• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Sunny days of childhood
 My mother
 The north wind
 Buttercups and daisies
 Violets
 The child's desire
 Little rain-drops
 How doth the little busy bee
 The turtle-dove's nest
 Lazy sheep
 Mary had a little lamb
 Little pussy
 Thank you, pretty cow
 The better land
 Try again
 Little things
 Poor Neddy
 A child's hymn of praise
 Suppose
 This is the way the ladies go
 Round the mulberry bush
 The old clock
 Little star
 Back Cover






Group Title: Childhood valley : the favourite songs of childhood
Title: Childhood valley
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00065453/00001
 Material Information
Title: Childhood valley the favourite songs of childhood
Physical Description: 38 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Lawson, John, fl. 1865-1909 ( Illustrator )
Simmonds, St. Clair ( Illustrator )
West, Maud ( Illustrator )
Nister, Ernest ( Printer )
E.P. Dutton (Firm) ( Publisher )
Publisher: E.P. Dutton & Co.
Place of Publication: New York
Manufacturer: E. Nister
Publication Date: [1889?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes -- 1889   ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry -- 1889   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1889
Genre: Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
Germany -- Nuremberg
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: with new pictures in color by John Lawson and vignettes by St. Clair Simmonds, Maud West and others.
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00065453
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223110
notis - ALG3358
oclc - 70870160

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page i
    Half Title
        Page ii
    Frontispiece
        Page iii
    Title Page
        Page iv
    Sunny days of childhood
        Page 1
        Page 2
    My mother
        Page 3
        Plate
    The north wind
        Page 4
        Plate
    Buttercups and daisies
        Page 5
    Violets
        Page 6
    The child's desire
        Plate
        Page 7
    Little rain-drops
        Page 8
        Page 9
    How doth the little busy bee
        Page 10
        Plate
    The turtle-dove's nest
        Page 11
    Lazy sheep
        Page 12
        Plate
        Plate
    Mary had a little lamb
        Page 13
    Little pussy
        Page 14
    Thank you, pretty cow
        Page 15
        Plate
    The better land
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Try again
        Plate
        Page 18
        Plate
    Little things
        Page 19
    Poor Neddy
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Plate
    A child's hymn of praise
        Page 22
    Suppose
        Page 23
    This is the way the ladies go
        Page 23
    Round the mulberry bush
        Page 23
    The old clock
        Page 24
    Little star
        Page 25
        Plate
        Page 26
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
Full Text





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sun\'C\f(r DT)ATS OF CHILDHOOD.


S UN (r days of childhood I Happy days of childhood I
Beautiful ye seem; Swiftly moving on:
Fair as Spring-tide flowers, Into manhood changing,
Bright as Summer's beam. Ye will soon be gone.
Days with joy o'erflowing, Like a streamlet flowing,
Care nor sadness knowing, Pause nor stillness knowing,
Must ye pass away? Thus ye pass away !













Precious days of childhood I
Days of promise fair;
If bedewed with wisdom,
Rich the fruits ye bear.
Jesu's footsteps keeping,
Blest shall be our reaping
In life's harvest day.


Sunny days of childhood !
We no tears will shed
When, like Spring-tide flowers,
Youth and health are fled.
Earthly scenes forsaking,
We shall hail the breaking
Of an endless day.


















7qIT qIOTHSRE.



HO sat and watched my infant head
SWhen sleeping on my cradle bed,
And tears of sweet affection shed ?
Mv Mother.

Who ran to help me when I fell,
And would some pretty story tell,
Or kiss the place to make it well ?
My Mother.

Who taught my infant lips to pray,
And love God's holy book and day,
And walk in wisdom's pleasant way?
My Mother.

And can I ever cease to be
Affectionate and kind to thee,
Who wast so very kind to me? -
My Mother.

When thou art feeble, old, and grey,
My healthy arms shall be thy stay,
And I will soothe thy pains away-
My Mother.

And when I see thee hang th' head,
'Twill be my turn to watch thy bed,
And tears of sweet affection shed-
My Mother.

















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SHE north wind doth blow and we shall have snow,
And what will the robin do then, poor thing ?
He'll sit in the barn and keep himself warm,
And hide his head under his wing, poor thing.


The north wind doth blow and we shall have snow,
And what shall the honey bee do, poor thing ?
In his hive he will stay till the cold's passed away,
And then he'll come out in the Spring, poor thing.


The north wind doth blow and we shall have snow,
And what will the dormouse do then, poor thing?
Rolled up like a ball in his nest, snug and small,
He'll sleep till warm weather comes back, poor
thing.


The north wind doth blow
and we shall have snow,
And what will the children do then,
poor things ?
When lessons are done
they '11 jump, skip, and run,
And that's how
they'll keep themselves warm,
poor things.



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k \ UTTEY CUTS and Daisies-
'/ Oh, the pretty flowers!
Coming ere the Spring-time,
To tell of sunny hours.
While the trees are leafless,
While the fields are bare,
Buttercups and Daisies
Spring up everywhere.


Ei2-: the Snow-drop peepeth,
ii e the Crocus bold,
L:E: the early Primrose
'.'pes its paly gold,
.-.'.,ewhere on a sunny bank
...ttercups are bright,
-. in!,where on a sunny bank
l',:eps the Daisy white.


Welcome, yellow Buttercups,
Welcome, Daisies white!
Ye are in my spirit
Visioned, a delight!
Coming ere the Spring-time,
Of sunny hours to tell,
Speaking to our hearts of Him
Who doeth all things well.




















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I t h,"..-N. in a green and shady bed,
S.\ oin.lest Violet grew;
It tt. ll was bent, it hung its head,
S.\ t' to hide from view.


I' ,I '.'t t '.is a lovely flower,
It- ....Iur Iright and fair;
It hmlit i i. .-: graced a rosy bower
Instead of hiding there.


Yet thus it was content to bloom,
In modest tints arrayed,
And there diffused its sweet perfume
Within the silent sha-c..


Then let me to the \.i!!':;' ,
This pretty flowc t,, :.-,
That I may also le.-iln Li -!.i. -i
In sweet humility. .-







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SWerT STOTzr OF OLD.
















THE CHILD'S






THIA'IQ, when I read thmt 4--'....., ,-,l ,)fl
When Jesus was here anrir..n Ir,
How He called little children .i L... H I I. l.l.
I should like to have be--!n 0\ 1 l. l l._n, tii el.


I wish that His hands had been placed on my head,
That His arms had been thrown around me,
And that I might have seen His kind look when He
said,
"Let the little ones come unto Me."


But still to His footstool in prayer I may go,
And ask for a share in His love;
And if I thus earnestly seek Him below,
I shall see Him and hear Him above,


In that beautiful place He has gone to prepare
For all that are washed and forgiven;
And many dear children are gathering there,
For of such is the kingdom of heaven."
Mrs. Luke.













LITTLE ,fICVL_-'DROPS.



O H, where do you come from,
You little drops of rain,
Pitter patter, pitter patter,
Down the window pane?


They won't let me walk,
And they won't let me play,
And they won't let me go
Out of doors, at all to-day.


They put away my plaything_,
Because I broke them all,
And then they lock'd up all r,- I.! ...i
And took away my ball.


Tell me, little rain-drops,
Is that the way you play,
Pitter patter, pitter patter,
All the rainy day ?














































They say I'm very naughty, The little rain-drops cannot speak,
But I've nothing else to do But pitterr patter pat"
But sit here at the window; Means, "We can play on this side,
I should like to play with you. Why can't you play on that?"











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HOW D OTH THIE
SLITTL S USr BS8.

S ... H OW doth the little busy bee
7 Improve each shining hour,
4 And gather honey all the day
S- From every opening flower!

How skilfully she builds her cell!
Sh How neat she spreads the wax!
,.- And labours hard
S--- to store it well
With the sweet food
she makes.

In works of labour or of skill, -
I would be busy, too, '
For Satan finds some mischief still
For idle hands to do.

In books, or work, or healthful play,
Let my first years be past,
That I may give for every day
Some good account at last.
B Isaac Watts.




















































IMTT^kOVI^C TH SHJIAC7\( HOUT










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The little turtle-dove
SMade a pretty nursery,
1 To please her little love.
She was gentle, she was soft,
SAnd her large dark eye
Often turned to her mate,
Who was sitting close by.


SCoo!" said the turtle-dove,
"Coo !" said she.
"Oh, I love thee !" said the turtle-dove;
"And I love thee."
In the long shady branches
Of the dark pine tree
How happy were the doves
In their little nursery !


The young turtle-doves In this nursery of yours,
Never quarrelled in their nest, Little sister, little brother,
For they dearly loved each other, Like the turtle-dove's nest,
Though they loved Do you love one another ?
their mother best. Are you kind, are you gentle
"Coo !" said the little doves; As children ought to be ?
"Coo !" said she. Then the happiest of nests
And they played together kindly Is your own nursery.
In the dark pine tree. A2nt E -.'s Rhymes.



















TL iz '..i:.p, pra 'tell me why
In' the pleasarit'I-ld 1 you lie,
Eating grass and daisies white
Fiom the morning till the night ?
Everything can something do,
But what kind of use are you ?


Nay, my little master, nay,
Do not serve me so, I pray;
Don't you see the wool that grows
On my back to make your clothes ?
Cold, ah! very cold you'd be,
If you had not wool from me.


When the farmer comes at last,
When the merry Spring is past,
Cuts my woolly fleece away
For your coat in wintry day;
Little master, this is why
In the pleasant fields I lie.
Ann Taylor.







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H. 1-D -1 LITTLE& L6Az IB.




4 4RLJ had.a little lamb,
1Ir ts fleece was white as snow;
And everywhere that Mary went,
The lamb was sure to go.


I!i followed her to school one day:
That was against the rule;
It made the children laugh and play
1'o see a lamb at school.


So the teacher turned him out, Then he ran to her, and laid
But still he lingered near, His head upon her arm,
And waited patiently about As if he said, "I'm not afraid-
Till Mary did appear. You'll keep me from all harm."


"What makes the lamb love Mary so ?
The eager children cry.
"Oh, Mary loves the lamb, you know,"
The teacher did reply.


And you each gentle animal
In confidence may bind,
And make them follow at your will,
If you are only kind.















LIETTLS PUSSr.



I LIICE little pussy, her coat is so warm;
And if I don't hurt her she'll do me no harm;
So I'll not pull her tail, nor drive her away,
But pussy and I very gently will play;
She shall sit by my side, and I'll give her some food;
And she'll love me because I am gentle and good.


I'll pat little pussy, and then she will purr,
And thus show her thanks for my kindness to her;
I'll not pinch her ears, nor tread on her paw,
Lest I should provoke her to use her sharp claw;
I never will vex her, nor make her displeased,
For pussy doesn't like to be worried or teased.






















P.RETTYT COW.

H /'li, ' il.' pIittY cow, that made
T kPl.iaanit nuilk t:o ct.ak my bread,
Every d. ml \and -ery night,
\VarIm and s\,cet, and fresh and white.

Do not chew the hemlock rank
Growing on the weedy bank,
But the yellow Cowslips eat;
They will make it very sweet.

Where the bubbling water flows,
Where the purple violet grows,
Where the grass is fresh and fine:
Pretty cow, go there and dinh..






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SHEIRT, thee speak of the better land:
Thou call'st its children a happy band;
Mother Oh, where is that radiant shore ?
Shall we not seek it, and weep no more ?
Is it where the flower of the orange blows,
And the fireflies glance through the myrtle boughs ?"
"Not there, not there, my child !"



"Is it where the feathery palm trees rise,
And the date grows ripe under sunny skies;
Or 'midst the green island of glittering seas,
Where fragrant forests perfume the breeze,
And strange bright birds on their starry wings
Bear the rich hues of all'glorious things ?"
"Not there, not there, my child !"
















Is it far away, in some region old,
Where the rivers wander o'er sands of gold -
Where the burning rays of the ruby shine,
And the diamond lights up the secret mine,
And the pearl gleams forth from the coral strand
Is it there, sweet mother, that better land?"
"Not there, not there, my child !"



"Eve hath not seen it, my gentle boy,
Ear hath not heard its deep songs of joy;
Dreams cannot picture a world so fair -
Sorrow and death may not enter there;
Time does not breathe on its fadeless bloom,
For beyond the clouds and beyond the tomb:
It is there, it is there, my child!"
Mrs. Hemans.

















































. .T .G I ...













IS a lesson you should heed,
Try again;
If at first you don't succeed,
Try again;
Then your courage should appear,
For if you will persevere,
You will conquer, never fear,
Try again.

Once or twice, though you should fail,
Try again;
If you would at last prevail,
Try again ;
If we strive, 'tis no disgrace
Though we do not win the race;
What should we do in that case ?
Try again.

If you find your task is hard,
Try again;
Time will bring you your reward,
Try again;
All that other folk can do,
Why, with patience, may not you ?
Only keep this rule in view,
Try again.
Hickson.









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TOO COLD.



















S ITTL drops of water,
Little grains of sand,
Make the mighty ocean
And the pleasant land.




i'hus the little minutes,
Humble though they be,
.. .i-: the mighty ages
i t eternity.




So our little errors
Lead the soul away
From the path of virtue,
Oft in sin to stray.




Little d(eeds of kindness,
Little words of love,
Make our earth an Eden,
Like the heaven above.
Brewer.


















I F I had a donkey that wouldn't go,
Do you think I'd wallop him ?
No, no, no;
I'd give him some hay,
and cry, Gee Whoa,
Come up, Neddy!




THRE88 BLIJ\j(D lf(ICE8.

e HO RoEE blind mice,
Three blind mice,
Three blind mice,
See how they run,
See how they run,
See how they run.
They all ran after the farmer's wife,
She cut off their tails with a carving-knife.
Did you ever see such a thing in your life
As three blind mice?


THE FIVE PIgs.

I. This pig went to market;
2. This pig stayed at home;
3. This pig had a bit of meat;
4. And this pig had none;
5. This pig said, Wee, wee, wee!
I can't find my way home.













O WS and horses walk on four legs,
Little children walk on two legs;
Fishes swim in water clear,
Birds fly up into the air.
One, two, three, four, five.
Catching fishes all alive.
Why did you let them go ?
Because they bit my finger so.




-O6, two,
Buckle my shoe,
Three, four,
Shut the door,
Five, six,
Pick up sticks,
Seven, eight,
Lay them straight,
Nine, ten,
A good fat hen,
Eleven, twelve,
Who will del-..? .--.-.
Thirteen, fourt.L::, 1'ff4
Maid's a comuit ..
Fifteen, sixtt-: n,
Maid's a kin ;,, '-"
Seventeen, e;i t- -tn,
Maid's in v.titi!n.. '-
Nineteen, ti-.,:nt-.,.
My stoma-t

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QooD> FRZjenjzs.












e CHILD'S Hr1WT (X OF 'PRfIS8.


I TtH I..XjK, the goodness and the grace
Which on my birth have smiled,
And made me, in these Christian days,
A happy English child.

I was not born, as thousands are, I was not born a little slave,
Where God was never known, To labour in the sun,
And taught to pray a useless prayer And wish I were but in the grave,
To blocks of wood and stone. And all my labour done.

I was not born without a home,
Or in some broken shed,
A gipsy baby, taught to roam,
And steal my daily bread.

My God, I thank Thee, who hast planned '
A better lot for me,
And placed me in this happy land,
Where I may hear of Thee.








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SU-P OS .

UPPOSIJC-G I were you,
S Supposing you were me,
Supposing I were somebody else,
I wonder who you would be.

If all the world were water,
If all the water were ink,
If all the ink were bread and cheese,
What should we do for drink ?



THIS IS THS W.>IT
THS Lc'DISS CjO.
^HIS is the way the ladies go-
Nim, nim, nim.
This is the way the gentlemen go-
Trot, trot, trot.
This is the way the hunters go-
Gallop, gallop, gallop.



RpOU\'~CD TH8 MIULWBrT 'BUSH.
4HER we go round the mulberry bush,
H Mulberry bush,
Mulberry bush,
Here we go round the mulberry bush,
On a cold frosty morning.
This is the way we brush our hair,
Brush our hair,
Brush our hair,
This is the way we brush our hair,
On a cold frosty morning.
[Followed by "This is the way we clean our boots," etc.]










SU-P OS .

UPPOSIJC-G I were you,
S Supposing you were me,
Supposing I were somebody else,
I wonder who you would be.

If all the world were water,
If all the water were ink,
If all the ink were bread and cheese,
What should we do for drink ?



THIS IS THS W.>IT
THS Lc'DISS CjO.
^HIS is the way the ladies go-
Nim, nim, nim.
This is the way the gentlemen go-
Trot, trot, trot.
This is the way the hunters go-
Gallop, gallop, gallop.



RpOU\'~CD TH8 MIULWBrT 'BUSH.
4HER we go round the mulberry bush,
H Mulberry bush,
Mulberry bush,
Here we go round the mulberry bush,
On a cold frosty morning.
This is the way we brush our hair,
Brush our hair,
Brush our hair,
This is the way we brush our hair,
On a cold frosty morning.
[Followed by "This is the way we clean our boots," etc.]










SU-P OS .

UPPOSIJC-G I were you,
S Supposing you were me,
Supposing I were somebody else,
I wonder who you would be.

If all the world were water,
If all the water were ink,
If all the ink were bread and cheese,
What should we do for drink ?



THIS IS THS W.>IT
THS Lc'DISS CjO.
^HIS is the way the ladies go-
Nim, nim, nim.
This is the way the gentlemen go-
Trot, trot, trot.
This is the way the hunters go-
Gallop, gallop, gallop.



RpOU\'~CD TH8 MIULWBrT 'BUSH.
4HER we go round the mulberry bush,
H Mulberry bush,
Mulberry bush,
Here we go round the mulberry bush,
On a cold frosty morning.
This is the way we brush our hair,
Brush our hair,
Brush our hair,
This is the way we brush our hair,
On a cold frosty morning.
[Followed by "This is the way we clean our boots," etc.]














CLO





the neat little clock,
in the corner it stands,
/J And points out the time
with its two pretty hands:
The one shows the minute, the other the hour,
ks you often may see in tbe church's high tow. r.



The pendulum swings inside the long case,
And sends the two hands round the neat, picetty I'..:.
And lest they should move on too slow or too quick,
It swings to and fro with a tic, tic, tic.



There 's a nice little bell, which a hammer does knock,
And when we hear that we may tell what's o'clock;
But we love twelve and five, as it then is our rule
Our lessons to finish and march out of school.



So must I, like the clock, have my face clean and bright,
And my hands while they're moving should always do right;
My tongue must be guided to say what is true,
Wherever I go or whatever I do.


















Sy~f INj e, twinkle, little star;
:How I wonder what you are !
Up above the world so high,
Like a diamond in the sky.



When the glorious sun is set,
When the grass with dew is wet,
Then you show -your little light,
Twinkle, twinkle, all the night.



In the dark blue sky you keep,
And often through my curtains peep;
For you never shut your eye
Till the sun is in the sky.



As your bright and tiny spark
Lights the traveller in the dark,
Though I know not what you are.
Twinkle, twinkle, little star.


M"'a 7*'




























































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