• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Chapter I: The camp
 Chapter II: Uncle Sydney's...
 Chapter III: The hay-field
 Chapter IV: A sufferer
 Chapter V: Pleasing no one
 Chapter VI: The doctor's repor...
 Chapter VII: Leila
 Chapter VIII: Lying still
 Chapter IX: Struggle and victo...
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Claude's victory
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00065395/00001
 Material Information
Title: Claude's victory
Physical Description: 64, 8 p., 1 leaf of plates : ill. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Brodie, Emily
John F. Shaw and Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: John F. Shaw and Co.
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: [1889?]
 Subjects
Subject: Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Soldiers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Uncles -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Despair -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's accidents -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1889   ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1889   ( rbprov )
Bldn -- 1889
Genre: Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance)   ( rbprov )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Emily Brodie ; with illustrations.
General Note: Date of publication from prize inscription.
General Note: Publisher's catalogue precedes and follows text.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00065395
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002222760
notis - ALG3006
oclc - 70822320

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Half Title
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
    Advertising
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Chapter I: The camp
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Chapter II: Uncle Sydney's inheritance
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Chapter III: The hay-field
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Chapter IV: A sufferer
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Chapter V: Pleasing no one
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Chapter VI: The doctor's report
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Chapter VII: Leila
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Chapter VIII: Lying still
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
    Chapter IX: Struggle and victory
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
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*CLAUDE'S VICTORY.












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"Oh yes, of course," Claude had answered proudly, "and I hope
I shall be as brave as Uncle Sydney."-p. 9.
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"Oh yes, of';H~ co~?urse," Cludehadansere proudly, and hope
shal he s have s Ucle ydny."-. p

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CLAUDE'S VICTORY.









BY

EMILY BRODIE,
AUTHOR OF
_" UNCLE FRED'S SHILLING," THE SEAGULL'S NEST," "LONELY JACK,"
"NORMAN AND ELSIE," ETC. ETC.





With lhi1strations.






LONDON:
JOHN F. SHAW AND CO.,
48, PATERNOSTER ROW, E.C.

[Al rights reserved.]









STORIES BY EMILY BRODIE.


Price Three ...' and Sixpence each. Crown 8vo.
SWith Illustrations.
COUSIN DORA; or, Serving the King.
HIS GUARDIAN ANGEL.
FIVE MINUTES TOO LATE; or, Leslie Harcourt's
Resolve.
NORA CLINTON; or, Did I do Right?
LONELY JACK and His Friends at Sunnyside.
NORMAN AND ELSIE; or, Two Little Prisoners.
UNCLE FRED'S SHILLING: Its Travels and Ad-
ventures.
ELSIE GORDON; or, Through Thorny Paths.
JEAN LINDSAY, the Vicar's Daughter.
THE HAMILTONS; or, Dora's Choice.

Price Half-a-Crown each.
OLD CHRISTIE'S CABIN. Crown 8vo., with Illus-
trations.
ROUGH THE TERRIER: His Life and Adventures.
Illustrated by T. PYM. Square, cloth extra.

Price Eighteenpence each, with Illustrations.
SYBIL'S MESSAGE.
EAST AND WEST; or, The Strolling Artist.
THE SEAGULLS' NEST; or, Charlie's Revenge.

Price One Shilling.
RUTH'S RESCUE; or, The Light of Ned's Home.

LONDON: JOHN F. SHAW & CO., 48, PATERNOSTER Row, E.C.























CONTENTS.




CHAP. PAGE
I. THE CAMP ... ... ... ... 7

II. UNCLE SYDNEY'S INHERITANCE ... 14

III. THE HAY-FIELD ... ... ... 20

IV. A YOUNG SUFFERER ... ... 29

V. PLEASING NO ONE ... ... .. 35

VI. THE DOCTOR'S REPORT ... ... 40

VII. LEILA ... .. .. ... 47

VIII. LYING STILL ... ... ... 52

IX. STRUGGLE AND VICTORY ... ... 57



















CLAUDE'S VICTORY.



CHAPTER I.
THE CAMP.
RUMS were beating, bugles sound-
ing, as a merry party of children
climbed the steep hill which leads
up from the sunny village of Sand-
gate to the camp above. It was a bright May
morning, and the sea lay stretched out below,
basking as it were in the sunshine.
"There goes Colonel Murray; come, Leila,
do make haste," cried Claude; "what slow
coaches you girls are Hurrah, how jolly it all
is! Uncle Sydney said we should have a fine
day. Come along, come along."
Leila tried to hurry her steps, but the hill
seemed unusually steep that morning, and
perhaps the spring day had made her legs







8 Claude's Victory.

unusually slow in doing their work. But the
top was reached at last, and the broad open
space of greensward came in view, looking gay
enough with the numerous companies of soldiers
which had already taken their stand upon the
ground.
"There's Uncle Syd, Miss Doulton," Claude
cried excitedly. I am sure that is Queen Bess
by the way she holds her head."
Before Miss Doulton could make any answer,
the party of ten children under her care had
darted off in the direction to which Claude
had pointed, and she was left to follow more
leisurely. The party consisted of five little
Stevensons and five little Murrays. They were
cousins, and for the first time they were enjoying
the pleasures of the seaside together. Sydney
Murray, who was uncle to all the ten, had
been the loadstone that had attracted them to
Sandgate; as Claude had said more than once
in his rather lordly way-" Sandgate would be
a dull old place were it not for the camp and
Uncle Syd." But with both these charms,
Claude like the rest decided that it was a very
delightful spot. Uncle Sydney was quite a hero
in the children's eyes. There was no one in
the world so good and brave, they thought, as
Uncle Sydney. The children were never tired







The Camp. 9

of hearing of his adventures in Zululand and the
Soudan. And when he told of how his men
had fought at Isandula, Claude's face would
flush and his eyes sparkle. He was never
better pleased than when he found himself in
the riding-school, or watching the men at drill.
Many of the soldiers and officers knew the fair
blue-eyed boy, that evidently so loved to be
among them, and they were ever ready to
answer his many questions.
"You're going to be a soldier some day, little
sir, I'll warrant," a man said to him one day,
Oh yes, of course," Claude had answered
proudly, "and I hope I shall be as brave as
Uncle Sydney."
"Ah, sir, and are you the good Colonel's little
nephew ? I've heard him speak on you."
"Yes, I am Colonel Murray's nephew," said
Claude, drawing himself up a little.
"Ah, and a good gentleman he is, sir; there
isn't a braver soldier in her Majesty's army, and
what's more, he's a brave soldier of the King of
kings. Pardon, sir, I'm wanted," said the man,
saluting the fair-haired boy as he disappeared
to answer the summons.
The various manceuvres had been gone
through, the march past was over, and the
men dismissed to their quarters before the







o1 Claude's Victory.

children could be persuaded to tear themselves
away from the camp.
"Oh, Miss Doulton, don't be in such a hurry;
we are going right away to-morwow," said Harry
Stevenson, dolefully.
"Well, there's one good thing, Uncle Sydney
is going with us," said Leila, cheeringly.
"Now then, who will' be at the bottom of the
hill first?" said Claude, who was always leader.
" Here goes."
They set off once more, leaving Miss Doulton
to follow. Of course Claude was the first to
reach the bottom. Though all the ten started
in the race, everybody knew that Claude would
be sure to win. They came to a stand at the
bottom, and waited graciously till Miss Doulton
joined them. A few minutes' walk brought
them to the house which they had occupied
during their visit. In the various rooms there
were evident signs of packing up. Trunks
stood open in every stage of being filled.
The children's dinner-bell was a welcome sound,
especially as they all said they were as hungry
as hunters.
"What shall we do this afternoon ?" asked
Leila, when dinner was nearly finished.
I can't bear things coming to an end," said
Hilda, it is so horrid to be packing up."







The Camp. 11

"You did not think the packing up horrid
when we came," said Miss Doulton.
"Oh, but then it was all to come, and now it
is all over."
Just then a head was poked in at the door,
which was received with noisy acclamations
from all the ten.
"Oh dear, I can't stand this," said Uncle Syd-
ney, pretending to run away again. I thought
I was coming to a fold of lambs, and instead I
find myself in the lions' den. Oh, let me go out,
Miss Doulton."
"Oh, Uncle Sydney, you are only laughing,"
said little Evelyn, clinging to him.
"We don't know what to do this afternoon,"
said Leila, ruefully.
"Everything's come to an end," said
Harry.
I thought lions were content when they had
had their dinner and went to sleep."
"We don't want to go to sleep, and it is so
horrid to think it is the last afternoon."
"The last afternoon ? What, are you going
to jail to-morrow ?"
"No, Uncle Sydney, you know we are
not."
"Oh, I made a mistake; you are going to
your den in the Zoo ?"







12 Claude's Victory.

"Uncle Sydney, you are too bad."
"Then what can you ten children be possibly
looking so dismal about ? I thought you were
going home to-morrow."
So we are."
"And is that anything to be dismal about ?"
Why, yes, Uncle Sydney, it means lessons,
and there'll be no camp and no sea."
That's it, is it ?-it means going home to duty,
and that has made you dismal. Why, I thought
I was going to be proud of my nephews and
nieces. I thought they were made of real good
stuff such as Englishmen ought to be, but instead
I find they are poor silly things that want all
their days to be one long holiday. Oh, let me
run away, Hilda !"
So Uncle Sydney disappeared, and the children
went back to their unfinished dinner. They
were all quiet now, and perhaps just a little
ashamed that Uncle Sydney should think that
they did not like doing their duty. Claude
looked particularly glum; of all things he liked
to stand high in his uncle's estimation.
Before many minutes had passed, however,
the kind handsome face of Colonel Murray
appeared at the door again.
"Would you poor dismal children be able
to walk to Folkestone this afternoon ? I am sure







The Camp. 13

your elders will be glad to' get rid of you while
all this packing-up is going on."
The ten faces grew radiant in a moment, and
Colonel Murray heard quite a chorus of "Thank
you, Uncle Syd!" "Oh, how jolly!" as he
once more disappeared.

















CHAPTER II.
UNCLE SYDNEY'S INHERITANCE.
HERE was a decided lull in the house
when the last of the ten had dis-
appeared, and nurse turned to the
trunks with a sigh of relief.
"Well, it is a blessing the Colonel has carried
off those noisy children. I do say he is the
most kindest gentleman as ever I came across."
The children no doubt quite agreed with her
as they trotted along merrily, asking him endless
questions that would have tried most men's
patience.
"Now then, which way shall we go?" he
asked, coming to a stand at the spot where
the two roads diverged-one leading along the.
pleasant undercliff, the other on the top of the
hill.
"Ah, the lower road will be best, for I want
to see the Boulogne boat in. It is possible an







Uncle Sydney's Inheritance. 15

old Indian friend may be on board, and I should
like to be one of the first to welcome him."
A brisk walk brought them after a while to
the harbour, which was always full of interest
to the children.
"Is that the Boulogne packet yonder ?" asked
Colonel Murray of a sailor standing at the end
of the pier.
"Yes, sir, that's her; she's coming in quick
too."
In an incredibly short time the black speck
in the distance gradually assumed the shape
of a steamer, and was soon drawing quite
near. Then all was bustle, and the children
found plenty to amuse them as the sailors
brought the vessel to her moorings, listening
to the sharp orders of the captain. The pas-
sengers were soon seen mounting the gangway,
and 'Colonel Murray before long recognized
his friend among them. Bidding the children
remain where they were till he returned, he
made his way through the crowd, and grasped
his friend's hand as he stepped on English
ground.
By the time Uncle Sydney returned, the
children were quite ready to go on their way.
They had watched the baggage being placed
in the cradles, and had seen it raised up by
cranes in a wonderful way, till it was lowered






16 Claude's Victory.

safely on the pier. The last cradle-full had just
reached the pier as Uncle Sydney came back.
"Come, children, I suppose you are tired of
waiting?"
"Oh no, uncle, not one bit tired; we have
been watching all the baggage come up, and
they have only just brought up the last
load."
"Yes, they make quick work of it, do they
not? Now we want to go into the town before
we go home."
Once among the shops the children remem-
bered that they had various wants, and Claude
and Harry discovered that they were hungry,
so a visit to a confectioner's was necessary, and
every one being refreshed, they set out for the
walk home. This time their way took them
along the Lees and over the cliff. The broad
expanse of sea lay below them, rippling lazily
in the warm sunshine.
"Oh, Uncle Sydney, do let us sit down a
little while," Leila entreated, "the evening is
perfectly lovely, and we shall be far away from
the sea by this time to-morrow."
"You are not getting the dismals again, I
hope, Leila."
"No, uncle, but I do love the sea, and we
have been so happy here; there have been no
disagreeables."







Uncle Sydney's Inheritance. 17

"Poor Leila!" said Uncle Sydney, seating
himself on the bank, we all like the pleasant
things, and want the disagreeables left out.
Do you see that large dark patch upon the sea
yonder?"
"Yes, uncle; where does it come from ?-all
the rest looks so sunny."
"Look above, children, and you will soon
see the cause. It is that dark cloud overhead.
Let us watch it a few minutes; presently you
will see it pass away, and it will all be bright
again."
The children had clustered round their uncle,
and watched the dark cloud in silence. Before
long it had passed away, and the piece of water
that had looked so dark and gloomy was bright
again.
There, children, you see it is all sunny again.
That is just like your young lives; you must
not expect them to be all sunshine. There will
be dark clouds, but our Father in Heaven loves
us too well to let the clouds stay too long; the
light of His great love is always behind."
"Uncle Sydney," said little Evelyn, looking
up into his face, "you are always thinking of
God's great love."
I do think of it very often, Queenie, for it is
the one thing that makes me always happy.
You children are a little sad this afternoon
B







18 Claude's Victory.

because you think your pleasant visit to Sand-
gate is over; now you want something else to
look forward to."
"That is just it, uncle," said Claude; "you see
*we shall probably not see the sea again for a
year, and then I dare say we shall not come
to Sandgate to be near the camp, because you
will be gone to India, so there's nothing nice
to look forward to, is there?"
"I have always something nice to look
forward to."
Have you, uncle? But then you are a man,
and we are all children, and have got to go
back to lessons," said Claude, with a heavy
sigh.
"I am always looking forward to the time
when I shall come into my inheritance," said
Uncle Sydney, quietly.
"Has somebody made you his heir, uncle?"
asked Harry with some astonishment.
"Yes, my boy, and the wonderful thing is
that each of you dear children may be His
heirs too. 'In My Father's house are many
mansions: if it were not so, I would have told
you. I go to prepare a place for you.' So you
see if we really love God, and trust in Jesus
as our Saviour, we have always something
pleasant to look forward to, and we need never
have the dismals."







Uncle Sydney's Inheritance. 19

"But, Uncle Sydney, that is such a long way
off," said Harry.
Is it ? We can none of us tell that, can we ?"
The children were silent; perhaps they were
thinking of a little girl they had seen playing
on the shore a week before, who now was lying
in the churchyard not far away.
"Come, dear children, we must be going on
our way; but I wish, on this last evening, you
would all make up your minds to give your
fresh young love to God. It is the secret of a
happy life, the secret of a happy death."
Leila stole quietly round to her uncle's side
and slipped her hand in his. She did not join
in the general chatter as they bent their steps
homewards. She was thinking of God's great
love, and the many mansions.












B 2

















CHAPTER III.
THE HAY-FIELD.
HERE was not much time the next
morning before the large party was
to start on the homeward journey.
The children, however, managed to
secure a quick walk along the esplanade, and
then made their way to the railway-station.
They looked wistfully at the sea as the train
steamed off, and in another minute a bend in
the line hid it from view. The journey was not
long enough for the young people to weary of
it, and then having arrived in London they had
to cross the busy streets to reach the line of
railway which would take them home. Things
began to look very familiar, and in less than an
hour the train drew up at Wentworth station.
The carriage was standing waiting for the elder
members of the party, while the younger ones
set off to walk.







The Hay-field. 21

The station at Wentworth lies in a hollow,
and a stiff hill leads up to the old-fashioned
town. It is rather a sleepy place now, and the
shops are by no means of an attractive descrip-
tion. In the old days it was wont to be enlivened
by the coaches that passed through on their
way to the north, and the chief inn was a stopping-
place for changing horses.
Uncle Sydney was very fond of the quaint
old place, and volunteered to walk up through
the town with the children. In twenty minutes
the first of the walking party had reached the
house.
BurnleyChase,as it is called,is an old-fashioned
house, built in the reign of Queen Elizabeth.
It was said that her Majesty had honoured the
house with her presence during her visits to the
neighbourhood. Near by is the Chase itself,
which the children, with their imaginative little
minds, loved to people with the dames and
squires of olden times. In the rear of the house
is a large garden with a small lake, and beyond
that again a field, which was a constant plea-
sure in summer-time. In the distance a finely-
wooded country stretched away for miles. It
was a beautiful home for the children to return
to. As Uncle Sydney watched them as they
scampered away in all directions, he thought of
their dismal faces of the day before. What could







22 Claude's Victory.

children desire more than had been lovingly
provided, and yet they were not content.
Nothing can satisfy them, poor children, but
God Himself," he said, as he turned to enter the
house.
Father," said Claude, later in the day, I
have been talking to Miles, and he says the
grass will be ready for cutting in a few days'
time. We are all so glad, for now we shall be
able to have the hay-making party while the
Stevensons are with us."
"I must see, my boy; I dare say your cousins
would enjoy it," said Mr. Murray.
Claude's account of the near prospect of hay-
making proved to be quite correct, and in a few
days Mrs. Murray was entreated to write invit-
ations to a goodly number of children for the
following Thursday.
The day was lovely, all that could be wished
for a hay-making party, and the children's faces
beamed with happiness. Claude as usual was
the leader in all that was going on.
"Do not be so excited, dear boy," his mother
said to him more than once; "learn to enjoy
everything more quietly."
But there was no quietness in Claude's nature
that day. The camp with all its charms was
still vividly in his mind, and he determined to
make a mimic camp-ground of the hay-field.







The Hay-field. 23

That very field was said to have been the scene
of one of the battles of the Wars of the Roses,
which greatly helped out his ideas. No sooner
had their guests arrived than he singled out the
boys that he deemed suitable for his plan, and
then set them to work.
"Now, Harry," he said to his cousin, "get
your men out. The first thing we must do is to
get our badges-your men must each have a red
rose, and mine white. We shall find plenty of
roses in the flower-garden; and there is mother,
I will run and ask her for some pins."
Mrs. Murray was amused at the request, and
by the time the boys had supplied themselves
with their several badges, the pins were ready
to fasten them on. She stood and watched
them as the two little regiments marched off
to their supposed battle-field. She could see
her own bright, fair-haired Claude leading off;
and as she listened to his boyish words of com-
mand as they rang out, she thought what a
brave officer he would make one day. And the
mother's heart lifted a prayer to heaven that if
her boy should live he might always lead on to
that which is good.
The field was a large one, and went by the
name of "twenty acres." The little girls were
enjoying the hay in one part in their own quieter
fashion, while the boys took possession of the







24 Claude's Victory.

other. And very hard these boy soldiers worked
building fortifications, and placing their men in
the most favourable positions. An old barn
was supposed to be in possession of the white
rose party, and they were to defend it against
their antagonists. At last all was ready, and
the signal given for the advance. Claude's
voice could be heard above every one's as he
shouted out his commands, urging his boy
soldiers on to defend their post with all their
strength. But Claude's regiment was by no
means composed of boys all like himself. Before
long several had been taken prisoners by the
opposing party, and now the remainder took
refuge in the upper story of the barn. A short
ladder leant against it, and the boys scrambled
up one after another. Claude was the last.
"Go it, boys, quick!" he cried.
Then there was a crack and a crash; cries
from many voices, and then a sudden silence.
Uncle Sydney had been with the boys for
some time, but had been called away to join the
party on the terrace, who were enjoying their
afternoon tea. In a moment his quick ear
noticed the changed sounds in the distance, and
hastily putting down his cup he walked off to
the field.
"Why has Sydney left us?" asked Mrs.
Murray. "Surely he might have let the children







The Hay-field. 25

play by themselves for a time, but really he will
do anything to make them happy."
"I hope there is nothing wrong," said Mr.
Murray, gravely. "Syd has set off running; I
think I had better go after him."
I dare say he thinks he can help them; I am
sure I would not go down the field in this heat,
Howard."
But Mr. Murray was not to be turned from his
purpose. "I will just go and see that all is
right," he said, quietly.
"I cannot think what has made either of
them imagine that something is wrong; it is not
like Howard or Sydney."
"I do not hear the children's voices shouting
as I did," said Mrs. Stevenson.
"Come, Marian, don't say that; you will make
me quite nervous between you."
A dead silence overspread the party on the
terrace, and made the fact that the children's
voices were indeed hushed a certainty.
Mrs. Murray turned pale, and looked'anxiously
towards the field. Soon a group was seen
coming from the far end apparently carrying
something. As they drew nearer they could
recognize Uncle Sydney, and could distinctly see
that he was carrying a boy. But who was the
boy ?-that was the question. Many mothers
were there who had come to watch the children's







26 Claude's Victory.

play and enjoy Mr. Murray's beautiful grounds.
Each mother wondered if it were her boy.
Somebody was 'hurt, that was all they knew.
Mrs. Murray felt as if she could not go and meet
the little procession. She turned into the house,
and hastily gave directions to some of the
servants. Something told her that it was her
boy. If she did not do something she felt she
must faint. Before the group of sad faces
reached the terrace, a servant was half way to
the doctor's, and happily found him at home.
As Uncle Sydney stepped into the hall, Mrs.
Murray was not surprised to see the fair hair
of her own boy resting unconsciously on his
shoulder. She made a sign for them to follow
her. She led them up-stairs, and they laid him
on his own little bed. The blue eyes were
closed, the hands hung listlessly by his side.
"Sydney," she cried, tell me, is he dead ?"
"No, dear, not dead; he will come to presently."
As he spoke Dr. Cairns entered the room.










L" *







-








1. 4 ,








i I~ \


Leila and Harry still lingered in their quiet hiding-place. Every one was
too much taken up with Claude's sad accident to miss them.-p. 32,
,' .
," .. 4,
-: ; \I.{ ,i IIL
,'-1',



...1~ ~ I ,. i


Lelaad -arystl lnerdintei qit ~ln-lae lvryoe a
too muc takenup wit Claud's a ciett ms hm-p 2




















CHAPTER IV.
A YOUNG SUFFERER.
R. CAIRNS looked very grave as he
came to the bedside. Claude had
been a great favourite from his
babyhood, and it grieved him to the
heart to see the boy lying there so motionless.
"Was it a fall ?" he asked of Colonel Murray.
I believe so; I think a ladder broke under
him."
Very tenderly they touched the injured boy,
and applied restoratives, but it was some time
before he showed any sign of returning
consciousness.
In the mean time the other children had left
their play, and were standing in groups near
the house, looking up with awed faces at the
windows. Harry Stevenson stood apart from
the rest. Presently he felt some one touch him,
It was his Cousin Leila.







30 Claude's Victory.

"Harry," she 'whispered with quivering lips,
"they say our Claude is dead; it is not true,
is it?"
The boy burst into tears, and turned away.
Leila followed him.
"Why do you ask me, Leila ?" he said, with
choking sobs.
Poor Leila's tears were falling fast too. Both
children longed to get away from the others,
and they instinctively sought a quiet nook in
the garden, where they knew nobody was likely
to find them. Harry threw himself down on
the ground, and cried so bitterly that Leila
forced herself to turn comforter.
"Couldn't you tell me how it happened,
Harry ?"
"Why, we were having such a jolly game.
Claude and I had planned it out together.
We were pretending that it was the War of the
Roses. He was the head of the Duke of York's
party, and I of the Duke of Lancaster's. He
and his men were in possession of that shed,
which we called Wentworth Castle, and we
arranged that if they were driven hard they
were to take refuge in the keep-that was the
upper floor of the barn. A ladder leant against
it that the men had been using, and we thought
it was just handy. We took several of his men
prisoners, and then he gave orders for the rest







A Young Sufferer. 31

to make for the keep. They were all scrambling
up, and Claude was the last, when we heard a
crack, then a crash. The ladder had given way
under him, snapped in two, and he fell heavily
to the ground. Oh, if it had been any of the
other fellows but Claude! It was so dreadful
to see Uncle Sydney carry him away."
Leila sat unable to speak. The very thought
of this dear brother suffering was hard to bear;
but what if it were true that she would' never
hear his voice again !
"Harry," she said at last, "don't you think
we might ask God to make him better? Perhaps
he fainted. I know Ellen once fainted in the
nursery, and she looked just as if she were
dead."
I never thought of that," said Harry, brighten-
ing up a little.
Uncle Sydney is always thinking how loving
God is ; do let us ask Him to make Claude better."
Then you must, I don't know what to say."
"He is our Father in Heaven," said Leila,
simply; "we may ask Him; I am sure He will
listen, though we are only children."
And so Leila lifted up her cry to her Father
in Heaven, and the loving Saviour, who so
tenderly called the children unto Him when
He was on earth, surely presented her feeble
petition at His Father's throne.







32 Claude's Victory.

Leila and Harry still lingered in their quiet
hiding-place. Every one was too much taken
up with Claude's sad accident to miss them.
Meanwhile at Mr. Murray's desire the children
had had tea, and then quietly went off in twos
and threes to their own homes. Uncle Sydney
was the first one to remember Leila. He had
slipped away from Claude's room finding that
he could not render any assistance, and joining
the children just as tea was over, he at once
missed Leila and Harry. He asked first one,
and then another, but nobody had seen them.
Guessing that their hearts were too sad to let
them join the other children, he set off in search
of them. He knew full well how dearly Leila
loved the quiet nook among the trees, and now
instinctively sought her there. He was not
surprised to find her sitting on the branch
of a low tree, and Harry with her. Both
children's faces were stained with tears. They
dropped down upon the ground as they caught
sight of their uncle.
Oh, Uncle Sydney, is it not dreadful ?-do
you know how dear Claude is?" asked Leila,
with a quivering voice.
He is not conscious yet, dear child," said
Uncle Sydney, kissing her tenderly, "but Dr.
Cairns hopes he will come round shortly; he
cannot tell yet how much poor Claude is hurt."






A Young Suferer. 33

"Do you think he will die?" asked Harry,
almost choking as he brought the words out.
"I trust not, Harry; we must remember that
his dear life is hanging in God's hands, not ours.
He has permitted this sad accident for some
wise reason; nothing comes by chance, dear
children. Our Father in Heaven cares even
when a sparrow falls to the ground, so we may
be quite sure that He cares for our Claude."
"I wish God hadn't let him fall," said I#rry.
"Poor dear boy!" said Uncle Sydney, resting
his hand on his shoulder; "many of us are apt
to wonder at times why God does this and that,
but we may be quite sure that He knows best.
You see He is always trying to fit us for our
inheritance, and perhaps He saw that Claude
could learn some lesson in this way that He
could teach him in no other. But we must
not be too downcast. The same loving Father
that has permitted this sad ending to our happy
afternoon is able to raise him up again."
"Leila has been asking Him to make Claude
better."
"Yes, dear, so have I, and I am sure father
and mother and many of our friends are joining
with us. Now you must come back to the
house with me. Your little guests had taken
tea, and were leaving the grounds very quietly
as I came to seek for you."
C







34 Claude's Victory.

"We did not want to talk to any of them,
uncle, so we slipped off here."
"Yes, I thought I should find you here; don't
you think I was a good guesser ?"
"Yes, uncle, I don't think anybody under-
stands us as you do, except mother."
They walked slowly up towards the house.
The setting sun lighted up the hay-field, which
such a short time before had been peopled with
merry children. It was all still and silent now.
The front-door was open, and as they entered
Dr. Cairns was coming down-stairs.
"What tidings have you, doctor?" asked
Colonel Murray, anxiously.
"I am thankful to tell you that Claude is
conscious; he was a long time coming round.
I cannot leave him to-night, but must send a
note to a patient at the other end of the town,
who will perhaps be looking for me."
Dr. Cairns went into the library, and soon
wrote and despatched his letter, then returned
at once to Claude's room.





~"5`L`~_ ~j


















CHAPTER V.
PLEASING NO ONE.
HE children never forgot the stillness
of that evening. Nobody said much,
but they could not help reading
the anxious faces of the servants.
Claude was loved by them all, and every one
was grieved to think of his suffering. His
faithful dog Royal, or Roy as the children
called him, made his way up-stairs, and could
not be persuaded to leave the door of Claude's
room. It was past eight o'clock when Colonel
Murray joined the children in the school-room.
They were sitting about, looking most discon-
solate, not knowing what to do with themselves.
They jumped up eagerly as Uncle Sydney
came in.
"Dear children, I have come to tell you that
Doctor Cairns has examined poor Claude very
carefully, and though he is much bruised and
C2







36 Claude's Victory.

shaken, he does not think any bones are broken,
so we may be very thankful for that."
All the young faces brightened up consider-
ably.
"Then he will soon be better, uncle, will he
not?" asked Harry.
"We hope so; but he will have to be kept
very quiet for some time. He fell from such a
height, that he is sadly shaken. He is very
patient, though it hurt him very much to be
moved; he tried hard not to cry out."
"Poor old Claude, he is always so brave,"
said Harry.
"Now, dear children, you had better go to
bed at once, for there is nothing to be done.
Mother sends her love, and wishes me to say
'good-night' to you all; she does not like to
leave Claude for a moment, in case he might
miss her."
The children's faces looked very rueful when
they heard they would not see Mrs. Murray
again that night, for she was almost as much
loved by her five nieces and nephews as she
was by her own children. They went tup-stairs
one after another on tip-toe, stopping for a
second as they came to Claude's door. But all
was silent within. Roy looked up into their
faces questioningly. He evidently thought some-
thing had gone very wrong with his young master.







SPleasing no one. 37

The next morning everybody's first question
was, "How is Claude?"
He had passed a restless night, old nurse said,
but was quite as well as they could expect.
They were cheered at breakfast by seeing Mrs.
Murray enter the room, and she was received
by a number of eager questioners. She told
them that they hoped Claude had passed the
worst, and. with quiet Dr. Cairns thought that
in time he would be himself again.
The children spent the day mostly in the
hay-field, for Mrs. Murray had stipulated that
the house must be kept very quiet. But Claude
was sadly missed. He had been the ringleader
of all the fun, and everything seemed very dull
and flat without him.
The next day Claude was reported to be
going on as favourably as possible, and towards
evening Leila was allowed to go and sit beside
him for a few minutes.
By the next day all the hay was stacked, and
the children began to look round for some fresh
amusement. They were out of tune with each
other and everything about them, and as Uncle
Sydney listened to them as they talked over
first one game and then another, he thought
that each child wanted his or her own way,
quite regardless of the wishes of any of the
others.







38 Claude's Victory.

"I don't care one bit for that game," he heard
Harold saying.
"Then I woii't play," answered Harry.
The young voices were rising in angry tones,
when suddenly Uncle Sydney appeared upon
the scene.
"Who are you trying to please, Harry?" he
asked quietly.
"They are all so stupid, Uncle Sydney, we
can't have any fun at all."
Who are you trying to please, Leila ?"
"Myself, uncle, I think," she said, holding
down her head.
"And you, Master Harold? Ah, I fear you
are all alike. Nine little souls all trying hard
to please no one, and not troubling in the least
how anybody else feels."
The nine heads were all rather bent, for every
one felt guilty. Nobody could say he was
thinking of anybody's pleasure but his own.
I am afraid, children, you have not looked at
the copy to-day I"
Most of the young heads went up a little,
wondering what Uncle Sydney meant.
"You know you and I have a great Example,
and we must try and do as He did. I read this
morning in my little Bible these words, 'For
even Christ pleased not Himself.' The Lord
Jesus Christ, the only Son of the King of kings,







Pleasing no one. 39

even He pleased not Himself. Dear children,
when you are tempted to be selfish again, just
think of those words. They will help you as
they have often helped me. We are all so in-
clined to be selfish, but there was nothing selfish
about Jesus, and I know you all want to be
like Him. Now I have a proposition to make.
How many of you would like a good walk in
the Chase with me?"
There was a chorus of voices at once, "I
would, uncle," and in less than ten minutes,
Colonel Murray was out of the grounds, followed
by the nine. Poor Claude through his open
window heard their retreating footsteps.
Mother," he asked, "when will Dr. Cairns
let me go down-stairs? I am tired of being
up here."
"I am not quite sure, Claude, but we will ask
him when he comes."


















CHAPTER VI.
THE DOCTOR'S REPORT.

HEN Dr. Cairns came a little later
Claude asked eagerly when he
might go down-stairs.
I think we might venture to take
you to the drawing-room in a few days, my boy,
if all goes well. That kind good uncle of yours
will be only too glad to carryyou down."
I shan't want to be carried," said Claude,
flushing a little.
"Then you must stay where you are, I fear."
When nearly a fortnight had passed, however,
Claude's desire to go down-stairs had over-
come his reluctance to being carried, and to the
great glee of the children he once more made
his appearance among them. Very different he
looked to the Claude of a fortnight before, as
he lay upon the sofa in the drawing-room. But
it was a good beginning, and the next day Dr.







The Doctor's Report. 41

Cairns said he might lie on the lawn under the
shade of the great elm trees. The days of the
Stevensons' visit passed quickly away, though
at Claude's petition they had been allowed to
lengthen their stay at Burnley Chase. The day
of their departure was to be marked by Claude's
walking down-stairs for the first time, and he
was among the group at the front-door to say
"good-bye" as they drove away.
Mind you get well soon, Claude," Harry
called out.
"All right, Hal; I feel first-rate to-day."
The next day lessons were to begin again.
Miss Doulton had been away to her own home
for a fortnight, but had returned to the Chase the
previous day. Dr. Cairns advised that Claude
should wait a little longer before he returned to
school, and be allowed to amuse himself as he
would. But the boy found the time hang rather
heavily. He missed his cousins, and his brother
and sisters were closeted in the school-room for
a good many hours in the day. Uncle Sydney
too had gone away on a visit, so if it had not
been for Roy, Claude would have been quite
.lonely. One day he and Roy rambled off to-
gether to the Chase. Mrs. Murray had missed
them, and had been looking for them in the
garden. She was just returning from her fruit-
less search, when she saw Claude coming very







42 Claudds Victory.

slowly towards her. He walked as if he were
very tired, and when she was near enough to see
his face she was quite frightened to see it looking
so white.
"You are tired out, Claude. Wherever have
you been ? I have been looking for you."
"I am tired," he said, sinking down on a
garden-seat. "I have not been so very far," he
said, slowly.
"Then what is it, Claude?" she asked,
anxiously.
"I don't know, mother. I was vaulting over
a stile, and somehow I couldn't do it in my old
fashion. I can't think what is up with me."
You want something to eat; let us go on to
the house."
Claude made an effort to rise, but gladly sat
down again.
"I will wait a little, mother."
Mrs. Murray went to the house and soon
returned with some refreshment.
"Eat this, Claude; you will feel better then,
you are still weak."
Claude eat the food slowly, and then, taking
his mother's arm, managed to get back to the
house. He kept quiet for the remainder of the
day, and as he seemed better, Mrs. Murray
thought there was no need to send for Dr.
Cairns. But the next day there was no mis-







The Doctor's Report. 43

taking that something was decidedly wrong
with Claude. Dr. Cairns came, and at once
expressed a wish that an eminent surgeon from
London might be called in.
What are you fearing, doctor ?" Mrs. Murray
asked anxiously.
"I hope my fears are groundless; I would
rather not make you anxious unless I find it
absolutely necessary. There is always satis-
faction in a second opinion," he added lightly.
So the next day the great surgeon met Dr.
Cairns in consultation. After talking their
patient over for some little time, they joined
Mr. and Mrs. Murray.
Mrs. Murray saw with one glance at their
faces that whatever Dr. Cairns' fears had been,
they were deepened rather than dispelled. It
was plain that Claude's injuries were more
serious than had at first appeared. It would
seem that a sharp corner of the splintered
ladder had inwardly bruised his back. There
was every reason to fear that the injury would
prove a very grave one.
"What must we do ?" asked Mrs. Murray.
"Complete rest is absolutely necessary. You
must keep him cheerful and amused, without
irritation or excitement."
Mr. Murray followed the doctors to the
door.







44 Claude's Victory.

"Tell me," he' asked, is this likely to affect
my boy's after life ?"
"Why do you ask me ? It is better to let
these things come gradually."
"Will it affect his walking powers.?"
"My dear sir, I would rather not have to tell
you; I fear your boy will never be able to walk
much again. I wish I could give you a better
report."
Another minute and the doctors' carriages
had rolled away. They left Mr. Murray looking
after them, or so it seemed, but he saw nothing,
his eyes were dim. Before him flashed the
marred future of his bright brave son, and the
thought almost stunned him. The remembrance
of his wife brought him back forcibly to the
present. She must not guess the truth, as the
doctor said it was better for it to come gradually.
So he went back to the drawing-room, but he
did not know what a feeble smile lighted up his
pale face. If he thought Mrs. Murray would
not guess the truth, he was mistaken.
"I think I know all," she said. How shall
we help our Claude to bear it?"
Mr. Murray bent down and kissed her
tenderly, but he could find no' answer to her
question just then.









I'




















JI>







rl














Oh, mother, is it not beautiful ?" he said in another minute; "how kind
of Uncle Syd !-see, it is my own text."-p. 64.




















CHAPTER VII.
LEILA.

RS. MURRAY felt that it was no
time to sit still and face the future.
She must try and forget the fears
for Claude's sake; at least force
them back to the far depths of her heart.
Every minute of her absence she knew would
seem like an hour to him. She must begin by
being brave herself, or how could she help her
boy? Just stopping in the hall to drink a glass
of cold water, she went at once to Claude's
room.
Are those doctors gone, mother ?" he asked.
"What a time they have been Come and sit
down close beside me, and tell me all they
said."
Mrs. Murray took the chair by the bedside.
"Well, little mother, may I get up to-morrow ?"
"I fear not, Claude dear."






48 Claude's Victory.

"Why not, mother? I can't keep on lying
here; I have had too much of bed lately."
"Dr. Cairns will look in again to-morrow
morning; I dare say he will allow you to lie
on a couch before long. You will not get so
weary as in bed."
But I want to go out, mother; it is nonsense
for them to keep me in like this," said Claude,
impatiently.
"The doctors ought to know best, Claude,
or what would be the use of our consulting
them ?"
I don't think half the time they know what
they are talking about."
"Hush, dear, you must not say that. Dr.
Cairns has always been so good to you."
When does Uncle Sydney come home?"
"The day after to-morrow."
Then I shall tell Dr. Cairns that I must be
down-stairs by the time Uncle Syd comes."
But Uncle Sydney was obliged to postpone
his return to Burnley Chase. To the great dis-
appointment of all the family, he wrote to say
that he was going down to Scotland for a few
weeks, and could not fix any definite day for
his arrival at the Chase. No one felt the dis-
appointment more than poor Claude. The
hours hung heavily upon him in spite of all the
loving care that was lavished on him.







Leila. 49

Mrs. Murray looked at him sadly, as she
noticed day by day how impatient he grew.
Leila was ever ready to do anything for him,
and would at any moment lay down an interest-
ing book to play some game with him. They
often played draughts and tactics,.but if Leila
happened to win, as she very often did, he lost
all pleasure in the game, and declared there was
no fun in it. One day Leila went to her mother
quite distressed.
Mother," she said, with tears in her eyes,
"Claude is so vexed that I won the game; I
wish he could always win, I don't care at all
about it."
It would not be good for Claude always to
win, dear; do not distress your kind little heart
too much about that."
But, mother, it is hard for him to be always
lying down, is it not? When do you think Dr.
Cairns will allow him to walk about?"
"Not yet, dear, for a long time, I fear," she
said sadly. She felt she could not tell her
happy little Leila of the great sorrow that would
probably mar Claude's life.
Poor dear Claude, we miss him so in all our
play; we don't know what to do without him."
"We must all help him to be brave, Leila,"
and in spite of her efforts Mrs. Murray's eyes
filled with tears.
D







50 Claude's Victory.

"Brave, mother? Why, Claude is always
brave, he is never afraid of anything. I heard
one of the men at the camp say one day as he
passed, what a brave officer the young gentleman
would make some day."
Mrs. Murray could not answer at the moment,
and Leila looking up saw her mother's tears for
the first time.
"Mother dear, mother," she cried, putting her
arms all round her neck, "what is the matter?
-tell me, why do you cry?"
Mrs. Murray could not answer.
"Mother dear," she whispered, in some way
divining her thoughts, "are you afraid that our
Claude will never be a soldier ?"
I hope, dear, that he will be a good soldier
of the King of kings, though he may never be
able to serve his earthly Queen."
Young as Leila was she understood it all now.
Her large blue eyes were gazing out at the far-
away hills, thinking of her mother's words.
"Poor dear Claude," she said presently; "I
wish I could bear it for him."
"You cannot bear it for him, dear child, but
I think you can help him in many ways. You
said that Claude is brave-so he is, very brave in
times of danger. But there is another kind of
bravery which is far harder. The bravery that
makes us patient under suffering, and willing to







Leila. 51

bear pain without murmuring. Many a hero
has found this harder work than the battle-field.
It is a bravery that the world knows little of,
but our Heavenly Father sees it and notes it
down in those dearest to Him. This was the
kind of bravery that shines forth so brightly in
our Saviour's life. How patient He was in all
His suffering!"
"Yes, mother, I see what you mean, I will
try and help Claude all I can; but oh, I do wish
I could bear it for him. It would not be so hard
for me to lie still all day as it is for him."
Mrs. Murray bent down and kissed her little
daughter tenderly.
"God saw this way was best for him, darling;
He knows better than we do."














D2


















CHAPTER VIII.
LYING STILL.
OLONEL MURRAY'S visit was
lengthened out' much longer than
he ever expected, and the children
began to think he was never coming
back. His mother lived on the borders of
Wales, and naturally claimed a long visit from
her much-loved son. So the time sped on till
Christmas was drawing near, and with great
difficulty Mrs. Murray was persuaded to leave
the seclusion of her Welsh home to spend the
Christmastide among her children and grand-
children at Burnley Chase. It was very hard
work for Claude to lie still in the drawing-room
when the carriage drove up to the front-door,
and knew that all the family were ready to
greet the travellers except him. The flushed
cheeks and knitted brow told Uncle Sydney
the moment he caught sight of him that it







Lying Still. 53

was indeed a hard struggle for the once active
boy.
"My dear old Claude, here you are," he said,
coming at once into the drawing-room and
speaking as brightly as he could. "You see
I have persuaded grandmamma to come after
all."
Claude looked up into his uncle's face and
saw in spite of his cheery tones that there was
a look of intense sympathy and pity in his
kind eyes. Anything like pity was more than
Claude could stand as yet.
"Yes, here I am, uncle, lying like a useless
log."
Claude's voice had a tone of bitterness in it
that grieved Colonel Murray to the heart.
"Now, old boy, you must not talk like that
now Uncle Syd has come. You must cheer
up; we are all going to be very happy this
Christmas, and make the most of each other."
Just then Mrs. Murray came in, and there
were more greetings, many questions about the
journey, and all the chit-chat as when friends
meet after a long absence. Claude could not
help being cheered with all the kindliness, and
as his mother glanced anxiously at him she
saw that the brows were less knitted, and she
said to herself, This is just what Claude wants.
It will help him to forget himself."








54 Claude's Victory.

The few days before Christmas are usually
busy ones in most families. It was especially
the case at Burnley Chase, for the poor were
always thought of, and there were blankets and
flannel-petticoats to distribute, to say nothing
of numerous Christmas dinners.
Some years had passed since Colonel Murray
had spent the season in England, and no one
enjoyed more than he did the peace and good-
will that is shed abroad at the remembrance
of God's great gift. There was no time for any
little quiet chats; but, for all that, he was
closely watching Claude, and what he saw
distressed him more every day. He saw his
impatience with the servants, who waited on
him with ceaseless kindness. He heard the
irritable answers he gave his sister Leila, who
was indeed trying day by day to help him to
bear his trial-helping in every way that she
could think of to amuse him, so that the time
might not be so wearisome.
Colonel Murray quietly watched and noted
everything. Finding himself alone with Claude's
mother for a few minutes, he said suddenly-
"Mildred, does Claude know the truth about
his future?"
No, Sydney, it seemed heartless to tell the
dear boy," she said with a pained look; "it is
better for him to know by degrees."







Lying Still. 55

"Then it is a great mistake; you are doing
Claude a great wrong."
Mrs. Murray, for the first time in her life, felt
inclined to be angry with her brother-in-law.
Forgive me, Mildred, I fear I spoke some-
what harshly; but don't you see how irritable
the boy is growing; he takes all Leila's unselfish
care of him as a matter of course."
"But, Sydney, just think what he has to bear;
think what it is for a high-spirited boy to lie
still all day."
"I know it-oh, I know it," said Colonel
Murray, speaking with deep feeling; "it is just
because it is so hard for him to bear that I want
to help him to be brave."
"Yes, I know; that is what I wish. I told
Leila the other day that we must help him to
be brave, and since then I have been touched
many times to see how unselfishly she does
what she thinks he likes best."
"You are helping Leila to be brave, not
Claude."
Mrs. Murray was silent for a minute.
"You may be right, Sydney; I believe you
are-oh, I do want to help my boy!" she said
pitifully.
"I am sure of it. Dear Mildred, we must go
to our Father in Heaven for wisdom in this as
in all else."







56 Claude's Victory.

Mrs. Murray was just then called away to
some visitors, and Colonel Murray, finding that
the rest of the family were all out, made his
way to the library where, as he expected, he
found Claude alone.



















CHAPTER IX.
STRUGGLE AND VICTORY.
T was growing dusk as Uncle Sydney
joined Claude. The invalid's couch
was drawn up near a large window
which looked towards the west.
The sky was still glowing with the winter
sunset.
Tired of reading, Claude? he asked, seeing
that his nephew had just laid down a book.
Yes, tired of everything," Claude said bitterly;
"Dr. Cairns is a regular old Molly, keeping me
lying here day after day. I wish you would ask
him when he is going to let me get up; he always
puts me off with some nonsense or other."
Colonel Murray laid his hand on Claude's
shoulder.
My boy, has it ever struck you that Dr.
Cairns did not like to give you an answer?"







.58 Claude's Victory.

"What do you mean, uncle?" he asked
sharply.
"Suppose he had something he did not like
to tell you ?"
Claude lay perfectly silent for a minute, then
he said in a hoarse voice-
Do you mean, Uncle Sydney, that he thinks
I shall never be able to walk again ?"
"My dear boy, I cannot bear to tell you, but
I fear it is even so."
Claude's face flushed crimson, then turned
ashy white. He started up and' cried-
"I can't bear it!-I tell you I can't bear
it !"
Uncle Sydney tenderly laid his large manly
hand on the boy's slender fingers.
Dear boy," he said, your Heavenly Father
only knows how hard it is, and He only can
help you to bear this great trial."
A great struggle was evidently going on in
poor Claude's heart. Presently he said more
quietly-
"Uncle Sydney, I am so tired, will you carry
me up to bed ? Tell them I have a headache.
I don't want to see any one to-night."
Uncle Sydney took the boy up in his strong
arms, and carried him up the broad staircase as
tenderly as a mother. With his own hands he
undressed him and laid him on his little bed.







Struggle and Victory. 59

"Put the gas down quite low, Uncle Syd,
please. And now I want to be alone."
Colonel Murray had reached the door when
Claude called him back.
Uncle Syd," he whispered, don't tell mother
I know."
"God bless you, my. dear boy, ay, and He
will bless you," Uncle Sydney whispered back.
He told one of the servants that Master Claude
wished to be undisturbed. Then he went to his
own room and stayed there till dinner-time.
The next morning Uncle Sydney sought
Claude's room the first thing. He found him
lying very still, with pale, wan cheeks.
I don't want to get up, Uncle Sydney; please
ask mother to let me lie still to-day, and please
ask her not to send for Dr. Cairns."
The boy spoke in a pleading voice that went
to Colonel Murray's heart. He longed to help
him, but he thought that at present it was best
to leave him alone. Mrs. Murray was at first very
much alarmed at Claude's state, but at Colonel
Murray's entreaties she consented not to send
for Dr. Cairns, and agreed to his taking charge
of the invalid for the day. Mrs. Murray had an
engagement in London which obliged her to
go out, so Uncle Sydney found himself without
difficulty by Claude's side. He seated himself
in an easy-chair, and took up a book, so that







60 Claude's Victory.

Claude might not think that he need talk unless
he wished.
The morning 'passed away very quietly, till
Colonel Murray went down-stairs to luncheon.
He soon returned, and once more took up his
post. He noticed sadly that the tempting tray
that had been placed by Claude's side was
almost untouched.
Cannot you eat a little more, my boy?"
"No, thank you, Uncle Syd."
The two remained silent for a little while, till
Colonel Murray heard Claude speaking in a low
voice.
"What did you say, Claude?" he asked
kindly.
"Uncle Sydney, I shall never be a soldier
now."
"Dear old boy !" said Colonel Murray.
"I've been thinking it all over, and I wish I
could die."
Hush, Claude, life is a precious gift, we must
not wish to throw it aside."
"What, such a life as mine will be, useless to
every one ?"-he spoke rapidly. I longed to
be a man that I might be a brave soldier. I
have often dreamt that I was grown up and
I was leading my men on to victory. Now, to
think it can never be, and I must just lie here!
Oh, Uncle Sydney, I can't bear it."







Struggle and Victory. 61

"Dear Claude, don't think that I do not deem
it hard. God only knows how hard; but there
is a victory yet that will bring you laurels of
more worth than any you have dreamt of."
Claude looked up interested.
He that is slow to anger is better than
the mighty, and he that ruleth his spirit than
he that taketh a city," said Colonel Murray
slowly.
Claude's pale face flushed.
You see that is God's way of looking at it.
He is our Commander-in-chief, and it is of more
consequence what He thinks than any one else.
If you were an officer and your General entrusted
a hard piece of work to you, would you not
esteem it an honour?"
Still Claude lay silent, and Colonel Murray
went on.
"Your General has appointed you some hard
work, my boy, but He has given you this
promise-' Lo, I am with you always.' With
Him close beside you, you will not find the
victory hard to win."
"But, Uncle Syd, I am often so impatient
and so selflh. I believe the last few weeks I
have never thought of anybody but myself."
"Yes, that is just it. Remember, he that
ruleth his spirit is better than he that taketh
a city."







62 Claude's Victory.

"But how can I do it?"
"Never in your own strength; but God is
pledged to help you if you ask Him. As the
impatient thoughts spring up, you must lift up
this little prayer, 'Lord, help me.'"
It was growing dusk by this time, and the
room looked cheerful as the firelight danced and
flickered. Claude lay evidently thinking, and
Colonel Murray was wisely silent. Presently
he looked up, and said-
"Uncle Sydney, will you ring the bell. I will
get up at once, and then I shall be down-stairs
when mother comes home."
Ah! that's right, there is nothing like begin-
ning at once," said Colonel Murray, brightly.
"How glad mother will be to have you to
welcome her!"
In half-an-hour Claude was lying on the
couch in the drawing-room. His face looked
very pale, but there was a more peaceful ex-
pression upon it than usual. One by one the
rest of the family found their way to the
drawing-room, for the news soon spread that
Claude had come down to tea. So when a
little later Mrs. Murray returned, she was
delighted to find such a happy party. After
awhile she and Claude were left alone.
"Mother," he said, stroking her hand, I did
not know till last night that I could never be







Struggle and Victory. 63

a soldier. It seemed terribly hard at first, and
I wished I could die. But Uncle Sydney has
been telling me how to win a greater victory,
and I will try. I am going to ask God to help
me; I am sure I can never do it alone. Mother
dear, I am sure I have been dreadfully horrid
all these weeks, when everybody has been kind
and good. But I will try hard to be different.
Uncle Syd says, 'that he that ruleth his spirit
is better than he that taketh a city.' I will try
and be a brave soldier after all."
Mrs. Murray's tears were dropping fast, and
she could hardly speak.
"God will give you the victory, my precious
boy," she whispered, as she bent down and
kissed him tenderly.

So Claude began the new warfare. As Uncle
Sydney knew, victory would not come all at
once. But the young soldier had begun in the
right way. Day by day he learnt to listen for
his commanding orders from the King of kings,
and as new and unlooked-for difficulties arose
he found the necessity of being clothed with the
whole armour of his God.
A few months later, when Uncle Sydney had
to leave England for foreign service, he said
good-bye to Claude with happier thoughts, for
he saw that the boy was a true, brave soldier







64 Claude's Victory.

of his King. He left a package for Claude, to
be opened when he had gone.
"What can 'it be, mother?" said Claude,
trying to undo the string; it feels like a picture.
Oh, mother, is it not beautiful ?" he said in
another minute; how kind of Uncle Syd !-see,
it is my own text."
And there it was with a laurel crown sur-
mounting it-
"He that is slow to anger is better than the
mighty, and he that ruleth his spirit than he
that taketh a city."







THE END.







JOHN F. SHAW & CO.'S



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Bright and Helpful Stories. 5



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LITTLE RADIANCE. A YEAR IN A CHILD'S LIFE ,, J. CHAPPELL
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SYBIL'S MESSAGE .,, EMILY BRODIE.
UP TO THE MARK. A STORY FOR BOYS. ,, H. BOULTWOOD.
ACTING ON THE SQUARE .. .. ,, H. BOULTWOOD.
TIM'S TREASURE AND HOW HE FOUND IT ALICE LANG.
HIS SERVANTS WHO SERVE ,, ELEANOR GRANT.
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THAT BOY TOM .. ... M. SEYMOUt.
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THE SEA-GULL'S NEST ..,, EMILY BRODIE.
THE SEFTON BOYS. ., Author of "Leo & Dick."
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POLLY AND WINNIE .. ... F. F. G.
PEGGY'S CHARGE F. F. G.
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LOST ON THE MOOR. THE STORY OF OUR
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6 Bright and Helpful Stories.


SHAW'S EIGHTEEHPENNY JUVENILES.
(Continued.)

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POP & PEGGY; OR, How TOM WAS SENT TO SEA .
TOM CARTER; OR, THE UPS AND DOWNS OF LIFE
MAY LANE; OR, LOVE AND DUTY
CHARLIE AND LUCY .. .. MARIANNE SMITH.
WANDERING MAY M. L. C.
LEFT AT HOME .. ,, M. L. C.
CLARIE'S LITTLE CHARGE .. ,, M. L. C.
HAPPY LAND . ... .,, M. L. C.



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Bright and Helpful Stories. 7



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