love. They
are strong, almost tireless, and very
swift. Their hoofs are small, not like
those of the great heavy cart-horses you may see any day at your door. Their necks are
beautifully arched, and their mane and tail are long and flowing. Their masters love
them next to their own children, and they share the tent with the family in, cold
weather. And to share the tent means to the Arab what it would mean to Papa if he
should bring his horse into the dining-room or parlor on cold nights; for the Arabs
have no houses like ours, no furnaces, no water brought in pipes from away off. They
have no house-lots to pitch their tents on. They do not want them. They like to go
where they please; to be in one place to-day and in another to-morrow. That is the
reason they do not build homes, but make beautifully striped tents which they can
easily make into a bundle. Longfellow, the poet, has made a beautiful verse, which
says about cares that they
Shall fold their tents like the Arab,
And silently steal away."
That is very pretty, is it not? to think that all which vexes Mamma or Papa or any of
you, shall some time fold up it house and steal away.
There are many little boys who have no parents with money enough to buy house
lots and build houses, so they earn their food by selling papers, or blacking shoes, or
running errands. They have no place often in which to sleep. To-night it may be in
some box left out by a shopman; to-morrow on a pile of ropes on the wharves. They
sleep wherever they can, and in whatever place the night finds them. They are like
the Arabs in that; but unlike them because they do not even have a tent to live in. So
we call them street arabs. Their lives are very hard, but they manage somehow to keep
cheerful. When we have so much to make us comfortable, we should not forget these
poor fellows that have to go without what seems to us necessities. The one before us
does not look unhappy. He seems to quite enjoy his old hat and shirt, which are cer-
tainly very becoming


LEFT IN CHARGE.


jcft in hargqe.


No, I'm not very old, nor yet very large,
But mamma, dear mamma, has left me in charge
With my good dog Zip so trusty, quite near,
Nothing will harm me; there's little to fear;
So I'll look at the flowers and fields so green,
And all of the sights which here may be seen.
I'll not move about, but sit very still,-
This will quite please Zip, I'm sure that it will;
And when mamma comes back, perhaps she will say,
I was a good little girl while she was away.


SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


little iora't Virnt
Airthdag.





LITTLE Dora, daughter dear,
Queen of our hearts, you've
reigned a year;
Within our home, until to-day,
You've ruled with undivided sway.
Baby dear, with laughing eyes !
Do you really half surmise
The kindly things that we would
say
Upon our Dora's first birthday ?

'Oh! little girl with rosy cheeks,
And silvery voice that almost
speaks.
With dimpled chin and saucy nose,
And chubby hands, and wee pink
toes,
How came thee with thy comely
face,
And with thy dainty air of grace ?
Did'stthou borrow from some little
elf,
Or did fairies grant them to thyself?

Our little Dora, busy sprite !
From early morning till the night,
You're peeping here, and hiding
there
With such an artless, baby air;
Ah thus it is, that day by day,
'Mid changing moods, serene or
gay,
You hold us by thy childish arts,
And twine more closely round our
hearts.

Then, little treasured baby child,
Reign ever with love's sceptre
mild;
And may thy innocence disarm
All things in life most fraught with
harm,
* So may we, with each natal day,
Be led in loving truth to say :
That little Dora is more dear
With each and every passing year.



4 Street Wrab.


You have all heard of Arab horses,
or, as they are usually called in poetry,
" Arab steeds," have you not? They
have carried their masters miles and
miles over the deserts and up steep
heights without any hope of reward
except kind words and love. They
are strong, almost tireless, and very
swift. Their hoofs are small, not like
those of the great heavy cart-horses you may see any day at your door. Their necks are
beautifully arched, and their mane and tail are long and flowing. Their masters love
them next to their own children, and they share the tent with the family in, cold
weather. And to share the tent means to the Arab what it would mean to Papa if he
should bring his horse into the dining-room or parlor on cold nights; for the Arabs
have no houses like ours, no furnaces, no water brought in pipes from away off. They
have no house-lots to pitch their tents on. They do not want them. They like to go
where they please; to be in one place to-day and in another to-morrow. That is the
reason they do not build homes, but make beautifully striped tents which they can
easily make into a bundle. Longfellow, the poet, has made a beautiful verse, which
says about cares that they
Shall fold their tents like the Arab,
And silently steal away."
That is very pretty, is it not? to think that all which vexes Mamma or Papa or any of
you, shall some time fold up it house and steal away.
There are many little boys who have no parents with money enough to buy house
lots and build houses, so they earn their food by selling papers, or blacking shoes, or
running errands. They have no place often in which to sleep. To-night it may be in
some box left out by a shopman; to-morrow on a pile of ropes on the wharves. They
sleep wherever they can, and in whatever place the night finds them. They are like
the Arabs in that; but unlike them because they do not even have a tent to live in. So
we call them street arabs. Their lives are very hard, but they manage somehow to keep
cheerful. When we have so much to make us comfortable, we should not forget these
poor fellows that have to go without what seems to us necessities. The one before us
does not look unhappy. He seems to quite enjoy his old hat and shirt, which are cer-
tainly very becoming


LEFT IN CHARGE.


jcft in hargqe.


No, I'm not very old, nor yet very large,
But mamma, dear mamma, has left me in charge
With my good dog Zip so trusty, quite near,
Nothing will harm me; there's little to fear;
So I'll look at the flowers and fields so green,
And all of the sights which here may be seen.
I'll not move about, but sit very still,-
This will quite please Zip, I'm sure that it will;
And when mamma comes back, perhaps she will say,
I was a good little girl while she was away.


SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


little iora't Virnt
Airthdag.





LITTLE Dora, daughter dear,
Queen of our hearts, you've
reigned a year;
Within our home, until to-day,
You've ruled with undivided sway.
Baby dear, with laughing eyes !
Do you really half surmise
The kindly things that we would
say
Upon our Dora's first birthday ?

'Oh! little girl with rosy cheeks,
And silvery voice that almost
speaks.
With dimpled chin and saucy nose,
And chubby hands, and wee pink
toes,
How came thee with thy comely
face,
And with thy dainty air of grace ?
Did'stthou borrow from some little
elf,
Or did fairies grant them to thyself?

Our little Dora, busy sprite !
From early morning till the night,
You're peeping here, and hiding
there
With such an artless, baby air;
Ah thus it is, that day by day,
'Mid changing moods, serene or
gay,
You hold us by thy childish arts,
And twine more closely round our
hearts.

Then, little treasured baby child,
Reign ever with love's sceptre
mild;
And may thy innocence disarm
All things in life most fraught with
harm,
* So may we, with each natal day,
Be led in loving truth to say :
That little Dora is more dear
With each and every passing year.



4 Street Wrab.


You have all heard of Arab horses,
or, as they are usually called in poetry,
" Arab steeds," have you not? They
have carried their masters miles and
miles over the deserts and up steep
heights without any hope of reward
except kind words and love. They
are strong, almost tireless, and very
swift. Their hoofs are small, not like
those of the great heavy cart-horses you may see any day at your door. Their necks are
beautifully arched, and their mane and tail are long and flowing. Their masters love
them next to their own children, and they share the tent with the family in, cold
weather. And to share the tent means to the Arab what it would mean to Papa if he
should bring his horse into the dining-room or parlor on cold nights; for the Arabs
have no houses like ours, no furnaces, no water brought in pipes from away off. They
have no house-lots to pitch their tents on. They do not want them. They like to go
where they please; to be in one place to-day and in another to-morrow. That is the
reason they do not build homes, but make beautifully striped tents which they can
easily make into a bundle. Longfellow, the poet, has made a beautiful verse, which
says about cares that they
Shall fold their tents like the Arab,
And silently steal away."
That is very pretty, is it not? to think that all which vexes Mamma or Papa or any of
you, shall some time fold up it house and steal away.
There are many little boys who have no parents with money enough to buy house
lots and build houses, so they earn their food by selling papers, or blacking shoes, or
running errands. They have no place often in which to sleep. To-night it may be in
some box left out by a shopman; to-morrow on a pile of ropes on the wharves. They
sleep wherever they can, and in whatever place the night finds them. They are like
the Arabs in that; but unlike them because they do not even have a tent to live in. So
we call them street arabs. Their lives are very hard, but they manage somehow to keep
cheerful. When we have so much to make us comfortable, we should not forget these
poor fellows that have to go without what seems to us necessities. The one before us
does not look unhappy. He seems to quite enjoy his old hat and shirt, which are cer-
tainly very becoming


LEFT IN CHARGE.


jcft in hargqe.


No, I'm not very old, nor yet very large,
But mamma, dear mamma, has left me in charge
With my good dog Zip so trusty, quite near,
Nothing will harm me; there's little to fear;
So I'll look at the flowers and fields so green,
And all of the sights which here may be seen.
I'll not move about, but sit very still,-
This will quite please Zip, I'm sure that it will;
And when mamma comes back, perhaps she will say,
I was a good little girl while she was away.


SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


little iora't Virnt
Airthdag.





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


Bolling Out the oie rut.


I DO not know how it has happened that Maudy and Lulu have
got possession of the bake board and rolling pin. They are very
careful, and do not seem to have soiled their aprons with the flour,
or put too much water in their dough. Sometimes little girls when
they are not careful make more work than they do good. Then
their poor tired mamma looks with dismay at the soiled aprons and
sticky board and the unclean rolling pin. It is well for little girls
to learn to be good house-keepers, and cook well, so much of home
comfort depends on good and cleanly cooking, and when habits are
acquired young they are no trouble to carry through life.


;ed.

NED belongs to that class of
boys who ask a good many ques-
.tions. One question answered seems
to suggest another. Every mother
knows of such a boy.
Ned's mother said to him one
morning as he started for school, that
she wished him to study his lessons
carefully, to be kind to his playfellows
and be good. Don't you want me
to be good for something, mamma?"
was his response.
Yes, Ned, good for something.
The world needs not only good boys,
but boys who are good for something.
So look out for your habits. Be true,
and brave, and noble.


;he R1le in the kq.


DOT and Dimple's home was in a large city, where long rows of
brown stones houses shut away the beautiful sky and much of the
sunlight from their nursery windows.
These little girls were twin sisters, and were so much alike one
could hardly tell one from the other. When they were christened,
they were called Lillian and Evelyn, but their pet names were Dot
and Dimple.
Their mother died when they were wee babies, and they had
been taught that she lived in heaven and still loved her little girls.
They talked much about their mother, and when they were four
years old they went to spend the summer in the country, way up
among the hills. All was new and strange. They began to wonder
and ask questions.
Where is the back-yard where we can play, Miss Tuck?"
said Dot. "All this green field is the back-yard," was the reply.
" May we walk on the grass? asked Dimple.
The beautiful blue sky was their greatest wonder. "Is this sky
allyour sky, Miss Tuck?" asked one of the twins. One evening,
standing by the window, the round, setting sun shining full upon
her, Dot exclaimed, 0, see that great hole into heaven! If I
should look right into that big hole could I see my mother? "





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


Bolling Out the oie rut.


I DO not know how it has happened that Maudy and Lulu have
got possession of the bake board and rolling pin. They are very
careful, and do not seem to have soiled their aprons with the flour,
or put too much water in their dough. Sometimes little girls when
they are not careful make more work than they do good. Then
their poor tired mamma looks with dismay at the soiled aprons and
sticky board and the unclean rolling pin. It is well for little girls
to learn to be good house-keepers, and cook well, so much of home
comfort depends on good and cleanly cooking, and when habits are
acquired young they are no trouble to carry through life.


;ed.

NED belongs to that class of
boys who ask a good many ques-
.tions. One question answered seems
to suggest another. Every mother
knows of such a boy.
Ned's mother said to him one
morning as he started for school, that
she wished him to study his lessons
carefully, to be kind to his playfellows
and be good. Don't you want me
to be good for something, mamma?"
was his response.
Yes, Ned, good for something.
The world needs not only good boys,
but boys who are good for something.
So look out for your habits. Be true,
and brave, and noble.


;he R1le in the kq.


DOT and Dimple's home was in a large city, where long rows of
brown stones houses shut away the beautiful sky and much of the
sunlight from their nursery windows.
These little girls were twin sisters, and were so much alike one
could hardly tell one from the other. When they were christened,
they were called Lillian and Evelyn, but their pet names were Dot
and Dimple.
Their mother died when they were wee babies, and they had
been taught that she lived in heaven and still loved her little girls.
They talked much about their mother, and when they were four
years old they went to spend the summer in the country, way up
among the hills. All was new and strange. They began to wonder
and ask questions.
Where is the back-yard where we can play, Miss Tuck?"
said Dot. "All this green field is the back-yard," was the reply.
" May we walk on the grass? asked Dimple.
The beautiful blue sky was their greatest wonder. "Is this sky
allyour sky, Miss Tuck?" asked one of the twins. One evening,
standing by the window, the round, setting sun shining full upon
her, Dot exclaimed, 0, see that great hole into heaven! If I
should look right into that big hole could I see my mother? "





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


Bolling Out the oie rut.


I DO not know how it has happened that Maudy and Lulu have
got possession of the bake board and rolling pin. They are very
careful, and do not seem to have soiled their aprons with the flour,
or put too much water in their dough. Sometimes little girls when
they are not careful make more work than they do good. Then
their poor tired mamma looks with dismay at the soiled aprons and
sticky board and the unclean rolling pin. It is well for little girls
to learn to be good house-keepers, and cook well, so much of home
comfort depends on good and cleanly cooking, and when habits are
acquired young they are no trouble to carry through life.


;ed.

NED belongs to that class of
boys who ask a good many ques-
.tions. One question answered seems
to suggest another. Every mother
knows of such a boy.
Ned's mother said to him one
morning as he started for school, that
she wished him to study his lessons
carefully, to be kind to his playfellows
and be good. Don't you want me
to be good for something, mamma?"
was his response.
Yes, Ned, good for something.
The world needs not only good boys,
but boys who are good for something.
So look out for your habits. Be true,
and brave, and noble.


;he R1le in the kq.


DOT and Dimple's home was in a large city, where long rows of
brown stones houses shut away the beautiful sky and much of the
sunlight from their nursery windows.
These little girls were twin sisters, and were so much alike one
could hardly tell one from the other. When they were christened,
they were called Lillian and Evelyn, but their pet names were Dot
and Dimple.
Their mother died when they were wee babies, and they had
been taught that she lived in heaven and still loved her little girls.
They talked much about their mother, and when they were four
years old they went to spend the summer in the country, way up
among the hills. All was new and strange. They began to wonder
and ask questions.
Where is the back-yard where we can play, Miss Tuck?"
said Dot. "All this green field is the back-yard," was the reply.
" May we walk on the grass? asked Dimple.
The beautiful blue sky was their greatest wonder. "Is this sky
allyour sky, Miss Tuck?" asked one of the twins. One evening,
standing by the window, the round, setting sun shining full upon
her, Dot exclaimed, 0, see that great hole into heaven! If I
should look right into that big hole could I see my mother? "





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOMEi


She ine I pple.

THIS fruit grows in a warm climate in those countries where
are many bright flowers. It takes this name because it looks some-
what like the cone, or fruit of the pine tree of the forest. Who does
not like the juicy pulp with its rich, delicious flavor? Shall we ask
John to bring home one from the fruit seller's this afternoon?


WHEN she was four
|, ,,years old ertie's .."' "oth-
I''''~ I'I. er made her a birthday
ll1 party. Papa printed
,, I,,,l l, ,I :, i ... i:: the daintiest cards, and
,i," ,i she went away with
.. ,,,',' '' "l''i' I',i Jam es in the carriage
!,,', i.' .,', and 'vited her ," fwens."
nThe birthday came,
11n0 the and so did Fannie and
S Susie and Teddie, and
II. "all the rest. The little
i ll four-year-old was full
of glee.
lIn the nursery they
played awhile with the
U dollies. There were
ever so many of them.
i-,.. ".i.' I 'They went to mamma's
room to see Gertie's
"-new birthday presents.
"And offthey skipped to
the parlor to have a nice
concert. They played
',and sang just like older
people, they thought.
They clapped their
MIss MIDGET. hands and said Gertie
sang the boofuless." They called her Miss Midget, and gave her
a basket of flowers. She played make a bow, and said Fank
you."
Supper came now, and they each had a piece of birthday cake,
which Ellen, the cook, had made and marked Gertie, four years,"
with red plums on the white frosting.
Then the fIwens said Good-bye," and went away home.


ll fc _-_-_-: _.-:,. Y
' ' 2 -- "-:;:----7.)-I /'.'


4 ending the A4 ol J lothe,.

How doll's clothes do wear out, and the dollies themselves get out
of order. For many blocks around, Miss Christie, the Doll-mender,
was the children's friend. To her they came with their pets and
left them for days in her tender care. Even the nice little ladies
came in their papa's carriages from the great city near by and
brought thier elegant dolls to see if she could restore their faded
beauty. Her father had been a maker of these toys in-France, and
many an hour she had sat beside him and seen how arms were hung,
hair curled and put on, and the eyes made to open and shut; and
she could do it now. When she was not too busy she talked with
her visitors about many things, for Miss Christie was an intelligent
person. She told them that the ladies of the royal family of England
learried to sew when they were young.
This impressed Lucy and made her wish to learn to sew. So
she begins by mending her doll's clothes, and is very careful to do it
jwell. She thinks she shall be able some day to make fine stitches
like those which Miss Christie showed her had been made by Prin-
c, ess Louise.


" P


WHAT a fine horse have I!
I am sure if we try
We can run around the world just so-
We will see every sight,
And be back before night -
So get up, horsey, go, go, go !





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOMEi


She ine I pple.

THIS fruit grows in a warm climate in those countries where
are many bright flowers. It takes this name because it looks some-
what like the cone, or fruit of the pine tree of the forest. Who does
not like the juicy pulp with its rich, delicious flavor? Shall we ask
John to bring home one from the fruit seller's this afternoon?


WHEN she was four
|, ,,years old ertie's .."' "oth-
I''''~ I'I. er made her a birthday
ll1 party. Papa printed
,, I,,,l l, ,I :, i ... i:: the daintiest cards, and
,i," ,i she went away with
.. ,,,',' '' "l''i' I',i Jam es in the carriage
!,,', i.' .,', and 'vited her ," fwens."
nThe birthday came,
11n0 the and so did Fannie and
S Susie and Teddie, and
II. "all the rest. The little
i ll four-year-old was full
of glee.
lIn the nursery they
played awhile with the
U dollies. There were
ever so many of them.
i-,.. ".i.' I 'They went to mamma's
room to see Gertie's
"-new birthday presents.
"And offthey skipped to
the parlor to have a nice
concert. They played
',and sang just like older
people, they thought.
They clapped their
MIss MIDGET. hands and said Gertie
sang the boofuless." They called her Miss Midget, and gave her
a basket of flowers. She played make a bow, and said Fank
you."
Supper came now, and they each had a piece of birthday cake,
which Ellen, the cook, had made and marked Gertie, four years,"
with red plums on the white frosting.
Then the fIwens said Good-bye," and went away home.


ll fc _-_-_-: _.-:,. Y
' ' 2 -- "-:;:----7.)-I /'.'


4 ending the A4 ol J lothe,.

How doll's clothes do wear out, and the dollies themselves get out
of order. For many blocks around, Miss Christie, the Doll-mender,
was the children's friend. To her they came with their pets and
left them for days in her tender care. Even the nice little ladies
came in their papa's carriages from the great city near by and
brought thier elegant dolls to see if she could restore their faded
beauty. Her father had been a maker of these toys in-France, and
many an hour she had sat beside him and seen how arms were hung,
hair curled and put on, and the eyes made to open and shut; and
she could do it now. When she was not too busy she talked with
her visitors about many things, for Miss Christie was an intelligent
person. She told them that the ladies of the royal family of England
learried to sew when they were young.
This impressed Lucy and made her wish to learn to sew. So
she begins by mending her doll's clothes, and is very careful to do it
jwell. She thinks she shall be able some day to make fine stitches
like those which Miss Christie showed her had been made by Prin-
c, ess Louise.


" P


WHAT a fine horse have I!
I am sure if we try
We can run around the world just so-
We will see every sight,
And be back before night -
So get up, horsey, go, go, go !





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOMEi


She ine I pple.

THIS fruit grows in a warm climate in those countries where
are many bright flowers. It takes this name because it looks some-
what like the cone, or fruit of the pine tree of the forest. Who does
not like the juicy pulp with its rich, delicious flavor? Shall we ask
John to bring home one from the fruit seller's this afternoon?


WHEN she was four
|, ,,years old ertie's .."' "oth-
I''''~ I'I. er made her a birthday
ll1 party. Papa printed
,, I,,,l l, ,I :, i ... i:: the daintiest cards, and
,i," ,i she went away with
.. ,,,',' '' "l''i' I',i Jam es in the carriage
!,,', i.' .,', and 'vited her ," fwens."
nThe birthday came,
11n0 the and so did Fannie and
S Susie and Teddie, and
II. "all the rest. The little
i ll four-year-old was full
of glee.
lIn the nursery they
played awhile with the
U dollies. There were
ever so many of them.
i-,.. ".i.' I 'They went to mamma's
room to see Gertie's
"-new birthday presents.
"And offthey skipped to
the parlor to have a nice
concert. They played
',and sang just like older
people, they thought.
They clapped their
MIss MIDGET. hands and said Gertie
sang the boofuless." They called her Miss Midget, and gave her
a basket of flowers. She played make a bow, and said Fank
you."
Supper came now, and they each had a piece of birthday cake,
which Ellen, the cook, had made and marked Gertie, four years,"
with red plums on the white frosting.
Then the fIwens said Good-bye," and went away home.


ll fc _-_-_-: _.-:,. Y
' ' 2 -- "-:;:----7.)-I /'.'


4 ending the A4 ol J lothe,.

How doll's clothes do wear out, and the dollies themselves get out
of order. For many blocks around, Miss Christie, the Doll-mender,
was the children's friend. To her they came with their pets and
left them for days in her tender care. Even the nice little ladies
came in their papa's carriages from the great city near by and
brought thier elegant dolls to see if she could restore their faded
beauty. Her father had been a maker of these toys in-France, and
many an hour she had sat beside him and seen how arms were hung,
hair curled and put on, and the eyes made to open and shut; and
she could do it now. When she was not too busy she talked with
her visitors about many things, for Miss Christie was an intelligent
person. She told them that the ladies of the royal family of England
learried to sew when they were young.
This impressed Lucy and made her wish to learn to sew. So
she begins by mending her doll's clothes, and is very careful to do it
jwell. She thinks she shall be able some day to make fine stitches
like those which Miss Christie showed her had been made by Prin-
c, ess Louise.


" P


WHAT a fine horse have I!
I am sure if we try
We can run around the world just so-
We will see every sight,
And be back before night -
So get up, horsey, go, go, go !





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOMEi


She ine I pple.

THIS fruit grows in a warm climate in those countries where
are many bright flowers. It takes this name because it looks some-
what like the cone, or fruit of the pine tree of the forest. Who does
not like the juicy pulp with its rich, delicious flavor? Shall we ask
John to bring home one from the fruit seller's this afternoon?


WHEN she was four
|, ,,years old ertie's .."' "oth-
I''''~ I'I. er made her a birthday
ll1 party. Papa printed
,, I,,,l l, ,I :, i ... i:: the daintiest cards, and
,i," ,i she went away with
.. ,,,',' '' "l''i' I',i Jam es in the carriage
!,,', i.' .,', and 'vited her ," fwens."
nThe birthday came,
11n0 the and so did Fannie and
S Susie and Teddie, and
II. "all the rest. The little
i ll four-year-old was full
of glee.
lIn the nursery they
played awhile with the
U dollies. There were
ever so many of them.
i-,.. ".i.' I 'They went to mamma's
room to see Gertie's
"-new birthday presents.
"And offthey skipped to
the parlor to have a nice
concert. They played
',and sang just like older
people, they thought.
They clapped their
MIss MIDGET. hands and said Gertie
sang the boofuless." They called her Miss Midget, and gave her
a basket of flowers. She played make a bow, and said Fank
you."
Supper came now, and they each had a piece of birthday cake,
which Ellen, the cook, had made and marked Gertie, four years,"
with red plums on the white frosting.
Then the fIwens said Good-bye," and went away home.


ll fc _-_-_-: _.-:,. Y
' ' 2 -- "-:;:----7.)-I /'.'


4 ending the A4 ol J lothe,.

How doll's clothes do wear out, and the dollies themselves get out
of order. For many blocks around, Miss Christie, the Doll-mender,
was the children's friend. To her they came with their pets and
left them for days in her tender care. Even the nice little ladies
came in their papa's carriages from the great city near by and
brought thier elegant dolls to see if she could restore their faded
beauty. Her father had been a maker of these toys in-France, and
many an hour she had sat beside him and seen how arms were hung,
hair curled and put on, and the eyes made to open and shut; and
she could do it now. When she was not too busy she talked with
her visitors about many things, for Miss Christie was an intelligent
person. She told them that the ladies of the royal family of England
learried to sew when they were young.
This impressed Lucy and made her wish to learn to sew. So
she begins by mending her doll's clothes, and is very careful to do it
jwell. She thinks she shall be able some day to make fine stitches
like those which Miss Christie showed her had been made by Prin-
c, ess Louise.


" P


WHAT a fine horse have I!
I am sure if we try
We can run around the world just so-
We will see every sight,
And be back before night -
So get up, horsey, go, go, go !






SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


But the Grizzly Bear is the largest and most ferocious of thi
family. He is twice the size of the Black Bear. His feet are very
large, and are adapted to digging up the ground, but he cannot
climb trees as can his brothers and sisters. He lives about the
Rocky Mountains, where he reigns as much of a monarch as the
lion is "of the sandy wastes of Africa." The Indians regard him
with great fear. He can endure many wounds, and the hunter who
fails to shoot him through the brain is often in great danger.


*w iag with Plate and *poon.

WHAT can folks be thinking about!
I'm tired of this chair-I want to get out,
Please, Mamma, take me away.
I'm too good to cry, but I want you to know
That plates, cups and spoons are no use to me, so
Just let me get down and play.



-fhe
Do you see these bears in the picture opposite? Are you not
afraid of them? They do not look as though they would harm any
one, do they? See how kindly the mother is looking at her cubs,
for that is what little bears are called, and the father, it may be, is
most contented as.he sits composedly in the trunk of the-tree. Do you
know very much about bears, any way? Let us see. Most people
think bears are very unsightly as they are covered with thick, shaggy
fur and look like a shapeless mass. It is true they vary in size,
some being about the size of a dog and others as large as a small
heifer.
The Black Bear is found in the northern parts of America, and
lives a lonely life in the forests and uncultivated parts, and eats
fruits and roots of vegetables. He is very fond of honey, and fish is
his delight, which he seeks on the borders of lakes, and when these
fail him, he will kill and eat small animals, for all bears eat either
animal or vegetable food; that is, a piece of sheep or lamb, an
apple, or a pot of-honey are each liked by them.
The Brown Bear is a solitary and a savage animal. He chooses
his den or home in the most gloomy parts of the forest, in some
cavern, or in the hollow of some old tree. When winter comes
on he goes away alone to his den, it is said, and passes this cold
time without food or even stirring abroad. A long sleep, is it not?
Away up in the cold regions of the North lives the Polar Bear.
It is a good deal larger than the Brown Bear, and is sometimes
twelve feet long. In the Polar regions it lives in great numbers, not
only on the land and fixed ice, but on the ice which floats away out
into the sea. This kind of bear is a dreaded foe. It dives in the
waters with great ease and chases the seal in. When seeking a seal
for his prey, he will swim a little way and then dive, and continue to
do this until the last dive brings him just where the seal is, which he
grasps and kills.
Honey Bear is a funny name, but this kind is a native of South
America. The Spanish missionaries give it this name because it
is a great destroyer of the nests of the wild bee. It has a long
tongue, with which it licks the honey out of the cells. This bear is
often kept in cages.


SubA and the icture6.


TILLIE GREY had a kitten given her for a birthday gift. She
was very fond of Kitty, and it was equally fond of Tillie. One day
her father brought home a new picture book, and Tillie sat down on
the carpet to see the pictures, and Kitty came, too.
"This picture is a dog," Tillie said. Kitty did not seem
interested. 0, cats don't like dogs. Cats and dogs fight,
mama says. Don't move your paws; if you do, I shall have to
hold them real tight. Now I'll read you a true story.
Once there was a little baby and he was born way off in Bef-
lehem. He hadn't any cradle, and he was put in a crib. Some wise
folks came to see him, and brought him presents. When he grew
up, cruel men put him to deff, and he went to live in heaven. He
loves little children and sends them nice things. Krismas is his birf-
day.
There, isnt that nice, Kitty?" And away they both ran
to Cousin Susy's home, to show the new book, Tillie with her

hair tossing in the wind, as happy and innocent as Kitty who
skipped by her side.





Catching a 1h.
DID you ever try
To catch a fly?
There he is,
The little quiz "
So still does he keep
You might think him asleep.
But, oh dear! no,
In a second or so
H-e is off on the wing,
The provoking thing !
He flies back once more
To the same place as before.
You are sure of him now.
Ii But with a polite little bow,
He flies coolly away,
And seems to say
"I wish you much joy
Trying to catch me, my boy!"






SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


But the Grizzly Bear is the largest and most ferocious of thi
family. He is twice the size of the Black Bear. His feet are very
large, and are adapted to digging up the ground, but he cannot
climb trees as can his brothers and sisters. He lives about the
Rocky Mountains, where he reigns as much of a monarch as the
lion is "of the sandy wastes of Africa." The Indians regard him
with great fear. He can endure many wounds, and the hunter who
fails to shoot him through the brain is often in great danger.


*w iag with Plate and *poon.

WHAT can folks be thinking about!
I'm tired of this chair-I want to get out,
Please, Mamma, take me away.
I'm too good to cry, but I want you to know
That plates, cups and spoons are no use to me, so
Just let me get down and play.



-fhe
Do you see these bears in the picture opposite? Are you not
afraid of them? They do not look as though they would harm any
one, do they? See how kindly the mother is looking at her cubs,
for that is what little bears are called, and the father, it may be, is
most contented as.he sits composedly in the trunk of the-tree. Do you
know very much about bears, any way? Let us see. Most people
think bears are very unsightly as they are covered with thick, shaggy
fur and look like a shapeless mass. It is true they vary in size,
some being about the size of a dog and others as large as a small
heifer.
The Black Bear is found in the northern parts of America, and
lives a lonely life in the forests and uncultivated parts, and eats
fruits and roots of vegetables. He is very fond of honey, and fish is
his delight, which he seeks on the borders of lakes, and when these
fail him, he will kill and eat small animals, for all bears eat either
animal or vegetable food; that is, a piece of sheep or lamb, an
apple, or a pot of-honey are each liked by them.
The Brown Bear is a solitary and a savage animal. He chooses
his den or home in the most gloomy parts of the forest, in some
cavern, or in the hollow of some old tree. When winter comes
on he goes away alone to his den, it is said, and passes this cold
time without food or even stirring abroad. A long sleep, is it not?
Away up in the cold regions of the North lives the Polar Bear.
It is a good deal larger than the Brown Bear, and is sometimes
twelve feet long. In the Polar regions it lives in great numbers, not
only on the land and fixed ice, but on the ice which floats away out
into the sea. This kind of bear is a dreaded foe. It dives in the
waters with great ease and chases the seal in. When seeking a seal
for his prey, he will swim a little way and then dive, and continue to
do this until the last dive brings him just where the seal is, which he
grasps and kills.
Honey Bear is a funny name, but this kind is a native of South
America. The Spanish missionaries give it this name because it
is a great destroyer of the nests of the wild bee. It has a long
tongue, with which it licks the honey out of the cells. This bear is
often kept in cages.


SubA and the icture6.


TILLIE GREY had a kitten given her for a birthday gift. She
was very fond of Kitty, and it was equally fond of Tillie. One day
her father brought home a new picture book, and Tillie sat down on
the carpet to see the pictures, and Kitty came, too.
"This picture is a dog," Tillie said. Kitty did not seem
interested. 0, cats don't like dogs. Cats and dogs fight,
mama says. Don't move your paws; if you do, I shall have to
hold them real tight. Now I'll read you a true story.
Once there was a little baby and he was born way off in Bef-
lehem. He hadn't any cradle, and he was put in a crib. Some wise
folks came to see him, and brought him presents. When he grew
up, cruel men put him to deff, and he went to live in heaven. He
loves little children and sends them nice things. Krismas is his birf-
day.
There, isnt that nice, Kitty?" And away they both ran
to Cousin Susy's home, to show the new book, Tillie with her

hair tossing in the wind, as happy and innocent as Kitty who
skipped by her side.





Catching a 1h.
DID you ever try
To catch a fly?
There he is,
The little quiz "
So still does he keep
You might think him asleep.
But, oh dear! no,
In a second or so
H-e is off on the wing,
The provoking thing !
He flies back once more
To the same place as before.
You are sure of him now.
Ii But with a polite little bow,
He flies coolly away,
And seems to say
"I wish you much joy
Trying to catch me, my boy!"






SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


But the Grizzly Bear is the largest and most ferocious of thi
family. He is twice the size of the Black Bear. His feet are very
large, and are adapted to digging up the ground, but he cannot
climb trees as can his brothers and sisters. He lives about the
Rocky Mountains, where he reigns as much of a monarch as the
lion is "of the sandy wastes of Africa." The Indians regard him
with great fear. He can endure many wounds, and the hunter who
fails to shoot him through the brain is often in great danger.


*w iag with Plate and *poon.

WHAT can folks be thinking about!
I'm tired of this chair-I want to get out,
Please, Mamma, take me away.
I'm too good to cry, but I want you to know
That plates, cups and spoons are no use to me, so
Just let me get down and play.



-fhe
Do you see these bears in the picture opposite? Are you not
afraid of them? They do not look as though they would harm any
one, do they? See how kindly the mother is looking at her cubs,
for that is what little bears are called, and the father, it may be, is
most contented as.he sits composedly in the trunk of the-tree. Do you
know very much about bears, any way? Let us see. Most people
think bears are very unsightly as they are covered with thick, shaggy
fur and look like a shapeless mass. It is true they vary in size,
some being about the size of a dog and others as large as a small
heifer.
The Black Bear is found in the northern parts of America, and
lives a lonely life in the forests and uncultivated parts, and eats
fruits and roots of vegetables. He is very fond of honey, and fish is
his delight, which he seeks on the borders of lakes, and when these
fail him, he will kill and eat small animals, for all bears eat either
animal or vegetable food; that is, a piece of sheep or lamb, an
apple, or a pot of-honey are each liked by them.
The Brown Bear is a solitary and a savage animal. He chooses
his den or home in the most gloomy parts of the forest, in some
cavern, or in the hollow of some old tree. When winter comes
on he goes away alone to his den, it is said, and passes this cold
time without food or even stirring abroad. A long sleep, is it not?
Away up in the cold regions of the North lives the Polar Bear.
It is a good deal larger than the Brown Bear, and is sometimes
twelve feet long. In the Polar regions it lives in great numbers, not
only on the land and fixed ice, but on the ice which floats away out
into the sea. This kind of bear is a dreaded foe. It dives in the
waters with great ease and chases the seal in. When seeking a seal
for his prey, he will swim a little way and then dive, and continue to
do this until the last dive brings him just where the seal is, which he
grasps and kills.
Honey Bear is a funny name, but this kind is a native of South
America. The Spanish missionaries give it this name because it
is a great destroyer of the nests of the wild bee. It has a long
tongue, with which it licks the honey out of the cells. This bear is
often kept in cages.


SubA and the icture6.


TILLIE GREY had a kitten given her for a birthday gift. She
was very fond of Kitty, and it was equally fond of Tillie. One day
her father brought home a new picture book, and Tillie sat down on
the carpet to see the pictures, and Kitty came, too.
"This picture is a dog," Tillie said. Kitty did not seem
interested. 0, cats don't like dogs. Cats and dogs fight,
mama says. Don't move your paws; if you do, I shall have to
hold them real tight. Now I'll read you a true story.
Once there was a little baby and he was born way off in Bef-
lehem. He hadn't any cradle, and he was put in a crib. Some wise
folks came to see him, and brought him presents. When he grew
up, cruel men put him to deff, and he went to live in heaven. He
loves little children and sends them nice things. Krismas is his birf-
day.
There, isnt that nice, Kitty?" And away they both ran
to Cousin Susy's home, to show the new book, Tillie with her

hair tossing in the wind, as happy and innocent as Kitty who
skipped by her side.





Catching a 1h.
DID you ever try
To catch a fly?
There he is,
The little quiz "
So still does he keep
You might think him asleep.
But, oh dear! no,
In a second or so
H-e is off on the wing,
The provoking thing !
He flies back once more
To the same place as before.
You are sure of him now.
Ii But with a polite little bow,
He flies coolly away,
And seems to say
"I wish you much joy
Trying to catch me, my boy!"






SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


But the Grizzly Bear is the largest and most ferocious of thi
family. He is twice the size of the Black Bear. His feet are very
large, and are adapted to digging up the ground, but he cannot
climb trees as can his brothers and sisters. He lives about the
Rocky Mountains, where he reigns as much of a monarch as the
lion is "of the sandy wastes of Africa." The Indians regard him
with great fear. He can endure many wounds, and the hunter who
fails to shoot him through the brain is often in great danger.


*w iag with Plate and *poon.

WHAT can folks be thinking about!
I'm tired of this chair-I want to get out,
Please, Mamma, take me away.
I'm too good to cry, but I want you to know
That plates, cups and spoons are no use to me, so
Just let me get down and play.



-fhe
Do you see these bears in the picture opposite? Are you not
afraid of them? They do not look as though they would harm any
one, do they? See how kindly the mother is looking at her cubs,
for that is what little bears are called, and the father, it may be, is
most contented as.he sits composedly in the trunk of the-tree. Do you
know very much about bears, any way? Let us see. Most people
think bears are very unsightly as they are covered with thick, shaggy
fur and look like a shapeless mass. It is true they vary in size,
some being about the size of a dog and others as large as a small
heifer.
The Black Bear is found in the northern parts of America, and
lives a lonely life in the forests and uncultivated parts, and eats
fruits and roots of vegetables. He is very fond of honey, and fish is
his delight, which he seeks on the borders of lakes, and when these
fail him, he will kill and eat small animals, for all bears eat either
animal or vegetable food; that is, a piece of sheep or lamb, an
apple, or a pot of-honey are each liked by them.
The Brown Bear is a solitary and a savage animal. He chooses
his den or home in the most gloomy parts of the forest, in some
cavern, or in the hollow of some old tree. When winter comes
on he goes away alone to his den, it is said, and passes this cold
time without food or even stirring abroad. A long sleep, is it not?
Away up in the cold regions of the North lives the Polar Bear.
It is a good deal larger than the Brown Bear, and is sometimes
twelve feet long. In the Polar regions it lives in great numbers, not
only on the land and fixed ice, but on the ice which floats away out
into the sea. This kind of bear is a dreaded foe. It dives in the
waters with great ease and chases the seal in. When seeking a seal
for his prey, he will swim a little way and then dive, and continue to
do this until the last dive brings him just where the seal is, which he
grasps and kills.
Honey Bear is a funny name, but this kind is a native of South
America. The Spanish missionaries give it this name because it
is a great destroyer of the nests of the wild bee. It has a long
tongue, with which it licks the honey out of the cells. This bear is
often kept in cages.


SubA and the icture6.


TILLIE GREY had a kitten given her for a birthday gift. She
was very fond of Kitty, and it was equally fond of Tillie. One day
her father brought home a new picture book, and Tillie sat down on
the carpet to see the pictures, and Kitty came, too.
"This picture is a dog," Tillie said. Kitty did not seem
interested. 0, cats don't like dogs. Cats and dogs fight,
mama says. Don't move your paws; if you do, I shall have to
hold them real tight. Now I'll read you a true story.
Once there was a little baby and he was born way off in Bef-
lehem. He hadn't any cradle, and he was put in a crib. Some wise
folks came to see him, and brought him presents. When he grew
up, cruel men put him to deff, and he went to live in heaven. He
loves little children and sends them nice things. Krismas is his birf-
day.
There, isnt that nice, Kitty?" And away they both ran
to Cousin Susy's home, to show the new book, Tillie with her

hair tossing in the wind, as happy and innocent as Kitty who
skipped by her side.





Catching a 1h.
DID you ever try
To catch a fly?
There he is,
The little quiz "
So still does he keep
You might think him asleep.
But, oh dear! no,
In a second or so
H-e is off on the wing,
The provoking thing !
He flies back once more
To the same place as before.
You are sure of him now.
Ii But with a polite little bow,
He flies coolly away,
And seems to say
"I wish you much joy
Trying to catch me, my boy!"



















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THE BEAR FAMILY.




SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


THE FLORAL ALPHABET.


is for Arbutus,
First flower of Spring,
In the wild wood it blossoms,
Before the birds sing.


is for Buttercup,
So yellow and bright,
Placed under the chin,
It gives a rich light.

is for Clover,
Which cows love to eat;
It grows red and white,
All strewn at our feet.

is for Daisy,
S It bends with the breeze,
And grows in the meadows,
Way up to our knees.


is for the Elder,
With its Bush so tall,
I And its blossoms of Summer,
Turned to Berries in Fall.

is for the Fern,
So frail and so fair,
And the finest of Ferns
Is the Maiden Hair.

is for Geranium,
In both pot and bed,
F 'Tis a beautiful flower
When its blossom is red.


is for Holly,
With its bright red berry,
At Christmas we see it,
When all are so merry.


is for Ivy.
In the language of flowers
'Tis the symbol of friendship;
May nothing break ours.

- is for Jonquil,
So fragrant and sweet;
She's the Daffodil's sister,
And is decked quite as neat.


is for Kingcup,
Did you know it before?
'Tis the same little Buttercup
That blooms near the door

is for the Lily,
Blooming in valleys and over
the leas;
j" Solomon in all his glory was
Not arrayed like one of these."


is for the Moss,
On rock, tree, and ground,
From North Pole to South Pole,
Everywhere it is found.

r' is for Nasturtium,
Bright orange and yellow,
It grows where the earth
Is soft, rich and mellow.


^ ? s/\




SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


is for Oleander,
( Finest shrub to be seen,
With its large red flowers,
And leaves ever green.


is for the Pansy,
Which comes with good cheer,
And greets us with gladness,
In the Spring of the year.


is for Quaking-grass,
| With its spikelets so slight,
It trembles with zephyrs,
Be they ever so light.


is for the Rose,
Blooming boldly and true,
The emblem of love,
L) Past centuries through.


is for the Shamrock,
"Light-hearted" and green;
A dear little emblem
As ever was seen.


,is for Thistle,
To Scottish sons dear;
It's stood for their country
Many a long year.


K is for the Ule,
Very useful to some;
From its sap there is made
Both rubber and gum.


"'s for the Violet,
Type of modesty fair;
Its petals' sweet incense
Fills the pure air.


is for Woodbine,
With rich festoons gay,
Climbing here and there,
In most artless way.


is for Xanthium,
Name and plant rather trying,
But it has a good use,
By the dyer, for dyeing.


is for the Yew,
'Tis a small evergreen;
'Mid snow-storm and sunshine
Its color is seen.


is for Zinnia; 7
Now do not forget,
There are lots of rare flowers
To learn about yet.


Little ones:
r "There's wit in every flower,
2 If you can gather it."-sAirle





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


" Now," said she to herself, every year, when I have a birthday,
mamma always makes me a present, and lets me have some little
girls to tea. I have always bought her present; but this year, I
mean to give her one that I have helped to make. She loves flowers
dearly, and I shall take such care of my plants that when her birth-
day comes, there will be a beautiful bouquet for her." Kittie did all that
she planned. She bought seeds that would bear sweet and pretty
flowers, and planted them with great care. It was quite a trial, then,
to wait until they sent up the first little green leaves; but she was
very patient, and the -plants rewarded her for her care by growing
as rapidly as they could. When Kittie saw the first buds, she was
almost wild with joy, and spent all of her play-time watching the
little leaves unfold into perfect flowers. And now the morning of
her mamma's birthday came, and Kittie went out to gather the
flowers. How beautiful and sweet they were Just as she was go-
ing back to the house, she met her mamma on the way and gave her
the flowers.
How pleased and surprised mamma was at her little daughter's
thoughtfulness, and how happy Kittie was, that she had thought of
the flowers.


Tins is not the cow with crumpled horn that ate the malt that
lay in the house which Jack built." Not at all: This cow lives in
New Hampshire, and feeds in the rich meadows of Farmer Tuck.
I think she is of Jersey stock. Does that mean that her ancestors
came from the island of Jersey ?
Daisy is a gentle cow and does not stray away so as to be fur-
nished with a bell on her neck, to tell where she may be found.
Morning and evening she gives her owner a brimming pail of foam-
ing milk. Drinking this rich milk has made the cheeks of Mary and
Susie, two twin sisters from a far-away city, round and plump.
Johnnie, who likes a good time, says he is sorry for the boys and
girls who cannot have the fun he does. Every day he has a frolic in
the lane with Daisy's bossy calf. See it now in the picture, looking
as if it is just back from a frisky run in which it has beaten Johnnie.
Patiently and lovingly the cow stands, holding out her head, as
if she would say, if she could speak, '- You are my child, and I love
you."
God made the dumb animals, and wishes us to be kind to them.


5amma'b irthdaq.

ONE bright morning in the spring, as Kittie and her papa and
mamma were seated at the breakfast table, Kittie's papa said, I
think it is getting warm enough now to see about having the garden
ploughed and planted." "Oh, papa!" said Kittie, "will you give
me a little piece of your garden, and let me plant and take care of
it?" Her papa said that he would, and Kittie was a very happy
little girl, and went singing around the house, smiling to herself, for
she had an idea that she meant to keep to herself for a time. But if
you won't tell any one, we will tell you what she was thinking about.


In ;hhe eadow.

WHAT a fine time our little Ada is having, as she walks in the
meadow among the tall grass. Perhaps she has found a bird's nest,
with little speckled eggs in it. See, she herself moves about as
lightly as a little birdie.


*{





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


" Now," said she to herself, every year, when I have a birthday,
mamma always makes me a present, and lets me have some little
girls to tea. I have always bought her present; but this year, I
mean to give her one that I have helped to make. She loves flowers
dearly, and I shall take such care of my plants that when her birth-
day comes, there will be a beautiful bouquet for her." Kittie did all that
she planned. She bought seeds that would bear sweet and pretty
flowers, and planted them with great care. It was quite a trial, then,
to wait until they sent up the first little green leaves; but she was
very patient, and the -plants rewarded her for her care by growing
as rapidly as they could. When Kittie saw the first buds, she was
almost wild with joy, and spent all of her play-time watching the
little leaves unfold into perfect flowers. And now the morning of
her mamma's birthday came, and Kittie went out to gather the
flowers. How beautiful and sweet they were Just as she was go-
ing back to the house, she met her mamma on the way and gave her
the flowers.
How pleased and surprised mamma was at her little daughter's
thoughtfulness, and how happy Kittie was, that she had thought of
the flowers.


Tins is not the cow with crumpled horn that ate the malt that
lay in the house which Jack built." Not at all: This cow lives in
New Hampshire, and feeds in the rich meadows of Farmer Tuck.
I think she is of Jersey stock. Does that mean that her ancestors
came from the island of Jersey ?
Daisy is a gentle cow and does not stray away so as to be fur-
nished with a bell on her neck, to tell where she may be found.
Morning and evening she gives her owner a brimming pail of foam-
ing milk. Drinking this rich milk has made the cheeks of Mary and
Susie, two twin sisters from a far-away city, round and plump.
Johnnie, who likes a good time, says he is sorry for the boys and
girls who cannot have the fun he does. Every day he has a frolic in
the lane with Daisy's bossy calf. See it now in the picture, looking
as if it is just back from a frisky run in which it has beaten Johnnie.
Patiently and lovingly the cow stands, holding out her head, as
if she would say, if she could speak, '- You are my child, and I love
you."
God made the dumb animals, and wishes us to be kind to them.


5amma'b irthdaq.

ONE bright morning in the spring, as Kittie and her papa and
mamma were seated at the breakfast table, Kittie's papa said, I
think it is getting warm enough now to see about having the garden
ploughed and planted." "Oh, papa!" said Kittie, "will you give
me a little piece of your garden, and let me plant and take care of
it?" Her papa said that he would, and Kittie was a very happy
little girl, and went singing around the house, smiling to herself, for
she had an idea that she meant to keep to herself for a time. But if
you won't tell any one, we will tell you what she was thinking about.


In ;hhe eadow.

WHAT a fine time our little Ada is having, as she walks in the
meadow among the tall grass. Perhaps she has found a bird's nest,
with little speckled eggs in it. See, she herself moves about as
lightly as a little birdie.


*{





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


Phe candman.


How beautiful the night must be
If I could only keep awake,
The stars and moonshine I could see
As o'er the roof their way they take.

The shining stars peep through the glass,
The moonbeams on the meadows play,
They shine upon the dewy grass
And make it prettier than by day.

Like tiny watchmen in the sky
The stars look down with laughing eyes.
And elves and fairies passing by
Look up at them, in glad surprise.

The nightingale in yonder tree
Sings out a lively wedding march,
A fairy wedding dance shall be
Beneath the graceful silver larch.

The fireflies come to give their light,
They dance, and fly, and flit about.
Oh I should dearly like some night
To see a merry fairies' rout.

But ere the cuckoo clock strikes eight,
My heavy eyes are full of sand,
And fairy balls begin so late
That I'm too sleepy far to stand.

0 Sandman, why do you do so?
Always the same bad trick you play,
And I to bed must early go.
And fairies never come by day.


Dear Sandman, just for once be kind,
And do not come again so soon,
If I'm awake I'm sure to find
The dancing elves; and see the moon.

In dreams alone the stars I see,
I never hear the elfking sing.
Oh! Sandman do not come to me
But ride off on your night bird's wing.




|he -|ow^ of the -Tield.

Cows are very harmless, but their horns make
them look ugly sometimes. I knew a lady who would
always run when she saw a cow. It was very foolish
to do so. She ran across the brook, and when
the cows came to the water they stopped and looked across at
her as if they were saying: We will not hurt you, and you don't
know what good milk we can give you; only let us have some of
this good water and eat the nice fresh grass and sweet clover that
grows along the banks." Cows are very useful. Besides the milk
they give us, their skins are used to make leather for our shoes, and
their horns to make buttons, and we all like the meat to eat, so that
we eat up nearly the whole cow, after we have drank her milk.


THE COWS OF THE FIELD.





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


4Jihe Aonnet grandma 4 ore.

MABEL'S father, who was a publisher in a large city, used to
come back to the old homestead, far away among the hills, every
summer, and take her with him. The brown house, with its lean-to
roof, stood unchanged. In the west chamber, which looked out
toward the setting sun, was the high-post bedstead with its chintz
curtains-the children used to call it the stage coach" in their
play,- the maple chest of drawers with brass handles, and the little
gilt-framed mirror.

There was grandma's trunk, too, in which were her treasures of
other days. Into this room Mabel liked to come, always with
grandma's permission, to look at the old-time things. The gowns
and bonnets amused her much, and she was delighted to put them on.

Dear grandma," she said, how old you must have looked in
this bonnet with such a high crown and flaring front. I wonder
where you wore it. Perhaps she'll tell me stories of her girlhood,"
and getting down from the flag-bottom chair and catching up the
train of grandma's wedding gown, away she went to ask the favor.

But the dear old lady was tired and fast asleep in her arm
chair, the sunlight falling on her snowy white hair. "Never
mind," said Mabel, softly, some time she'll tell me," and going
back she folded the things carefully and put them all in their places
again.


Q ickie and 4 ollt.

DICKIE and Dolly are two pretty birds,
Singing all day in their songs without words;
Flying about in the sun and the breeze,
Rising and falling like leaves on the trees.
Dickie and Dolly know nothing of care,
They are as free as their neighbor, the air:
Swinging on tree-top, or swaying on corn,
Merriest rattle-pates ever were born.
Dickie and Dolly, the jolly and bold,
What will you do when the winter's a-cold?
"Do?" says brave Dick, with a worm in his mouth,
"Do? Why, Johnnie, we'll leave and go south."



F3ancic in the iFirelight.

BEFORE the cheerful firelight in grandpa's sitting-room sat
Katie and Johnnie and little Bessie one autumn evening. The fire
crackled and blazed and sent clouds of fleecy smoke up the chimney.
Johnnie had thrown down his book, and Katie had drawn up the
cricket nearer the hearth.
O0, let us play .' Fancies in the Firelight,'" said Johnnie.
" Let me tell first what I see." And what do you think it was? A
giant in a coat of mail, his sword in his hand, riding on a horse
which wore a breastplate of steel all polished and bright.
Bessie saw butterflies all booful," and up and up they flew.
And Katie's fancy was in rhyme :
"When I'm a woman grown,
And go from father and mother
To live in a house of my own,
"I am to have pretty pictures
On the walls of every room-
Pictures to be like the sunshine,
That chases away all gloom.
"An artist will paint for me
If he can, our apple tree,
All covered with blossoms,
And under it you and me.
I'm to have dear mother's picture,
Mother dear we'll always keep -
Just as she looks bending over
The baby when he's asleep.
And with all these pictures, you see,
I cannot feel sad and lone
When, away from father and mother
I live in a house of my own."


FANCIES IN THE FIRELIGHT.





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


4Jihe Aonnet grandma 4 ore.

MABEL'S father, who was a publisher in a large city, used to
come back to the old homestead, far away among the hills, every
summer, and take her with him. The brown house, with its lean-to
roof, stood unchanged. In the west chamber, which looked out
toward the setting sun, was the high-post bedstead with its chintz
curtains-the children used to call it the stage coach" in their
play,- the maple chest of drawers with brass handles, and the little
gilt-framed mirror.

There was grandma's trunk, too, in which were her treasures of
other days. Into this room Mabel liked to come, always with
grandma's permission, to look at the old-time things. The gowns
and bonnets amused her much, and she was delighted to put them on.

Dear grandma," she said, how old you must have looked in
this bonnet with such a high crown and flaring front. I wonder
where you wore it. Perhaps she'll tell me stories of her girlhood,"
and getting down from the flag-bottom chair and catching up the
train of grandma's wedding gown, away she went to ask the favor.

But the dear old lady was tired and fast asleep in her arm
chair, the sunlight falling on her snowy white hair. "Never
mind," said Mabel, softly, some time she'll tell me," and going
back she folded the things carefully and put them all in their places
again.


Q ickie and 4 ollt.

DICKIE and Dolly are two pretty birds,
Singing all day in their songs without words;
Flying about in the sun and the breeze,
Rising and falling like leaves on the trees.
Dickie and Dolly know nothing of care,
They are as free as their neighbor, the air:
Swinging on tree-top, or swaying on corn,
Merriest rattle-pates ever were born.
Dickie and Dolly, the jolly and bold,
What will you do when the winter's a-cold?
"Do?" says brave Dick, with a worm in his mouth,
"Do? Why, Johnnie, we'll leave and go south."



F3ancic in the iFirelight.

BEFORE the cheerful firelight in grandpa's sitting-room sat
Katie and Johnnie and little Bessie one autumn evening. The fire
crackled and blazed and sent clouds of fleecy smoke up the chimney.
Johnnie had thrown down his book, and Katie had drawn up the
cricket nearer the hearth.
O0, let us play .' Fancies in the Firelight,'" said Johnnie.
" Let me tell first what I see." And what do you think it was? A
giant in a coat of mail, his sword in his hand, riding on a horse
which wore a breastplate of steel all polished and bright.
Bessie saw butterflies all booful," and up and up they flew.
And Katie's fancy was in rhyme :
"When I'm a woman grown,
And go from father and mother
To live in a house of my own,
"I am to have pretty pictures
On the walls of every room-
Pictures to be like the sunshine,
That chases away all gloom.
"An artist will paint for me
If he can, our apple tree,
All covered with blossoms,
And under it you and me.
I'm to have dear mother's picture,
Mother dear we'll always keep -
Just as she looks bending over
The baby when he's asleep.
And with all these pictures, you see,
I cannot feel sad and lone
When, away from father and mother
I live in a house of my own."


FANCIES IN THE FIRELIGHT.





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


4Jihe Aonnet grandma 4 ore.

MABEL'S father, who was a publisher in a large city, used to
come back to the old homestead, far away among the hills, every
summer, and take her with him. The brown house, with its lean-to
roof, stood unchanged. In the west chamber, which looked out
toward the setting sun, was the high-post bedstead with its chintz
curtains-the children used to call it the stage coach" in their
play,- the maple chest of drawers with brass handles, and the little
gilt-framed mirror.

There was grandma's trunk, too, in which were her treasures of
other days. Into this room Mabel liked to come, always with
grandma's permission, to look at the old-time things. The gowns
and bonnets amused her much, and she was delighted to put them on.

Dear grandma," she said, how old you must have looked in
this bonnet with such a high crown and flaring front. I wonder
where you wore it. Perhaps she'll tell me stories of her girlhood,"
and getting down from the flag-bottom chair and catching up the
train of grandma's wedding gown, away she went to ask the favor.

But the dear old lady was tired and fast asleep in her arm
chair, the sunlight falling on her snowy white hair. "Never
mind," said Mabel, softly, some time she'll tell me," and going
back she folded the things carefully and put them all in their places
again.


Q ickie and 4 ollt.

DICKIE and Dolly are two pretty birds,
Singing all day in their songs without words;
Flying about in the sun and the breeze,
Rising and falling like leaves on the trees.
Dickie and Dolly know nothing of care,
They are as free as their neighbor, the air:
Swinging on tree-top, or swaying on corn,
Merriest rattle-pates ever were born.
Dickie and Dolly, the jolly and bold,
What will you do when the winter's a-cold?
"Do?" says brave Dick, with a worm in his mouth,
"Do? Why, Johnnie, we'll leave and go south."



F3ancic in the iFirelight.

BEFORE the cheerful firelight in grandpa's sitting-room sat
Katie and Johnnie and little Bessie one autumn evening. The fire
crackled and blazed and sent clouds of fleecy smoke up the chimney.
Johnnie had thrown down his book, and Katie had drawn up the
cricket nearer the hearth.
O0, let us play .' Fancies in the Firelight,'" said Johnnie.
" Let me tell first what I see." And what do you think it was? A
giant in a coat of mail, his sword in his hand, riding on a horse
which wore a breastplate of steel all polished and bright.
Bessie saw butterflies all booful," and up and up they flew.
And Katie's fancy was in rhyme :
"When I'm a woman grown,
And go from father and mother
To live in a house of my own,
"I am to have pretty pictures
On the walls of every room-
Pictures to be like the sunshine,
That chases away all gloom.
"An artist will paint for me
If he can, our apple tree,
All covered with blossoms,
And under it you and me.
I'm to have dear mother's picture,
Mother dear we'll always keep -
Just as she looks bending over
The baby when he's asleep.
And with all these pictures, you see,
I cannot feel sad and lone
When, away from father and mother
I live in a house of my own."


FANCIES IN THE FIRELIGHT.





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


Now did you think that it would be
So wonderful and fine ?
Such beauties did you hope to see,
Dear little brother mine ?
Why baby how surprised you look !
And oh how wonderwise !
Is it a pretty picture book
That spreads before your eyes ?


Look at the mountains far away,
The streamlet rushing by,
The apple blossom and the May,
The birds, the bees, that dragon fly !
The springing corn, the cherry tree,
That robin, and those pigeons white!
Now did you think that you would see
So wonderful a sight?


Little e rop of- AVater.

Little drops of water,
Little grains of sand,
Make the mighty ocean,
And the pleasant land.
Little deeds of kindness,
Little words of love,
Make our earth an Eden,
Like the Heaven above.





In the Sulk.

Oh dear how very cross I am,
I don't know what to say,
With trumpet, rocking-horse and drum
I do not care to play.
My puzzles, too, are no more good,
I cannot use them if I would.
Even Aunt Kitty teases me.
I do not like my ball.
My gun, and my new helmet bright,
They please me not at all.
And then I'm always cross they say;
Perhaps that's why I'm so to-day.


A, Cloriouo Weam!


Oh, the joy of a glorious team !
Beating all the powers of steam.
A crack of the whip and off they go,
Through the rain and through the snow.


We never stop for river
or sea,
And all are as safe as
safe can be
Ease and comfort all the way,
And, what is better, there's nothing to pay.
A thousand miles in a minute we go,
And all my passengers like it so.
Come mount and take a seat, my friend,
And away we'll go to your journey's end.


IN THE SULKS


Bab9'b Fir.t GlimpFc of the Wo rld.


C-if





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


Now did you think that it would be
So wonderful and fine ?
Such beauties did you hope to see,
Dear little brother mine ?
Why baby how surprised you look !
And oh how wonderwise !
Is it a pretty picture book
That spreads before your eyes ?


Look at the mountains far away,
The streamlet rushing by,
The apple blossom and the May,
The birds, the bees, that dragon fly !
The springing corn, the cherry tree,
That robin, and those pigeons white!
Now did you think that you would see
So wonderful a sight?


Little e rop of- AVater.

Little drops of water,
Little grains of sand,
Make the mighty ocean,
And the pleasant land.
Little deeds of kindness,
Little words of love,
Make our earth an Eden,
Like the Heaven above.





In the Sulk.

Oh dear how very cross I am,
I don't know what to say,
With trumpet, rocking-horse and drum
I do not care to play.
My puzzles, too, are no more good,
I cannot use them if I would.
Even Aunt Kitty teases me.
I do not like my ball.
My gun, and my new helmet bright,
They please me not at all.
And then I'm always cross they say;
Perhaps that's why I'm so to-day.


A, Cloriouo Weam!


Oh, the joy of a glorious team !
Beating all the powers of steam.
A crack of the whip and off they go,
Through the rain and through the snow.


We never stop for river
or sea,
And all are as safe as
safe can be
Ease and comfort all the way,
And, what is better, there's nothing to pay.
A thousand miles in a minute we go,
And all my passengers like it so.
Come mount and take a seat, my friend,
And away we'll go to your journey's end.


IN THE SULKS


Bab9'b Fir.t GlimpFc of the Wo rld.


C-if





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


Now did you think that it would be
So wonderful and fine ?
Such beauties did you hope to see,
Dear little brother mine ?
Why baby how surprised you look !
And oh how wonderwise !
Is it a pretty picture book
That spreads before your eyes ?


Look at the mountains far away,
The streamlet rushing by,
The apple blossom and the May,
The birds, the bees, that dragon fly !
The springing corn, the cherry tree,
That robin, and those pigeons white!
Now did you think that you would see
So wonderful a sight?


Little e rop of- AVater.

Little drops of water,
Little grains of sand,
Make the mighty ocean,
And the pleasant land.
Little deeds of kindness,
Little words of love,
Make our earth an Eden,
Like the Heaven above.





In the Sulk.

Oh dear how very cross I am,
I don't know what to say,
With trumpet, rocking-horse and drum
I do not care to play.
My puzzles, too, are no more good,
I cannot use them if I would.
Even Aunt Kitty teases me.
I do not like my ball.
My gun, and my new helmet bright,
They please me not at all.
And then I'm always cross they say;
Perhaps that's why I'm so to-day.


A, Cloriouo Weam!


Oh, the joy of a glorious team !
Beating all the powers of steam.
A crack of the whip and off they go,
Through the rain and through the snow.


We never stop for river
or sea,
And all are as safe as
safe can be
Ease and comfort all the way,
And, what is better, there's nothing to pay.
A thousand miles in a minute we go,
And all my passengers like it so.
Come mount and take a seat, my friend,
And away we'll go to your journey's end.


IN THE SULKS


Bab9'b Fir.t GlimpFc of the Wo rld.


C-if





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


Now did you think that it would be
So wonderful and fine ?
Such beauties did you hope to see,
Dear little brother mine ?
Why baby how surprised you look !
And oh how wonderwise !
Is it a pretty picture book
That spreads before your eyes ?


Look at the mountains far away,
The streamlet rushing by,
The apple blossom and the May,
The birds, the bees, that dragon fly !
The springing corn, the cherry tree,
That robin, and those pigeons white!
Now did you think that you would see
So wonderful a sight?


Little e rop of- AVater.

Little drops of water,
Little grains of sand,
Make the mighty ocean,
And the pleasant land.
Little deeds of kindness,
Little words of love,
Make our earth an Eden,
Like the Heaven above.





In the Sulk.

Oh dear how very cross I am,
I don't know what to say,
With trumpet, rocking-horse and drum
I do not care to play.
My puzzles, too, are no more good,
I cannot use them if I would.
Even Aunt Kitty teases me.
I do not like my ball.
My gun, and my new helmet bright,
They please me not at all.
And then I'm always cross they say;
Perhaps that's why I'm so to-day.


A, Cloriouo Weam!


Oh, the joy of a glorious team !
Beating all the powers of steam.
A crack of the whip and off they go,
Through the rain and through the snow.


We never stop for river
or sea,
And all are as safe as
safe can be
Ease and comfort all the way,
And, what is better, there's nothing to pay.
A thousand miles in a minute we go,
And all my passengers like it so.
Come mount and take a seat, my friend,
And away we'll go to your journey's end.


IN THE SULKS


Bab9'b Fir.t GlimpFc of the Wo rld.


C-if






SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


At the market arrived, she looked well about,
The very best pig she could find to pick out;
A white one she chose, and a bargain she
made,
And only a florin for Piggy she paid.


Her money thus spent she was puzzled to know
How both would get home if the pig wouldn't
go;
And fearing the creature might play her a trick,
She bought there, to drive him, a little crab
stick.


Through streets and through highways the little
Dame went,
With Piggy's behavior at first quite content;
Till, just as they came to the banks of a brook,
An obstinate fit little white Piggy took.


Neat Little Dame Crump, with her little hair broom.



Little name rump.



NEAT Little Dame Crump, with her little hair
broom,
One morning was sweeping her nice little room,
When casting her little gray eyes on the ground,
In a sly little corner a florin she found.

The Dame picked it up, and exclaimed with
surprise.
How lucky I am Oh, dear me, what a prize !
To market I'll go, and a pig I will buy.
And little John Gubbins shall build it a sty."

She put on her hat, and she tucked up her gown,
And locked up her house, and set off to town;
Across the green meadows she took her glad
way,
Where the hedges were white with the blossoms
of May.


So she went to a mill and borrowed a sack,
Which she hofaed Piggy in and placed on her back,


Piggy gave just a grunt; as if he woold say,
" Pray do as you like I shall have my own way."
So she went to a mill and borrowed a sack,
Which she popped Piggy, in and placed on her
back.


She carried him thus to his neat little sty,
And made him a litter of straw, fresh and dry,
With a handful of peas the Piggy was fed,
And soon fell asleep 4n his snug little bed.


The Dame very tired,,as you well may believe,
Was glad little Pig to his slumbers to leave:
She went straight to bed and she put out the
light, -
(But first said her pray'rs) -here we'll wish
her Good-night."


An obstinate fit little white Piggy took.


He stood still and grunted, and on wouldn't
go, -
Now, wasn't he naughty to tease the Dame so?
She, finding that coaxing and scolding were
vain,
Used her stick on his back till he went on again.

But, oh, not for long at the foot of the hill,
Where the pathway runs up to the neighboring
mill,
Once more he refused to proceed on his way,
And even the stick would no longer obey.

"Now what shall I do," said the poor little
Dame.
" Night draws on apace ; it is really a shame!
Well, Piggy, since thus you're resolved to stand
still,
I'll leave you and go up for help to the mill."


The Dame very tired, as you well may believe.


She bought there, to drive him, a little crab stick.




SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


Eling the 4ite.


HIGHER and higher, my beautiful kite,
Steadily, steadily speed on your fight,
Rise o'er the steeple, away through the air
Gently float onward, the evening is fair.
No wild wind to toss you as upward you fly -
I wish I could ride you, I'd mount to the sky,
Over the mountains and rivers and seas -
Anywhere, everywhere, just as I please.
I might find a land where there's
nothing but play,
No lessons to do, and
cake every day,
Where sums don't
come wrong, and all that you wear
Is made of a stuff that won't dirty or tear.
Where peg-tops and marbles are everywhere found,
Hoops that will trundle and balls that will bound;
And Oh dear, there I've fallen right over the wire
That runs round the flower bed ; -higher and higher
Away flies my kite, for I've broken the string-
Unchecked and unheeding away it takes wing-
How tiresome, the wire to come in. my way!
But that is what happens to dreamers by day.
And castles in air be they ever so fine,
Are sure to get tumbled and ruined like mine.
And thus it oft happens to people who try,
When running, to keep their eyes
fixed on the sky.


qust ike tamma.


It is great fun to dress up in mamma's
clothes and play "grown-up," but oh
dear I am glad I do not have to wear
such things all the time! These long,
heavy skirts would be always it the
way, and I could not run and play, nor
do half so much as I can do so easily
in my short dresses.
Between you and me, I think grown-
up ladies have just as hard a time taking
care of their dresses as we little girls.


JUST LIKE MAMMA.


4 ',


3abt Wrother.


This is my baby brother,
Just one year old to-day;
He cannot talk, he cannot wall
But he can laugh and play.

Step out now, baby brother,
And use your feet so small;
Oh, never fear, while I am her
You shall not have a fall.


I know I soil mine badly, and tear
them very often, but mamma always'
comes in on a wet day with the bottom
of her dress all muddy, and it takes
her a long time the next morning to clean
it, and the braid is always wearing
out. Then it is so much more trouble
to make her dresses than it is to make
mine. I believe, after all, that I'm
glad I am a little girl and can have
simple little dresses that are easy to
make and comfortable to wear.


e;

-e




SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


Eling the 4ite.


HIGHER and higher, my beautiful kite,
Steadily, steadily speed on your fight,
Rise o'er the steeple, away through the air
Gently float onward, the evening is fair.
No wild wind to toss you as upward you fly -
I wish I could ride you, I'd mount to the sky,
Over the mountains and rivers and seas -
Anywhere, everywhere, just as I please.
I might find a land where there's
nothing but play,
No lessons to do, and
cake every day,
Where sums don't
come wrong, and all that you wear
Is made of a stuff that won't dirty or tear.
Where peg-tops and marbles are everywhere found,
Hoops that will trundle and balls that will bound;
And Oh dear, there I've fallen right over the wire
That runs round the flower bed ; -higher and higher
Away flies my kite, for I've broken the string-
Unchecked and unheeding away it takes wing-
How tiresome, the wire to come in. my way!
But that is what happens to dreamers by day.
And castles in air be they ever so fine,
Are sure to get tumbled and ruined like mine.
And thus it oft happens to people who try,
When running, to keep their eyes
fixed on the sky.


qust ike tamma.


It is great fun to dress up in mamma's
clothes and play "grown-up," but oh
dear I am glad I do not have to wear
such things all the time! These long,
heavy skirts would be always it the
way, and I could not run and play, nor
do half so much as I can do so easily
in my short dresses.
Between you and me, I think grown-
up ladies have just as hard a time taking
care of their dresses as we little girls.


JUST LIKE MAMMA.


4 ',


3abt Wrother.


This is my baby brother,
Just one year old to-day;
He cannot talk, he cannot wall
But he can laugh and play.

Step out now, baby brother,
And use your feet so small;
Oh, never fear, while I am her
You shall not have a fall.


I know I soil mine badly, and tear
them very often, but mamma always'
comes in on a wet day with the bottom
of her dress all muddy, and it takes
her a long time the next morning to clean
it, and the braid is always wearing
out. Then it is so much more trouble
to make her dresses than it is to make
mine. I believe, after all, that I'm
glad I am a little girl and can have
simple little dresses that are easy to
make and comfortable to wear.


e;

-e




SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


Eling the 4ite.


HIGHER and higher, my beautiful kite,
Steadily, steadily speed on your fight,
Rise o'er the steeple, away through the air
Gently float onward, the evening is fair.
No wild wind to toss you as upward you fly -
I wish I could ride you, I'd mount to the sky,
Over the mountains and rivers and seas -
Anywhere, everywhere, just as I please.
I might find a land where there's
nothing but play,
No lessons to do, and
cake every day,
Where sums don't
come wrong, and all that you wear
Is made of a stuff that won't dirty or tear.
Where peg-tops and marbles are everywhere found,
Hoops that will trundle and balls that will bound;
And Oh dear, there I've fallen right over the wire
That runs round the flower bed ; -higher and higher
Away flies my kite, for I've broken the string-
Unchecked and unheeding away it takes wing-
How tiresome, the wire to come in. my way!
But that is what happens to dreamers by day.
And castles in air be they ever so fine,
Are sure to get tumbled and ruined like mine.
And thus it oft happens to people who try,
When running, to keep their eyes
fixed on the sky.


qust ike tamma.


It is great fun to dress up in mamma's
clothes and play "grown-up," but oh
dear I am glad I do not have to wear
such things all the time! These long,
heavy skirts would be always it the
way, and I could not run and play, nor
do half so much as I can do so easily
in my short dresses.
Between you and me, I think grown-
up ladies have just as hard a time taking
care of their dresses as we little girls.


JUST LIKE MAMMA.


4 ',


3abt Wrother.


This is my baby brother,
Just one year old to-day;
He cannot talk, he cannot wall
But he can laugh and play.

Step out now, baby brother,
And use your feet so small;
Oh, never fear, while I am her
You shall not have a fall.


I know I soil mine badly, and tear
them very often, but mamma always'
comes in on a wet day with the bottom
of her dress all muddy, and it takes
her a long time the next morning to clean
it, and the braid is always wearing
out. Then it is so much more trouble
to make her dresses than it is to make
mine. I believe, after all, that I'm
glad I am a little girl and can have
simple little dresses that are easy to
make and comfortable to wear.


e;

-e





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


The Wind- ill.
V. M
DID you ever see, a wind-mill? It is a curious building, where
wind is used to make the machinery go instead of steam or water.
SThe frames which you
see in the picture are
What the sails are placed
on, and when the wind
blows against them, they
Turn round and round,
.' following one another
.-around the axle, and
That moves all the ma-
chinery in the mill, and
the mill-stones, which
grind the grain. The
building is made small
so as not to be in the
way of the wind, and
prevent it from blowing
againstthe sails. Many
years ago they were
used to grind corn and
other grain; but now we
have steam engines that
will do more woik, and
will work, too, when
there is no wind, which
the wind-mill cannot do.
A great many wind-mills
| are used now for pump-
ling water on our farms,
Sbut very few for grinding

W incd-mills are to be
i found in some of the old
towns of New England,
....- and are very interesting
to visit. In Holland there are still a great many wind-mills, and
that country has always been renowned for the great number found
there.


;he sal.

SEALS live in very cold countries. They often crawl out of the
water and lie on the ice and banks to sport and sun themselves.
Then they are caught, or killed with spears, for they could not be
found easily in the water. They are not savage and do not fight
often, except when they have young seals to defend. Sometimes


they are tamed and then they are gentle and can be taught very odd
tricks, such as shaking hands, bowing the head, and smoking a pipe.
The hair of some seals is very soft and their skin very thin, and it
makes nice caps and cloaks for ladies.


Slakinq Fricnlo.

Now, Elsie, you're not cross I'm sure,
I did not mean to tease you, dear,
I'll never do so any more;
So don't you shed another tear.
Come, shall I give you all these flowers?
Or fetch some poppies from the wheat?
Some blowing clocks to count the hours,
Or else a hedge-rose, wild and sweet?
Perhaps I'll find some shaking grass
Of that I know you're very fond;
Or some forget-me-nots; we pass
Them, coming by the pond.
But we are friends again? Now see,
'Tis time for us to leave the dell;
So I will take you home; and we
Will go the way you love so well.
And I'll tell tales to you the while
As we are walking slowly on.
Ah ah you rogue, I see a smile,
At last we're friends -the quarrel's done.


Ulu- Peacock.

WIWHAT a handsome bird this is,
---- but how much more beautiful you
Should think it, if you could see the
bird, instead of the picture. In the
-- feathers of its tail, which it is able
_-to spread like a fan, are some of the
Most beautiful colors, green, gold-
-- en, bronze and blue. It is very
proud of its beauty and likes to
.show its feathers. Walking up and
down in the sunshine, or perched
on a gate post or branch of a tree,
Sit will spread its tail, and turn its
head this way and that, as much as
to say, Did you ever see such a
beauty as I?" and as long as it
keeps still (for it has so harsh a
voice, we do not like to hear it) we
are willing to say, No, we never
did." They feed on barley and
other grains. Its flesh is not good
for food, and they are kept only to
ornament lawns. In their native
S state, in India, Java, and Ceylon,
these birds run wild, strut about the
rice fields, and sometimes become
quite tame. In some countries, as
in Greece, the natives think them
Sacred, and never hunt or frighten
*' them, which causes them to lose theit
I shyness and become very familiar.


9


', 1, : 0 V
i~ lll~ l~~ l'l',l!,l'',,i If' "





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


The Wind- ill.
V. M
DID you ever see, a wind-mill? It is a curious building, where
wind is used to make the machinery go instead of steam or water.
SThe frames which you
see in the picture are
What the sails are placed
on, and when the wind
blows against them, they
Turn round and round,
.' following one another
.-around the axle, and
That moves all the ma-
chinery in the mill, and
the mill-stones, which
grind the grain. The
building is made small
so as not to be in the
way of the wind, and
prevent it from blowing
againstthe sails. Many
years ago they were
used to grind corn and
other grain; but now we
have steam engines that
will do more woik, and
will work, too, when
there is no wind, which
the wind-mill cannot do.
A great many wind-mills
| are used now for pump-
ling water on our farms,
Sbut very few for grinding

W incd-mills are to be
i found in some of the old
towns of New England,
....- and are very interesting
to visit. In Holland there are still a great many wind-mills, and
that country has always been renowned for the great number found
there.


;he sal.

SEALS live in very cold countries. They often crawl out of the
water and lie on the ice and banks to sport and sun themselves.
Then they are caught, or killed with spears, for they could not be
found easily in the water. They are not savage and do not fight
often, except when they have young seals to defend. Sometimes


they are tamed and then they are gentle and can be taught very odd
tricks, such as shaking hands, bowing the head, and smoking a pipe.
The hair of some seals is very soft and their skin very thin, and it
makes nice caps and cloaks for ladies.


Slakinq Fricnlo.

Now, Elsie, you're not cross I'm sure,
I did not mean to tease you, dear,
I'll never do so any more;
So don't you shed another tear.
Come, shall I give you all these flowers?
Or fetch some poppies from the wheat?
Some blowing clocks to count the hours,
Or else a hedge-rose, wild and sweet?
Perhaps I'll find some shaking grass
Of that I know you're very fond;
Or some forget-me-nots; we pass
Them, coming by the pond.
But we are friends again? Now see,
'Tis time for us to leave the dell;
So I will take you home; and we
Will go the way you love so well.
And I'll tell tales to you the while
As we are walking slowly on.
Ah ah you rogue, I see a smile,
At last we're friends -the quarrel's done.


Ulu- Peacock.

WIWHAT a handsome bird this is,
---- but how much more beautiful you
Should think it, if you could see the
bird, instead of the picture. In the
-- feathers of its tail, which it is able
_-to spread like a fan, are some of the
Most beautiful colors, green, gold-
-- en, bronze and blue. It is very
proud of its beauty and likes to
.show its feathers. Walking up and
down in the sunshine, or perched
on a gate post or branch of a tree,
Sit will spread its tail, and turn its
head this way and that, as much as
to say, Did you ever see such a
beauty as I?" and as long as it
keeps still (for it has so harsh a
voice, we do not like to hear it) we
are willing to say, No, we never
did." They feed on barley and
other grains. Its flesh is not good
for food, and they are kept only to
ornament lawns. In their native
S state, in India, Java, and Ceylon,
these birds run wild, strut about the
rice fields, and sometimes become
quite tame. In some countries, as
in Greece, the natives think them
Sacred, and never hunt or frighten
*' them, which causes them to lose theit
I shyness and become very familiar.


9


', 1, : 0 V
i~ lll~ l~~ l'l',l!,l'',,i If' "





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


The Wind- ill.
V. M
DID you ever see, a wind-mill? It is a curious building, where
wind is used to make the machinery go instead of steam or water.
SThe frames which you
see in the picture are
What the sails are placed
on, and when the wind
blows against them, they
Turn round and round,
.' following one another
.-around the axle, and
That moves all the ma-
chinery in the mill, and
the mill-stones, which
grind the grain. The
building is made small
so as not to be in the
way of the wind, and
prevent it from blowing
againstthe sails. Many
years ago they were
used to grind corn and
other grain; but now we
have steam engines that
will do more woik, and
will work, too, when
there is no wind, which
the wind-mill cannot do.
A great many wind-mills
| are used now for pump-
ling water on our farms,
Sbut very few for grinding

W incd-mills are to be
i found in some of the old
towns of New England,
....- and are very interesting
to visit. In Holland there are still a great many wind-mills, and
that country has always been renowned for the great number found
there.


;he sal.

SEALS live in very cold countries. They often crawl out of the
water and lie on the ice and banks to sport and sun themselves.
Then they are caught, or killed with spears, for they could not be
found easily in the water. They are not savage and do not fight
often, except when they have young seals to defend. Sometimes


they are tamed and then they are gentle and can be taught very odd
tricks, such as shaking hands, bowing the head, and smoking a pipe.
The hair of some seals is very soft and their skin very thin, and it
makes nice caps and cloaks for ladies.


Slakinq Fricnlo.

Now, Elsie, you're not cross I'm sure,
I did not mean to tease you, dear,
I'll never do so any more;
So don't you shed another tear.
Come, shall I give you all these flowers?
Or fetch some poppies from the wheat?
Some blowing clocks to count the hours,
Or else a hedge-rose, wild and sweet?
Perhaps I'll find some shaking grass
Of that I know you're very fond;
Or some forget-me-nots; we pass
Them, coming by the pond.
But we are friends again? Now see,
'Tis time for us to leave the dell;
So I will take you home; and we
Will go the way you love so well.
And I'll tell tales to you the while
As we are walking slowly on.
Ah ah you rogue, I see a smile,
At last we're friends -the quarrel's done.


Ulu- Peacock.

WIWHAT a handsome bird this is,
---- but how much more beautiful you
Should think it, if you could see the
bird, instead of the picture. In the
-- feathers of its tail, which it is able
_-to spread like a fan, are some of the
Most beautiful colors, green, gold-
-- en, bronze and blue. It is very
proud of its beauty and likes to
.show its feathers. Walking up and
down in the sunshine, or perched
on a gate post or branch of a tree,
Sit will spread its tail, and turn its
head this way and that, as much as
to say, Did you ever see such a
beauty as I?" and as long as it
keeps still (for it has so harsh a
voice, we do not like to hear it) we
are willing to say, No, we never
did." They feed on barley and
other grains. Its flesh is not good
for food, and they are kept only to
ornament lawns. In their native
S state, in India, Java, and Ceylon,
these birds run wild, strut about the
rice fields, and sometimes become
quite tame. In some countries, as
in Greece, the natives think them
Sacred, and never hunt or frighten
*' them, which causes them to lose theit
I shyness and become very familiar.


9


', 1, : 0 V
i~ lll~ l~~ l'l',l!,l'',,i If' "





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


The Wind- ill.
V. M
DID you ever see, a wind-mill? It is a curious building, where
wind is used to make the machinery go instead of steam or water.
SThe frames which you
see in the picture are
What the sails are placed
on, and when the wind
blows against them, they
Turn round and round,
.' following one another
.-around the axle, and
That moves all the ma-
chinery in the mill, and
the mill-stones, which
grind the grain. The
building is made small
so as not to be in the
way of the wind, and
prevent it from blowing
againstthe sails. Many
years ago they were
used to grind corn and
other grain; but now we
have steam engines that
will do more woik, and
will work, too, when
there is no wind, which
the wind-mill cannot do.
A great many wind-mills
| are used now for pump-
ling water on our farms,
Sbut very few for grinding

W incd-mills are to be
i found in some of the old
towns of New England,
....- and are very interesting
to visit. In Holland there are still a great many wind-mills, and
that country has always been renowned for the great number found
there.


;he sal.

SEALS live in very cold countries. They often crawl out of the
water and lie on the ice and banks to sport and sun themselves.
Then they are caught, or killed with spears, for they could not be
found easily in the water. They are not savage and do not fight
often, except when they have young seals to defend. Sometimes


they are tamed and then they are gentle and can be taught very odd
tricks, such as shaking hands, bowing the head, and smoking a pipe.
The hair of some seals is very soft and their skin very thin, and it
makes nice caps and cloaks for ladies.


Slakinq Fricnlo.

Now, Elsie, you're not cross I'm sure,
I did not mean to tease you, dear,
I'll never do so any more;
So don't you shed another tear.
Come, shall I give you all these flowers?
Or fetch some poppies from the wheat?
Some blowing clocks to count the hours,
Or else a hedge-rose, wild and sweet?
Perhaps I'll find some shaking grass
Of that I know you're very fond;
Or some forget-me-nots; we pass
Them, coming by the pond.
But we are friends again? Now see,
'Tis time for us to leave the dell;
So I will take you home; and we
Will go the way you love so well.
And I'll tell tales to you the while
As we are walking slowly on.
Ah ah you rogue, I see a smile,
At last we're friends -the quarrel's done.


Ulu- Peacock.

WIWHAT a handsome bird this is,
---- but how much more beautiful you
Should think it, if you could see the
bird, instead of the picture. In the
-- feathers of its tail, which it is able
_-to spread like a fan, are some of the
Most beautiful colors, green, gold-
-- en, bronze and blue. It is very
proud of its beauty and likes to
.show its feathers. Walking up and
down in the sunshine, or perched
on a gate post or branch of a tree,
Sit will spread its tail, and turn its
head this way and that, as much as
to say, Did you ever see such a
beauty as I?" and as long as it
keeps still (for it has so harsh a
voice, we do not like to hear it) we
are willing to say, No, we never
did." They feed on barley and
other grains. Its flesh is not good
for food, and they are kept only to
ornament lawns. In their native
S state, in India, Java, and Ceylon,
these birds run wild, strut about the
rice fields, and sometimes become
quite tame. In some countries, as
in Greece, the natives think them
Sacred, and never hunt or frighten
*' them, which causes them to lose theit
I shyness and become very familiar.


9


', 1, : 0 V
i~ lll~ l~~ l'l',l!,l'',,i If' "





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


POOR hlttle Will Martin He had never seen the country before, with
its green fields, and birds and flowers, for his home was in a tiny room in a
crowded city street, and there he had left his mother and two little sisters.
But he had been ill, and the clergyman who visited them from time to time
had sent him to his old coun-
try home, where kind Mr.
-" ,and Mrs. Norris and their lit-
tle daughter Polly had gladly
welcomed the pale, thin boy.
S''*"" for Will, full of new sights and sounds.
Soon after breakfast Polly and he started
for a long morning in the woods close to their
house. Will had never seen so many trees to-
', gether before, and he seemed never tired of look-
ing up through their leafy branches, and at the
tall ferns and brambles, rich 'with flowers and the
,o.,nise of fruit, which grew at their feet. Sometimes
PoI ll and Will would carry their dinner into the woods,
nr.l "- Ilay picnic." But the greatest treat was to take
S/ ftlI'i- dinner to him when he was at work too far
a. .\ t.. spare time to come home to it, for this meant
".,!k all through the wood and a merry dinner with
A Mi. Norris, and then home by a different way.
One day when they were returning through the
S ,:-, I, Polly suddenly stopped Will, and pointing to a
br' ich ...verhanging their path, whispered, There, there !
...n't \.-.u see? There's a dear little squirrel." And, look-
n"'''- I.'., Will saw a little brown head and a pair of bright
.. e ,:"-' ping out from among the leaves. Both children
t.'. -till, not daring, to move, lest the pretty creature
sh ..uil run away; but he seemed to have no fear and
sl.ip .Ld about the bough, showing his bushy tail and
10 quiLk, nimble movements, now hidingin a fork of the tree,
and then scrambling up the trunk, till at last he was out of sight. Next day,
and for many days, they paid visits to the tree, sometimes catching sight of
the squirrel and sometimes being disappointed; but each time they saw it
they longed the more to have a squirrel which they could keep and tame.
One afternoon Mrs. Norris called to them-
"Make haste, children, here's something father's got to show you."
"What can it be?" Will and Polly asked each other till they reached
the door, when they stood still with surprise; for on the table stood a long
strange looking box, part of it being round and made of wire, and the other
like a little house with a high roof and wire bars in front. Will ran and
peeped into the box, and shouted, "Oh, Polly, it's a squirrel! "
But when Polly reached the cage the squirrel had hidden behind some
hay, and she could only see the tip of his tail. It had been caught that day,
and Mr. Norris said, Be very gentle with it and you'll tame it."
From that day the squirrel was their chief delight. At first it disap-
pointed them by being very timid, and no tempting nut would draw it out
from behind the hay, so long as the eager little watchers were in sight, and
it would only feed when they were away or hidden. But by-and-by Puff, as
they named their pet, learned that they would do him no haim. The chil-
dren's thoughts were full of their new plaything, and everything he did was
the source of delight.
Every day Puff ',of tamer. One day he came to the bars and took a nut
out of Will's finge;s and sat with it in his two pretty paws, nibbling off
the shell. Polly was so delighted and so screamed for joy, that startled
Puff dropped his nut and whisked behind the hay. Puff was let out of his
cage and gambolled about the room. Ah what a saucy little fellow he was !
He would dart up the chairs and onto a beam which ran across the kitchen,
/! .I> 7'- and sit there crack-
ing nuts. Andthen
.'," -_ when Will called
/ "Puff, Puff," lihe
would jump onto
his shoulder, rub
4- his furry little face
T. against his cheek,
.- and take a nut
from his fingers,
and be off again
for another scram-
.' ble and romp. But
his great treat was
i a lump of sugar,
S' and this he always
I' had on Sundays, so
that, as Polly said,
"Puft may know
S it's Sunday."
Cne da3 Poll
.WE- was not very well,
so Will had to go
._by himself to carry
PUFFHI"L- HE O-- father's dinner, as
PUFF H11) 12N TEE Vo,,S. he was at work at


the other side of the woods. Generally if he had to go alone, he found, on
his return, the little maiden swinging on the garden gate, eagerly watching
for him. But to-day no Polly was visible and when he reached the door there
she sat crying bitterly, while her favorite doll lay on the floor with arms
stretched out and face turned dejectedly towards the ceiling.
"Why, what's the matter, Polly?" cried Will, stopping with surprise.
You mustn't be angry with her, Will," her mother said to him, but
she's let poor Puff out of his cage. But she didn't mean to, and when she
saw him run down the path and off into the wood, I thought she'd break
her heart, poor little thing." Then the little broken-hearted girl stole timidly
up to Will to ask him to forgive her. But when Polly put up her tear-
stained face and sobbed out something, Will pushed her away, saying, "I
don't want to kiss you; you're a bad girl to lose Puff," and burst out crying
himself.
It was a very dismal dinner, and it began raining soon after. Will could
not go into the wood to look for Puff, so the afternoon passed miserably
away. Will cried, and Polly cried. So when Father Norris returned he
found "as much rain indoors as out," as he said. At last Polly was taken
away to bed by her mother, and Will soon crept to his room feeling very
wretched. As he undressed, some words of his mother's came into his mind.
" We must be kind and forgive because God is so good and forgives," she
had often said to him. Then
stealing with bare feet to
Polly's bedside, he stooped
over her and whispered,
" Don't cry, Polly, I'm
sorry I've been cross, for
I'm sure you didn't mean
to lose Puff," and they
made friends, and Will
went back to his bed with
a happier heart.
Will woke next morn-
ing with the sunlight
streaming over his pillow,
and as soon as breakfast
was over, he started out
into the wood with a
pocket full of nuts to see
if he could by any chance
catch sight of Puff and
tempt him back.
At first he went mer-
rily along, peeping up into
every tree, but as an hour
passed and he had not had
a glimpse anywhere ofPuff.
he threw himself down, for-
getful of mother's injunc-
tions about the wet grass, t
near to a strangely twisted PUFF AT HOME AGAIN.
tree, seeing nothing, and PF AT HOE AGAI.
then-There! No -yes, yes there was a pair of bright eyes peeping
at him. Puff skipped out of his hiding place with just his old wicked little
flirt of his tail. Will, almost breathless, held out a nut, calling softly,
Puff, Puff," and the little creature darted down the trunk and took it, but
was off again before his master could catch him. He came and took several
more, but was too saucy to let Will touch him. After a time, when the
little boy really thought he was coming to him, he darted off and disappeared
from view. Will waited for half an hour, but no Puffcame, and he was
just turning away rubbing his sleeve over his eyes to wipe off some bitter
tears, when there was a scramble, a jump, and the dear little furry face was
softly laid against his. Ah, how he kissed and hugged him! and Puff
seemed as happy as his old loving little master was, and nestled down
into his favorite place inside Will's coat with his pretty head peeping out,
as the boy ran joyfully home. There was Polly swinging rather dismally on
the gate; but her face brightened at Will's shout of -
"Polly, Polly, I've got him !" and then she too left the gate, running up
the garden path with a cry of-
Mother, mother, Will's got Puff! Will's got Puff! which brought
Mrs. Norris in surprise to the door. Ah! what rejoicing there was in the
cottage. Polly declared that "Puff must have a piece of sugar, even though
it isn't Sunday, because he's such a dear little squirrel to love us so, and come
back." And that night after they had both been sent to bed, two little white,
bare-footed figures stole down "just to have a look at Puff and make sure
it's all really true and not a dream," as Will explained.


* .'tf.p


"WHERE THERE'S A WILL


THERE'S A WAY."

ran1


.






SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


Whe Utory of Five little igA.


THERE was once a family of five little pigs, and Mrs. Pig, their mother,
loved them very dearly. Some of these little pigs were very good, and
took a great deal of pains to please their mother. But the best of all was the
eldest pig. He was so useful and active that his mother and all his brothers
called him Mr. Pig. He was a fine, strong, broad-backed fellow, with large,
smiling face, and very long, brown ears. One day his mother told him to
go to market, with the donkey, and cart filled with vegetables. She told
him to be very careful with Rusty (that was the donkey's name), as he had
a very bad temper. The cart was soon filled, and Rusty having been put in
the harness, away went Mr. Pig on the gallop. Rusty went on very well
for about a mile and a half, but then his bad temper began to show itself.
First he drew himself up on his hind legs, then he fixed his fore legs firmly
on the ground, and began kicking away at the front of the cart. When he
had quite tired himself out, he made a great noise with his mouth and nostrils


The Family Party.
and came to a stand-still. All the coaxing and whipping that Mr. Pig gave
him could not induce him to move a step. Mr. Pig saw a number of little
pigs playing in a field by the road-side, so he went up to them and asked
them to assist him. A rope was tied in front of Rusty, and the little pigs
dragged him and the cart along, whilst Mr. Pig gave Rusty a good whipping
from behind. At last all the little pigs, who were so willing to assist Mr.
Pig, were tired out. One by one they were forced to quit their hold of the
rope, till at last poor Mr. Pig found himself alone and at a long distance from
the market.
As perverse Rusty would not drag the cart, Mr. Pig took him out of the
shafts, and sat down by the road-side, thinking what he should do. But he
knew that he would never get to market in that way.
So he started up, and placing himself in the shafts, pulled away by him-
self, and being a very strong and brave pig, he went along in this manner
till within sight of the market-place.
When he got there all the big and little pigs began to laugh. They called
Mr. Pig a great many names, saying what a fool he was to drag his cart to
market, instead of making his donkey do so. But they did not laugh so


A-

L "


First Pig. -This Little Pig went to Market.
loudly when Mr. Pig told all his struggles on the road. Some of them even
went so far as to curl their tails in anger at the bad conduct of Rusty. Mr.
Pig lost no time in selling off all his cart-load of vegetables.
Very soon after, Rusty came trotting into the market-place with his ears
thrown forward, and eying with a good deal of seeming pleasure, the empty
cart. Mr. Pig at first thought of giving lazy Rusty a sound whipping. But
he thought also how much he was wanted at home, and as Rusty seemed
willing to take his place in the cart, he thought it would be better to start for
home without delay. When he got home he told.Mrs. Pig all his story, and
she patted him on the back and called him her best and most worthy son.
The second pig wanted very much to go with his elder brother, the steady
Mr. Pig, to market, and because his mother would not allow him to do so,
he cried very much. But he was such a naughty pig, and so fond of mis-
chief, that Mrs. Pig knew it would not be safe to trust him so far from home.
She had to go to the miller's to buy some flour, for she wanted to make some
nice cakes for Mr. Pig and his four brothers. Before she went out she told
this little pig to keep up a good fire to bake the cakes by when she came
home. But when he was left alone, instead of learning his lesson, he
began to tease the cat. He pulled her ears, and put her paws on the bars
of the grate, and did many cruel things, such as only a bad little pig would
think of. Then he dressed up Miss Puss in his mother's cloak and cap, and
put a pipe in her mouth. After this he found his mother's birch, which he
made Puss hold in her paw. When he was tired of thus playing, lie got the
bellows, which had for a very long time been a puzzle to him. He could
not tell how it was that the wind came from the pipe, and also where the
wind came from. So he thought he would see the inside of the bellows,
and judge for himself. Upon this he took a knife and cut through all the
leather portion, quite spoiling it. When he had done so, he could not find
out all that he wanted to know, so he began to cry. He thought he would
amuse himself with his brother's fine large kite, and big drum, and splendid
horse with the black and white spots on its back. But he soon got tired of
merely playing with them, and then his habits of mischief began to show
themselves. He forced the drum-sticks through the parchment of the big


These Little Pigs drag Rusty and the Cart Along.


a










A


i
1






SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


drum, tore off the-flow- /
ingtail of the large kite,
and broke one of the
hind legs of the spotted
horse, after which he =
pulled off its head from
its body.
This very naughty
pig after this went to b
the cupboard, and find-
ing out his mother's
jam-pots, half emptied
most of them. He did
not even wait to look -
for a spoon, but forcing
his paws into the jam,
this paws into the jam, Mr. Pig pulls the Cart Himself.
ate it in that way.
Even this was not enough mischief for him. Taking the poker, he made it
red hot, and with it burnt more than ten great holes in the hearth-rug,
and also burnt holes in his mother's new carpet. When Mrs. Pig came
home from the miller's with the flour, she sat down by the fire, and being
very tired, she soon fell asleep. No sooner had she done so, than this bad
little pig, getting a long handkerchief, tied her in her chair. But it was not
very long before she awoke. Very quickly she found out all the mischief
that this little pig had been doing. She soon saw all the damage he had
done to his brother's playthings. Quickly too, she brought out her thickest
and heaviest birch. The naughty little pig ran all round the room, and cried





















Mr. Pig telling his Troubles with Rusty.
and begged of his mother to forgive him. But all this did not avail him in
the least. His mother took him by the ear, and applied the birch to his back
and sides till they tingled and smarted in such a way that he did not forget
for a long time.
The third pig, who had roast beef, was a very good and careful little fel-
low. He gave his mother scarcely any trouble, and, like his eldest brother,
Mr. Pig, always took a pleasure in doing what she bade him. Here you se(
him sitting down, with a clean face, and well-washed hands, to some nic(
roast beef. His brother, who was idle, and would not learn his lessons, ih
standing on a stool in the corner, with the dunce's cap on. And this is th<
reason why the good little pig had roast beef, while his brother, the idle one


Second Pig.- He cuts open tht, ellows.


He eats his Mother's Jam.


had none. He sat down quietly in the
corner while he learned his lesson. Hav-
ing gone over it many times, saying one
line after another to himself, he asked his 1
mother to hear him repeat it. And he
did so, from the first line to the very ro
last, without a single mistake. Mrs. Pig 0(
stroked him on the ears and forehead,
and called him a good little pig. After -. f
this he asked her to allow him to assist
in making tea. He brought everything
she wanted, and lifted off the kettle from '
the fire, without spilling a drop, either
on his toes or on the carpet.
By and by he went out, after asking
his mother, to play with his hoop. He
had not gone far when he saw an old He burns Holes In the Carpet.
blind pig, who, with his hat in hand, was crying at the loss of his dog. That
naughty dog had broken the string by which his master held him, and had
run away. He felt his pockets, and found he had one cent, which he gave
to the poor old pig, like a kind and thoughtful little pig, as he was. Not
very long after this, he saw a great, strong, spiteful pig, who wore a very
short jacket, and had a very large green cap on his head, beating one of his
little brothers. Going up to the big pig, he told him what a shame it was
that he should so ill-treat a poor little pig, so much smaller than himself, who
had done him no harm. The great, stupid pig did not seem quite able to
make out what this wise pig said to him, but he ran off. His poor little
brother had been knocked down and bruised, and one of his eyes was red


Naughty Little Pig ties his Mother to the Chair.


and swollen. So he took out his handkerchief and tied it over his brother's '
face. Then he, in the most careful and tender manner, led the beaten pig
home to his mother's house. He placed one of his paws under his own arm,
and so they went along. They
were a long time getting home,
for the poor pig who had been so
sadly treated, was lame, and cried
a great deal with the pain his eye
caused him; but when they got
home, the careful little pig made
him some nice hot mutton-broth,
and took it up to his bed for him f
to sip it. It was for such good,
kind, thoughtful conduct as this,
that his mother almost every week,
gave this good little pig roast beef.
The fourth pig, unlike his broth- X
er, the little pig who had roast
beef, was a most perverse and wil-
ful little pig. No wonder, then,
that while his good brother had
roast beef, he had none. His
mother had set him to learn his
lesson, but no sooner had she gone
out into the garden, then he tore ___ _---
his book into pieces. He took the His Mother applies the Birch to his Back*





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


Third Pig. -This Little Pig has Roast Beef.
poker and forced the leaves through the bars of the grate, and held the poker
in his hand till they were all burnt, laughing all the time. When his mother
came back he did not let her know what he had done. But -a hen she had
fallen asleep, he ran off into the streets to play with other idle little pigs such
as himself. He was very fond of jumping over the backs of little pigs.
Sometimes when another little pig would refuse to allow him to jump over
his back, or would not lend him his top, he would beat the poor pig in a
very spiteful way. And so it would happen that a number of the little pigs
he had so ill-treated, would fall upon him together. Not having a ball of
his own to play with, he thought he would take one away from a weak little
pig who could not resist. But very shortly, two of the bigger brothers of the
little pig he had so robbed, came up and gave him a sound beating. When
they had done so, they ran off, and left him crying. He felt very sorry, now
that it was too late, that he had not staid at home, and read over and learned
his lessons. He was afraid to go home, too, though he felt very tired and
hungry. So he staid about till it was quite dark and cold, and having lost
his cap he caught a cold in his head. Mrs. Pig, at home, was quite angry at
first at his running away, so she went in search of him, as did also Mr. Pig
and another of his brothers. It was very late indeed when they found him,
and at a great distance from home, for in his terror and fright he had lost his
way. But they brought him home and he was put to bed. The doctor came
to see him, and left a lot of very nasty physic, which he had to take. He
was in much pain, and had to lie in bed for more than a week, which never
would have happened, had he staid at home and learned his lessons, instead
of running off, after destroying his books. And this is the way he had no
roast beef given to him.
One day, in the summer time, Mrs. Pig told all her sons, the five little pigs,
that they might go out into the country for a whole day. Mr. Pig, the eldest
son, asked his brothers whether
they would rather spend the
day with him, than to enjoy it
S-- alone, each one for himself.
They all agreed to go with him.
All but one, at least- this little
i pig that you see crying Wee !
wee all the way home. This
little pig had bought a new fish-
I Thing rod and tackle, and he was
anxious to try to fish for the
first time. He had made up
his mind to fish in a stream
that was close by, and so he
said he would spend his holi-
-, dayby himself. "Very well,"
said Mrs. Pig, "but you must
not go into Farmer Grumpy's
S\ grounds, for he is a very severe
His Mother hears him repeat his Lesson. man, and he carries a great


Fourth Pig.- This Little PVg had none.


heavy whip." The little pig told his mother he did not intend to fish in the
farmer's part of the river. Away he went, but he told his mother a story;
he did intend to go into Farmer Grumpy's grounds.
When he got there he threw his line into the water and watched the float
for a long time. After a while he saw the float bobbing about under the
water, and very soon after he dragged an immense fish to land. Piggy took
him up into his arms
and started towards
home with him. But
he soon found the fish
too heavy to be carried kn
in that way. So he sat
down to refresh him- [
self, and to think how en
he was to get the fish 1
along. He had only
been thinking thus a
short time, when he
heard agreatgruffvoice
shouting out, and soon
after he saw the dread-
ful Farmer Grumpy, .
with his heavy whip in
his hand, on a hill very
near him. So he
jumped up, caught the He stops the big, stupid Pig from beating his Brother.
great fish in his arms, and ran off as fast as he could. Farmer Grumpy ran,
too, cracking his whip and shouting out, followed by one of his men. This















He drags the large Fish along.
piggy that told his mother a falsehood, soon found that they were overtaking
him, so he dropped his fish, which you remember was a very large one, and
an with all his might, for he was terribly frightened, but it was of no


'I--




SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


wisely at the book. Then they must be students. Books are great
store-houses of knowledge. They contain wonderful stories and long
records of what has happened in the world in the past. Books are
written about all kinds of things. So every one wants to read books
and become students.


use; poor Piggy was caught by
the strong farmer, who said he
would cut his back for fishing
on his grounds without his con-
sent. So he laid his strong
whip over Piggy's back for
some time, after which this
poor little Piggy was let go,
and he ran off crying out in
great pain, for he was severely
whipped, "Wee! wee!" all
the way home.


He gives his Brother some nice IMutton-Brotl


guot little little.

Says Kitty Black to Kitty White,
" Come, let us have a snow-ball fight.
The boys and girls do have such fun,
Why can't we try a little one ?
You just sit still, I'll show you how,
Roll up the snow, and then-Miau "


Fiftb Pig.-This Ittle Pig cried "Wee! Wee !" all the way Home.


X Prink of Sater.

Fred is good to hold the dipper so still for Mattie to drink from
it. Mattie is fond of good, cold water, and she will feel refreshed by
the cool liquid. Pure, cold water, is the best thing that any of us
can drink. None of us should ever touch intoxicating drinks,
because their use is harmful.


The itudent6.

Students are those who study and become wise. Is not this lit-
tle girl reading intently. And does not her friend, the dog, look


HErN mother says, "Do this, or that,"
S Don't say What for and. "Yhy,"
But let her hear your gentle voice;
Say 1" Mother dear, rIl try."


- T




SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


wisely at the book. Then they must be students. Books are great
store-houses of knowledge. They contain wonderful stories and long
records of what has happened in the world in the past. Books are
written about all kinds of things. So every one wants to read books
and become students.


use; poor Piggy was caught by
the strong farmer, who said he
would cut his back for fishing
on his grounds without his con-
sent. So he laid his strong
whip over Piggy's back for
some time, after which this
poor little Piggy was let go,
and he ran off crying out in
great pain, for he was severely
whipped, "Wee! wee!" all
the way home.


He gives his Brother some nice IMutton-Brotl


guot little little.

Says Kitty Black to Kitty White,
" Come, let us have a snow-ball fight.
The boys and girls do have such fun,
Why can't we try a little one ?
You just sit still, I'll show you how,
Roll up the snow, and then-Miau "


Fiftb Pig.-This Ittle Pig cried "Wee! Wee !" all the way Home.


X Prink of Sater.

Fred is good to hold the dipper so still for Mattie to drink from
it. Mattie is fond of good, cold water, and she will feel refreshed by
the cool liquid. Pure, cold water, is the best thing that any of us
can drink. None of us should ever touch intoxicating drinks,
because their use is harmful.


The itudent6.

Students are those who study and become wise. Is not this lit-
tle girl reading intently. And does not her friend, the dog, look


HErN mother says, "Do this, or that,"
S Don't say What for and. "Yhy,"
But let her hear your gentle voice;
Say 1" Mother dear, rIl try."


- T




SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


wisely at the book. Then they must be students. Books are great
store-houses of knowledge. They contain wonderful stories and long
records of what has happened in the world in the past. Books are
written about all kinds of things. So every one wants to read books
and become students.


use; poor Piggy was caught by
the strong farmer, who said he
would cut his back for fishing
on his grounds without his con-
sent. So he laid his strong
whip over Piggy's back for
some time, after which this
poor little Piggy was let go,
and he ran off crying out in
great pain, for he was severely
whipped, "Wee! wee!" all
the way home.


He gives his Brother some nice IMutton-Brotl


guot little little.

Says Kitty Black to Kitty White,
" Come, let us have a snow-ball fight.
The boys and girls do have such fun,
Why can't we try a little one ?
You just sit still, I'll show you how,
Roll up the snow, and then-Miau "


Fiftb Pig.-This Ittle Pig cried "Wee! Wee !" all the way Home.


X Prink of Sater.

Fred is good to hold the dipper so still for Mattie to drink from
it. Mattie is fond of good, cold water, and she will feel refreshed by
the cool liquid. Pure, cold water, is the best thing that any of us
can drink. None of us should ever touch intoxicating drinks,
because their use is harmful.


The itudent6.

Students are those who study and become wise. Is not this lit-
tle girl reading intently. And does not her friend, the dog, look


HErN mother says, "Do this, or that,"
S Don't say What for and. "Yhy,"
But let her hear your gentle voice;
Say 1" Mother dear, rIl try."


- T




SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


ghe Catbird.

The catbird belongs to the family of thrushes, and is one of the
most peculiar of our American birds. It is dark colored, with brown
head and neck, and greenish-black tail. The bird is fond of society,
and usually builds its nest near the dwellings of men, rather than
in the quiet of the forest.


Its voice, when angry or disturbed, is harsh and shrill, but at
other times, soft and sweet. It has also a cry like the mewing of a
cat, from which it derives its name. It is very courageous, and will
defend its young until it falls exhausted.
The catbird can be tamed, but is as mischievous as a young
monkey,- meddlesome, full of curiosity, and so jealous that it will
drive any other pet bird out of the house. It dislikes to be caged,
preferring the freedom of the room, so that it may look in the
looking-glass, take pins off from the cushion, or perch on the plants
in the window.


ood Horning.

Good morning, my darling, at last you're awake,
Why surely I see not a tear?
Away from your roses that dewdrop I'll take
Which shines like a diamond so clear.
Just listen your pigeons, the cooing they make
The cherry twigs tap on the pane,
I think they are asking if you are awake
And ready for play time again.
Be quick, or they will not be willing to wait.
First the bath, then the shoes and the socks-
-They wonder what's keeping their little playmate -
At last comes the whitest of frocks !
The bonny blue sash let me tie in a bow-
-0 dear !' those strings, they are such a tease !-
Never mind, you are ready, now I'd like to know
Who there is that my.boy would not please.



friend and oce.

ONE bright morning in June, as two little boys, James and John,
were going to school, they stopped by the way to play. The game
went on merrily for a time, and their happy laugh rang out on the
air, until James, forgetting the Golden Rule Do unto others as you
would that they should do unto you," began to cheat.
John seeing it, became very angry, turned on him as you see in
the picture, threw him down, and began to strike him. When they
began the game they were friends, but because one boy did not play
fairly, the game was not only spoiled, but far worse than that, the
two boys lost their temper, and behaved like quarrelsome animals,
that are not supposed to know any better.


A Tiny Writer.

Who's so busy with the ink?
It is little Paul I think.
Joe can write- that's very true
But he cannot scrawl like you.
What a busy little man,
'Tis not often that you can
Undisturbed, with ink and pen,
Write, as do quite grown-up men.
Joe writes with pencil, that's a pity
Thinks Paul, he finds the ink so pretty.
Now he has finished, in a row
Stand six tall P's a splendid show.
But on the fingers, frock, and hair,
The pinafore, and everywhere
Are blots ; and there will be, I fear,
Six slaps for all this mischief here.


THE GAME: FRIEND -AND FOE.


/ {4




SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


ghe Catbird.

The catbird belongs to the family of thrushes, and is one of the
most peculiar of our American birds. It is dark colored, with brown
head and neck, and greenish-black tail. The bird is fond of society,
and usually builds its nest near the dwellings of men, rather than
in the quiet of the forest.


Its voice, when angry or disturbed, is harsh and shrill, but at
other times, soft and sweet. It has also a cry like the mewing of a
cat, from which it derives its name. It is very courageous, and will
defend its young until it falls exhausted.
The catbird can be tamed, but is as mischievous as a young
monkey,- meddlesome, full of curiosity, and so jealous that it will
drive any other pet bird out of the house. It dislikes to be caged,
preferring the freedom of the room, so that it may look in the
looking-glass, take pins off from the cushion, or perch on the plants
in the window.


ood Horning.

Good morning, my darling, at last you're awake,
Why surely I see not a tear?
Away from your roses that dewdrop I'll take
Which shines like a diamond so clear.
Just listen your pigeons, the cooing they make
The cherry twigs tap on the pane,
I think they are asking if you are awake
And ready for play time again.
Be quick, or they will not be willing to wait.
First the bath, then the shoes and the socks-
-They wonder what's keeping their little playmate -
At last comes the whitest of frocks !
The bonny blue sash let me tie in a bow-
-0 dear !' those strings, they are such a tease !-
Never mind, you are ready, now I'd like to know
Who there is that my.boy would not please.



friend and oce.

ONE bright morning in June, as two little boys, James and John,
were going to school, they stopped by the way to play. The game
went on merrily for a time, and their happy laugh rang out on the
air, until James, forgetting the Golden Rule Do unto others as you
would that they should do unto you," began to cheat.
John seeing it, became very angry, turned on him as you see in
the picture, threw him down, and began to strike him. When they
began the game they were friends, but because one boy did not play
fairly, the game was not only spoiled, but far worse than that, the
two boys lost their temper, and behaved like quarrelsome animals,
that are not supposed to know any better.


A Tiny Writer.

Who's so busy with the ink?
It is little Paul I think.
Joe can write- that's very true
But he cannot scrawl like you.
What a busy little man,
'Tis not often that you can
Undisturbed, with ink and pen,
Write, as do quite grown-up men.
Joe writes with pencil, that's a pity
Thinks Paul, he finds the ink so pretty.
Now he has finished, in a row
Stand six tall P's a splendid show.
But on the fingers, frock, and hair,
The pinafore, and everywhere
Are blots ; and there will be, I fear,
Six slaps for all this mischief here.


THE GAME: FRIEND -AND FOE.


/ {4




SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


ghe Catbird.

The catbird belongs to the family of thrushes, and is one of the
most peculiar of our American birds. It is dark colored, with brown
head and neck, and greenish-black tail. The bird is fond of society,
and usually builds its nest near the dwellings of men, rather than
in the quiet of the forest.


Its voice, when angry or disturbed, is harsh and shrill, but at
other times, soft and sweet. It has also a cry like the mewing of a
cat, from which it derives its name. It is very courageous, and will
defend its young until it falls exhausted.
The catbird can be tamed, but is as mischievous as a young
monkey,- meddlesome, full of curiosity, and so jealous that it will
drive any other pet bird out of the house. It dislikes to be caged,
preferring the freedom of the room, so that it may look in the
looking-glass, take pins off from the cushion, or perch on the plants
in the window.


ood Horning.

Good morning, my darling, at last you're awake,
Why surely I see not a tear?
Away from your roses that dewdrop I'll take
Which shines like a diamond so clear.
Just listen your pigeons, the cooing they make
The cherry twigs tap on the pane,
I think they are asking if you are awake
And ready for play time again.
Be quick, or they will not be willing to wait.
First the bath, then the shoes and the socks-
-They wonder what's keeping their little playmate -
At last comes the whitest of frocks !
The bonny blue sash let me tie in a bow-
-0 dear !' those strings, they are such a tease !-
Never mind, you are ready, now I'd like to know
Who there is that my.boy would not please.



friend and oce.

ONE bright morning in June, as two little boys, James and John,
were going to school, they stopped by the way to play. The game
went on merrily for a time, and their happy laugh rang out on the
air, until James, forgetting the Golden Rule Do unto others as you
would that they should do unto you," began to cheat.
John seeing it, became very angry, turned on him as you see in
the picture, threw him down, and began to strike him. When they
began the game they were friends, but because one boy did not play
fairly, the game was not only spoiled, but far worse than that, the
two boys lost their temper, and behaved like quarrelsome animals,
that are not supposed to know any better.


A Tiny Writer.

Who's so busy with the ink?
It is little Paul I think.
Joe can write- that's very true
But he cannot scrawl like you.
What a busy little man,
'Tis not often that you can
Undisturbed, with ink and pen,
Write, as do quite grown-up men.
Joe writes with pencil, that's a pity
Thinks Paul, he finds the ink so pretty.
Now he has finished, in a row
Stand six tall P's a splendid show.
But on the fingers, frock, and hair,
The pinafore, and everywhere
Are blots ; and there will be, I fear,
Six slaps for all this mischief here.


THE GAME: FRIEND -AND FOE.


/ {4




SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


ghe Catbird.

The catbird belongs to the family of thrushes, and is one of the
most peculiar of our American birds. It is dark colored, with brown
head and neck, and greenish-black tail. The bird is fond of society,
and usually builds its nest near the dwellings of men, rather than
in the quiet of the forest.


Its voice, when angry or disturbed, is harsh and shrill, but at
other times, soft and sweet. It has also a cry like the mewing of a
cat, from which it derives its name. It is very courageous, and will
defend its young until it falls exhausted.
The catbird can be tamed, but is as mischievous as a young
monkey,- meddlesome, full of curiosity, and so jealous that it will
drive any other pet bird out of the house. It dislikes to be caged,
preferring the freedom of the room, so that it may look in the
looking-glass, take pins off from the cushion, or perch on the plants
in the window.


ood Horning.

Good morning, my darling, at last you're awake,
Why surely I see not a tear?
Away from your roses that dewdrop I'll take
Which shines like a diamond so clear.
Just listen your pigeons, the cooing they make
The cherry twigs tap on the pane,
I think they are asking if you are awake
And ready for play time again.
Be quick, or they will not be willing to wait.
First the bath, then the shoes and the socks-
-They wonder what's keeping their little playmate -
At last comes the whitest of frocks !
The bonny blue sash let me tie in a bow-
-0 dear !' those strings, they are such a tease !-
Never mind, you are ready, now I'd like to know
Who there is that my.boy would not please.



friend and oce.

ONE bright morning in June, as two little boys, James and John,
were going to school, they stopped by the way to play. The game
went on merrily for a time, and their happy laugh rang out on the
air, until James, forgetting the Golden Rule Do unto others as you
would that they should do unto you," began to cheat.
John seeing it, became very angry, turned on him as you see in
the picture, threw him down, and began to strike him. When they
began the game they were friends, but because one boy did not play
fairly, the game was not only spoiled, but far worse than that, the
two boys lost their temper, and behaved like quarrelsome animals,
that are not supposed to know any better.


A Tiny Writer.

Who's so busy with the ink?
It is little Paul I think.
Joe can write- that's very true
But he cannot scrawl like you.
What a busy little man,
'Tis not often that you can
Undisturbed, with ink and pen,
Write, as do quite grown-up men.
Joe writes with pencil, that's a pity
Thinks Paul, he finds the ink so pretty.
Now he has finished, in a row
Stand six tall P's a splendid show.
But on the fingers, frock, and hair,
The pinafore, and everywhere
Are blots ; and there will be, I fear,
Six slaps for all this mischief here.


THE GAME: FRIEND -AND FOE.


/ {4





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


The gew Prother.

What can rival our new treasure?
What could give us greater pleasure
Than the welcome tiny guest
Lying in his cosy nest?
Baby must you always sleep ?
Won't you take one little peep
At us? We love you, do not fear,
Just look at us, baby dear.
See this is sister Margaret,
We call her Daisy, little pet.


4hhe gew :Slcd.


Who would have thought
When it was bought,
That dull dark day, so bleak and chill,
Before the glow
Of the shining snow
Lay cheery and white on snow and hill,

What a wonder of speed
It held indeed,
In scarlet runner and polished shoe.
For very tame
Looked the painted name,
The "Swallow" upon it in letters blue.

But now that the height
Is icy white,
And the Swallow is flying with flashing wings,
With a speck of black
Perched on its back,-
The speck being Teddy, who clings and clings,

We all of us know,
It was only the snow
It needed to prove its name was fit;
And as swift a bird
As ever stirred
The air with its flight, must yield to it.

I watch my boy
With his cherished toy
Come skimming along the course, and then
At the foot each time
Turn back and climb
The beaten, difficult hill again.

And I know that the good,
Fresh ruddy blood
Runs warm and strong from top to toe,
And Teddy's heart
Is the lightest part
Of the Swallow" flying along the snow.


THE NEW BROTHER.


I am Frank; I'm eight and so
Every day to school I go -
My lessons are not always done,
For I am fonder far of fun
Than work, but still I mean to try
To learn them better by and by.
Now, baby dear, you look so cosy,
Your cheeks are warm, and soft and rosy,
Lie still and sleep ; we'll run away
And eat the cake that came to-day.


.0'_
F little things that God has made,
1. Are useful in their kind,
0, let us learn a simple truth,
And bear it on our mind:
That every child can praise Him,
However weak and small;
Let each with joy remember this:
That God has work for all.





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


The gew Prother.

What can rival our new treasure?
What could give us greater pleasure
Than the welcome tiny guest
Lying in his cosy nest?
Baby must you always sleep ?
Won't you take one little peep
At us? We love you, do not fear,
Just look at us, baby dear.
See this is sister Margaret,
We call her Daisy, little pet.


4hhe gew :Slcd.


Who would have thought
When it was bought,
That dull dark day, so bleak and chill,
Before the glow
Of the shining snow
Lay cheery and white on snow and hill,

What a wonder of speed
It held indeed,
In scarlet runner and polished shoe.
For very tame
Looked the painted name,
The "Swallow" upon it in letters blue.

But now that the height
Is icy white,
And the Swallow is flying with flashing wings,
With a speck of black
Perched on its back,-
The speck being Teddy, who clings and clings,

We all of us know,
It was only the snow
It needed to prove its name was fit;
And as swift a bird
As ever stirred
The air with its flight, must yield to it.

I watch my boy
With his cherished toy
Come skimming along the course, and then
At the foot each time
Turn back and climb
The beaten, difficult hill again.

And I know that the good,
Fresh ruddy blood
Runs warm and strong from top to toe,
And Teddy's heart
Is the lightest part
Of the Swallow" flying along the snow.


THE NEW BROTHER.


I am Frank; I'm eight and so
Every day to school I go -
My lessons are not always done,
For I am fonder far of fun
Than work, but still I mean to try
To learn them better by and by.
Now, baby dear, you look so cosy,
Your cheeks are warm, and soft and rosy,
Lie still and sleep ; we'll run away
And eat the cake that came to-day.


.0'_
F little things that God has made,
1. Are useful in their kind,
0, let us learn a simple truth,
And bear it on our mind:
That every child can praise Him,
However weak and small;
Let each with joy remember this:
That God has work for all.





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


A, Long ermon.
"- :^. C1 y


Drhe Deacd Bird.
YEs, the little bird is dead. Nellie looks very sad as she holds her little
pet in her hand. She knows that the bird cannot hop about any more. She
remembers how sweetly the bird sang, and she is very sorry that the poor bird
cannot sing again. See how gently she takes the little bird in her hand, and
how tenderly she looks at it. Sometimes children do not take good care of pet
birds, and then they are very, very sad when any mishap takes them away
or hurts them. But Nellie looks like a little girl who would be kind to her pets.
Children should always be careful and gentle with birds and pet animals,
because they may be hurt and feel the pain just as children sometimes -feel
pain.


ROBBIE and Jennie were
not fond of going to church,
for theirs was an old one
and their seat was an un-
comfortable one. The
back was so high tha chey
could hardly see over the
top, and there was nothing
very pleasant to see any-
way. The sermon was
very long and the day very
hot and Jennie soon fell
fast asleep, while poor
Robbie had a hard time
trying to keep awake until
the sermon was over and
they could go into the Sun-
day School, which they
both enjoyed very much.


Swiinkle, Twinkle.


TWINKLE, twinkle, little star ;
How I wonder what you are !
Up above the world so high,
Like a diamond in the sky.


Faithful Bob.
FAITHFUL Bob is only a dog, but he is one that tries to do his duty. Bob's
master is an old blind man who goes about begging. One day as Bob was
leading his blind master along the side-walk, Bob saw a ladder before him so
placed from the curbstone to the side of the house that if he should lead his
master under it, the poor blind man would hit his head. Bob led his master
off' the sidewalk on to the pavements so that both passed round the ladder
instead of passing under it.
Is not Bob a wise dog to do this? Bob is not a handsome dog,
but this story about him is true. See how good he is, and how patiently he
waits till his blind master comes to hold the string and be guided by him
through the streets.


(athering -W oodland Yl0wcr.

AN afternoon in the woods -what a pleasure it is! Mary and Charlie
have come from their city home to spend the summer in the country, and
how good the cool, green grass and trees and the lovely flowers are. They
have found a cornel bush with its large white blossoms. Mamma will have
a rare bouquet when she comes to supper, tired with the journey and the
unpacking.


When the glorious sun is set,
When the grass with dew is wet,
Then you show your little light,
Twinkle, twinkle, all the night.


""mow&





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


A, Long ermon.
"- :^. C1 y


Drhe Deacd Bird.
YEs, the little bird is dead. Nellie looks very sad as she holds her little
pet in her hand. She knows that the bird cannot hop about any more. She
remembers how sweetly the bird sang, and she is very sorry that the poor bird
cannot sing again. See how gently she takes the little bird in her hand, and
how tenderly she looks at it. Sometimes children do not take good care of pet
birds, and then they are very, very sad when any mishap takes them away
or hurts them. But Nellie looks like a little girl who would be kind to her pets.
Children should always be careful and gentle with birds and pet animals,
because they may be hurt and feel the pain just as children sometimes -feel
pain.


ROBBIE and Jennie were
not fond of going to church,
for theirs was an old one
and their seat was an un-
comfortable one. The
back was so high tha chey
could hardly see over the
top, and there was nothing
very pleasant to see any-
way. The sermon was
very long and the day very
hot and Jennie soon fell
fast asleep, while poor
Robbie had a hard time
trying to keep awake until
the sermon was over and
they could go into the Sun-
day School, which they
both enjoyed very much.


Swiinkle, Twinkle.


TWINKLE, twinkle, little star ;
How I wonder what you are !
Up above the world so high,
Like a diamond in the sky.


Faithful Bob.
FAITHFUL Bob is only a dog, but he is one that tries to do his duty. Bob's
master is an old blind man who goes about begging. One day as Bob was
leading his blind master along the side-walk, Bob saw a ladder before him so
placed from the curbstone to the side of the house that if he should lead his
master under it, the poor blind man would hit his head. Bob led his master
off' the sidewalk on to the pavements so that both passed round the ladder
instead of passing under it.
Is not Bob a wise dog to do this? Bob is not a handsome dog,
but this story about him is true. See how good he is, and how patiently he
waits till his blind master comes to hold the string and be guided by him
through the streets.


(athering -W oodland Yl0wcr.

AN afternoon in the woods -what a pleasure it is! Mary and Charlie
have come from their city home to spend the summer in the country, and
how good the cool, green grass and trees and the lovely flowers are. They
have found a cornel bush with its large white blossoms. Mamma will have
a rare bouquet when she comes to supper, tired with the journey and the
unpacking.


When the glorious sun is set,
When the grass with dew is wet,
Then you show your little light,
Twinkle, twinkle, all the night.


""mow&





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


A, Long ermon.
"- :^. C1 y


Drhe Deacd Bird.
YEs, the little bird is dead. Nellie looks very sad as she holds her little
pet in her hand. She knows that the bird cannot hop about any more. She
remembers how sweetly the bird sang, and she is very sorry that the poor bird
cannot sing again. See how gently she takes the little bird in her hand, and
how tenderly she looks at it. Sometimes children do not take good care of pet
birds, and then they are very, very sad when any mishap takes them away
or hurts them. But Nellie looks like a little girl who would be kind to her pets.
Children should always be careful and gentle with birds and pet animals,
because they may be hurt and feel the pain just as children sometimes -feel
pain.


ROBBIE and Jennie were
not fond of going to church,
for theirs was an old one
and their seat was an un-
comfortable one. The
back was so high tha chey
could hardly see over the
top, and there was nothing
very pleasant to see any-
way. The sermon was
very long and the day very
hot and Jennie soon fell
fast asleep, while poor
Robbie had a hard time
trying to keep awake until
the sermon was over and
they could go into the Sun-
day School, which they
both enjoyed very much.


Swiinkle, Twinkle.


TWINKLE, twinkle, little star ;
How I wonder what you are !
Up above the world so high,
Like a diamond in the sky.


Faithful Bob.
FAITHFUL Bob is only a dog, but he is one that tries to do his duty. Bob's
master is an old blind man who goes about begging. One day as Bob was
leading his blind master along the side-walk, Bob saw a ladder before him so
placed from the curbstone to the side of the house that if he should lead his
master under it, the poor blind man would hit his head. Bob led his master
off' the sidewalk on to the pavements so that both passed round the ladder
instead of passing under it.
Is not Bob a wise dog to do this? Bob is not a handsome dog,
but this story about him is true. See how good he is, and how patiently he
waits till his blind master comes to hold the string and be guided by him
through the streets.


(athering -W oodland Yl0wcr.

AN afternoon in the woods -what a pleasure it is! Mary and Charlie
have come from their city home to spend the summer in the country, and
how good the cool, green grass and trees and the lovely flowers are. They
have found a cornel bush with its large white blossoms. Mamma will have
a rare bouquet when she comes to supper, tired with the journey and the
unpacking.


When the glorious sun is set,
When the grass with dew is wet,
Then you show your little light,
Twinkle, twinkle, all the night.


""mow&





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


A, Long ermon.
"- :^. C1 y


Drhe Deacd Bird.
YEs, the little bird is dead. Nellie looks very sad as she holds her little
pet in her hand. She knows that the bird cannot hop about any more. She
remembers how sweetly the bird sang, and she is very sorry that the poor bird
cannot sing again. See how gently she takes the little bird in her hand, and
how tenderly she looks at it. Sometimes children do not take good care of pet
birds, and then they are very, very sad when any mishap takes them away
or hurts them. But Nellie looks like a little girl who would be kind to her pets.
Children should always be careful and gentle with birds and pet animals,
because they may be hurt and feel the pain just as children sometimes -feel
pain.


ROBBIE and Jennie were
not fond of going to church,
for theirs was an old one
and their seat was an un-
comfortable one. The
back was so high tha chey
could hardly see over the
top, and there was nothing
very pleasant to see any-
way. The sermon was
very long and the day very
hot and Jennie soon fell
fast asleep, while poor
Robbie had a hard time
trying to keep awake until
the sermon was over and
they could go into the Sun-
day School, which they
both enjoyed very much.


Swiinkle, Twinkle.


TWINKLE, twinkle, little star ;
How I wonder what you are !
Up above the world so high,
Like a diamond in the sky.


Faithful Bob.
FAITHFUL Bob is only a dog, but he is one that tries to do his duty. Bob's
master is an old blind man who goes about begging. One day as Bob was
leading his blind master along the side-walk, Bob saw a ladder before him so
placed from the curbstone to the side of the house that if he should lead his
master under it, the poor blind man would hit his head. Bob led his master
off' the sidewalk on to the pavements so that both passed round the ladder
instead of passing under it.
Is not Bob a wise dog to do this? Bob is not a handsome dog,
but this story about him is true. See how good he is, and how patiently he
waits till his blind master comes to hold the string and be guided by him
through the streets.


(athering -W oodland Yl0wcr.

AN afternoon in the woods -what a pleasure it is! Mary and Charlie
have come from their city home to spend the summer in the country, and
how good the cool, green grass and trees and the lovely flowers are. They
have found a cornel bush with its large white blossoms. Mamma will have
a rare bouquet when she comes to supper, tired with the journey and the
unpacking.


When the glorious sun is set,
When the grass with dew is wet,
Then you show your little light,
Twinkle, twinkle, all the night.


""mow&





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


Veek-a-boo!


Dood evening. Is my Papa tum home
yet? Ise all washed and dessed so's to be
clean and pretty when my Papa turns. You
wouldn't fink what a dirty little girl I was!
Mamma said there wasn't a clean place on
my face big enough to tiss, but it's all clean
now. Yes, you may have a tiss if you want
one. Peek-a-boo."



glaging Poll 'tore.


Hearing the ghieken0.



"PETER, Peter, twice to-day
You've been told to come away
And not to tease the poor old hen-

"Can it be'you're there again?
Let those little chickens be,
They are frightened; don't you see ?

Every thing you tease and bother-
See the poor old clucking mother
All her feathers flying round
Strew'd about upon the ground.

What she'll do I do not know,
How can you tease her chickens so?
But, Peter, you had best take care
For I see some one coming there.
You know what happened once be-
fore ;-
What stands behind the cupboard
door? "


"Good morning, Mrs. Gray. My little girl tells me you have just opened a doll's
store, and she has*been teasing me to come and buy her one of your lovely dollies.
Please show me what you have."


~r~_
~
((F


PLAYING i


I" Here is the best one of all.
Si I 1t I know your little girl would like
lip it. She looks at it as if it were
just what she wanted. All the
rest of the dolls are home-made,
but I bought this, though I made
the dress and hat myself. It is
only fifty cents.
I must tell you what we will
do with the money we make by
selling our dolls. We are going
to open a doll's hzos ital. We
have some very skillful surgeons
engaged, and we will promise to
cure all the troubles of doll-life.
We can do a great deal more
than the hospitals where children
and grown-up people are carried
when they are hurt or sick. The
doctors there cannot put on new
heads and arms and legs. It is
as much as they can do to take
them off. I hope you will help
us to start our hospital."
DOLL STORE. I shall be glad to do so,
and Dora will send you several patients who are now suffering
sadly for want of attention. I will buy this new dolly, and I hope
you will be very successful with your doll store, and doll hospital."




Do all the good you canI
In all the ways you can T
To all the people you can I
In every place you can T
At all the times you can Ti
As long as ever you can I





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


Veek-a-boo!


Dood evening. Is my Papa tum home
yet? Ise all washed and dessed so's to be
clean and pretty when my Papa turns. You
wouldn't fink what a dirty little girl I was!
Mamma said there wasn't a clean place on
my face big enough to tiss, but it's all clean
now. Yes, you may have a tiss if you want
one. Peek-a-boo."



glaging Poll 'tore.


Hearing the ghieken0.



"PETER, Peter, twice to-day
You've been told to come away
And not to tease the poor old hen-

"Can it be'you're there again?
Let those little chickens be,
They are frightened; don't you see ?

Every thing you tease and bother-
See the poor old clucking mother
All her feathers flying round
Strew'd about upon the ground.

What she'll do I do not know,
How can you tease her chickens so?
But, Peter, you had best take care
For I see some one coming there.
You know what happened once be-
fore ;-
What stands behind the cupboard
door? "


"Good morning, Mrs. Gray. My little girl tells me you have just opened a doll's
store, and she has*been teasing me to come and buy her one of your lovely dollies.
Please show me what you have."


~r~_
~
((F


PLAYING i


I" Here is the best one of all.
Si I 1t I know your little girl would like
lip it. She looks at it as if it were
just what she wanted. All the
rest of the dolls are home-made,
but I bought this, though I made
the dress and hat myself. It is
only fifty cents.
I must tell you what we will
do with the money we make by
selling our dolls. We are going
to open a doll's hzos ital. We
have some very skillful surgeons
engaged, and we will promise to
cure all the troubles of doll-life.
We can do a great deal more
than the hospitals where children
and grown-up people are carried
when they are hurt or sick. The
doctors there cannot put on new
heads and arms and legs. It is
as much as they can do to take
them off. I hope you will help
us to start our hospital."
DOLL STORE. I shall be glad to do so,
and Dora will send you several patients who are now suffering
sadly for want of attention. I will buy this new dolly, and I hope
you will be very successful with your doll store, and doll hospital."




Do all the good you canI
In all the ways you can T
To all the people you can I
In every place you can T
At all the times you can Ti
As long as ever you can I





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


Veek-a-boo!


Dood evening. Is my Papa tum home
yet? Ise all washed and dessed so's to be
clean and pretty when my Papa turns. You
wouldn't fink what a dirty little girl I was!
Mamma said there wasn't a clean place on
my face big enough to tiss, but it's all clean
now. Yes, you may have a tiss if you want
one. Peek-a-boo."



glaging Poll 'tore.


Hearing the ghieken0.



"PETER, Peter, twice to-day
You've been told to come away
And not to tease the poor old hen-

"Can it be'you're there again?
Let those little chickens be,
They are frightened; don't you see ?

Every thing you tease and bother-
See the poor old clucking mother
All her feathers flying round
Strew'd about upon the ground.

What she'll do I do not know,
How can you tease her chickens so?
But, Peter, you had best take care
For I see some one coming there.
You know what happened once be-
fore ;-
What stands behind the cupboard
door? "


"Good morning, Mrs. Gray. My little girl tells me you have just opened a doll's
store, and she has*been teasing me to come and buy her one of your lovely dollies.
Please show me what you have."


~r~_
~
((F


PLAYING i


I" Here is the best one of all.
Si I 1t I know your little girl would like
lip it. She looks at it as if it were
just what she wanted. All the
rest of the dolls are home-made,
but I bought this, though I made
the dress and hat myself. It is
only fifty cents.
I must tell you what we will
do with the money we make by
selling our dolls. We are going
to open a doll's hzos ital. We
have some very skillful surgeons
engaged, and we will promise to
cure all the troubles of doll-life.
We can do a great deal more
than the hospitals where children
and grown-up people are carried
when they are hurt or sick. The
doctors there cannot put on new
heads and arms and legs. It is
as much as they can do to take
them off. I hope you will help
us to start our hospital."
DOLL STORE. I shall be glad to do so,
and Dora will send you several patients who are now suffering
sadly for want of attention. I will buy this new dolly, and I hope
you will be very successful with your doll store, and doll hospital."




Do all the good you canI
In all the ways you can T
To all the people you can I
In every place you can T
At all the times you can Ti
As long as ever you can I





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


Whe mour for Ptorie6.
You know hiw cozy and cheerful is a bright wood fire in an
open fire-place. It is just the light to tell stories by, and to roast
apples and pop corn. Here is a happy circle who seem to find life very
pleasant this evening. Uncle Tom in the easy chair tells the first
story, which begins Once upon a time," and tells about fairy Black-
stick and the magic ring and rose, and how the fairy gave a queer
present to a little prince and princess, for she said, My dears, the
best thing I can wish you is a little misfortune," and truly they
had more than a little misfortune and many adventures in which the
magic ring and rose played a large part. These were also gifts of
the fairy Blackstick, and made those who wore them most beautiful
and charming. Those who wish to know more of this beautiful story
must look for it among Mr. Thackeray's books.
Then it was Fred's turn. He had been studying the old stories
of Homer, and told of the Trojan War, the most famous of all wars,
and the old gods and heroes who fought on the plains of Troy.
Alec said he thought our own Civil War was as interesting as
any war could be. He had been reading some of Mr. Coffin's books,
and was full of enthusiasm for the Boys in Blue. He wished he had
been alive then to follow the flag. Mamma looked as if she was
very glad he wasn't, but she agreed with the rest that one could
never grow tired of the grand and beautiful stories of those stirring
years.
Laura had been reading Miss Strickland's Lives of the Jtcens
of England, and said she couldn't begin to tell all the interesting
stories she found there. She told some about Matilda, Eleanora and
Elizabeth.
Mamma belonged to an art class which was studying the pictures
of the old masters, so she told some of the legends of the saints, St.
Elizabeth and St. Cecilia and St. Agnes and St Christopher, and
showed how they could be recognized in the paintings by something
connected with their stories.
Then the children's hour was over, and they went up stairs to
have Willie Winkie tell such strange' stories in their ears after their
eyes were shut and they were fast asleep.


IWhe terrible Frio.
These are the robbers-the terrible three,
In showing no mercy they all agree;
Policemen and soldiers, beware, retire !

But if you should meet this terrible band,
Now don't run away, but come quick to a stand :
Be humble and quiet, and don't act amiss,
And all they'll rob you of will be a kiss.


Uladge and the 'irdie6.


Madge must be a country girl, and she must be very gentle and
kind to make the birdies so tame. I think she spends a great deal of
time out of doors, watching the birds and learning their ways, so that
now they are not at all afraid of her. The mother-bird is saying:
" You are very good to feed my little ones, but you must be careful
not to hurt them, and when you are through, please put our nest
back just where it came from in the grape arbor."
S*****'-***-**** c '-W-*i:***********e *day

Do your best, your very best,
And do it every day;


geeret6.
" What do you think?"
I'm sure I don't know."
' Don't tell anybody."
Oh, no! oh, no !"


Little boys and little girls,
That is the wisest way.


/


I





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


Whe mour for Ptorie6.
You know hiw cozy and cheerful is a bright wood fire in an
open fire-place. It is just the light to tell stories by, and to roast
apples and pop corn. Here is a happy circle who seem to find life very
pleasant this evening. Uncle Tom in the easy chair tells the first
story, which begins Once upon a time," and tells about fairy Black-
stick and the magic ring and rose, and how the fairy gave a queer
present to a little prince and princess, for she said, My dears, the
best thing I can wish you is a little misfortune," and truly they
had more than a little misfortune and many adventures in which the
magic ring and rose played a large part. These were also gifts of
the fairy Blackstick, and made those who wore them most beautiful
and charming. Those who wish to know more of this beautiful story
must look for it among Mr. Thackeray's books.
Then it was Fred's turn. He had been studying the old stories
of Homer, and told of the Trojan War, the most famous of all wars,
and the old gods and heroes who fought on the plains of Troy.
Alec said he thought our own Civil War was as interesting as
any war could be. He had been reading some of Mr. Coffin's books,
and was full of enthusiasm for the Boys in Blue. He wished he had
been alive then to follow the flag. Mamma looked as if she was
very glad he wasn't, but she agreed with the rest that one could
never grow tired of the grand and beautiful stories of those stirring
years.
Laura had been reading Miss Strickland's Lives of the Jtcens
of England, and said she couldn't begin to tell all the interesting
stories she found there. She told some about Matilda, Eleanora and
Elizabeth.
Mamma belonged to an art class which was studying the pictures
of the old masters, so she told some of the legends of the saints, St.
Elizabeth and St. Cecilia and St. Agnes and St Christopher, and
showed how they could be recognized in the paintings by something
connected with their stories.
Then the children's hour was over, and they went up stairs to
have Willie Winkie tell such strange' stories in their ears after their
eyes were shut and they were fast asleep.


IWhe terrible Frio.
These are the robbers-the terrible three,
In showing no mercy they all agree;
Policemen and soldiers, beware, retire !

But if you should meet this terrible band,
Now don't run away, but come quick to a stand :
Be humble and quiet, and don't act amiss,
And all they'll rob you of will be a kiss.


Uladge and the 'irdie6.


Madge must be a country girl, and she must be very gentle and
kind to make the birdies so tame. I think she spends a great deal of
time out of doors, watching the birds and learning their ways, so that
now they are not at all afraid of her. The mother-bird is saying:
" You are very good to feed my little ones, but you must be careful
not to hurt them, and when you are through, please put our nest
back just where it came from in the grape arbor."
S*****'-***-**** c '-W-*i:***********e *day

Do your best, your very best,
And do it every day;


geeret6.
" What do you think?"
I'm sure I don't know."
' Don't tell anybody."
Oh, no! oh, no !"


Little boys and little girls,
That is the wisest way.


/


I





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


Whe mour for Ptorie6.
You know hiw cozy and cheerful is a bright wood fire in an
open fire-place. It is just the light to tell stories by, and to roast
apples and pop corn. Here is a happy circle who seem to find life very
pleasant this evening. Uncle Tom in the easy chair tells the first
story, which begins Once upon a time," and tells about fairy Black-
stick and the magic ring and rose, and how the fairy gave a queer
present to a little prince and princess, for she said, My dears, the
best thing I can wish you is a little misfortune," and truly they
had more than a little misfortune and many adventures in which the
magic ring and rose played a large part. These were also gifts of
the fairy Blackstick, and made those who wore them most beautiful
and charming. Those who wish to know more of this beautiful story
must look for it among Mr. Thackeray's books.
Then it was Fred's turn. He had been studying the old stories
of Homer, and told of the Trojan War, the most famous of all wars,
and the old gods and heroes who fought on the plains of Troy.
Alec said he thought our own Civil War was as interesting as
any war could be. He had been reading some of Mr. Coffin's books,
and was full of enthusiasm for the Boys in Blue. He wished he had
been alive then to follow the flag. Mamma looked as if she was
very glad he wasn't, but she agreed with the rest that one could
never grow tired of the grand and beautiful stories of those stirring
years.
Laura had been reading Miss Strickland's Lives of the Jtcens
of England, and said she couldn't begin to tell all the interesting
stories she found there. She told some about Matilda, Eleanora and
Elizabeth.
Mamma belonged to an art class which was studying the pictures
of the old masters, so she told some of the legends of the saints, St.
Elizabeth and St. Cecilia and St. Agnes and St Christopher, and
showed how they could be recognized in the paintings by something
connected with their stories.
Then the children's hour was over, and they went up stairs to
have Willie Winkie tell such strange' stories in their ears after their
eyes were shut and they were fast asleep.


IWhe terrible Frio.
These are the robbers-the terrible three,
In showing no mercy they all agree;
Policemen and soldiers, beware, retire !

But if you should meet this terrible band,
Now don't run away, but come quick to a stand :
Be humble and quiet, and don't act amiss,
And all they'll rob you of will be a kiss.


Uladge and the 'irdie6.


Madge must be a country girl, and she must be very gentle and
kind to make the birdies so tame. I think she spends a great deal of
time out of doors, watching the birds and learning their ways, so that
now they are not at all afraid of her. The mother-bird is saying:
" You are very good to feed my little ones, but you must be careful
not to hurt them, and when you are through, please put our nest
back just where it came from in the grape arbor."
S*****'-***-**** c '-W-*i:***********e *day

Do your best, your very best,
And do it every day;


geeret6.
" What do you think?"
I'm sure I don't know."
' Don't tell anybody."
Oh, no! oh, no !"


Little boys and little girls,
That is the wisest way.


/


I





SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


qohn gilpin'd gide.



JOHN GILPIN was a citizen
Of credit and renown,
A train-band captain eke was he,
Of famous London town.


The morning came, the chaise was brought,
But yet was not allowed
To drive up to the door, lest all
Should say that she was proud.

So three doors off the chaise was stayed,
Where they did all get in ;
Six precious souls, and all agog
To dash through thick and thin.


" Iam a linendraper bold."


John Gilpin's spouse said to her dear,
Though wedded we have been
These twice ten tedious years, yet we
No holiday have seen.

" To-morrow is our wedding-day,
And we will then repair
Unto the Bell 'at Edmonton,
All in a chaise and pair.


Tohn Gilfin kissed his loviaa wife."

" My sister, and my sister's child,
Myself and children three,
Will fill the chaise; so you must ride
On horseback after we."

He soon replied, I do admire
Of womankind but one,
And you are she, my dearest dear,
Therefore it shall be done.

"I am a linendraper bold,
As all the world doth know,
And my good friend the calender,
Will lend his horse to go."


Now Mistress Gilpin (careful soul!)
Had two stone bottles found,
To hold the liquor that she loved,
And keep it safe and sound.

Each bottle had a curling ear,
Through which the belt he drew,
And hung a bottle on each side,
To make his balance true.

Then over all, that he might be
Equipped from top to toe,
His long red cloak, well brushed and neat,
He manfully did throw.

Now see him mounted once again
Upon his nimble steed,
Full slowly pacing o'er the stones,
With caution and good heed.


"And hung a bottle on each side."


Smack went the whip, round went the wheels,
Were never folks so glad!
The stones did rattle underneath,
As if Cheapside was mad.

John Gilpin at his horse's side
Seized fast the flowing mane,
And up he got in haste to ride,
But soon came down again.


"Now see him mounted once again."


For saddletree scarce reached had he,
His journey to begin,
When, turning round his head, he saw
Three customers come in.

So down he came; for loss of time
Although it grieved him sore,
Yet loss of pence, full well he knew,
Would trouble him much more.


I\ i


"And every soul cried out, Well done!'"

But finding soon a smoother road
Beneath his well-shod feet,
The snorting beast began to trot,
Which galled him in his seat.

" So, fair and softly! "John he cried,
But John he cried in vain;
That trot became a gallop soon,
In spite of curb and rein.

So, stooping down, as needs he must
Who cannot sit upright,
He grasped the mane with both his hands,
And eke with all his might.

His horse, who never in that sort
Had handled been before,
What thing upon his back had got,
Did wonder more and more.

Away went Gilpin, neck or naught;
Away went hat and wig;
He little dreamt, when he set out,
Of running such a rig.

The wind did blow, the cloak did fly
Like streamer long and gay,
Till loop and button failing both,
At last it flew away.


a


7-",


" Three customers come in,n"


Quoth Mrs. Gilpin, That's well said;
. And for that wine is dear,
We will be furnished with our own,
Which is both bright and clear."

John Gilpin kissed his loving wife;
O'erjoyed was he to find,
That though on pleasure she was bent,
She had a-frugal mind.
I


" That trot became a gallop soon."


'Twas long before the customers
Were suited to their mind,
When Betty, screaming, came down-stairs,
The wine is left behind! "

" Good lack! quoth he, yet bring it me,
My leather belt likewise,
In which I bear my trusty sword
When I do exercise."


6I L (


The bottles twain behind his back
Were shattered at a blow."

Then might all people well discern
The bottles he had swung:
A bottle swinging at each side,
As hath been said or sung.

The dogs did bark, the children screamed,
Up flew the windows all;
And every soul cried out, "Well done!"
As loud as he could bawl.






SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


Away went Gilpin -who but he?
His fame soon spread around ;
" He carries weight! he rides a race!
'Tis for a thousand pound! "

And still as fast as he drew near,
'Twas wonderful to view
How in a trice the turnpike-men
Their gates wide open threw.


And now, as he went bowing down
His reeking head full low,
The bottles twain behind his back
Were shattered at a blow.

Down ran the wine into the road,
Most piteous to be seen,
Which made the horse's flanks to smoke,
As they had basted been.

But still he seemed to carry weight,
With leather girdle braced;
For all might see the bottle-necks
Still dangling at his waist.


Thus all through merry Islington
These gambols he did play,
Until he came unto the Wash
Of Edmonton so gay.


And the-e he threw the wash about
On both sides of the way,
Just like unto a trumbling mop,
Or a wild goose at play.


" His horse at last stood still."'


At Edmonton his loving wife
From the balcony spied
Her tender husband, wondering much
To see how he did ride.


" Stop, stop John Gilpin!-Here's the house!"
They all at once did cry;
' The dinner waits, and we are tired; "
Said Gilpin-" So am I!"


But yet his horse was not a whit
Inclined to tarry there;
For Why?-his owner had a house
Full ten miles off, at Ware.


So like an arrow swift he flew,
Shot by an archer strong;
So did he fly- which brings me to
The middle of my song.

Away went Gilpin, out of breath,
And sore against his will,
Till at his friend the calender's,
His horse at last stood still.

The calender, amazed to see
His neighbor in such trim,
Laid down his pipe, flew to the gate,
And thus accosted him:

" What news?-What news? your tidings tell;
Tell me you must and shall-
Say why bareheaded you are come, ,
Or why you come at all? "

Now Gilpin had a pleasant wit,
And loved a timely joke;
And thus unto ihe calender
In merry guise he spoke:

" I came because your horse would come;
And if I well forebode,
My hat and wig will soon be here,
They are upon the road."

The calendar, right glad to find
His friend in merry pin,
Returned him not a single word,
But to the house went in;

Whence straight he came with hat and wig,
A wig that flowed behind,
A hat not much the worse for wear,
Each comely in its kind.


The frightened steed hefrightened more."


HIe held them up, and in. his turn
Thus showed his ready wit:
" My head is twice as big as yours,
They therefore needs must fit.

" But let me scrape the dirt away,
That hangs upon your face;
And stop and eat, for well you may
Be in a hungry case."

Said John, It is my wedding-day,
And all the world would stare
If wife should dine at Edmonton
And I should dine at Ware."

So turning to his horse he said,
I am in haste to dine;
'Twas for your pleasure you came here,
You shall go back for mine."

Ah! luckless speech, and bootless boast!
For which he paid full dear;
For while he spake, a braying ass
Did sing most loud and clear;

Whereat his horse did snort, as he
Had heard a lion roar,
And galloped off with all his might,
As he had done before.

Away went Gilpin, and away
Went Gilpin's hat and wig;
He lost them sooner than at first,
For why?-they were to big.


Now Mistress Gilpin, when she saw
Her husband posting down
Into the country far away
She pulled out half a crown;


And thus unto the youth she said,
That drove them to the Bell,"
" This shall be yours when you bring back
My husband safe and well."


t


"Did join in the pursuit."


The youth did ride, and soon did meet
John coming back amain;
Whom in a trice he tried to stop,
By catching at his rein.


But not performing what he meant,
And gladly would have done,
The frightened steed he frightened more,
And made him faster run.

Away went Gilpin, and away
Went postboy at his heels,
The postboy's horse right glad to miss
The lumbering of the wheels.


Six gentlemen upon the road,
Thus seeing Gilpin fly,
With postboy scampering in the rear,
They raised the hue and cry.

Stop thief! stop thief! a highwayman! "
Not one of them was mute;
And all and eat h that passed that way,
Did join in the pursuit.














', i :-









"And Gilpin, long live he."


And now the turnpike gates again
Flew open in short space,
The toll-men thinking as before,
That Gilpin rode a race.

And so he did, and won it too,
For he got first to town;
Nor stopped till where he first got up,
He did again get down.


Now let us sing, Long live the king,
And Gilpin, long live he;
And when he next doth ride abroad,
May I be there to see.


I1


I


f




SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


Here are a young lady and her father playing the
game of chess while her mother sews near by. What
a pleasant room, with its soft lamp-light and roses, its
pictures and piano, and the sweet-faced people!
There are not many children who play chess, be-
cause it takes a long time to learn, and a great deal of
thinking while playing. But if your mother or father,
or any of your older friends play, there is no reason
why you should not begin to learn at once. Of course
you must have first a chess-board and men, as the
things you play with are called-the pawn, the knight,
the bishop, the king and queen. What delightful names!
The game has been played for hundreds of years.


Nobody knows who first played it. Some people who
have tried to find out, think it originated in India, but
there is nothing certain about it. It makes no differ-
ence who first played it, it is a splendid game, and well
worth all the time it will take you to learn it. The
board becomes a battle-field, and the king and queen
dressed in white fight against the king and queen dressed
in black, and their knights and bishops and the rest
come in gallantly to fight for them.
It is much better to fight with prettily carved wooden
men on a chess-board in a pleasant room than to go
out and hurt somebody, is it not?


9 la"Inq @he 6.




SUNBEAMS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.
_ ________________________ i *


Siohermen.


Four men with kind, serious, pleasant faces. Four
brave men, who are wrinkled and rough because they
have to fight with the wind and the ocean in storms,
and to work hard all the time to keep their little fam-
ilies in comfort. They are rough on the outside only.
They have tender hearts, every one of them, and each
thinks when he is away on the vast ocean, of the warm
fire-light and his loving wife and children.
Think how they must long to see their little boys
and girls, and how the children must watch and watch,
day after day, for the returning boats that they may
see their dear father again.
Think how you would feel if your papa went off in
a small boat upon the great, tumbling waves to catch
fish. What would you do if a great storm arose?
Would you not pray for his safety, that his boat might
weather the storm, and come to you again? That is
just what the children of these men do. Then when
papa really did come home, how you'd crawl upon his
r


knee, and nestle your head on his shoulder, and listen
to his stories of the great fish and strange creatures he
saw; the way the wind blew and the waves tossed.
How pleasant the warm drift-wood fire, the singing tea-
kettle, and the loving child on his knee would be to him
after his perilous voyage.
There are thousands of these men who brave every
kind of hardship every year that they and their families
may live, and our markets be supplied with fish. Very
many of them are drowned lost at sea, the papers say,
you know, and some little girl or boy looks in vain with
tear-wet eyes for papa's return. It is dreadful, is it not,
that so many must die that others may live ?
Yet the life has pleasure, too. At any rate, when
we see rough faces and hands we must not think the
people disagreeable because of it; perhaps like these
tender-hearted fishermen, all the roughness comes from
the struggle they make to provide for their little girls
and boys.




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