• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Christmas bells
 My cat
 Little chicks
 An unwilling pupil
 An intruder
 Tom Wright and his kite
 A little trader
 A little gardener
 A song of pussy-cats
 Playmates (illustration)
 Lost in the wood
 A birthday party
 Out in the rain
 The woodcock and its young
 Holding the skein
 Spanish water sellers
 My dollies
 A kind mastiff
 Little John Jones
 Slate drawing
 The donkey-ride
 Baby's guardian
 A jumping jack
 Friskie and Tiny
 Baby
 Apples!
 Chatterers
 The two Jacks
 Patience and her task
 Out in the snow
 Baby at the seaside
 Baby's air-ball
 Three little girls
 Slate drawing
 Little Mary's pets
 A kind rook
 What tiger did
 Isabella
 Among the snowflakes
 A little traveller
 The little maid
 Slumber song
 A playmate from Asia
 A strange ride
 The chick and the sunset
 The cat's nursery
 Advertising
 Back Cover






Group Title: Delights of childhood : : pictures and stories for our pets.
Title: Delights of childhood
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00065434/00001
 Material Information
Title: Delights of childhood pictures and stories for our pets
Physical Description: 80, 1 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Beatty & Votteler ( Lithographer )
Cassell & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: Cassell & Company
Place of Publication: New York ;
London ;
Paris ;
Melbourne
Publication Date: c1889
 Subjects
Subject: Pets -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Country life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1889   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1889   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1889   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1889
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
England -- London
France -- Paris
Australia -- Melbourne
 Notes
General Note: Contains prose and verse.
General Note: Cover chromolithographed by Beatty & Votteler.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements follow text and on endpapers.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00065434
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223315
notis - ALG3564
oclc - 70870158

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Advertising
        Advertising 1
        Advertising 2
        Advertising 3
    Front Matter
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Christmas bells
        Page 5
        Page 6
    My cat
        Page 7
    Little chicks
        Page 8
        Page 9
    An unwilling pupil
        Page 10
        Page 11
    An intruder
        Page 12
    Tom Wright and his kite
        Page 13
    A little trader
        Page 14
    A little gardener
        Page 15
    A song of pussy-cats
        Page 16
    Playmates (illustration)
        Page 17
    Lost in the wood
        Page 18
        Page 19
    A birthday party
        Page 20
    Out in the rain
        Page 21
    The woodcock and its young
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Holding the skein
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Spanish water sellers
        Page 26
        Page 27
    My dollies
        Page 28
        Page 29
    A kind mastiff
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Little John Jones
        Page 32
    Slate drawing
        Page 33
    The donkey-ride
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Baby's guardian
        Page 38
    A jumping jack
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Friskie and Tiny
        Page 41
    Baby
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Apples!
        Page 44
    Chatterers
        Page 45
    The two Jacks
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Patience and her task
        Page 48
        Page 49
    Out in the snow
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Baby at the seaside
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
    Baby's air-ball
        Page 55
    Three little girls
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
    Slate drawing
        Page 59
    Little Mary's pets
        Page 60
        Page 61
    A kind rook
        Page 62
        Page 63
    What tiger did
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Isabella
        Page 66
    Among the snowflakes
        Page 67
    A little traveller
        Page 68
        Page 69
    The little maid
        Page 70
        Page 71
    Slumber song
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
    A playmate from Asia
        Page 76
    A strange ride
        Page 77
        Page 78
    The chick and the sunset
        Page 79
    The cat's nursery
        Page 80
    Advertising
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text















































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General Manager. Traffic Manager. General Passenger Agent.
















"CHRISTMAS HAS COME AGAIN."


I''"I
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THE CHRISTMAS STOCKING.


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DELIGHTS OF CHILDHOOD








PICTURES AND STORIES FOR OUR PETS


CASSELL & COMPANY, LIMITED
NEW YORK, LONDON, PARIS AND MELBOURNE.


~L _~ I I


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d~r~xo -I --~5-,
~~































































COPYRIGHT, 1889,

BY

O. M. DUNHAM








THE CBILJD'S DELIGIrT


. .-- "^CHIlPTMl;

:''- W(V-HAT does (
bring to u
W~ hat does (
bring to u
The soft whi
nd wee r
a. row,
S found shini
holly-berrg
A-nd thei mis-


BELL-.

2hristmas
s,
Thristmas


s?
te snow,
obins in


ng


, LI t. t -_ I lo m111' lL\
Vhil(-e the 1ell ,


_ all chiming
" sin~ to us, :.i;


"( C'hulst.Lmas- .
tide is ihere, -,.':i
Christnmastide is
here '

--./ '- ._--I-- "3
... ^ M_-' .. ...


A.


- --- -" -


- -- -- --- ---- -


----


---


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5


F


1








CHRISTMAS BELLS.


What is Christmas bringing,
What is Christmas bringing?
The firm cold ice
Big children think so nice;
Even little ones who stumble,
Should they chance to get a tumble
Only laugh in merry cheer:
While sweetly, far and near,
They hear the glad bells ringing
"Christmastide is here,
Christmastide is here!"





-- ",


__ ~~_~ ~ ~P


------- ~~ ._I_~ = ~__


--


6







MY CAT.


MY CAT.
HAVE a cat, so sleek and fat,
She has the sweetest purr!
And she loves me, I'm sure of that,
For I, you see, love her!


~


7










8 LITTLE CHICKS.







LITTLE CHICKS. 9


Twicklety twee, it is such fun,
All in a hurry to see them run.

Baby Jim loves all the chicks:
All the chicks love baby Jim!
They fancy he's a big big bird,
And tell such funny tales to him.
Baby hears and answers all
As they come running to his call.
Twicklety twee! it is such fun,
All in a hurry to see them run.
With a "chicklety chy! chicklety choo !
Little bird, baby boy, how do you do!"
"Chicklety choo, chicklety chy,
Why don't you spread your wings and
fly ?"


l ~
jW~.cC
-I ?~L







AN UNWILLING PUPIL.


A3B UJWILLIJq PUPIL.
,T was of no use. Harry held up a piece
of cake and counted, One, two, three "
But Dash either wagged his tail and
jumped up at the cake, or else if Harry
scolded he sat with his head down, and
would not move or listen to what was
being said.
He looked just as Harry looked when
he did not want to say A, B, C, and nurse
could not get him to tell her which was
round 0 or crooked S, though Harry knew
quite well.
"Oh, how hard it is to teach dogs !"
said Harry.
Then nurse, who was not far off, said-
"It is sometimes quite as hard to teach
little boys."
Harry looked a little ashamed for a
moment, and then he said, "Well, never
mind, Dash, this is play-time; we will
have a scamper on the beach, and I will
teach you to beg to morrow."


10














AN UNWILLING PUPIL.


AN UNWILLING PUPIL.


_I_


r ~


11







AN INTRUDER.


AN INTRUDER.
i LITTLE guinea-pig got tired of living
in his hutch, and one day, when his
master had forgotten to shut the door,
he ran out into the yard. By good
fortune, he came first to Frisk's kennel,
or I don't know what might have
happened to him. Frisk's puppies could


12







TOM WRIGHT AND HIS KITE.


not make him out at all, though they said
as plainly as a dog can, "Surely you are
not one of us!" Frisk, however, ran for
his master, who soon put Master Guinea-
pig back in the hutch.












Tojy WRIGHT AND HIt KITE.
LITTLE Tom Wright
Had a very large kite,
And once on a windy day
It lifted him quite,
And little Tom Wright
With the kite went flying away.


13







A LITTLE TRADER.


A LITTLE TRADER.


_HUBARB to sell,


Just fit for a pie;


Gathered this morning:
Pray, who will buy?


14








THE LITTLE GARDENER.


A LITTLE QARDENiER.
AM a little gardener!
These flowers are all my own;
I give them water, quite a lot
Out of a real watering-pot.


Nurse fetched this daisy from the green;
I'll wash its face so pinkie clean.
Now I do trust it won't be long
Before it grows up straight and strong.


- I --- --


-- -


16:







A SONG OF PUSSY-CATS.


A jONq OF PUpJY-CATP.
SING a song of pussy-cats,
A Persian kitten rare,
Rufus was his name because
He had red eyes and hair.
The children kissed him every night,
Before they went to bed,
And as he couldn't say "Good night,"
"Mew, mew," the kitten said.

Sing a song of pussy-cats,
Of Persian kittens too,
If poor Rufus hurts himself,
What will Jackie do ?
He will gently stroke his fur,
And, looking very wise,
Will take a little handkerchief
And wipe his shining eyes.


_ _


--


16














PLAYMATES.


PLAYMATES.


~ __ _1~1


~ ~


__ __ __


17













LOST IN THE WOOD.


LOST IN THE WOOD.


18


- --








LOST IN THE WOOD.


LOT IN THE WOOD.
-- -- ow dark it is, Dolly!" said
Nelly; "I don't know
Which way to go, and
the snow-storm is begin-
:i n ing." Dolly, being a
doll, could not make
any answer, and Nelly
put up her umbrella,
for the snow was begin-
ning to fall faster and faster. It was
darker now, and Nelly began to feel
alarmed. "Oh, Dolly, Dolly," she cried;
"we are lost, we are lost, like the babes
in the wood."
But just then she heard her little
dog Frisk's joyful bark, for he had made
his way to her. He looked at his mistress
as much as to say "Stay here," and then
he,darted away. But he soon came back,
and Nelly's father came with him, with
a large cloak for Nelly. And so they all
got safely out of the wood.


I_~ __ ___~~_ __


_ __


_ __ _


19 1








A BIRTHDAY PARTY.


A BIRTHDAY }PAITY.

NIs baby's birthday, so he sits
Just like a prince in state;
And we, his humble followers,
Upon his highness wait.


20


s- --












OUT IN THE RAIN.


" PLEASE LET ME IN!"


_ _


21







OUT IN THE RAIN.


OUT 1] THE 'AIN.
qLEASE, will you open the window,
For pussy is out in the rain ?
She waits to come in to her kitten,
And sit by the fire again.
Please will you open the window,
For pussy is wet to the skin,
And she longs for her cosy warm basket,
And to be with her kitten within.



THE WOODCOCK AJD ITS YOUNQ.
of.ou have seen a cat when she wants
to carry her kittens from one place
to another-how carefully she lifts her
baby with her mouth, and then gently car-
ries it to its new home. Now, birds tend
their young ones in a different way. They
usually keep them in the nest until their
feathers grow long enough to enable them
to fly off on their own account. This is


22







THE WOODCOCK AND ITS YOUNG.


the rule, but the woodcock has an odd
way of rearing her babies. The first nest
is made in a very dry spot in the forest,
where it is difficult to get food for the












S ------------ A-_ a
_- -' = _ -- : ',1 r -.I -= -- :-




fledglings. The mother, however, will not
let her children starve, but soon takes
them to moist feeding-grounds. But how
do you think she manages that ? She cun't
carry them in her mouth as puss does.


23







HOLDING THE SKEIN.


Well, it was long thought she put them
between her feet, and so flew with them
from place to place. It is now believed,
however, that her claws are not strong
enough to bear such a weight, but that
she clasps the little one tightly between
her legs, and thus the baby woodcock is
carried safe and sound to its new abode.






HOLDIJ\Q THE JKEIN.
WiIND, wind, wind!
My hands are beginning to ache.
Wind, wind, wind!
Really some rest I must take.
What a great ball you have made!
When will the winding be ended ?"
"Ah, little Dorothy, think
Of the stockings that have to be mended !"


24













HOLDING THE SKEIN.


'II,


i, .


HOLDING THE SKEIN.


25


~


~";~s~-rs
!'~ ~







SPANISH WATER-SELLER.


SPANISH


WATEF- ELLER .


to lead
picture
mules.


SUN the Spanish cities you
jmay often see a string
7 of mules carrying jars
in the panniers on their
,, backs. These jars hold
Sweater, and the driver of
sII' the mules is a water-
,:> seller. As you may see
ji; in the picture, the mules
S .1,! are decked with gay rib-
W bonds and ornaments,
Sand they do not seem
a very hard life. Here, too, is a
of a Spanish omnibus drawn by


__


26


-~-----
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A


WATER- CARRIER. 27












,








































A WVATER-CARRIER.








28 MY D OLLIES.



MY JDOLLIE.

JIFp, my dollies, one, two, three,
I ,must bathe you all, I see.
Dollies of china, wax, and wood,
Let me beg you to be good!
Don't cry at
_._ the soap,
.__._i -. -: an d don't
-- .:kik at the

l Doll,


. I' "f -- --I
1 1- .' i I


lknow, are
the better
ifo scIub-
bring


~_ I


;-Z.--"-.. .:: :--, U .--- -- .









MY D OLLIES.


Big Mabel, shall it be
your turn first?
.- No(, for I think
-:i h ust.he sawdust


, 7]iOr yu ion, \Iiss
Belle, witi ,
.hthe c -.
hhaisrIlus
1'' 1 1111 11 Z

Lif '


-:"


b'


Or Rosalinda, pink
and fair;
Or little black Judy,
lying there,
Looking about with a
queer glass stare ?


If'


'2 9
'


29


----


^.










A KIND MASTIFF.


A KIND MAjTIFF.
ONE day a fine-looking mastiff was passing
along a street where not many people
were about, and he found a poor spaniel
who had just met with an accident. A
carriage which had been -driving rapidly
along had broken the unfortunate dog's
leg, and had gone on without attempting
to give any assistance. NIow, it happened
that some months previously the mastiff
himself had met with a very serious acci-
dent while out with his master, and so
the latter had at once taken him off to the
doctor to have him attended to, and he
had got well again by this time. And
what do you think this clever mastiff did
when he found the injured spaniel? He
took the dog up in his mouth, ran
along with him through different streets,
and then at last actually carried him to
the very doctor who had so successfully
cured him. And, as you may guess, the


30












A KIND MASTIFF.


A KIND MASTIFF.


- ----


31 1







LITTLE JOHN JONES.


good doctor was so struck by the kindness
shown by the mastiff to the Iinjured
spaniel, that he at once attended to the
broken bone, and in the course of time, I
am glad to say, made him quite well again.
Was not the mastiff a very good and very
clever dog?






-I'I





LITTLE John Jones
Was throwing stones
Into a pool of water,
When a fish in a hat
Said, "Pray, don't do that,
Or you'll hit my son and daughter."


__


_ __ __ _~


32










SLA TE-DRA WING. 33


SLATE DqA}WIJC.


TO BE COPIED ON AN ORDINARY SLATE, OR TO BE
TRACED ON A TRANSPARENT SLATE.


P-


I---














MAYBUD AND CARPIE.


J


L IN


' I '


THE DONKEY-RIDE.


34


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THE DONKEY-RIDE.


THE DONKEY- IDE.

gHE day was fair; the sun shone bright
O'er meadow, hill, and valley;
There stood a donkey at the door,
The children called her Sally.

The donkey had two panniers on,
And Maybud said, "Now shall I
With Carpie and the baby go
And have a ride on Sally?

Nurse Lizzie said, if we were good
That we should go to-day
Into. the hayfield, and could help
The people make the hay."

Then in one pannier Maybud sat,
Carpie rode in the other;
Turse Lizzie carried for awhile
Their little baby-brother.

Then off they went, and one might hear
Their merry peals of laughter,


_ _


_ ~ ___


__


35








THE D ONKEY-RIDE.


As Sally sc. ampellre on,
and l-ft
Nurse Lizzie tru(d:o'.in


Andl in due time the
field they reacle-d :
The hay was tossed
about;


___ ~


36








THE D ONKEY-RIDE.


They covered one another o'er,
Then from the heap crept out.


And Sally quietly st
And munched I
fresh sweet hay,
Thinking wouldd
very pleasant
be
To come >i
there
every
day


5ood by


S 'I ,"
, ,l n I. n/ ,,; ,;'!,, ,


--


37







88 BABY'S G GUARDIAN.


BABY'p GUARDIAN.
MERE'S a picture sweet to see!
Chubby arms and pinky toes,
Eyes that look out wond'ringly,
Cheeks where every dimple shows!

This is Vera, with her arm
Round her guardian brave and true!
Jack guards Vera from all harm;
Vera loves him, trusts him too.






A JUJVIPINQ JACK.
I HAVE a little Jumping Jack,
All red and green and yellow;
He kicks if you just pull a, string,
He's such an active fellow.
With a hop, a skip, and a jump,
Or doubled up all of a lump,


_ _II_







88 BABY'S G GUARDIAN.


BABY'p GUARDIAN.
MERE'S a picture sweet to see!
Chubby arms and pinky toes,
Eyes that look out wond'ringly,
Cheeks where every dimple shows!

This is Vera, with her arm
Round her guardian brave and true!
Jack guards Vera from all harm;
Vera loves him, trusts him too.






A JUJVIPINQ JACK.
I HAVE a little Jumping Jack,
All red and green and yellow;
He kicks if you just pull a, string,
He's such an active fellow.
With a hop, a skip, and a jump,
Or doubled up all of a lump,


_ _II_












BABY'S GUARDIAN.


..:. '.' .. .

^ ^ *:. v'. ," :,
., .. :^^. .
,.i .. ..

..: ..' .:,? '. ": ,... .. .Y .
.2: ,.../..,..'


....



K.
.,:: '.. '. '


BABY'S GUARDIAN.


39


~







A JUMPING JACK.


A splendid toy for a little
boy
Is my comical Jumping
Jack.

I have puzzles, and books,
and a big Noah's ark,
And a rocking horse, and
a dog that will bark;
Of picture cards such a won-
derful pack-
But better I like my dancing
Jack !
St For he bends his arms
and stretches his
legs,
Or stands up straight like a dog '
that begs;
He can turn up his heels to touch
his back:
Look how he dances, -
my Jump-
ing Jack. L_


------~---~ ~ __


-- ~-----


40







FRISKIE AND TINY.


FRI KIE AJiD TINY.

SRISKIE and Tiny were two little white
curly puppies, and they always looked
clean. This was because their young


master gave them a bath every day. At
first they did not like 'it! and would
shiver and look so frightened; but they
soon got over their fear of the water,
when they found it did not hurt them.


41









42~ BABY


Hi S THE Jvlin.joE)s

lioM A IEO to IE brLY






,OF WUITTe
flQ)ET OTf..VE ,EA Ly.




*o WATCI1) -EGoy iipY
(QUET eOT?

WH ME MI T,
,aJaneor u-STPHd


I_ I


_I _


42


BABY.


~55~4 ~M
F-;c~f~--a






BABY. 43





-WO Tf$ZSE T G^LST
( J$uy cugLq^;^
'on \A *1t ThoP QJCT 8FOT,
SWH 8LEcrP TWI M(T), I 1%BES OF B
Wor 1wie. r, r1 .
Wqo^ A;IL Cove$ pSLy.


j W Ao C~s yo/, 5oY^'"- OF Kou5^
^1^ ,^,,W~ o TEAs8To l tr ,W TH su80 YV
SIJ L 9),
^^ *o wVOTCi yE 6Or cd ( 9 P7 spofj
m SA WE agE ITE' G

/08 AA coVQ VIEA&


11_1_ ~1









APPLES!


:1 'l:I "'

Ii,,


" "LITTLE jilli1,
maid,


Where are you going,
Now sunshine is meirrv,
And all things are "


growing ? "


44








CHATTERERS.


"Little maid, little maid,
I know a place
Where rosy red apples
Are falling apace!


"Come with me to gather them,
One, two, and three;
Then fill all your pockets
For baby to see!"


CHATTEIFEIf.
OOCKATOOS, or girls and boys:
Which of these chatterers make the
most noise ?


_I _


45







46 THE TWO JACKS.


THE Two JACKS.
j ACK is our magpie, and full
of mischief he is too. lIe
comes hopping into the
house, and unless we are
on the watch he will carry
NIP away anything he sees lying
about. But we have a little dog named
Nip, who keeps his eyes on Jack, and
soon lets us know if he is in mischief;
and, as you may suppose, Nip and Jack
are not very good friends.
But Jack has a good friend in the
stable-yard, and this is our great mastiff,
Jack. Is it not funny that both the
mastiff and the magpie should be called
Jack? When the cook puts the bones
outside the kennel, Jack, the magpie, will
often walk up with a pert air, and peck
away at them; and the mastiff never
touches him. He looks a little bit cross
now and then; but he is not so really.


_ __














THE TWO JACKS.


THE TWO JACKS.


~I


_ i


47







48 PATIENCE AND HER TASK.


PATIENCE AND HER TAPK.
SHE birds were sing-
ing and the children
were playing under
the trees. Patience
wished she werewith
\ them, but she had
to hem the side of a
large handkerchief
She felt a little
cross, and her thread
broke, and she
dropped her needle, until at last she
almost cried, and she thought the sewing
would never be finished.
Suddenly she thought of a verse she
had heard sung by a little girl who was
knitting-
"n My name is Patience, so you see
I must be patient as can be."
"Yes," said Patience; "I too will have
patience !" So she hemmed and hemmed,
and soon the handkerchief was finished.


_ I_ ~



















PATIENCE AND HER TASK. 49


'*1,


LITTLE PATIENCE.


I


I- -- ---


-- I


g^ ~


L-


---




~ad-~








OUT IN TIE SNOW.


s$-ajEC;-PI\P'-" o.:_,- .. .. ,
.-"' N C)

OUr Irn THE ^NOW'. /^


AJLL in a row, \
iB3irlds iln the snowy,
Saitini till sornel:ody,
S-- somiiiebody comes
With a heart full of love, and hands full
of crumbs.


~









OUT IN THE SNOW


"o- 1 : I -, '
>1'- I 1 <
-'---A


Two girls I know,
Loving birds so,
They will go out with their hands full
of crumbs,
And the birdies will sing, because "some-
body" comes.


51


~c -



















52 BABY AT THE SEA-SIDE.


AT THE SEA-SIDE.


I ~


_I ___~_


-"









BABY AT THE SEA-SIDE.


-a-o
V.i,I .!" .
i^.-.


- yellow,

Where the skies are blue,
Where there's spade
and shovel,
and shov~el,


N

U. 4


are-


53







BABY AT THE SEA-SIDE.


What do babies do ?
I know-don't you ?

They pile up big sand castles
With shovel and with pail,
Then bare their little pinky feet
The mighty walls to scale;
Or paddle in the shining pools,
And think each fish a whale.

Where the sands are yellow,
Where the skies are blue,
Where there's spade and shovel,
That's what babies do!
I know-don't you ?


~ ~


- '~---






BABPS AIR-BALL.


~ BABY JIF~-BALL.

IG it is, and red, and
round;
See it fly with merry
bound!
In the garden, on the
stair,
Baby has it
To and fro, high floating there.
and low,
Like a bubble,
watch it go.
Old Ponto, jump, and
Si'f.ty ru.n. I -
3Kitty, run! ! "
If you catch .-' ;"-
it, 'tw ill .. ,,. _,.. .i


be fun!


55







THREE LITTLE GIRLS.


THREE LITTLE QIRL;.
ONCE upon a time there were three little
girls, Nancy, Rosie, and Violet, and
each of these was the happy owner of a
doll. Now Nancy really loved her doll,


and called it Baby, and would watch it
carefully when it was put to rest in the
cradle. "Hush," she would say, if any
one made a noise; Baby's asleep."
Rosie and Violet were pleased with
their dolls at first, but they soon got tired


56











"HUSH!"


"HUSH! BABY'S ASLEEP! "







THREE LITTLE GIRLS.


of. them, and gave them up for other
playthings. Violet perhaps was worse
than Rosie, for when she was vexed she


would throw her doll and her toys
about, and often broke them. She did
not care at all for old playthings, but
was always wanting some new toy;
and if she could not have it she would
cry and look very miserable.


I ii _~









SLATE-DRAWING. 59



bLATE-D RAWjQ.















fc__ -="""'''-----"------ s ---- ~--~=















TO BE COPIED ON AN ORDINARY SLATE, OR TO BE
TRACED ON A TRANSPARENT SLATE.







LITTLE MARY'S PETS.


LITTLE MARY'P PETj.

DowN at the farm lived
little Mary, with her
father and mother; and
happy indeed was she all
through the day. Mary
made pets of many kinds
in and about the farm,
from the big cart-horses
right down to the tiny
little chicks in the hen-
coops. She seemed al-
ways happy, and as she
was so gentle and kind
to all the animals, they
were very fond of her,
and were never afraid of her. Among
her pets was a pretty calf called Nanny,
which was a special favourite of Mary's;
and she loved to make her way to the
cow-shed, when Nanny would come to
the door and let the little girl stroke it,


_ _


_ _


60










LITTLE MARY'S PETS,


and then would try to take something
to eat out of Mary's hand.


--


61








A KIND ROOK.


A KIND 00OOK.
4lHE birds around us teach
us many things, and among
them there are lessons of
kindness and self-denial
which we should all do well
to remember. One day a kind-hearted
little girl had spread some crumbs for
the birds, many of which were at
the time starving for want of food.
Suddenly a big rook flew down to
the spot, and having secured some of
the bread, hastened back to the spot
where it had left another rook, which
was too weak and ill to fly itself; and
then the kind bird fed the other with
the bread it had brought. And not con-
tent with this, the rook flew back again
for some more crumbs, and did not take
any for itself until its friend was satisfied.
iS ,:-- L-i


_ _I I__


_ ~ __


--L--


62














A KIND ROOK.


A KIND ROOK.


_=


63







WHAT TIGER -DID.


WHAT TIQER ,DID.
j WILL tell you a story about a very
clever dog, named Tiger. Tiger
used to be sent every morning by
his master to the butcher's shop with a
copper coin, to buy his breakfast; but
one day his usual shop was, for some
reason, closed, so the dog made his way
to another butcher's. But no sooner had
he put down the piece of money than the
butcher took it, put it into the till, and
refused to give Tiger his meat. The dog
did not, however, take much notice of
this treatment at the time; but the next
morning he went again to the cheating
butcher, and put down his coin, with
his paw upon it; and when the man
had given him the meat, as he did this
time, and was about to. take the money,
he suddenly swallowed his breakfast, and
then sped off with the coin in his
mouth as fast as ever he could.


_ I ~


64












WHAT TIGER DID.


TIGER AT THE BUTCHER'S SHOP.


65


I-l
v


' ^ir


"s-- %
--~-~







ISABELLA.


ISABELLA.
jITTLE Isabella
Had such a large umbrella,
That when she was walking along the
street,


Beneath its covering green,
There was nothing of her seen
But her long black stockings and her
little feet.


_ ___ __


66








AMONG THE SNO WFLAKES.


A~NoQ THE jIOWFLAKE.


JITH hearts all aglow,
We laugh at the snow,
The pretty white flakes
As they float to and fro.


L.


67







A LITTLE TRAVELLER.


A LITTLE TRAVELLER.
SHE naughty little guinea-pig of which
I have before told you took it into
its head to go out once more on its travels.
So one day when the door of the hutch
was open, it ran out and hid itself in a
wood. After a time the little creature got


68












A LITTLE TRAVELLER. 69


t. 1I


III, i, II


" WHO ARE YOU "


?~-~i(u-


I!


'' '


~L~S~ ~
.r"


=-~


i_

---








THE LITTLE MAID.


braver, and resolved to go still farther
afield. So coming forth from its retreat,
it walked on and on. But not for long, for
suddenly it came upon a number of wild
rabbits, which gazed in surprise at the
curious tail-less animal. Then the guinea-
pig was frightened, and went off as fast as
ever it could. But it had only gone on a
little way when something more alarm-
ing came in view, and this was a puppy,
the sight of which made the guinea-pig
quite shake within itself for fear. For-
tunately the puppy only looked at it, as
much as to say, Who are you ? How-
ever, the guinea-pig thought it time to
run away home.


THE LITTLE MAID.
.A LITTLE maid sat all alone
Upon a summer day,
And called unto a bird that sang
A song upon a spray,


__


70








THE LITTLE MAID.


"My playfellows away are gone,
So won't you with me play ?"
The bird his head put on one side,
And looked at little Nell,


And sweeter through the summer air
His joyous song did swell;
But what the words were that he said
The maid she could not tell.


_ I~I~


71
















72 SLUMBER SONG.


I __


----


- -








SLUMBER SONG.


And baby in his cosy bed
Must lay his sleepy, curly head.
Sleep, mother's darling, sweetly sleep,
Bright angels will my baby keep.


_ _


73











SOD MORNING.


Lc2


GOOD MORNING!


74


p













GOOD NIGHT.


hL. ~ -


GOOD NIGHT!


_ __~ __


75


-1- I!








A PLAYMATE FROM ASIA.


A LIT


your Bi


fA PLAYMATE FROJ AIA.

I TIIS,: :, is the like-
ness of a little girl
from a far-away
country in Asia,
Known as Kurdi-
stan.
Do you see the
two doves which
she is carrying ?
Does not this re-
mind you of the
offering which
was made in the
Temple at Jeru-
salem when our
Saviour was born
-"a pair of tur-
tledoves or two
young pigeons?"
TLE IKURDISH GIRL.
Will you look in
bles and try to find this text ?


~ ~I_ ~I~


_ ~


76


/







A STRANGE RIDE.


A pTRANQE RIDE.
S ARRY did so want to go out, but
the rain would come down, so
he sat in the hall watching
his hat and the umbrella-stand,
and longing to put it on, open
the door, and be off. As he sat
there, he began to think what
Sa strange stand it was, and
then when he blinked his eyes
/ a little it seemed to look
funnier than ever. Why, it
was something like a bird
with two long legs! And
now it was flying in the air
And surely that was Harry himself on
its back, sitting with one leg in front
of each wing! Oh, what a ride it was!
What strong wings the bird had, and
how swiftly they sped through the air!
Harry felt that he could not hold on
long: he must fall unless the bird
stopped. But it didn't, and slowly,


_


77








A STRANGE RIDE.


slowly, Harry felt he was slipping off
In another moment he had fallen from
its back, made one plunge at the feathers
in its tail, and then-
Harry woke up, that was all, and
found the hat hanging on its peg just as
usual. He had been sitting on the seat
so long, that at last he had fallen asleep,
and the strange ride was only a dream.


_ _____


_ __


78







THE CHICK AND THE S UNSET.


THE CHICK AID THE SUNSET.
" IHICK-A-CHICK-A-CHEE
What is that I see
Stretching right across the way,
In colours bright and gay?"
Cock-a-doodle-doo!
My child, 'tis nothing new;
Just the sun, who is alight,
To warm us ere he says good-night
Cock-a-doodle-doo !"


79








THE CAT'S NURSERY.


'rI -_I '

'~ ~ ~ ~~~:rk f' ':'t' .., '-
,! .
'
., -, .
" -.i ,, '. " -'r ''
. _.-., _ -. ;.


THE CAT' NURSERfY.


eRS. PUss found her kittens


so much


in the way
She made them a nursery where


they


could play,
And told both the nurses to keep the kits
quiet,
And send them to bed if they made any
riot.


80


e












0 OTHER Life Policies as liberal cost as
Little money, no others as cheap give as
much for the money, as those of


THE TRAVELERS

OF HARTFORD, CONN.

Best either for Family Protection or Invest-
ment of Savings. Non-forfeitable, world-wide,
lowest cash rate.
All claims paid without discount, and imme-
diately on receipt of satisfactory proofs.


Assets, $10,383,000.
Surplus, $ 2,041,000.

JAS. G. BATTERSON, Pres't.
RODNEY DENNIS, Sec'y.

















A is for Aunty who in
her old days
Declared that SAPOLIO de-
served highest praise.





-- ,,





F, is for Fence where one's
eyes will oft meet
SAPOLIO'S signs if the fence
is complete.
__ -.i_= -


T, is for England, she
S scours the seas,
Dont you see Old Britannia
down on her knees.


G is for Girls, in the
kitchen who think,
SAPOLIO peerless for clean-
ing thesink.
----- "-.^, ,










Sis for Labor, a word of
the past
SAPOLIO'S aid brings us
leisure at last.
r -,


- -- 2 --

I is for Inkspot once
black on the floor,
But scrubbed with SAPOLIO
you see it no more.
i 7 --7


Sis for Jane who took an
J> old spoon
And with some SAPOLIO
madeitshine like the moon.


rin ^ .'I


O is for Oilcloth, indeed
it is true
A little SAPOLIO will make
it look new.


T is for Table, though
black be its board
Scrub it with SAPOLIO and
it's fit for a lord.
;~~4- rii


V is for Village, and in
all the shops
You should find SAPOLIO
as plenty as hops.
I day in early spring of
year
When homes are cleaned
both far and near,
SMaidens met, their looks
would say [other gay.
That one was grave, the
3 weeks said one, i've
worked to clean
The master's house,
where I have been,
Kinds of horrid cleaning
stuff [not enough.
I've used and still I've
hours each day on wall
and floor
I've worked, until I'm
sick and sore.


X is for Xmas and what
do we see
SAProLo's bright wrappers
adorning the tree.
6 years of service I've seen
Kate,
The other maiden then
did state ;
days each week in all
this time
I've used but one to
clean and shine;
Other girls, too, I know
Use nothing but SAP-
OLIO.
Cakes of which one year
does me [tree,
Although I use it very
i| times the labor you
O| t'will save
And you'll look gay in-
stead of grave.


y is the Youngster, who
S soils all the paint
But SAPOLIO remedies
every complaint.


























v-


I .~.


4. ;U^




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