• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 A Greek pantomime
 The matterhorn
 Scenes from Shakespeare's life
 The giant's hold
 The children's water-colour...
 Off for a scamper with Fido
 Church-decking in bygone days
 The old year and the new
 New Year's Eve (words and...
 Shakespeare's schooldays and...
 The burying beetle
 The clouded tiger
 The giant's hold (continued from...
 A girl of the last century
 Balboa: The discoverer of...
 A very old story
 The children's water-colour...
 No more fairies (words and...
 The lion at home
 The true story of a lost dog
 The Duchess of Devonshire and her...
 "We brings oursel's up"
 Frost fair on the Thames, 1814
 Shakespear's work and last...
 A hurricane in the West Indies
 The giant's hold
 The children's water-colour...
 The cripple (words and music)
 The castle of Chillon
 Before the revolution
 Of a Grecian sage whom a king held...
 Cottage children
 The wolf child
 A fancy ball (words and music)
 Falconry among the Arabs
 A Brazilian forest
 My artillery pet
 Taking care of the kittens
 The giant's hold (continued from...
 Story of a robin
 The children's water-colour...
 The puma
 The wreck of the "undine"
 The sentinel
 Something about names
 The dishonest cat
 A brave mouse
 After the battle
 The giant's hold
 An enraged elephant
 A south sea chief
 Ice avalanches
 Sheep lost on swiss mountain
 Two rounds (words and music)
 Tapirs
 An earwig's nest
 A mouse at supper
 Katie's adventures
 Young rough head
 Lightning in the tropics
 Rags and bones
 The boa constrictor
 An awkward encounter
 The children's water-colour...
 Colin (words and music)
 Old chaffinch
 Great trees in South America
 The spinning-wheel
 Rags and bones
 The redbreast and butterfly
 The giant's hold (continued from...
 Death of Henry the fourth...
 Chinese ladies
 Our tadpoles
 Summertime (words and music)
 Flying fish
 The burning of Moscow
 Our jackdaw
 The horned owl
 A little journey long ago
 A duel interrupted
 The giant's hold (continued from...
 Stalactite Cavern in Brazil
 Master crewe
 Bird's labor lost (words and...
 The goat and the dog
 Monuments of ancient Egypt
 Among the butterflies
 My great grandmother
 The reign of terror
 The giant's hold (continued from...
 Old horse at Dolgelly
 Cocky's escape
 A goose who was no goose
 Gooseberries (words and music)
 Not caught yet
 Bamboos
 Our day at Shormash, and what came...
 Arab boar hunting
 A tug of war
 General Hoche
 The giant's hold
 Simplicity
 Pond life
 The goat and the boy
 Little questions for little birds...
 The crocodile
 An inundation
 Fresh water shells
 Little lord Burghersh
 The giant's hold (continued from...
 Panthers
 A midnight sail
 A Chinese actor
 The tale of a crooked sixpence
 A friend in need
 Autumn leaves (words and music...
 The holy family
 Little Philip and his pets
 The story of a viper
 The tale of a crooked sixpence
 Hippopotamus, crocodile and water...
 The children's illustrated...
 Merry Christmas-time (words and...
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Children's illustrated annual
Title: The children's illustrated annual
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00065352/00001
 Material Information
Title: The children's illustrated annual
Alternate Title: Children's illustrated annual stories, songs, and pictures
Physical Description: 3, 187, 1 p., 23 leaves of plates : ill. (some col.), music ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Church, A. J ( Author )
Briton, E. Vincent ( Author )
Cowper, Frank ( Author )
Mckean, Minnie ( Author )
Cuthell, Edith E ( Author )
Reynolds, Joshua, 1723-1792 ( Illustrator )
Gainsborough, Thomas, 1727-1788 ( Illustrator )
Lawrence, Thomas, 1769-1830 ( Illustrator )
Romney, John, 1786-1863 ( Illustrator )
Hull, E ( Illustrator )
Glindoni, H. G ( Illustrator )
Murray, Charles O ( Illustrator )
Bayard, Émile Antoine, 1837-1891 ( Illustrator )
Seeley and Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: Seeley & Co.
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: 1889
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
National characteristics -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's songs -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
History -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1889   ( lcsh )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1889   ( rbprov )
Bldn -- 1889
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Prize books (Provenance)   ( rbprov )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: containing contributions by Professor Church, E. Vincent Briton, Mrs. Frank Cowper, Miss McKean, Mrs. Cuthell, and other writers ; and illustrations after Sir Joshua Reynolds, Gainsborough, Sir T. Lawrence, Romney, E. Hull, H.G. Glindoni, Co.O. Murray, Emile Bayard, and other artists.
General Note: Contains fiction and non-fiction.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00065352
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224031
notis - ALG4289
oclc - 70706893

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Plate
    Title Page
        Page i
    Table of Contents
        Page ii
    List of Illustrations
        Page iii
    A Greek pantomime
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Plate
        Page 5
    The matterhorn
        Page 6
    Scenes from Shakespeare's life
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    The giant's hold
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Plate
        Page 13
    The children's water-colour club
        Page 14
    Off for a scamper with Fido
        Page 14
    Church-decking in bygone days
        Page 15
    The old year and the new
        Page 15
    New Year's Eve (words and music)
        Page 16
    Shakespeare's schooldays and youth
        Page 17
    The burying beetle
        Page 18
        Page 19
    The clouded tiger
        Page 20
        Plate
    The giant's hold (continued from page 14)
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    A girl of the last century
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Balboa: The discoverer of the Pacific
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    A very old story
        Page 31
    The children's water-colour club
        Page 31
    No more fairies (words and music)
        Page 32
    The lion at home
        Page 33
    The true story of a lost dog
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Plate
    The Duchess of Devonshire and her child
        Page 37
    "We brings oursel's up"
        Page 37
    Frost fair on the Thames, 1814
        Page 38
    Shakespear's work and last days
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    A hurricane in the West Indies
        Page 42
    The giant's hold
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Plate
        Page 45
        Page 46
    The children's water-colour club
        Page 47
    The cripple (words and music)
        Page 48
    The castle of Chillon
        Page 49
    Before the revolution
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Of a Grecian sage whom a king held in prison
        Page 52
        Plate
    Cottage children
        Page 53
    The wolf child
        Page 53
    A fancy ball (words and music)
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Falconry among the Arabs
        Page 56
    A Brazilian forest
        Page 56
        Page 57
    My artillery pet
        Page 58
    Taking care of the kittens
        Page 58
        Page 59
    The giant's hold (continued from page 47)
        Page 60
        Plate
        Page 61
        Page 62
    Story of a robin
        Page 63
    The children's water-colour club
        Page 64
    The puma
        Page 65
    The wreck of the "undine"
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Plate
    The sentinel
        Page 69
    Something about names
        Page 69
    The dishonest cat
        Page 70
    A brave mouse
        Page 70
        Page 71
    After the battle
        Page 72
    The giant's hold
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Plate
        Page 77
    An enraged elephant
        Page 78
    A south sea chief
        Page 79
    Ice avalanches
        Page 79
    Sheep lost on swiss mountain
        Page 79
    Two rounds (words and music)
        Page 80
    Tapirs
        Page 81
    An earwig's nest
        Page 81
        Page 82
    A mouse at supper
        Page 83
    Katie's adventures
        Page 84
        Plate
    Young rough head
        Page 85
    Lightning in the tropics
        Page 86
    Rags and bones
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
    The boa constrictor
        Page 91
    An awkward encounter
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Plate
        Page 93
        Page 94
    The children's water-colour club
        Page 95
    Colin (words and music)
        Page 96
    Old chaffinch
        Page 97
    Great trees in South America
        Page 98
        Page 99
    The spinning-wheel
        Page 100
    Rags and bones
        Page 100
        Plate
        Page 101
        Page 102
    The redbreast and butterfly
        Page 103
    The giant's hold (continued from page 95)
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Plate
        Page 109
    Death of Henry the fourth of France
        Page 110
    Chinese ladies
        Page 110
    Our tadpoles
        Page 110
        Page 111
    Summertime (words and music)
        Page 112
    Flying fish
        Page 113
    The burning of Moscow
        Page 114
    Our jackdaw
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Plate
    The horned owl
        Page 117
    A little journey long ago
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
    A duel interrupted
        Page 120
        Page 121
    The giant's hold (continued from page 110)
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
    Stalactite Cavern in Brazil
        Page 127
    Master crewe
        Page 127
    Bird's labor lost (words and music)
        Page 128
    The goat and the dog
        Page 129
    Monuments of ancient Egypt
        Page 129
    Among the butterflies
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Plate
        Page 133
        Page 134
    My great grandmother
        Page 135
    The reign of terror
        Page 136
        Page 137
    The giant's hold (continued from page 127)
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Plate
    Old horse at Dolgelly
        Page 141
    Cocky's escape
        Page 141
        Page 142
    A goose who was no goose
        Page 143
    Gooseberries (words and music)
        Page 144
    Not caught yet
        Page 145
    Bamboos
        Page 145
    Our day at Shormash, and what came of it
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Plate
        Page 149
    Arab boar hunting
        Page 150
    A tug of war
        Page 150
        Page 151
    General Hoche
        Page 152
    The giant's hold
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Plate
    Simplicity
        Page 157
    Pond life
        Page 157
        Page 158
    The goat and the boy
        Page 159
    Little questions for little birds (words and music)
        Page 160
    The crocodile
        Page 161
    An inundation
        Page 162
    Fresh water shells
        Page 162
        Page 163
    Little lord Burghersh
        Page 164
        Plate
    The giant's hold (continued from page 157)
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
    Panthers
        Page 168
    A midnight sail
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Plate
    A Chinese actor
        Page 173
    The tale of a crooked sixpence
        Page 173
        Page 174
    A friend in need
        Page 175
    Autumn leaves (words and music)
        Page 176
    The holy family
        Page 177
    Little Philip and his pets
        Page 178
        Plate
        Page 179
        Page 180
    The story of a viper
        Page 181
    The tale of a crooked sixpence
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Plate
    Hippopotamus, crocodile and water hog
        Page 187
    The children's illustrated annual
        Page 187
    Merry Christmas-time (words and music)
        Page 188
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
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MASTER CREWE, DRESSED LIKE HENRY VIII. By Sir foshua Reynolds.






THE CHILDREN'S

ILLUSTRATED ANNUAL

CONTAINING CONTRIBUTIONS
by Professor CHURCH, E. VINCENT BRITON, Mrs. FRANK COWPER,
Miss McKEAN, Mrs. CUTHELL, and other Writers

AND ILLUSTRATIONS
after SIR JOSHUA REYNOLDS, GAINSBOROUGH, SIR T. LAWRENCE,
ROMNEr, E. HULL, H. G. GLINDONI, C. O. MURRAY, EMILE BAFARD,
and other Artists





F,,









LONDON
Published by SEELEY AND Co. LIMITED
Essex Street, Strand
1889
*, ,





















A Greek Pantomime. By ev. A. / Church Tapirs 8
0, 17 3 A s S e













Off f.r a Scamper with Fido 14 Lightning in the Tropics .- 86
Church-decking in Bygone Days i.5 Rags and Bones. 8..6, ioo
The Old Year and the New 15 The Boa. Constrictor.... .. ... 91
CONTENTS. .-:




New Year's Eve. Words by G. Paterson An Awkward Encounter PAGE
A reek Pantomime. By e.16 Con. Words by Paterson. Old Welsh
The MatterhoBurying Beetle. By ini 6 An Eawig'sNest. By nniecan 896
Thenes f rom Shakespeare's Life. 6, 7,38 A Mouse at Supper. 83
AThe Gir l of the Last Cy E. in t ion, 1, Katie's Adventures. y America .oore 84
21, 42, 6o, 72, 9I, 104, 122, 138, 152, 165, 178 Young Rough Head 85



Balbo r a ScampDiscoverer of the Pacific 28 The Spinning in thee Tropics .
Church-decking in Bygone Days 15 R d breast and Butterfly. By William
A Very Old Year and the New The Boa Constrictor 1
N more Fairies Eve. or by Bethoven Death of Henry IV. of Franter .
The Lion at Home 16 Cinese Ladies by G. Patero. .Old
The Tru e Story of a Lost Dog. By in Edith Our Tadpoles. By Minnie Mcea 96



Cuthell......... 34 Summertime. Words and Music by H. Berkeley
The Duchess of d Tigerher Child 37 Our Chainch 11297
WA Girl of the Last Century 26 Great Trees in Suth America 98
BalbFrost Fair on the ThamDiscoverer of the Pacific 8 The Spinning oWheel M .
True Stories about Foxest d 29 The Rackdbreast and Butterfly. By llia 1
TA V ery Old Stords by G. Paterson. Air The Horned Owl .




adapted from Neiikonm 47 A Little Journey long ago. By A. Wilson 117
The Castle of Chillonairs. Ar by .e9 A32 Death of Henry IV. of France 120
Before the Revolution at Home 49 Stalactite Cavern in Brazil 127
Thef a Grecian Story of a Lost DoKing held in Prison. 52 Master CrTadpoles. By Mc n .
Cottage Children 53 Bird's Labour Lost. Air adapted from Beethoven 128
The Duchess of Devonshire ad her 53 The Goat and the Dog 129
'We brings oursel's up' .. 37 Flying Fish 113
Frost Fair on the Thames, 1814 38 The Burning of Mloscow 114
A Hurricane in the West Indies .. 42 Our Jackdaw ..I4



The Cripple. Words by G. E. Paterson. Air he HMonuments of Ancient Egypt 129
adapted from iiozart. 54 Among the Butterfliesong. By A. H Palmer 13
The Castle of Chillon e 49 AM Duel Interrupted 135
A Brazilian Fore the RevolutionThe Reign of Terror .. 136



My Artillery Pet.. 58 Old House at Dolgelly .41
Taking Careian Sagof the Kittwhom aging held in 58 Cocky's Escape. By Edith Cutell 141



Story of a Robin. By Cross Key 63 A Goose who was no Goose 143
Cottage PumaChildren 53 Bird's Labour Lost. Air adapted from Beethoven 1
The Wreck of the Undine. By .r. 53 The Goat and the Dog 145
FancyperBall. .Words by. E. Patrson. Air Monuments ofAncint Egypt 129
The Searranged fromMort. 69 Our Day at Shormash, and what Pame of it. By
Falconry among the rams 69 M Great-Gs Frandmother 135
A Brazilian ForDishonest Cat .56 The.i Arab Boar Huntinge 1365
MArtillery Pet 58 Old House of War. Bogey lara oore 150
Taking Care of the Battle. kittens 58 Cocky's Escape. By Edith .. 1Cuthell .52
Story of a Roein. By Coss y. 63 A Goose who was no Goose. 15743
A South Sea Chief. 79 Pond Life. BAir arranged McKean o 157
IThe e Avalanches Undie.79 The Goaut and the Boy 145
Cow'per 65 Bamboos 145



heepst on a Swiss Mountainel9 Little Quetions for Little Birds. Words aid
Something about Names ..69 Mrs, Frank Cowper 146



Tw o Rounds. Spring oys-Boys Laughing Music by Hunting. Berkeley Sco o
A Brave Mouse 70 A Tug of War. By Clara E. A. Moore 150
After the Battle. 72 General Hoche.. I52
An Enraged Elephant 78 Simplicity .. 157
A South Sea Chief .. 79 Pond Life. By Mitoiie McKean I57
Ice Avalanches .. 79 The Goat and the Boy 159
Sheep,lost on a Swiss Mountain 79 Little Questions for Little Birds. Words and
Two Rounds. Spring Joys--Boys Laughing Music by H, Berkeley Score 16o
Round. Words and Music by f. Berkeley The Crocodile 161
Score So An Inundation .. .. 162






ILLUSTRATIONS AND COLOURED PLATES.

PAGE PAGE
Fresh Water Shells. By Minnie M3cKean 162 The Holy Family 177
Little Lord Burghersh 164 Little Philip and his Pets 178
Panthers. 168 The Story of a Viper. By William Cowper 181
A Midnight Sail. By MArs Frank Cowiper 168 Hippopotamus,- Crocodile, and Water Hog 187
A Chinese Actor .. 173 The Children's Illustrated Annual 187
The Tale of a Crooked Sixpence. By F. Scarlett Merry Christmas-time. Words by G. E. Pater-
Potter 173, 182 son. Air arranged by Beethoven. 188
A Friend in Need 175 The Children's Water-Colour Club 14, 31, 47, 64,
Autumn Leaves. Words by G. E. Paterson. 79, 95, III, 127, 143, 159, 175
Air adapted from Handel 175



ILLUSTRATIONS.
PAGE PAGE
Zeus and the Muses. By Flaxman .. I After the Battle .73
The Cock. By H. G. Glindani 2 An Enraged Elephant 77
Plausible and Hopeful threatened by the Birds. Tapirs 81
By H. GGlindoni 3 A Mouse at Supper 83
Plausible and Prometheus. By H. G. Glindoni. 5 Lightning in the Tropics 87
The Birds at the Sacrifice. By H. G. Glindoni. 7 The Bda Constrictor 8
Font in the Vestry of Stratford Church, where A Chaffinch's Nest .. 97
Shakespeare was christened. By E. Hull 8 Great Trees in South America 99
Stratford-on-Avon: Shakespeare's- Birthplace. The Redbreast chasing a Butterfly. By E. L.
By E. Hull 9 Seeley Io
Church-decking in bygone days. By B. Foster 15 Death of Henry IV. By E. Bayard. 107
Meadow Walk by the Avon, near Stratford. By Flying Fish .. .. 113
E. Hull 17 The Burning of Moscow 11
The School in which William Shakespeare did Horned Owl .. 116
his Lessons. By E. Hull 19 Mrs. Puss and Master Chow. By E. L. Seeley 121
A Girl of the last Century. By A. Bertrand 25 Stalactite Cavern. 123
Balboa taking possession of the Pacific Ocean .27 The Goat and the Dog. By G. 0. Murray 29
A Hare for the Little Ones 30 Monuments of Ancient Egypt. By E. Bayard 131
A Lion at the Watering-place 33 Monument in Lucerne to the Swiss Guard 136
The Lion and his Prey 35 The Poet in Prison' 137
Stratford Church. By E. Hull 39 Not Caught Yet. By Sir E. Landseer 145
Chancel of the Church of the Holy Trinity 40 Bamboos ...147
Shakespeare's Monument in Stratford Church 41 General Hoche writing by a Camp Fire 153
A Hurricane in the West Indies 43 The Goat and the Boy. By G. O. Murray 159
The Castle of Chillon .49 The Crocodile 161
The Gay Court at Versailles 51 An Inundation .163
Arabs Hawking 57 Panthers .169
A Brazilian Forest :59 The Little Crooked Man. 174
The Puma 65 The Holy Family. By Sir Joshua Reynolds 177
The Dishonest Cat ..71 The Viper and the Kittens 183



COLOURED PLATES.
PAGE PAGE
MASTER CREWE DRESSED LIKE HENRY'VIII. YOUNG ROUGH HEAD. By SirThomasLawrence 84
By Sir Joshua Reynolds Frontispiece AN AWKWARD ENCOUNTER 93
THE MATTERHORN 4 THE SPINNING WHEEL. By G. Romney 100
OFF FOR A SCAMPER WITH FIDO. By G. CHINESE LADIES l09
Romnney 13 MY GREAT-GRANDMOTSIER 135
CLOUDED TIGERS 20 OLD HOUSE AT DOLGELLY 141
CHILDREN'S WATER COLOUR CLUB. PRIZE ARA.B BOAR HUNTING 150
WINNERS, 1888 29 SIMPLICITY. By SirJoshua Reynolds 157
THE DUCHESS OF DEVONSHIIRE AND HER LITTLE LORD BURGHERSH. By Sir Joshua
CHILD. By Sir Joshua Reynolds 36 Reynolds 164
FAIR ON THE THAMES, FEBRUARY 1814 45 A CHINESE ACTOR .. i173
COTTAGE CHILDREN. By Gainsborouglz 5z LITTLE PHILIP AND HIS FRIENDS. By Sir
TAKING CARE OF THE KITTENS 61 Joshua Reynolds 178
THE SENTINEL. By Sir E. Landseer .68 HIPPOPOTAMUS,. CROCODILE, AND WATER
A SOUTH SEA CHIEF 77 HOG .187




















Zeus and the Muses-FLAXMAN.


The Children's Illustrated Magazine


A GREEK PANTOMIME. thought, to discover such a place, would be
the birds, for the birds fly far and wide over
BY PROFESSOR A. J. CHURCH. land and sea and see all the cities of men.
Further, the hoopoe who was king over the
I AM going to tell you the story of a play that birds, was once a man, and perhaps would
was acted at Athens more than two thousand be the more willing to help for this reason.
years ago. I have called it a pantomime, So they set out in search of the hoopoe.
because it was very like the pantomimes you First, however, they bought two very clever
go to see, though formerly there was no birds, who were to help them to find him.
speaking in a pantomime, but the story Plausible had a crow, and Hopeful a jack-
was acted in dumb-show. But before I daw. Well, after a long rough journey, the
tell it I should like to say one thing, and crow made a sigh to show them that they
that is about the way in which these Athe- were near the palace of the hoopoe; there
nians laughed at their gods, whom yet they was no palace to be seen, but only a large
worshipped. All over their city there were rock. Then Hbpeful took a stone and
splendid temples of these gods and beautiful knocked against it as against the door of a
images of them made of gold and ivory, and house, and called out, Boy, boy !'
yet, as you will see, they talked of them as After a short time a bird came out who had
if they were more foolish and greedy than a huge beak, wide open. This was King
men. Hoopoe's servant. When he saw Plausible
Two men, called Plausible and Hopeful, and Hopeful, he was very much frightened.
being very tired of life in Athens, made'up Dear me!' he cried, 'here are two bird-
their minds to seek for a new city where they catchers, they must certainly be put to death.'
would be free from all trouble and worry, Now when they heard this, Plausible and
and where, above all things, there would be Hopeful began to declare at once that they
no law courts, for they both owed money were not men at all, but birds like him-
and were not very anxious to pay it. Now self. He did not altogether believe them,
the creatures who could help them best, they but consented to go and fetch the king to talk
VOL. II.






2 A GREEK PANTOMIME.

to them. Presently there came out a very Neither the king nor his servant could think
stately old bird, with a tremendous hooked of such a place, but at last a new idea struck
beak and three great crests of bright coloured Plausible, Why,' he cried, I have a splendid
feathers on his head. At first, Plausible plan the birds themselves shall build a city.'







































I t /,
THE COCK.

and Hopeful could not help laughing a little, 'But where?' asked King Hoopoe.
and this made him rather angry. Soon, I n the air, of course,' replied Plausible,
however, they told him why they had come: half way between heaven and earth.'
'We don't like our city,' said Plausible, 'and Why there ?' said the king.
we want to find a new one, where people 'Don't you know,' said Plausible, 'that very
need not pay their debts.' long ago the birds were kings of all the world?'























t'b q' ', ,I 2- ,, .*

































PLAUSIBLE AND HOPEFUL 'I'THREATENED 1Y rTHiE BIRDS. Drawn b H. G. GLINDONI.






4 A GREEK PANTOMIME.

Yes,' answered the king; 'I have heard it. much frightened, but they determined to
And then the gods took it from them?' make a fight for their lives. So when the
'Yes. Well, if you will build the city, they birds drew themselves up into lines like
will be kings again.' soldiers to attack them, they prepared to
'How so?' defend themselves. At length the hoopoe
We will make the gods pay tribute. managed to explain that the two men had
When people on earth burn sacrifices to not come to harm the birds, but rather to
them, of course all the smoke and the do them a service. So the birds consented
savoury smell must go up to them through to hear what their idea was. When they
the air.' We will stop the smoke and the understood Plausible's plan, they were as
smell as they go; and so we will starve the much delighted as the hoopoe had been.
gods out. You will see that they will come 'And what shall we call the new city when
to us before very long and ask for peace, we have built it ?' said King Hoopoe.
and then you must make them give up the 'We cannot do better than call it Cloud
Royalty.' Cuckoo Land,"' said Plausible.
When the hoopoe heard this plan, he was 'But,' said Hopeful, 'how shall we live in
delighted. 'It is splendid!' he said; 'but the air? We have no wings.'
first we must consult the rest of the birds. 'We'll eat Feathergrass,' said Plausible;
So I will wake my wife, the nightingale, and 'that will make wings grow.'
together we will sing a song, and this will So King Hoopoe called for a priest, and
bring them, for they always come with all he offered a sacrifice, and so they laid the
speed to hear us sing.' So the hoopoe sang a foundation of the new city.
little song to wake his wife, and when she had A short time after the city had been built,
come out, she and the hoopoe sang together. someone came to see Plausible, and he had
Presently the birds began to appear, birds so many wraps that it was impossible to recog-
of all sorts and from all countries; storks nise him. But when the wraps were taken
from Egypt, and scarlet flamingoes from West off, 'Why,' cried Plausible, it is my dear
Africa, and pheasants from the Black Sea; friend, Prometheus.'
very fine many of them were, but, after all, 'Hush !' said Prometheus, 'or else Zeus
there were few that were finer, and certainly will hear. If he sees me here, I'm lost; for
none that thought more of themselves than I've come down to tell you the news from
our old friend, the Cock. heaven, and while we are talking I'll put up
Presently, when they were all assembled, this umbrella so that the gods above can't
King Hoopoe said, 'Two strangers are come .see me.'
who counsel us to build a city. What do So they put up the umbrella, and talked
you say to this?' under that. Then Prometheus told Plausible
When the birds heard this they were very that the gods were in a state of starvation,
angry. 'Why,' they cried to the hoopoe, because the steam from the sacrifices was
'you have betrayed us; men were always kept back, and that they intended to send
our worst enemies, trying to snare us and an embassy to Cloud Cuckoo Land to make
kill us, and now you have brought them terms with the birds.
here. You shall be punished for this; but 'But don't you accept any terms but these,'
first we will take vengeance on these two for he said: 'that their power be restored again
all that we have suffered, and will tear them to the birds, and that you have Zeus's
to pieces.' beautiful daughter, Royalty, for your wife,
At this Plausible and Hopeful were very for she has charge of his money and his





















= "' -:J ',
-La

e Io





L.4




S. .. ,. ._


















TiHE MATTERHORN.






A GREEK PANTOMIME. 5

thunderbolts.' Then Prometheus went away 'Certainly,' said Plausible; 'my terms are
again, that you shall restore their former power to
Soon the embassy from the gods arrived, the race of birds. If this is agreed to, I
There was Poseidon and Herakles and a shall ask you to lunch with me.'

















-M,





















strange barbarian god, whose language Herakles, who felt very greedy after his
nobody could understand. They found long fast from sacrifices, at once said
Plausible cooking his lunch. He seemed 'Yes.'
to-take very little notice of the gods, and They asked the barbarian, but he said
went on with what he was doing. something which nobody could understand.
'We have come,' said Poseidon, 'to make Plausible declared that it meant yes.
terms and put an end to the quarrel between So Neptune said, 'That as two voted for it,
you birds and the gods." he should vote for it also.'






6 tSHAKESPEARE'S BIRTHPLACE.
'Again,' said Plausible, 'I must have SHAKESPEARE'S BIRTH-
Zeus's daughter, Royalty, for my wife.' PLACE.
'That's too much,' said Poseidon; 'we
must go home again!' IN the year 1564, that is, when Queen
But Herakles, who had become more and Elizabeth had been about six years on the
more greedy as the savoury smell of the throne, the town of Stratford-on-Avon, in
meal increased, cried out, 'Poseidon, my Warwickshire, was a thriving and pleasant
good fellow, what are you thinking of?-we place, as times went. Let us try and pic-
mustn't quarrel about a woman. I vote for ture it to ourselves as it must have looked
yielding in this too.' when the baby was born who was to make
But Poseidon said he should vote the it so famous.
other way. William Shakespeare was born at his
'Then,' said Plausible, 'it all depends on father's house in Henley Street, in the
the barbarian. What do you say?' he asked, month of April. It was not a grand house,
turning to him; and as he was very hungry for his father came of a family of yeomen,
too, he said, 'De pritti girli, a birdi yieldime.' and lived by selling farm produce-such as
'Well,' said Plausible, 'you've just come corn, timber, skins, and leather. He is
in time for the wedding breakfast.' So sometimes said to have been a glover, but
Plausible got his pretty wife, and the birds probably the gloves he sold were the strong
their old power, and Herakles and the leather gauntlets used in different kinds of
barbarian got their savoury luncheon, which farm work. He seems to have been a busy,
Poseidon was not loth to take his share of. active man, and very prosperous and well-to-
This curious play is called The Birds, do at first. Four years after his eldest son's
and it was written by a famous Greek poet, birth he was high bailiff, or mayor of the
named Aristophanes. town, and had bought houses and gardens in
different parts of it. His wife, Mary Arden,
Came of gentler blood. She belonged to a
E MATTE RN. branch of an old Warwickshire family, and
THIS is a very lofty mountain in the southern one of her ancestors had been hanged at
part of Switzerland, not very far from the Ludlow as a Yorkist, at a time when the
Rhone Valley. Its shape is even more re- Lancastrians were victorious in the long
markable than its height, and you would say Wars of the Roses. She had lands, too, of
that no one could climb such a mountain, her own, at Snitterfield and Wilmcote, two
There was a very dreadful accident about villages near, and was heiress to the farm
twenty years ago, when mountaineers began where old Richard Shakespeare, her hus-
to try the ascent, and four Englishmen fell band's father, lived as tenant. So, at the
from a great height and were killed. But time when her eldest son, William, was born,
now the guides have blasted away rocks in her husband was one of the chief men in the
some difficult places, and have fixed iron town, and might sign himself 'John Shake-
chains in others, and many people climb to speare, gentleman,' and be addressed as
the top every year. Round the peaks of 'Master.'
these high mountains fly the Alpine choughs, Eight children were born to John and
with their brightly coloured beaks and legs. Mary Shakespeare. Two little girls, Joan
On their sides browse the chamois in places and Margaret, died as babies, and another,
which one would suppose that only birds Anne, did not live to grow up. William was
could reach. Lower down are found the the eldest son, and there were three other boys,
curious little marmots.






6 tSHAKESPEARE'S BIRTHPLACE.
'Again,' said Plausible, 'I must have SHAKESPEARE'S BIRTH-
Zeus's daughter, Royalty, for my wife.' PLACE.
'That's too much,' said Poseidon; 'we
must go home again!' IN the year 1564, that is, when Queen
But Herakles, who had become more and Elizabeth had been about six years on the
more greedy as the savoury smell of the throne, the town of Stratford-on-Avon, in
meal increased, cried out, 'Poseidon, my Warwickshire, was a thriving and pleasant
good fellow, what are you thinking of?-we place, as times went. Let us try and pic-
mustn't quarrel about a woman. I vote for ture it to ourselves as it must have looked
yielding in this too.' when the baby was born who was to make
But Poseidon said he should vote the it so famous.
other way. William Shakespeare was born at his
'Then,' said Plausible, 'it all depends on father's house in Henley Street, in the
the barbarian. What do you say?' he asked, month of April. It was not a grand house,
turning to him; and as he was very hungry for his father came of a family of yeomen,
too, he said, 'De pritti girli, a birdi yieldime.' and lived by selling farm produce-such as
'Well,' said Plausible, 'you've just come corn, timber, skins, and leather. He is
in time for the wedding breakfast.' So sometimes said to have been a glover, but
Plausible got his pretty wife, and the birds probably the gloves he sold were the strong
their old power, and Herakles and the leather gauntlets used in different kinds of
barbarian got their savoury luncheon, which farm work. He seems to have been a busy,
Poseidon was not loth to take his share of. active man, and very prosperous and well-to-
This curious play is called The Birds, do at first. Four years after his eldest son's
and it was written by a famous Greek poet, birth he was high bailiff, or mayor of the
named Aristophanes. town, and had bought houses and gardens in
different parts of it. His wife, Mary Arden,
Came of gentler blood. She belonged to a
E MATTE RN. branch of an old Warwickshire family, and
THIS is a very lofty mountain in the southern one of her ancestors had been hanged at
part of Switzerland, not very far from the Ludlow as a Yorkist, at a time when the
Rhone Valley. Its shape is even more re- Lancastrians were victorious in the long
markable than its height, and you would say Wars of the Roses. She had lands, too, of
that no one could climb such a mountain, her own, at Snitterfield and Wilmcote, two
There was a very dreadful accident about villages near, and was heiress to the farm
twenty years ago, when mountaineers began where old Richard Shakespeare, her hus-
to try the ascent, and four Englishmen fell band's father, lived as tenant. So, at the
from a great height and were killed. But time when her eldest son, William, was born,
now the guides have blasted away rocks in her husband was one of the chief men in the
some difficult places, and have fixed iron town, and might sign himself 'John Shake-
chains in others, and many people climb to speare, gentleman,' and be addressed as
the top every year. Round the peaks of 'Master.'
these high mountains fly the Alpine choughs, Eight children were born to John and
with their brightly coloured beaks and legs. Mary Shakespeare. Two little girls, Joan
On their sides browse the chamois in places and Margaret, died as babies, and another,
which one would suppose that only birds Anne, did not live to grow up. William was
could reach. Lower down are found the the eldest son, and there were three other boys,
curious little marmots.














I ,. .,
ri
'~; ", ,Ii
': /I,.






THLI BIRDS AT THE SACRIFICE,. Dr'awtn b), 1-1. G. GLINDONI,






8 SHAKESPEARE'S BIRTHPLACE.

Gilbert, Richard, and Edmund, and another the christening feast, at which his father's
sister, a second Joan. Let us look for a friends and kinsfolk would assemble to bring
moment at the house they lived in. Most their gifts to the tiny baby, probably only
of the houses, except quite the best, were two or three days old, wrapped in his white
built of timber and plaster, with clay 'chrisome cloth.' Perhaps when the feast
floors, and no chimneys. The ground was over the guests would stroll in the garden
floor contained one large room, or hall, under the blossoming fruit trees and tall elms.
which served for kitchen and dining-room Most Stratford houses stood in gardens of
in one. Leading out of it there might be some sort, separated from each other by mud
a parlour, and, besides, a few out-houses walls, instead of fences or hedges, and in
and cellars. The them grew plots
parlour would t- of vegetables
very likely have 'iWmes q ol sh c, a- and herbs, and
a large bed in it, __ s .-_--- a few simple
covered with a I- flowers.
fine embroidered When Shake-
counterpane, and __ speare was two
the rest of the S or three months
sleeping rooms old, Stratford
would be up- .-2 i- was visited by a
stairs, and not terrible sickness
much better 1t -the plague,
than lofts, as we 1 which carried off
should think 4 one-seventh part
now-a- days. of the inhabi-
The plaster walls l tants. John
were hung with l Shakespeare's
'arras,' or tapes- family escaped
try work, or, if altogether, and
that was too ex- the new baby
pensive, with .S, grew and flour-
'painted cloths.' ished through
Both were cov- this and other
ered with pictures from Bible and other dangers. Fires were frequent in the town,
stories, or with hunting scenes. The furni- owing to the timber houses and the scarce-
ture was simple; a few stools, perhaps a ness of chimneys. It must have been dan-
great chair or two, and some large carved gerous work to cook a dinner in one of
chests, were the chief part. The plates and those halls I have mentioned, where the
dishes were of pewter or brass, and if there fire was built up on one side against a
were any carpets in the house, you would piece of stonework, with a hole above it,
not find them on the floors, but on the through which the smoke, or some of it,
tables. On the 26th of April, 1564, when found its way out. The Avon, too, often
John Shakespeare took his eldest son to overflowed in wet seasons, and caused
church to be christened, I think the floors great damage to the hay and cornfields on
must have been swept and strewn with fresh its banks, besides bringing sickness to the
rushes and sweet herbs, in preparation for townspeople.

























I
















II




STRATFORD-ON-AVON : TIE IIOUSE IN WHICH SIIAK.ES'EAIRE WAS BORN.






10 THE GIANT'S HOLD.

Still, the citizens led a comfortable life on Mother's eyes are all red, just as yours
the whole, and, perhaps, a merrier one are when you're put in the corner, Jock'
than their descendants do now. They had 'If father did that to mother,' protested
their Christmas and Whitsuntide revels, their Jock, vehemently, I'd like to- but he
Mayday feasts, and visits from companies couldn't; there isn't any corner that would
of strolling players. They ruled themselves fit, I know there isn't.'
strictly enough, as we should think. There 'Well, what can it be?'
were fines for all sorts of things-such as 'It's something very dreadful,' sighed
not going to church on Sundays, playing at Alex.
bowls at wrong times and in wrong places, And then the three boys sat still in a row,
letting heaps of refuse grow, and not keeping their six elbows resting on their six knees,
roads and gutters clean, breaking rules as to and their chins supported on their hands,
dress, and so on. All dogs had to wear wrapt in meditation. A long five minutes
muzzles in the streets, and there were the passed thus, then Jock spoke.
stocks and pillory for thieves and vagabonds, 'Yesterday, when I broke my'head, and
and for any one who spoke rudely to a town mother was tying it up, she had big tears
officer, or disobeyed a decree of the Council. in her eyes.'
Scolding women were tied to the ducking Not about your head, Jock?'
stool, and dipped three times into the Avon 'No, no, course not; but she said, "Only
to cure their loud tongues. There were so think, there'll be nobody to do "this for
many of these rules that they were often them;" and father said, "Then they must
broken; particularly those about keeping the leave off breaking their heads." What did
streets clean. A. E. S. she mean, Rob ?'
Rob looked very solemn, and shook his
head; he was the eldest, and, of course, the
THE GIANT'S HOLD. wisest, but no explanation could he give.
BE. CENT BRITON. 'We're not as bad about tumbling down-
stairs as we used to be,' he said; 'you did it
CHAPTER I.-THREE TRAVELLERS. last, Alex.'
' I FEEL as if it would kill me,' said Mrs. I's very sorry; won't do it again,' replied
Mackay. the culprit.
'And no wonder, ma'am,' said nurse. 'Mind you don't. Mother said she'd no
'Can't master think of any other plan ?' rags left.'
But Mrs. Mackay shook her head. Meanwhile, in the cosy breakfast-room,
'I believe father's done something very Captain and Mrs. Mackay were discussing
wicked !' said Rob Mackay, aged six years. the very matter which had so puzzled their
More likely it's you, Rob !' remarked little sons, and, as before, the mother's eyes
Jock, aged five. were full of tears.
'I do believe it's all of us,' protested The Captain had a letter in his hand, and
Alex, aged four; and then, as mother and as he ate his breakfast he read scraps of it
nurse went away, and busied themselves with to his wife. If Jock had been there, his
their own affairs, the three little men set wits would soon have found out all he
themselves to inquire earnestly into the wanted to know.
cause of the gloom which all knew was 'Now, you really must cheer up,' said the
hanging over the household. Captain. He was always cheery, and hated
'It must be father,' persisted Rob. tears. 'You know it's as plain as possible






THE GIANT'S HOLD. II

le boys can't go with us to Burmah; the strange uncle whom their father called Uncle
imate of the place we are ordered to is Will, but their mother described by'the
bominable. The chances are we shall both alarming name of Giant Grim.
ave jungle fever or cholera in no time. I'm And all this came about in spite of
ire you'd rather by far send the boys home.' mother's tears, and notwithstanding the big
'Yes, if only there was some kind, lumps which came into Rob, Jock, and
motherly lady who would take care of them. Alex's throats. One hot day they found
t is most unlucky that neither you nor I themselves on board a very big ship, sailing
ave any sisters, and that our mothers are away very fast to England, father and mother
ead; and so there's no one who can take having disappeared altogether in a great
ie children.' crowd and tumult, leaving Alex's cheeks
'But there is; here's Will says he's ready very wet with tears-I don't know whether
-a first-rate fellow is Will, and there's the they were his own or his mother's-and
Id house where I was born and spent my Rob and Jock's ears full of loving words,
childhood; what could you desire better?' and last charges to be good and love each
'An old bachelor!' murmured Mrs. other, and never quarrel.
lackay; 'what will he do with three babes They sat still on a hard seat on which they
ke Rob, Jock, and Alex?' had been placed, three very quaint, solemn-
'Listen to his letter-just like himself:- looking little figures, in white linen sailor
suits, and large round hats. Their feet were
"Send me the cubs as soon as you like ; I'11 s an a round t he feet were
ed them, board them, and beat them. Don't along way from the deck, and they felt very
now in the least what children are like, but small indeed. I think they had never felt so
oppose they can eat what I do. I will look small before the ship was so big, and there
at that they get enough. Don't trouble to let e so many people on board, and the se
ie know when they're coming, but tie a label were so many people on board, and the sea
)und their necks, and they won't fail to be was so big, and before long the distance from
delivered safe and sound. And they'll find me the shore grew very big indeed, until the land
:home, or somewhere about, whenever they faded right away altogether, and then Jock
remarked dismally, 'I'm beginning to feel as
'Hospitable as ever, you see; dear old if we hadn't any father and mother at all; as
Aill!' if we hadn't anything or anybody, and it's
We used to call him Giant Grim, in the very horrid.' And Rob said nothing; he
Id days, before I was married,' said his wife. had told his father he would be brave, and
Well, what of that ? He has a soft heart, not mind very much, but he did mind, and
SI've told you many a time. He'll be good felt very much ashamed of himself. And
) the boys. At any rate, there's nothing Alex sat still, and wondered whether he was
Ise to be done, and the captain of the to sit in that seat all the days and hours and
)rient promises to look after them, and to minutes of the month that his mother had
e them safe into the train when they get to told him would pass before his Uncle Will
,ondon. They are soldier's children, and would come to take care of him. She had
lust learn to be plucky, Mary.' bidden him to sit very still and quiet, lest he
And this was the great secret Rob, Jock, should roll into the sea; poor little Alex
nd Alex had to cross all that long piece of meant to obey her, but he hoped that month
,a that lay between Bombay and England would pass more quickly than the month
without father and mother, and by themselves which had a trick of coming in between
'avel to their father's old home in the north Jock's birthday and his, and which always
f England, and make acquaintance with a seemed so endless.






12 THE GIANT'S HOLD.

How long those three little men sat still ship goes up and down I think sometimes
-in the spot where their parents had left them she'll tumble right over, and upset us all
I cannot tell. From time to time they made into the water.'
.a remark or two, but the many strangers But as nobody else seemed to think this
.around them made them feel shy, and their very likely-for Rob and Jock said it was great
.great trouble made them silent. Once, in fun when the ship rolled about--Alex tried
great despair, Jock exclaimed, 'I don't see to think so too, and lay still in his funny
what's to be done,' and Alex, his round face bed, looking very white, and tried to play
.all blotched with crying, sobbed out, 'It's a 'with his tin soldiers, but as they couldn't
most dreadful thing: worse than when Rob stand up any more than he could, he soon
tumbled out of window, and Jock rolled into grew weary of them, and lay still waiting till
-the fire, and poor Alex was eaten up by the better times should come. And they did
-dog.' He had a habit of calling himself come at last. The ship got into better ways,
' poor Alex,' and when Rob said, I tell you and left off dancing about so much, and
what we'll do, we speak to the captain, and then Alex could get up again, and run about
tell him to stop the next ship that comes by, with the other children, for there were ten
.and send us back to father and mother,' he other little boys and girls besides Rob and
replied, 'Yes, and poor Alex will sit quite Jock, and they were a merry crew, chasing
still in that other ship; most likely it won't each other about the deck, and up and down
roll about like this nasty, horrid thing.' the saloon, tumbling down the stairs, and
But somehow or other that other ship treading on old gentlemen's toes.
never came by when the captain was on Jock, who was sociable, soon made many
-deck, or, if she did, she was so far off that friends, both little and big. Rob had a
he could not make her hear. Ships were great craving for adventures, and on board
uncommonly hard of hearing, so the captain ship adventures must surely come. It
told Rob; and so the days went on, and the won't be half a right kind of thing,' he said,
Orient kept sailing on as fast as ever she one day, 'if we don't have a shipwreck
-could go, carrying them further and further before we get to England, and the captain
from father and mother and nurse, and doesn't think it in the least likely-he doesn't
pitching, and tumbling, and rolling about seem to want one either; I do believe he's a
all the while, horrid thing that she was. bit of a coward.'
And then there came a dismal period, 'But suppose we do have a shipwreck,'
when poor Alex felt more to be pitied than said Jock, 'what'll we do-we three ?'
ever; Rob and Jock did not mind how the 'Well, that depends. Ships don't always
ship rolled and tumbled, but poor Alex cried do the same things; sometimes they go
and fretted, and finally grew very white, and down with all on board. I suppose that
was carried off by the stewardess and put to means the masts and sails, and, perhaps, the
bed. He was sure he had eaten too much, sailors. That wouldn't be nice for them.'
and wished mamma would come and send 'Qh, they come up again all right, you
for the doctor, for he thought he was going know But sometimes the ship runs on a
to die; but another little boy's mamma came rock, and makes a big hole in its side, and
and comforted him, and told him it would that is splendid fun, for everybody has to
all be right by-and-by; and he tried to hope work hard pumping, and dipping the water.
it would, being a brave little boy in the out as fast as it comes in. I hope our ship
main. But you see, nothing but drefful will run on a rock, I do.'
things have happened lately, and when the 'I don't,' said Alex, resolutely..






























































-OFF FOR A SCAMPER WIH FIDO. By .
--~ ~a~ s~u~ia~_--






THE GIANT'S HOLD. I3U

Well, you're only a baby; perhaps you're But the captain, though a very wise man,
Lfraid?' did not always know what was going to.
'Yes, I am; so is Jock !' happen, and when he advised the children,
Jock did not say so, because he stood in who were terribly wild, to go to bed early
;ome awe of Rob, and did not wish to be that night, that they might be up early to,
calledd a baby; but he tried to change the get the first sight of 'home,' he had little-
:onversation, and when Rob persisted in idea what that first sight would be. An
dwelling on the-to him-entrancing subject old sailor muttered something about 'ugly
)f disasters at sea, he ran away and left him weather ahead,' but the captain was cheery,
o himself. and said, 'We'll be in dock first,' and I've a
Alex and he slept in each other's arms notion that he went to bed like everybody else
hat night, and whispered some of their fears that night, in first-rate spirits, and dreamed
nto each other's ears low and quiet, so that of his wife and little children at home.
Rob might not overhear them. They knew And then, while all was silent in the great
:hey were great cowards, and when the ship ship, as she rushed along through the quiet
)itched about, and a great wave slapped her waters, the moon set, and a great sheet of
;ides with a loud noise, they said their damp mist spread over the face of the deep.
)rayers over again, and sobbed a little, and It wrapped everything in its wet embrace, and
thought about their mother so far away. grew thicker and thicker; the stars had, one-
But the morning's, light, bright sunshine, by one, popped out of sight, and nothing could
Lnd a good breakfast, put such thoughts out be seen through the dense, choking fog.
tf their heads. England was drawing near, Very snug in their berths slept our three
he passengers said, and with England would little men; they had grown quite used to-
:ome that strange uncle, whom father called them by this time, and the nursery in their
Jncle Will, and mother, Giant Grim. Each Indian home was fading from their memories,
iad their thoughts about Giant Grim; and the ship cabin was fast becoming home-
:houghts that were not altogether comfortable, like to them, but they slept most quietly
or giants were, as every one knew, bad men, when the ship rode smoothly, as on this.
rom Goliath downwards. particular night.
But while they cogitated over these matters Suddenly all three awoke, and sat up with,
.he good ship was making much haste on her a startled cry, and from all the berths and
Nay. She passed along the Mediterranean, cabins came the same shrill screams, and yet
nd stopped at Gibraltar, but, alas though no one knew why he' cried out, or what all
:he small boys had promised themselves the the noise around him meant. Louder and
delight of catching a monkey there, no one louder grew the din, and mingled with the
proposedd to take them ashore, and as for screams was heard a strange rushing, gur-
nonkeys, though they stared with all their gling sound, while with deafening uproar the
night, not one was to be seen. 'It's a take- sea seemed to fling its strength against the
n,' said Rob, 'there .aren't any monkeys sides of the ship, as if seized with sudden
,here; nothing but guns and soldiers.' rage and frenzy.
Then they went on again into the wide Then there came such a babel of voices,
)pen sea, and every day people said they asking questions, wrangling, disputing, ]a-
vould soon be in dear old England; and at meeting; such confusion, such rushing to
ast there came a day when the captain told and fro, such loud shouting on deck, such
hem that when they got up the next morn- roaring of waters, as the stewardess declared.
ng the coast would be in sight. 'was never seen the like.' She had dragged.






14 OFF FOR A SCAMPER WITH FIDO.

our three little men out of bed, and was pushed off from the ship and began to row out.
bundling them into some clothes, inside out, into the darkness. Big waves swept over the
hind part before, anyhow, comforting and boat again and again; the ladies shrieked;
scolding all the time, and to all their ques- the children cried and gasped for breath,
tions her only reply was, It's the Lizard, my huddled in one corner, the three small boys
dears-horrid thing; I always knew it would held each other's hands, and tried not to
be the death of me some day, and to go on mind all the water which came into their
driving at that rate in a fog, it was a sin and mouths, and ears, and eyes. Once Jock
shame, and the Lizard in the way, too! But said to Alex, 'I wish I could find your
there, don't talk-mercy, one can't hear what face-I want to kiss it!' but he only found
one says !' the back of his little brother's head, very wet
And then she carried all three at once, in and dirty, and kissed that instead.
her strong arms, on deck. They knew (Tobecontinued.)
nothing more but that they were in the
THE CHILDREN'S WATER-COLOUR
midst of a great crowd. People were crying, CLUB.
scolding, and quarrelling; some had hardly THERE will be four Competitions, and in each three
any clothes on, and the water was washing Prizes of twenty shillings, ten shillings, and five
over the deck, and drenching all the poor shillings will be given. The subjects will be quite
frightened creatures. different from those of last year. A wish has been
Rob, Jock, and Alex found themselves expressed that there should be drawing to do as well
as colouring, and we think this a very good suggestion,
half dragged, half carried to the side of onlywe must not make the drawing too difficult at
the vessel. Th2y could see down into the first. So when the cards are sent out the members
water below, and there were two or three will find that in some cards parts of the engraving are
boats there and men in them; some great printed in a very pale ink, and all these parts will
waves were rolling up white froth against have to be carefully drawn over with a fine brush.
Si i And in one competition, perhaps the fourth, there
the ship's side, and the boats were bouncing will be an easy bit of drawing to be done without
about. Alex clung in terror to the strong, the help of faint lines; and the first prize will be for a
kind arms that held him, but his clutch was drawing done by eye, but the second and third prizes
unloosened, and he found himself held out will be given for a tracing, and with the cards full
over the white foaming breakers, which threw directions for the very useful art of tracing will be sent.
r i In one or two of the competitions no pattern will
their spray into his face. be given for the colouring, but the members will be
Some ladies were pressing into the boats, left to choose their own tints with the help of some
but the stewardess pushed in front. Take printed suggestions.
-these first!' she said to the sailors in the The subscription, as before, will be one shilling,
and the cards will be ready in February. It is thought
boat; 'they've none to see to them-no best that only one prize in the year should be adjudged
father nor mother, and I promised -- to the same competitor. In awarding the second and
And then Rob, finding himself rolling and third prizes age will be taken into consideration.
-tumbling about in the bottom of the boat,
-clutched his two little brothers, exclaiming, OFF FOR A SCAMPER
' I do think it's a shipwreck after all !' whereat WITH FIDO.
-the two little ones cried, and said it wasn't THIS picture was painted by George Romney,
-nice at all, and they knew they were going one of the famous English portrait painters of
right down into the bottom of the sea. the last century. He and Sir Joshua Reynolds
Then crowds ofpeoplepressed into the boat, and Gainsborough were all painting at the
and they found themselves half smothered and same time, and rich people who wanted their
in much danger of being crushed, as the sailors portraits painted, or the portraits of their






14 OFF FOR A SCAMPER WITH FIDO.

our three little men out of bed, and was pushed off from the ship and began to row out.
bundling them into some clothes, inside out, into the darkness. Big waves swept over the
hind part before, anyhow, comforting and boat again and again; the ladies shrieked;
scolding all the time, and to all their ques- the children cried and gasped for breath,
tions her only reply was, It's the Lizard, my huddled in one corner, the three small boys
dears-horrid thing; I always knew it would held each other's hands, and tried not to
be the death of me some day, and to go on mind all the water which came into their
driving at that rate in a fog, it was a sin and mouths, and ears, and eyes. Once Jock
shame, and the Lizard in the way, too! But said to Alex, 'I wish I could find your
there, don't talk-mercy, one can't hear what face-I want to kiss it!' but he only found
one says !' the back of his little brother's head, very wet
And then she carried all three at once, in and dirty, and kissed that instead.
her strong arms, on deck. They knew (Tobecontinued.)
nothing more but that they were in the
THE CHILDREN'S WATER-COLOUR
midst of a great crowd. People were crying, CLUB.
scolding, and quarrelling; some had hardly THERE will be four Competitions, and in each three
any clothes on, and the water was washing Prizes of twenty shillings, ten shillings, and five
over the deck, and drenching all the poor shillings will be given. The subjects will be quite
frightened creatures. different from those of last year. A wish has been
Rob, Jock, and Alex found themselves expressed that there should be drawing to do as well
as colouring, and we think this a very good suggestion,
half dragged, half carried to the side of onlywe must not make the drawing too difficult at
the vessel. Th2y could see down into the first. So when the cards are sent out the members
water below, and there were two or three will find that in some cards parts of the engraving are
boats there and men in them; some great printed in a very pale ink, and all these parts will
waves were rolling up white froth against have to be carefully drawn over with a fine brush.
Si i And in one competition, perhaps the fourth, there
the ship's side, and the boats were bouncing will be an easy bit of drawing to be done without
about. Alex clung in terror to the strong, the help of faint lines; and the first prize will be for a
kind arms that held him, but his clutch was drawing done by eye, but the second and third prizes
unloosened, and he found himself held out will be given for a tracing, and with the cards full
over the white foaming breakers, which threw directions for the very useful art of tracing will be sent.
r i In one or two of the competitions no pattern will
their spray into his face. be given for the colouring, but the members will be
Some ladies were pressing into the boats, left to choose their own tints with the help of some
but the stewardess pushed in front. Take printed suggestions.
-these first!' she said to the sailors in the The subscription, as before, will be one shilling,
and the cards will be ready in February. It is thought
boat; 'they've none to see to them-no best that only one prize in the year should be adjudged
father nor mother, and I promised -- to the same competitor. In awarding the second and
And then Rob, finding himself rolling and third prizes age will be taken into consideration.
-tumbling about in the bottom of the boat,
-clutched his two little brothers, exclaiming, OFF FOR A SCAMPER
' I do think it's a shipwreck after all !' whereat WITH FIDO.
-the two little ones cried, and said it wasn't THIS picture was painted by George Romney,
-nice at all, and they knew they were going one of the famous English portrait painters of
right down into the bottom of the sea. the last century. He and Sir Joshua Reynolds
Then crowds ofpeoplepressed into the boat, and Gainsborough were all painting at the
and they found themselves half smothered and same time, and rich people who wanted their
in much danger of being crushed, as the sailors portraits painted, or the portraits of their





THE OLD TEAR AND THE NEW. 15

wives or children, had only to choose which because he admired her beautiful face so
of these three great artists they would go to. much. Does she not look as if she were
'This beautiful portrait was taken from a very alive? In a moment she will put her little
pretty lady whom Romney painted many dog down, and they will be off for a mad
times, not because she paid him to do it, but scamper together.

























CHURCH- DECKING IN THE OLD YEAR AND THE
BYGONE DAYS. NEW.
THIS is the way in which we used to dress THE old year dies:
our churches for Christmas years ago. In- Alack for his blue skies,
stead of crosses, and letters, and texts of Also his showers,
coloured paper on cotton-wool, and wreaths The spring and summer flowers
of leaves and strings of holly berries, which And mirth he had,
take a great deal of time and pains to get The times when we were glad,
Steady, the clerk and the woman who cleaned Which were not few !
the church would bring in heaps of ever- But now what can we do
greens, holly chiefly, with the berries on, But heave a sigh,
ivy and laurel, and so forth, and fasten great And thengo hopefully
boughs of them to the ends of the pews, the T
pillars, and any other possible place, till the Ts ti to see him do
church looked something like a wood, Trustng to see hm do
SGreen with fresh holly, every pew a perch Hs part to th' end
In which the linnet or the thrush might sing, As well as our old friend?
Merry and loud and safe from prying search.' F. P.





THE OLD TEAR AND THE NEW. 15

wives or children, had only to choose which because he admired her beautiful face so
of these three great artists they would go to. much. Does she not look as if she were
'This beautiful portrait was taken from a very alive? In a moment she will put her little
pretty lady whom Romney painted many dog down, and they will be off for a mad
times, not because she paid him to do it, but scamper together.

























CHURCH- DECKING IN THE OLD YEAR AND THE
BYGONE DAYS. NEW.
THIS is the way in which we used to dress THE old year dies:
our churches for Christmas years ago. In- Alack for his blue skies,
stead of crosses, and letters, and texts of Also his showers,
coloured paper on cotton-wool, and wreaths The spring and summer flowers
of leaves and strings of holly berries, which And mirth he had,
take a great deal of time and pains to get The times when we were glad,
Steady, the clerk and the woman who cleaned Which were not few !
the church would bring in heaps of ever- But now what can we do
greens, holly chiefly, with the berries on, But heave a sigh,
ivy and laurel, and so forth, and fasten great And thengo hopefully
boughs of them to the ends of the pews, the T
pillars, and any other possible place, till the Ts ti to see him do
church looked something like a wood, Trustng to see hm do
SGreen with fresh holly, every pew a perch Hs part to th' end
In which the linnet or the thrush might sing, As well as our old friend?
Merry and loud and safe from prying search.' F. P.







NEW YEAR'S EVE.
Words by G. E. PATERSON. BERG.


I. Dark is the sky, last day of the year! Sun set fades too soon in' night;
2. Out of the star-light comes the New Year, While the clocks chime out the hour;
3. Friend of the past, in peace de part! Thine ac corn plish'd round of days


tI --
n Andane. f .







Lo, from the hearth slips a comrade grown dear, Yield-ing his place by the chee ry fire-light:
Joum-ney'dfrom re gions dim to us here, Welcom'd by voi ces from bel fry and tower.
Hath its im print left on each heart, Mo nu ments for blame or praise.
16II i1 do 1








r i' -4 --^0
Steals a strain ger o ver the moor, While we bid our friend fare well;
Bow'd his shoul- ders as he stands With new fates of hope and fear;
May good deeds out live thy span, Pros per, while thy sor- rows die

1 -Q -- jx, ---- --- k --- t- --- > --i^ ...-r

-.






Fin gers numb tap lighton the door, New Year en ters with us to dwell.
Gifts from God's im par tial hands,- Bring us bless ings, kind New Year.
Here as when thy life be gan,- Bid we wel come and good bye.
-fr-d do i, ,m r-,- ,-,_


-


17 f
I I M ^.= ..h







SHAKESPEARE'S SCHOOLDAYS AND YOUTH.

AT the corner of Church Street, in the old town taught in country schools to those of the
of Stratford-on-Avon, stands the Grammar highest boys who hoped in some way, or
School where little Will Shakespeare went other to get to the University. I do not
daily from his father's house, not far off in think boys found school quite such fun 'as
Henley Street. He was most likely admitted they do now. Perhaps it was rather tedious
when he was about seven years old, and had work spending seven years over nothing but



























MEADOW WALK BY THE AVON, NEAR STRATFORD.

learned somehow to read and write. Here Latin. And no doubt, also, there was a good
he spent some years-we do not know how deal more flogging in those days. There is
many exactly-in company with the rest a story of one schoolmaster who would give
of the boys of the town up to the age of his boys a whipping just to warm himself on
fourteen, learning from Master Roche, and a cold winter's morning I But Shakespeare's
then from his successor, Master Hunt, first masters were, perhaps, different. He draws
the Latin grammar, and then Latin sentences the portraits of one or two in his plays, and
and conversations, and finally a little Horace, makes them rather what you would call 'jolly,
Seneca, and so on, much as our boys do now. on the whole.
Only little Will and his companions learnt There was no cricket, but the boys had
very little besides Latin. Greek was only all sorts of games for play-time and holidays.
VOL. II. 2





I8 THE BURYING BEETLE.

We hear of tops, nine-pins, quoits, hockey, deer-stealing in the park of a very sour-tem-
football, leap-frog, prisoner's-base, besides pered and strict gentleman of the neighbour-
others which we have forgotten how to hood, Sir Thomas Lucy, of Charlecote. But
play, such as 'nine men's morris,' which there is another event in William Shake-
may have been something like 'fox and speare's life which we know did happen just
geese,' and 'barley break,' which was played before this time, and which would make it
in the cornfields at harvest-time.. There was very needful indeed for him to seek his for-
the river too, the Avon, for the boys to bathe tune in some place where it was easier to find
and fish in. than in the little country town. In 1582,
For the grown-up people there were wrest- though he was only eighteen, he had married
ling and shooting matches, coursing with grey- Anne Hathaway, who lived at a pretty cottage
hounds, bear-baiting and bull-baiting, besides in the village of Shottery, a little way from
hunting and hawking for the gentlefolk of the Stratford. Now that he had a wife and, very
country round. In all these the boys were soon, a child to work for, besides his father
sure to take a deep interest, while eagerly and mother, and young brothers and sisters
waiting for the time when they would be old to help, it was clear that he must try hard in
enough to have a share in them. some way to make money.
But, unfortunately, while William Shake- You remember that companies ofp!ayers
speare was.going to the Grammar School and often visited the town. One of these was
working steadily through his Latin lessons, a called the Earl of Leicester's players,' and a
dark shadow was creeping over his home inl Stratford man, Burbage, was at their head.
Henley Street. As years went on his father, Perhaps William thought he could get some-
who had made his way in the town and be- thing to do among them. But, as I said
come one of the principal citizens, began to before, we know very little about these years
lose money, and grow poorer instead of richer of his life. All we know is that he was busy
every day. We cannot tell how it was. Per- helping the players in all sorts of ways,
haps he was cleverer at getting money than acting, arranging plays, and altering and re-
at keeping it; perhaps there were bad har- writing them when they wanted it-ready to
vests, or -some other farmer's trouble. Any- do anything and everything that he saw
how, he had to sell the land his wife had wanted doing. It is said that in the midst
brought him, bit by bit, and year by year he of this busy life, and in all the excitement
seems to have got into greater difficulties, and pleasures of London, he always went
till he quite lost his position in the town, and down the long way to his home once a-year
his fellow-citizens were obliged to choose to see his wife and his father and mother,
another alderman in his place. At the be- and no doubt to take them the greater part
ginning of his troubles he seems- to have 6f Mte money he had earned since his last
taken his son away from school, very likely visit. A. E. S.
to help him in his business. We do not
know at all how the boy passed the next THE BURYING BEETLE.
few years, from 1578 to about 1585. They
must have been bad ones to all the family. BY MINNIE MCKEAN.
Somewhere between 1585 and 1587 Shake- ALL insects undergo transformations before
speare, now a young man, went to try his they become perfect: first, the egg; second,
fortune in London. Some people say it was the larva or caterpillar; third, the nymph
because he had got into trouble, by being or chrysalis; and fourth, the perfect insect.
caught, together with some wild companions, When you see a beautiful butterfly in summer











































THE SCHOOL IN WHICH WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE DID HIS LESSONS.





20 THE CLOUDED TIGER.

flitting about from flower to flower, eating the his might towards the hole, but very soon
pollen or sipping the nectar, it is very diffi- he was quite exhausted and puffing for want
cult to believe what a hard, dry-looking little of breath, so off he trotted to get assistance;
chrysalis it was just a few weeks before, as he soon came back with a comrade bigger
now it dazzles you with its beauty. than himself, who took in the situation
There is one genus of beetles that is of affairs at once, and creeping under the
very interesting, especially -one of the mouse, he lay down on his back and shoved
species who provide food for themselves it with his strong legs, and after a great deal
and their young in a very curious way, of puffing and kicking (which made me laugh
they are called the Sexton or 'Burying immensely to myself) the mouse was got back
Beetles.' They are common throughout the to the hole, and the beetles began digging
greater part of Europe, and easily recog- below it vigorously, throwing out the soil
nised by their colour. The body is black, from below as it gradually sank deeper and
ornamented down the sides with yellow deeper. I took away the mouse five times,
hairs; their elytra or wing cases are crossed and every time the same operations were
with bands of a light red colour; they have gone through. A gentleman in Regina,
strong legs and thighs, and are wonderfully where we are living, told me what would
active, happen after I left. The beetles would bury
Now, before the eggs of this beetle are the mouse completely by dint of hard work
laid, great care is taken by the parents that in twenty-four hours; they would then take
when the little caterpillars are hatched they up their abode in it and feed upon it. The
may have plenty of food to eat. How they eggs would speedily be laid in it also, so that
,manage this I will now tell you in Charlie's when the little caterpillars were hatched they
own words. He went to Canada in March would have plenty of food.'
this year, 1888, when he was newly thirteen, But now, as Charlie has told us so far, I
and sent me his first 'Natural History Notes,' think you would like to hear how the cater-
dated Saturday, May 5, 1888:- pillars manage when they are full-grown and
'While walking along the Saskatoon track wish to become nymphs? They then leave
this morning, my attention was drawn to the body of the mouse, and making a little-
something moving on the ground, which, by leathery-looking cell they roll themselves in
close observation, I found to be a couple it and bury themselves four or five feet deep in
of large sexton beetles. They were busily the earth, and there they undergo the other
engaged burying a dead field mouse. Here transformations and come forth perfect little
was a grand opportunity for me to observe beetles in three or four weeks' time. I have
their method of burial, so I lifted the mouse heard of dead robins and other birds being
and placed it about two inches from the taken possession of in the same way as the:
"grave," and then hid behind a tree to mouse by these wonderful little sextons.
watch what the beetles would do. As soon
as they knew that the body had been taken
away they both scuttled off and hid them- THE CLOUDED TIGER.
selves for about five minutes. One of them THE Tiger is the largest animal of the cat
then cautiously peeped out, and seeing no tribe, larger even than the lion, and, as some
danger, came forward to where the mouse people say, more courageous. It is wonder-
was lying. The next operation was to get fully like our pet cats in its shape and move-
it moved back to the "grave." So the ments, and with iti.: .ight coloured skin and
plucky little fellow began shoving it with all fine black stripes i.yzien more beautiful than.
































\, L 7 '

"I































'CLOUDED Ti .S






THE GIANT'S HOLD. 21

they. But its terrific teeth and claws, and its blind. Oh, no! but his sight was not-so good
prodigious strength and activity, make it as as it once had been, that was all; he had
terrible as it is beautiful. If a man finds been footman and then butler in that house
himself in the neighbourhood of a lion, and for seventy years, so you see he was not
can climb up a tree he is safe, for the heavy a very young man, but he wouldn't wear
creature cannot follow him. But look at these spectacles; he had not come to that yet.
tigers playing about on a branch, just like a He shuffled into his master's room, and stood
couple of pretty little cats. It would be of there shading his dim eyes with his hand as
little use, indeed, to climb a tree in trying to he asked, 'What are you wanting,. Major?-'
escape from one of them. You see that their 'A crack with you about these young ones
skins are not marked with the clear stripes that are coming. They may turn. up any
which you see on most tigers; that is why day, and we must not be taken by surprise.'
they are called Clouded Tigers, but there 'What will they want that isn't in the
does not seem to be any other difference house?' the old man asked; 'there's room
between them. enough for three boys, or for threescore if
you like.'
'Three are enough, Simon,' said the Major,
HE GANTS HOL gravely. 'But there are a few things to be
BY E. VINCENT BRITON. settled before they come, and I thought it
(Continued from. 14.) best to speak to you and Mrs. Fareweather.'
CHAPTER II.-GIANT GRIM. 'To be sure; what's your will, Major?'
MAJOR WILLOUGHBY MACKAY sat in his 'These children, Simon, are not to be
smoking-room and read the paper, or rather coddled, fussed, or treated like babies.'
he meant to read the paper when he had 'Well, Major, you might spare the trouble
settled some business which he had had in his of saying that. Who's to coddle them ? I'm
mind some time, but had delayed arranging not so young as I once was, and what with
for certain reasons best known to himself, waiting on you, I've my time pretty well
'But they may turn up any day,' he said filled up. And Mrs. Fareweather-well, she's
to himself, 'so the servants must know.' And fast in her chair with rheumatics ; and Jane,
then he rang his bell and waited. that housemaid lass, as I told you yesterday,
How long he waited I cannot tell. He has been and broke her leg and off to the
walked round the room about a dozen times, hospital-her mother comes to make beds
then he sat down in his leather arm-chair and such-like; and cook-well, she might
and reflected a good ten minutes, but no one spoil them, but she lies in bed half her time
came to inquire what he wanted. Then he with general weakness, as she calls it; they
remembered that he had not rung that bell won't see much of her.'
for many years, and probably it was broken, 'Perhaps,' said the Major, as if a sudden
or the servants had got out of the way of thought had struck him, 'we ought to have
attending to it. So he went to the door and some more servants. I don't like to think
shouted 'Simon!' and after he had shouted cook has to get up to cook my dinner when
five or six times a shuffling noise was heard, she'd rather be in bed; and though I don't
and a very old man in a shiny black suit care whether my bed is made or not, it's a
came creeping along the corridor that led custom, I know, and there'll be the children's
from the back part of +he house. He felt to make. Where are they to sleep, Simon?'
his way by passing hi! nd along the wall 'Well, Mrs. Fareweather and I couldn't
as he came, but you n not think he was quite come to terms about that matter. I






22 THE GIANT'S HOLD.

said the. nursery was the place for them, but drily; 'but I know nothing about children,
says she it's half a quarter of a mile from the and I wanted to hear if you thought all things
rest of the house, and if it's not haunted, it's were straight and shipshape for them ; they
worse, for the rats do rampage about there may turn in any day-in fact, the papers have
like mad; and so she said she'd put two.more got a story about the Orient (that's the ship
beds into the big best chamber over yours, their father mentioned) having gone ashore
and the children could sleep there right well, or run on a rock near Land's End, and, if so,
and you'd hear. if they got into mischief, no doubt they'll be finding their way here
which isn't altogether unlikely if so be they're before long.'
like.the rest of the family. But as for more 'Run ashore, sir! gone on a rock! but that's
servants,. Major, I hope you'll not be for a bad thing for certain; how many lives lost?
introducing any of the modern, new-fangled Some one should go and look after the
kind-me and Mrs. Fareweather couldn't children; who knows what's happened?'
stand that no way; and what with cook always 'The passengers were all saved,' the Major
in bed, and Jane that's broken her leg, and said, hastily; 'no need to be scared about the
the kitchen-girl that's never in the house at boys, Mrs. Fareweather. They were to be
all, and the lad as pretends to help me, but labelled and directed all right; they'll turn
spends his time losing of things, why, we've up.'
enough and to spare.' But the old woman was wiping away a
'So it seems,' said the Major, thoughtfully; tear, and tears were the Major's abhorrence.
'then you think all's ready for the children 'Such a thing to happen! Master Alick's
-beds aired, and enough bread and milk in children to be washed ashore like seaweed,
the house; that's what you feed children on, and maybe lie on the wet beach till some
isn't it?' one picked them up I Major, it's not the
Oh, I'll answer for it, they'll eat almost thing at all; for the honour of the family,.
anything. Do you want to see Mrs. Fare- some one should be sent to look for them.
weather, Major? because, if so, you'll have to I wish I could go myself. Where did you
step to her room; she's that lame she can't say-Land's End? and where may that be,
move.' I wonder; it sounds a long way off.'
'Well, perhaps I'd better hear her ideas; 'It's not so far but that the boys will find
women see more of children than men, I their way here,' said the Major, doggedly.
suppose;' and so saying, the Major got up 'I'm going to have no fuss with these children,.
and stalked'off with heavy tread towards the Mrs. Fareweather.'
old housekeeper's room. 'No indeed, sir; I understand that fast
She had been his nurse in the days long enough: but I'm wondering where they are
ago, but he didn't care to be reminded of now, and who's seeing to them.' And again
that time, which he considered a period of those hateful tears would appear in the old.
great foolishness and troublesomeness, the woman's blue eyes.
sooner forgotten the better. She knew his The Major got up in despair. 'They'll
ideas, and;never alluded to the days of his turn up,' he said again. 'I'll send them up
boyhood, though she often thought of them to see you when they come.' And then he
when. she was alone. walked off and went and fetched some fishing
'Master Alick's children,' she said, when tackle, and sauntered down by the river.
he had opened the conversation; 'ay, sure It was a.noisy little river, which had made.
sir, they'll be dear little things.' for itself a bed close beneath the walls of
Just like other boys, I suppose,' he said, Thorpe Tower, as the old home of the






THE GIANT'S HOLD. 23

Mackays was called; it dashed and chattered When he heard this, the Major was half
along over stones and rocks, under high red inclined to think perhaps he'd better go and
banks, sometimes called cliffs; it sparkled look for these children, but as he had said
and glistened, and every now and then made he wouldn't, he didn't see very well how he
funny little waterfalls, and then sobered down, could. So he got ready for dinner, and sat
and went more quietly on its way again, down to the steak which Simon set before him
There was plenty of fish there, and when without thinking any more than he could
he wanted to persuade himself that he was help about the girl who fetched the pig's
very busy, the Major always betook himself wash; and Simon waited on him very silently,
to the river, and came home bearing such which was not his wont.
a load of small fish that it was perfectly plain The steak eaten, there was a pause; the
he had been hard at work. Major's hunger was not quite appeased, and
He was feeling little bit worried, too, about he waited.
these children, and fishing is a soothing, cor- Simon filled his glass, and said, 'Cheese,
forting occupation, as everybody knows. So Major? There aren't any sweets; the girl
he sat under the shadow of the great red that fetches the pig's wash don't know any-
bank and flung his line and smoked his pipe, thing about such things, and cook, she said-'
and tried to forget these children. But Mrs. 'Well! what did cook say?'
Fareweather's words, 'I'm wondering where 'She said that to hear that Master Alick's
they are now, and who's seeing to them,' boys were to be left sitting on the beach to be
would keep repeating themselves in his mind, washed away by any spiteful wretch of a
and, as he would have said, bothering him. wave would be her death-blow, and she.
I'm determined to have no fuss with didn't care if you never ate jelly again, she
these boys,' he said again to himself; 'people didn't; she speaks her mind, does cook.'
talk about children being a plague and a: The Major was quite aware of that fact,
torment, but if you don't bother yourself and said nothing; he twirled his long thick
about them, they'll be no more plague than moustache, and gazed at the ceiling, and
the cats and dogs about the place. Go and repeated again to himself, They'll turn up
look for them I'll do nothing of the kind. all right.' Then he turned to Simon, and
A fine beginning that would be. Then he growled 'cheese!' and the old man shuffled
whipped the stream with his line and said out to fetch it.
again, 'They'll turn up all right.' And twenty He was long in returning, and had not the
times that day he said the same thing; but kitchen premises been at some considerable
yet when he got up to go home he had not distance from the dining-room, the Major
left off saying it, and when the old butler would have been able to guess the reason
met him with a very grave face and said, why. For truth to tell, the gardener, and the
'I'm sorry to say, sir, that I fear your dinner groom, and the washerwoman, and the old
will not be to your liking, for cook was so man who looked after the cows, and the boy
put out about the had news that she couldn't who fed the poultry, had come in to hear
get up at all to-day, and as Jane has broken what the Major meant to do about those
her leg, and Mrs. Fareweather is that bad poor children who had been washed up half
she can't come down, and the lad who loses drowned at Land's End, and Simon had to
everything has been now and lost himself, stop and tell them that so far master hadn't
there was nobody'but the girl who fetches made up his mind.
the pig's wash to cook your victuals, and she 'Go back and make it up for him; take
isn't not to say particularly clean, that girl.' him that old mouldy Stilton, that's too green






2!. THE GIANT'S HOLD.

even for him, and see if that don't bring him 'I'm not thinking of sending anybody.'
to his senses.' So said the gardener, and 'You'll be thinking of going yourself-
Simon acquiesced, muttering, He must be that'll be far the most convenient, and cook
hungry if he can eat that.' will likely be well by the time you're back.'
Apparently the Major was hungry, for he 'I'm not thinking of anything of the sort,
stuck a knife into the mouldy Stilton, and Simon; you're growing old and silly. The
remarked it was 'better than that strong boys will turn up all right; now go and get
Gloucester we had the other day.' your supper.'
And Simon could bear it no longer, but 'Major, I can't!' The old man sat down
standing with the door in his hand replied on a chair by the door, and pulling a large
grimly, 'As nobody but the Major could eat red and green handkerchief from his pocket,
it, he was welcome to it, but before it grew began to rub his eyes vigorously. 'To think
any later, he'd be obliged if master would of it!' he said; 'to think of it! There aren't
tell him the nearest way to get to Land's End, many of the old stock left, and here's three
and whether he'd need to go by rail or sea, of them tumbling about among the waves;
as he meant to start as soon as possible.' why, they may be blown out to sea again
Then the Major's eyes came down from any day and lost entirely-such a pity! such
the ceiling, and fixed themselves with some a pity! Think better of it, master, and let
amazement on the old servant's face: for full me go ; I'll make shift to find the, babes.'
five minutes he made no reply, and old The Major rubbed his forehead and passed
Simon felt a little uncomfortable. The his hand slowly through his hair; it was
Major could speak so that a man felt his naturally rather rough, but after this opera-
head loosening on his shoulders,' Simon had tion it stood up straight from his head like
often heard people say, and the old butler the bristles in a clothes-brush: then he took
was nearly ninety, and his head often felt a large mouthful of cheese and laid down
rather shaky. 'Look here, Simon!' the voice his knife. 'Simon,' he said, 'if you go on
sounded harsh and cold, 'whose house is this?' like this, these children will be as great a
'Well, sir, as the children must be getting torment as-as Alick and I used to be, and'
mighty cold by this time, I don't see there's for the matter of that, as most children are.'
any call to settle that just now; but not to be 'Well, Major, I suppose you're right, and
wanting in respect, of course it's yours, though it can't be helped; children do torment a
as for knowing what's due and fitting, and body most to death, but so do young chickens,
what belongs to the honour of the family, young dogs, and most young things, and it
as I have lived in it twice as long as you, I has to be borne, and by-and-by they grow up,
may know near as much.' and if they're of a good stock, they pay for
'And what's this about going to Land's the trouble; so I wouldn't miss the chance
End?' of catching these here, 'cause one knows
'Just to look for the children, Major.' they're of a good sort, and there aren't a
You want to go you haven't been further many of them left.'
than the village for twenty years 'If they're worth anything at all, they will
The old man's eyes grew watery; he rubbed have the sense to find their way here, Simon;
them with the back of his hand. 'Maybe if they can't do that, why I'd rather not be
you think of sending gardener or Joe. Joe bothered with them.'
might do if there's not more than two or The old man looked miserable. Another
three publics between here and Land's End; idea struck him. One might telegraph,' he
he can't pass a many.' said, 'if so be there's any telegraph to this

































- -















---------------

























. . . . . . .~































A GIRL OF THEii LAST CENTURY



A GIRL OF THE LAST CENTURY.






26 A GIRL OF THE LAST CENTURY.

place at the end of the world; Land's End washerwoman, 'and say they'd better come
you call it, don't you?' at once, and not wait to get their linen
It's only about a couple of hundred miles washed, as folks do sometimes when they're
off; the ship went ashore off the Lizard, not going a journey.'
Land's End.' 'Tell them,' said the old man who looked
'Ay, that don't sound quite so bad. after the cows and pigs, that the cream's
Maybe you'll send a telegram, Major; Joe first-rate, and as fine a litter of young pigs.
could take it when he goes home. It would as ever was seen, and a pig just fit for killing;.
be easy to ask the postmaster, or the parson but I'll keep it a day or two if so be the
or doctor of the place, to see if there are any young gentlemen would like to see it.'
stray children lying about on the beach.' 'Tell them,' began the boy again-but his.
'Easy enough to be sure, and the answer words were lost in a strange jangling of bells,.
will be Yes a score or two; how many do and no one heard the rest of his speech.
you want ?" There's no lack of children There was a certain bell-wire which had got
anywhere.' itself entangled in several of its neighbours,.
'Then I'll tell Joe to shut up and go and when it was set in motion, the din thus
before the post shuts up, and I'll come and caused was 'deafening. It echoed through
fetch the message, master;' and, much re- the long silent passages, startled Mrs. Fare-
lieved, old Simon crept away to the kitchen. weather upstairs, the Major in his dimly
'It ain't the right thing to be done,' said lighted dining-room, and cook in her bed-
the gardener, room, for all knew that it rang from the iron
'No, indeed,' said the washerwoman; the gates at the far end of the stable-yard, and
Major is a queer fish, sitting in his arm-chair who could be ringing there at that hour in
doing nothing, while these poor bairns are the evening was not to be easily guessed.
dying of cold and hunger.' (To be continued.)
'He's a brute-always knowed as much,'
said the gardener's boy. 'He shied an old A GIRL OF THE LAST
trowel at me just 'cause I'd left it in the CENTURY.
middle of the drive t'other day.'
'Serve you right hold your impudent A HUNDRED years ago girls did not spend so
tongue; who asked for.your opinion?' replied much time over their lessons as they do now;
the gardener. 'I've a mind to tell him you're or, rather, their lessons were not all learnt out
not worth your wage.' of books. Many things which servants do
'But it isn't the thing to do, just to send for us were done in those days by the ladies
one of those nasty cheap sixpenny yellow of the house, and the little ladies spent a
envelopes to ask about the children,' echoed good part of each day in learning how to do
the groom, Joe;' his own heirs and all Folks them. They were taught to make bread and
at the village will think it mean.' to churn; to make cakes, pies, and puddings,
'Which the Major isn't; mean's not the jellies and syllabubs; to roast, boil, and stew;
word to be used about one of the Mackays. to polish the furniture and keep the silver
When you begin to talk about your betters, bright; to take care of the clothes, and lay
you'd do well to pick your words more care- them up in drawers and presses, with lavender
fully, Joe Freeman,' said old Simon, severely, to give them a pleasant smell. And they
'Didn't I tell you the Major bid you be quick learnt to make wine of cowslips and elder-
and take his message to the post?' berries, and to dry the leaves of roses and
'Tell 'em to answer quick,' said the pinks, and other flowers, and store them up




















Si- ..... ----- : ,






A
B B TSA
-. ;-<'_ I"-.






--,--- ---=--





















B3ALEOXA TAKING POSSESSION OF TIF PACIF IC OCEAN.






28 BALBOA: THE DISCOVERER OF THE PACIFIC.
in china jars for scent in winter-time. And After one of his forays some of his men
when the mother went to market they would were quarrelling about the division of some
go with her, and be taught how to .know gold which they had collected from the
young fowls from old, and fresh fish from chiefs, when one of the natives told them
stale, and good strong cloth from bad. And that if they were so fond of gold he would
all this though they might be very fond of lead them to a country where the commonest
reading, and often take a book with them things were made of it-a country six days'
when they were sent on an errand to buy a journey distant, on the shores of another
salad, or a few vegetables, at the village shop. ocean, and so wealthy and powerful that
they would want many men to conquer it.
Balboa was delighted at this chance of
BA OA: THE DISCOVERER discovering the ocean which Columbus had
OF THE PACIFIC. sought for in vain, and which would lead to
ABOUT ten years after Columbus had dis- India; so, as soon as he could get more men
covered the mainland of America, during from the islands, he set out on the ist of
which nothing more had been done by September, 1513. The Spaniards had only
Spain in conquering or settling it, two sixty miles to march across the isthmus, but
private adventurers, Ojeda and Nicuessa, there were high mountains covered with
led two expeditions from St. Domingo to dense forests to be climbed, and valleys to be
try and win some of the unknown land for crossed, which in that climate, where it rains
themselves and King Ferdinand. The king the greater part of the year, are dangerous
would give no money, but bestowed titles marshes full of deadly reptiles, and all sorts of
and honours in plenty, fevers and diseases bred by the steamy heat.
But when the invaders landed on the However, Balboa started with his little
Isthmus of Panama and claimed the country troop of 190 men, and iooo Indians to carry
for the King of Spain, ordering the people their provisions. They met with so many
to receive Christianity on pain of death or difficulties by the way, such difficulties as
slavery, they found them fierce and war- I have described, as well as resistance from
like, and not at all ready to submit. Their the people of the district, that instead of
poisoned arrows, together with want of food making the journey in six days it was not till
and the deadly climate, which is the worst the twenty-fifth that they reached the foot of
in all America, swept away the greater num- a high mountain, from which their guides
ber of the Spaniards. A few were left under told them they would see the ocean they
the command of Vasco Nufez de Balboa, were seeking. They struggled on till, when
who,. it is said, had joined the expedition they were nearly at the top, Balboa called a
hidden in a barrel to escape from his halt, and went forward alone to be the first
creditors in St. Domingo. His comrades to hail the sight. When the great ocean
chose him for their captain, when left in came in view he fell on his knees and thanked
the miserable little settlement of Santa God for his success, and when his followers
Maria, on the Gulf of Darien, because he joined him they all hurried down the steep
had proved himself in all their dangers and descent to the shore, where Balboa, with the
troubles the bravest and most prudent and royal banner in one hand and his drawn sword
determined of all. But he wanted the king in the other, went into the water up to his
to approve of this too, and made up his waist, and took possession of the great Pacific
mind, therefore, to do something great in Ocean in the name of his master, vowing to
order to deserve the honour, hold it against all the enemies of Spain.












(l- T rl..7IL.DR 6

WAT&R

R COLOUR

S188 CLUB D





-G
1_7









--, ..
( >

















BEATRICE ALICE JACKSON.
!Winner in the First and Third Competitions; equal in the Fourth.
MONICA TAN; BRUCE. UNA MARY BEAUMONT.
Wiiner in the Second Competition. Winner in th Fourth Competition.






30 TRUE STORIES ABOUT FOXES.
along the top of the wall and seated himself tamed by man. A friend of mine in Ireland
calmly among the bushes on the hill to watch noticed that a fox used to come in winter when
the hounds, in full cry, run over the place the birds were fed and try to pick up some
where he had jumped off the grass. Soonthey of the food. He gradually grew bolder and
dis covered bolder, until
they had lost -at last, when
the scent, and the snow was
Foxie knew very deep and
they were not the frost had
likely to find -remained a
it again, as long time, he
they would actually came
never guess and joined
that he had si the pets at my
jumped on to friend'shouse.
the wall. He soon be-
Not long gan to accom-
ago an old fox --- pany her in
ran to ground --t .-_ n .-d her walks,and
in a deep 7. followed her
hole after a like a dog.
long run. Oneday,when
The hunts- a stranger
man dug him --. called, the
out, and what fox was seen
do you think standing on
he found? the doorstep
Mr. Fox calm- barking at the
ly feeding on visitor and his
a nice plump terrier, just as
fowl, which he any careful
had picked up-- j old watch-dog
in the last -might do.
farmyard Foxie is
he passed certainly mis-
throug gh be .s__ chievous, but
fore reaching =2 _______ ---------so are a great
the hole, for manychildren
which he had A HARE FOR THE L.ITTLE ONES. who ought to
evidently aim- know better.
ed all along. So you see that he was not He is brave and ready-witted, which is more
scared into thinking of nothing but escape, than can be said of all children, or of all grown-
as he had positively remembered that he up people either. So you see there is good to
would want some dinner, and was clear-headed be found in him as in all other living beings;
enough to know how and where to get it. and there are lessons to be learnt from him as
In some rare cases foxes have been quite from all the rest of God's marvellous works.
A. E. N.





/1 VERY OLD STORY. 31

A VERY OLD STORY. on each stone a man was seated. One of
them, a very old man, with a long white beard,
BY LENNA.' turned round at the noise of her footsteps-for
EVERYBODY knows the story of Cinderella, all the men were seated with their faces to the
but there is one version of it that I read fire-he turned round and asked Elsie what
lately in a folk-lore book-a book full of she wanted. So she told her sad story, and
very old stories-and it is so pretty and all the twelve men listened. When she had
uncommon that I am sure you would like finished the old man said: My name is
to hear it. January, and you cannot find violets in my
Once upon a time there was a little girl month ; but I am sorry for you and will help
whose name was Elsie, and she lived with you.' Then he said to one of his brethren, a
her father, who was a woodman, and her man not quite as old as himself, ',Brother
stepmother, and her stepsister, in a cottage March, will you change places with me?'
near a great forest. She was not happy, for Brother March was very pleased to do so,
her father was away all day, and her step- and came and sat in January's place, and
mother made her work very hard, and her presently the snow melted away from the
.stepsister used to pinch her and tell false- ground, the air was soft, the sun shone, the
hoods about her. But Elsie was patient and trees budded with tender green, and the birds
gentle, and tried to do the work they set her flitted about, building their nests in the thorn
as well as she could, though, poor child, bushes; and as/ Elsie watched a lark dart
she cried with shame and vexation when down from the/blue sky to the grass at her
she was accused of doing wicked things, feet, she saw some violet plants covered with
One day her stepmother got quite tired of their lovely flowers.
scolding her, and said to her daughter: 'Elsie With a thankful heart Elsie plucked a
does everything she is told, however hard it handful and took them home, and gave
is. I am almost ashamed of treating her so them to her stepsister. She was never
severely.' harshly treated again, for her gentleness
'I know something she can't do,' said the had won her stepmother's heart, and even
daughter; 'let me try her.' her stepsister grew ashamed of her jealousy.
'Well, you may this once,' was the answer;
'but only this once.' THE CHILDREN'S WATER-COLOUR
So Elsie was called, and the spiteful girl CLUB.
told her to go into the forest and not come THi.. subject for the first competition will be the
back until she had found a bunch of violets. picture of Clouded Tigers in this number. On the
mie of wint s l card the border will be printed in a very pale ink,
Now it was the middle of winter; snow lay and the competitors will have to paint it in gold. Not
thick on the ground, and an icy wind howled real gold of course, for that would be much too ex-
through the black branches of the trees, pensive, but the imitation gold paint which is sold at
making them creak and moan in a dreadful all colour shops. Full directions will be sent with
way. But poor Elsie was driven out, and she the cards, which will be ready about the middle of
February.
went forth into the dark forest, weeping bitterly The day for sending in the first painted card will
.and miserably cold. She knew she could not be March io, and'the winners' names will appear in
find any violets in such weather, and without the April number. All children who take in The
them she dared not return. She wandered on, Children's Illustrated Magazine, and are under four-
.and her trouble was so great that she did not teen years of age, can become members of the club.
They should send in their names and addresses
see, until she was close to it, a big fire, and without delay, together with their subscription of
round the fire there were twelve stones, and one shilling each.





/1 VERY OLD STORY. 31

A VERY OLD STORY. on each stone a man was seated. One of
them, a very old man, with a long white beard,
BY LENNA.' turned round at the noise of her footsteps-for
EVERYBODY knows the story of Cinderella, all the men were seated with their faces to the
but there is one version of it that I read fire-he turned round and asked Elsie what
lately in a folk-lore book-a book full of she wanted. So she told her sad story, and
very old stories-and it is so pretty and all the twelve men listened. When she had
uncommon that I am sure you would like finished the old man said: My name is
to hear it. January, and you cannot find violets in my
Once upon a time there was a little girl month ; but I am sorry for you and will help
whose name was Elsie, and she lived with you.' Then he said to one of his brethren, a
her father, who was a woodman, and her man not quite as old as himself, ',Brother
stepmother, and her stepsister, in a cottage March, will you change places with me?'
near a great forest. She was not happy, for Brother March was very pleased to do so,
her father was away all day, and her step- and came and sat in January's place, and
mother made her work very hard, and her presently the snow melted away from the
.stepsister used to pinch her and tell false- ground, the air was soft, the sun shone, the
hoods about her. But Elsie was patient and trees budded with tender green, and the birds
gentle, and tried to do the work they set her flitted about, building their nests in the thorn
as well as she could, though, poor child, bushes; and as/ Elsie watched a lark dart
she cried with shame and vexation when down from the/blue sky to the grass at her
she was accused of doing wicked things, feet, she saw some violet plants covered with
One day her stepmother got quite tired of their lovely flowers.
scolding her, and said to her daughter: 'Elsie With a thankful heart Elsie plucked a
does everything she is told, however hard it handful and took them home, and gave
is. I am almost ashamed of treating her so them to her stepsister. She was never
severely.' harshly treated again, for her gentleness
'I know something she can't do,' said the had won her stepmother's heart, and even
daughter; 'let me try her.' her stepsister grew ashamed of her jealousy.
'Well, you may this once,' was the answer;
'but only this once.' THE CHILDREN'S WATER-COLOUR
So Elsie was called, and the spiteful girl CLUB.
told her to go into the forest and not come THi.. subject for the first competition will be the
back until she had found a bunch of violets. picture of Clouded Tigers in this number. On the
mie of wint s l card the border will be printed in a very pale ink,
Now it was the middle of winter; snow lay and the competitors will have to paint it in gold. Not
thick on the ground, and an icy wind howled real gold of course, for that would be much too ex-
through the black branches of the trees, pensive, but the imitation gold paint which is sold at
making them creak and moan in a dreadful all colour shops. Full directions will be sent with
way. But poor Elsie was driven out, and she the cards, which will be ready about the middle of
February.
went forth into the dark forest, weeping bitterly The day for sending in the first painted card will
.and miserably cold. She knew she could not be March io, and'the winners' names will appear in
find any violets in such weather, and without the April number. All children who take in The
them she dared not return. She wandered on, Children's Illustrated Magazine, and are under four-
.and her trouble was so great that she did not teen years of age, can become members of the club.
They should send in their names and addresses
see, until she was close to it, a big fire, and without delay, together with their subscription of
round the fire there were twelve stones, and one shilling each.








Words by F. NO MORE FAIRIES! Air by BEETHOVEN.
Allesro nmoderato


r. Come, let us go, Bet sy and Joe, And from our door step sweep the snow;
2. Where now is Lob, Who by the hob Lay warm sip-ping his well earned cream?

p___ Ii-i "-1 -I----

vI__ I J- i I 1 --- I--
Stfn.
I I ten- I.






For no more, As of yore, Elf brooms sweep be fore our door.
'Twixt night and morn, Thresh-ing our corn, Aye, and all of them? gone like a dream.
iten. i

I s-- r ? r f I^----'<_ -
Ssf en. sf teni.

I \-




Once if we left all our work at night, Still it was done be fore the light;
Gone from us now are the kind ly fays ; Gone, too, say old folk, the good old days;
ten.


Sten cres. f







Kind lit tie elves Did it them-selves, Fi nish'd his task for each wea ry wight.
Now we must toil, Spin, bake, and moil; No more fai ries now a days.
ten. l ten.



) ,, -t-, r-f --- ^
S sf- I -- W-1


I-









THE LION AT HOME.

AFRICA is the great country of the lion now, to scramble over it again with the ox in his
though there are still some to be found in jaws. However, their joint weight caused
parts of Western Asia. We must not think the stakes to give way, and so the lion easily
that he is a very active, because a very made off with his prey. But, unfortunately
powerful, beast. In fact, he cannot run for himself, he was not content with the
down his prey like the hunting leopard, nor ox; but must needs come back and steal a







....




i r ,r-,,













A LION AT THE WATERING-PLACE.

climb a tree like the tiger, so that he is favourite horse, and this so enraged the
obliged to lie in wait for his victim at the Boer that he determined to stalk the lion
watering-place, and then suddenly to spring, to his lair. Dutchmen in the interior are
and, perhaps, with- one blow kill it, for with very brave at this, and they have most
one blow a lion of three years old can kill a wonderful nerve in delivering an unerring
horse or an ox. A full-grown lion has been shot. This man knew he should find the
known to carry in his mouth an ox as big as lion near the horse-at least, near as much
himself for several miles, trotting the whole of it as there was left and so he did.
time and never stopping to rest. Another Quietly crouching in the bush, he presently
lion jumped over a strong palisade near a saw an indistinct object moving near some
Boer's house, killed an ox, and endeavoured plants abou twenty paces from him; this
VoL. II. 3






34 THE TRUE STORY OF A LOST DOG.
was the lion, which had become disturbed, THE TRUE STORY OF A
and was watching the bushes near the Boer. LOST DOG.
However, there was no safe shot to be had
then, so the Boer kept very still, and the BY EDITH E. CUTHELL.
lion lay down to rest. Then very quietly THEY were so delighted when mother came
the Boer prepared to fire. The slight into the nursery and gave out the delightful
noise of cocking disturbed the lion; he news that they were going to the seaside.
sprang up, and immediately received two Who were they
shots from the Boer's rifle. Though mor- They were big Winnie, and Maggie, and
tally wounded he bounded away; but before little Aleck, and last, but not least, Chip.
sunset his carcase was found by the Hotten- And they went to the Isle of Wight, cross-
tots, and his skin was pegged down outside ing over the Solent in a steamer, which was
the Boer's house. a great delight, and going on by train to
The lion in our picture looks a good deal Sandown. It was quite dark when they
more like a king of beasts than the poor arrived. Winnie peeped behind her bed-
captives we see at the Zoological Gardens. room blind as she went to bed.
But, then, in his own country he is free, and He's there I can hear him though I
has plenty of exercise to keep his muscles in can't see him !'
good play, and plenty of food to make him 'Who's there?' asked Aleck.
strong. See how his eyes glare, and he Why, listen-the sea. Hark! it's talk-
looks as if he bad just given one of those ing,' and a slow, sullen murmur came
tremendous roars which the Arabs say are through the darkness.
like thunder. The next morning was beautiful, and
I dare say you look with pity on the pretty immediately after breakfast they all rushed
little animal at his feet, and, certainly, one out to the sands, including Chip, who was
is not inclined to admire strength when it every one's pet and quite one of the family..
is crushing the weak, but we have to re- They were in a lovely bay, bounded on one
member that the lion must have animal side by a tall white cliff, and- on the other
food, and there seems to be a most wonder- by a taller yellow sand headland topped
ful provision against suffering in the creatures with green down and gorse.
whom he devours.. You. know that lions Chip could not dig and build castles'like
attack men, and even sometimes prefer the rest, but he enjoyed himself exceedingly.
human beings to all other food. Such lions He sat with his knowing little white head,
are called 'man-eaters;' and we have stories with the one black ear, cocked on one side,
told by people who have been under the and watched the children, taking now and
lion's claws. They say that a kind of dreami- again a run on his own account-chasing
ness came over them so that they felt no a piece of seaweed, or one of the 'fairy
pain and yet knew all that was going on. pancakes of yellow tide foam' left on the
There is an account given by a hunter who smooth sand, and bounding in and out of
had his arm munched by a tiger, and he said pools and wavelets.
he felt scarcely any pain, and only wondered Winnie and Maggie and Aleck did much
what the creature would do next. So we the same at Sandown that summer as any of
can hope that the lower animals become you do at the seaside. 'They dug, they
dreamy, too, and do not feel the horrible paddled, they bathed, they walked on the
pain which we fancy they must suffer under cliffs. But they did one thing that none of
such usage. you who have not been in those parts could















----,9-,










































THE LION AND HIS PREY.






36 THE TRUE STORY OF A LOST DOG.
do. You will never guess 'what it was; Italian climate, would have found it,' replied
They went to see the Roman villa, father. But they knew how to make them-
Now those of you who do English history selves comfortable.' And he led the way,
will remember how, many hundreds of years past many glass cases full of coins and
ago, the Romans conquered Britain and pottery and ornaments dug up out ,of the
occupied it for nearly five hundred years. rubbish, to a smaller room beyond the great
We find many traces of them to this day- hall. 'This is the heating chamber. These
the roads they made, the walls, the build- little pillars of flat tiles supported the floor,
ings they constructed, and their cemeteries, and between that and the ground was the
Their war-galleys lay sheltered and safe in hot air heated by a furnace and conveyed
the Solent, as our nien-of-war do to-day, and by-flues under the rest of the building.'
they found the Isle of Wight-Vectis, they But Aleck, who did not understand much
called it-as pleasant a place as we do. of this, had wandered off into another room.
They fortified the hill where Carisbrooke 'What's the large, half-round hole?' lhc
Castle now stands, and, a few miles on asked.
either side, have been lately discovered the 'That's the bathroom,' said father. The
remains of two villas, or private country old Romans were great people for bathing.
houses of some wealthy Roman gentleman. Now come and see the well.'
It was one of these father took the This was a little way off, in another corner
children to see. Chip, of course, went too, of the enclosure.
though I am afraid he did not understand 'It's quite dry,' said Maggie, throwing
much about the old Romans. They walked down a stone, 'but deep. The stone takes
along the Brading road, and then up into a a long time getting to the bottom.'
turnip-field. Here it was that, in ploughing, The others threw stones down too, and
the foundations of the villa had been dis- Chip grew quite excited, thinking it was
covered only a few inches below the ground. done to amuse him. Then father called,
There's a roof and walls !' cried Aleck. and they ran to rejoin him.
'Did the Romans build those?' The party now separated. Father and
Father explained that the old roof and Winnie went back by the downs, the rest
walls had fallen in long ago, and that these by the road. They all met again at tea,
had been recently put up to protect the and mother prepared Chip's bread and milk,
paintings on the pavement from the weather, and looked for him under the table. But
Then they passed into the shed, and looked he was not in the room.
down from a gallery on to this very pave- 'Did not Chip come back with you?' she
ment, on which, sixteen hundred years ago, asked father.
old Romans, clad in toga or armour, had He was not with us. I thought he was
walked and stood, waited on by British with you,' he answered.
slaves. The party round the tea-table looked at
'How pretty !' cried Winnie, 'and how each other blankly. Dear Chip was lost !
bright and distinct the colours of the pic- They searched the house, father whistled
tures on the floor still are What queer up and down the street, but no little white
birds and faces I should like a painted dog was to be found, and the children all
floor like this in the drawing-room.' wept.
'Rather cold, though, with no carpet,' 'I'm sure he was with us at the villa,'
said Maggie. said Winnie. The man asked in fun if
'And so the Romans, fresh from the soft we were going to pay for bringing him in."







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^1



THE DUCHY.SS OF DEVONSHIRE AND HER CHILD. .By Sir foshu~a Reynalds.






'WE BRINGS OURSEL'S UP.' 37

We had better go back, then, and inquire,' Father always says Chip is the wisest dog
said father; and early next morning he he knows, for, like a sage of old, he went
started with Winnie. down to the bottom of a well to seek for
But the man in charge, though he remem- truth.
bered the dog, had seen nothing of him.
Winnie's heart sank. But she lingered THE DUCHESS OF DEVON-
behind a few moments, and gave a last SHIRE AND HER CHILD.
despairing call: 'Chip! Chip! Chip! THIS is one of the famous pictures by Sir
Her voice broke in a sob, but the next
Sv b Joshua Reynolds. It shows the grace and
moment she held her breath to listen.
Ss liveliness of the 'beautiful Duchess of Devon-
'I thought I heard a faint bark,' she said, i a w w. P y
Sshire in a wonderful way. Perhaps you will
and called again. But no sound broke the
n an n s say that you do not think her very beautiful,
silence in answer, and she sorrowfully re-
iene in aner, and very likely it was her brightness and
joined her father. gaiety that made people call her so. An Irish
They went and inquired at the police-
Sat Sandon, and ha the dog cried workman said of her, 'I could light my pipe
station at Sandown, and had the dog cried
at her eyes !' And once at an election, when
about the town by a crier with a big bell:- a h e 1 A r at a e
about the town by a crier with a big bell :- she was trying to get votes for a friend of
'Lost, on Friday, a white terrier with one
hers, a butcher said he would give her his
black ear and spot on his tail, answering e the would give hr hs
to the name of Cip. Finder will be vote if she would give him a kiss-and she
to the name of Chip. Finder will be dd
handsomely rewarded.'
But all in vain. No one brought the dog R O RS 'S P
back; no one came for the reward.WE INGS OUREL UP.
He was so pretty, he's been stolen !' A TRUE STORY. WHO CAN CAP IT?
suggested Maggie, WALKING down a court in London, one day,
'If he'd only been ugly !' moaned Aleck. I looked in at a window and saw inside four
The children returned sadly to London little children: one a baby kicking on the
without their beloved pet. But two days floor; one about two; another a trifle older
after they returned, who do you think came and the eldest, who was evidently in charge
back too?--Chip himself! brought by a of the party, and who looked about four,
porter from the station, and his fare to pay trying to make up the fire with very long
from the Isle of Wight. He was silent about pieces of wood. Now children were often
it himself, of course; but where do you think getting bad burns down there, and I thought
he had been found ?-in the Roman well These will be on fire directly,' and tried to
He must have lingered behind the chil- open the door. But the lock was out of
dren,- and either jumped or fallen down order, and it could only be opened from the
after the stones they threw, and have been inside. Happily one of these bairns knew the
unable to get out. But he was ten days trick of it, and after some minutes I got in.
down the well, and how he escaped unhurt Of course I talked about playing with the
from his fall or how he lived will ever fire, and so on, and asked 'Where was mother,
remain a mystery. Perhaps he ate the grandmother, and auht?' All out. So I went
descendants of the rats and mice who pil- out too, and talked to some of the neighbours
fered the old Roman's larder in days of old. about the shame it was to leave such mites
'Then it was Chip's bark I heard,' cried alone.
Winnie, hugging him. 'Oh, Chip why did One of these neighbours was a very nice
not you bark again?' woman, I must tell you, and while she was






'WE BRINGS OURSEL'S UP.' 37

We had better go back, then, and inquire,' Father always says Chip is the wisest dog
said father; and early next morning he he knows, for, like a sage of old, he went
started with Winnie. down to the bottom of a well to seek for
But the man in charge, though he remem- truth.
bered the dog, had seen nothing of him.
Winnie's heart sank. But she lingered THE DUCHESS OF DEVON-
behind a few moments, and gave a last SHIRE AND HER CHILD.
despairing call: 'Chip! Chip! Chip! THIS is one of the famous pictures by Sir
Her voice broke in a sob, but the next
Sv b Joshua Reynolds. It shows the grace and
moment she held her breath to listen.
Ss liveliness of the 'beautiful Duchess of Devon-
'I thought I heard a faint bark,' she said, i a w w. P y
Sshire in a wonderful way. Perhaps you will
and called again. But no sound broke the
n an n s say that you do not think her very beautiful,
silence in answer, and she sorrowfully re-
iene in aner, and very likely it was her brightness and
joined her father. gaiety that made people call her so. An Irish
They went and inquired at the police-
Sat Sandon, and ha the dog cried workman said of her, 'I could light my pipe
station at Sandown, and had the dog cried
at her eyes !' And once at an election, when
about the town by a crier with a big bell:- a h e 1 A r at a e
about the town by a crier with a big bell :- she was trying to get votes for a friend of
'Lost, on Friday, a white terrier with one
hers, a butcher said he would give her his
black ear and spot on his tail, answering e the would give hr hs
to the name of Cip. Finder will be vote if she would give him a kiss-and she
to the name of Chip. Finder will be dd
handsomely rewarded.'
But all in vain. No one brought the dog R O RS 'S P
back; no one came for the reward.WE INGS OUREL UP.
He was so pretty, he's been stolen !' A TRUE STORY. WHO CAN CAP IT?
suggested Maggie, WALKING down a court in London, one day,
'If he'd only been ugly !' moaned Aleck. I looked in at a window and saw inside four
The children returned sadly to London little children: one a baby kicking on the
without their beloved pet. But two days floor; one about two; another a trifle older
after they returned, who do you think came and the eldest, who was evidently in charge
back too?--Chip himself! brought by a of the party, and who looked about four,
porter from the station, and his fare to pay trying to make up the fire with very long
from the Isle of Wight. He was silent about pieces of wood. Now children were often
it himself, of course; but where do you think getting bad burns down there, and I thought
he had been found ?-in the Roman well These will be on fire directly,' and tried to
He must have lingered behind the chil- open the door. But the lock was out of
dren,- and either jumped or fallen down order, and it could only be opened from the
after the stones they threw, and have been inside. Happily one of these bairns knew the
unable to get out. But he was ten days trick of it, and after some minutes I got in.
down the well, and how he escaped unhurt Of course I talked about playing with the
from his fall or how he lived will ever fire, and so on, and asked 'Where was mother,
remain a mystery. Perhaps he ate the grandmother, and auht?' All out. So I went
descendants of the rats and mice who pil- out too, and talked to some of the neighbours
fered the old Roman's larder in days of old. about the shame it was to leave such mites
'Then it was Chip's bark I heard,' cried alone.
Winnie, hugging him. 'Oh, Chip why did One of these neighbours was a very nice
not you bark again?' woman, I must tell you, and while she was






.38 SHAKESPEARE'S WORK AND LAST DArS.
talking to me a heavy waggon came down of things were printed and bought for the
the court, and she called to a little two-year- curiosity of the thing. One handbill ran
old whom she saw toddling about, Molly as follows:-' Whereas you, J. Frost, have
Molly! get out of the way!' by force and violence taken possession of
Where's her mother?' the River Thames, I hereby give you warn-
Ah she has to go out to work.' ing to quit immediately. A. THAW.'
'-And leave that mite?' At the end of the first week in February
Oh, yes; she leaves her plenty of bread the frost did begin to give a little, and the
and butter; and the woman of the. house booths, merry-go-rounds, donkeys, and all
looks after her now and again; but, my dear the rest had to beat a hasty retreat. By
lady, Molly ought to be able to take care the 9th the ice had split up into great
of herself. Why, when my Annie was only masses again, and these were carried up.
eighteen months I could leave her with per- and down with every tide, doing a great
feet confidence; yes, and she'd look after the deal of damage to the boats and barges
baby for me, too !' which had been frozen in, and were now
Boys and girls, could you do that at torn from their moorings.
eighteen months ? Poor little mites No By the middle of the month the river was
nurseries for them. They look after them- flowing freely again, and though we have
selves; only a good many get scalded or had many severe winters since, it is not
burnt M. likely that we shall ever have another frost
fair, because the narrow arches of old
FROST FAIR ON THE London Bridge are no longer there to
M hinder the rush of the water, and if masses
THAMES, 1814. of ice do form. they are carried down to
A DENSE fog wrapped London in gloom on the sea without being able to -unite and
January Ist, 1814. The darkness lasted for make a solid sheet across the river.
a week. On the 8th the wind changed, the
fog rolled away, and a frost set in, in its place SHAKESPEARE'S WORK AND
-so severe and so intense that it did not LAT
LAST DAYS.
entirely vanish till the 2oth of March.
Masses of ice began to gather between THE first years of Shakespeare's life in
the bridges in London; several people London were some of the most wonderful
ventured to pick their way across from side and exciting in all English history. In 1587
to side, and at last the river there was one Mary, queen of Scots, was beheaded, and
thick sheet of ice. Booths for the sale through the early summer of the next year
of food and drink were set up, and on England was on the tiptoe of expectation
February 3rd a sheep was roasted whole looking for the.great Armada which had
between London Bridge and Blackfriars. been so long preparing in Spanish ports.
This part of the river, in fact, was.turned When 1588 closed, and Englishmen had
into a regular fair. Skittles, dancing, don- taken breath again, they saw that their little
key-riding, and skating went on merrily, country-England was then England simply,.
and the watermen made up for the want remember, without Scotland, with Ireland in
of their usual occupation by charging every continual revolt, with no Colonies, and no
one a few pence who wanted to come on India-had resisted and defied Philip of
the scene of so much fun. Printing-presses Spain, the most determined, the richest and
were set at work on the ice, and all sorts greatest sovereign of the time, the master,






.38 SHAKESPEARE'S WORK AND LAST DArS.
talking to me a heavy waggon came down of things were printed and bought for the
the court, and she called to a little two-year- curiosity of the thing. One handbill ran
old whom she saw toddling about, Molly as follows:-' Whereas you, J. Frost, have
Molly! get out of the way!' by force and violence taken possession of
Where's her mother?' the River Thames, I hereby give you warn-
Ah she has to go out to work.' ing to quit immediately. A. THAW.'
'-And leave that mite?' At the end of the first week in February
Oh, yes; she leaves her plenty of bread the frost did begin to give a little, and the
and butter; and the woman of the. house booths, merry-go-rounds, donkeys, and all
looks after her now and again; but, my dear the rest had to beat a hasty retreat. By
lady, Molly ought to be able to take care the 9th the ice had split up into great
of herself. Why, when my Annie was only masses again, and these were carried up.
eighteen months I could leave her with per- and down with every tide, doing a great
feet confidence; yes, and she'd look after the deal of damage to the boats and barges
baby for me, too !' which had been frozen in, and were now
Boys and girls, could you do that at torn from their moorings.
eighteen months ? Poor little mites No By the middle of the month the river was
nurseries for them. They look after them- flowing freely again, and though we have
selves; only a good many get scalded or had many severe winters since, it is not
burnt M. likely that we shall ever have another frost
fair, because the narrow arches of old
FROST FAIR ON THE London Bridge are no longer there to
M hinder the rush of the water, and if masses
THAMES, 1814. of ice do form. they are carried down to
A DENSE fog wrapped London in gloom on the sea without being able to -unite and
January Ist, 1814. The darkness lasted for make a solid sheet across the river.
a week. On the 8th the wind changed, the
fog rolled away, and a frost set in, in its place SHAKESPEARE'S WORK AND
-so severe and so intense that it did not LAT
LAST DAYS.
entirely vanish till the 2oth of March.
Masses of ice began to gather between THE first years of Shakespeare's life in
the bridges in London; several people London were some of the most wonderful
ventured to pick their way across from side and exciting in all English history. In 1587
to side, and at last the river there was one Mary, queen of Scots, was beheaded, and
thick sheet of ice. Booths for the sale through the early summer of the next year
of food and drink were set up, and on England was on the tiptoe of expectation
February 3rd a sheep was roasted whole looking for the.great Armada which had
between London Bridge and Blackfriars. been so long preparing in Spanish ports.
This part of the river, in fact, was.turned When 1588 closed, and Englishmen had
into a regular fair. Skittles, dancing, don- taken breath again, they saw that their little
key-riding, and skating went on merrily, country-England was then England simply,.
and the watermen made up for the want remember, without Scotland, with Ireland in
of their usual occupation by charging every continual revolt, with no Colonies, and no
one a few pence who wanted to come on India-had resisted and defied Philip of
the scene of so much fun. Printing-presses Spain, the most determined, the richest and
were set at work on the ice, and all sorts greatest sovereign of the time, the master,






SHAKESPEARE'S WORK AND LAST DAYS. 39

too, of that wonderful New World across the the play. Great numbers of plays were
Atlantic which was drawing so many restless written by many writers besides Shakespeare
spirits from the Old World to explore its -Peele, Greene, Marlowe, Ben Jonson, and
golden shores, others. Shakespeare himself is thought to
There was a great deal doing then, and have written fifteen in about six years,
men's minds were full of all sorts of new.and The poets of this time took many of their


































STRATFORD CHURCH.

great and romantic thoughts. But books, subjects from Italian stories, for Italian
though more and more were being written writers were very much read and admired,
and printed every year, were nothing like as and Shakespeare did it as much as any,
cheap and easy to get as they are now. especially in his earlier plays. Romeo and
Newspapers and magazines there were none. Juliet, the Two Gentlemen of Verona, AMuch
So the kind of interest-and amusement we Ado about Nothing, The Merchant of Venice,
get from these, I suppose the men of Shake- all have their scenes laid in Italy. But the
speare's time had to get partly by going to plays which had for their subjects scenes of






40 SHAKESPEARE'S WORK AND LAST DATS.

English history, such as Henry IV., Heny V., writing, and perhaps the good acting, th::t
Henry VI, and Richard III. were very took people in such numbers to see the plays
popular. It is said that thousands of people of Shakespeare and his companions. Ther2
flocked to see Henry VZ when it was first was no grand scenery, and the theatres were
acted in 1592, and one can imagine the thrill rough buildings. A label at the back of the
of pride and exultation with which the hearers stage often was all there was to show where
must have listened to such lines as- the story was supposed to be taking place,





















-7f -





CHANCEL OF THE CHURCH OF THE HOLY TRINITY, STRATFORD.

'This England never did, nor ever shall, and the greater number of the spectators sat
But when t first did help to wound itself. in the pit, which in the earlier theatres was
Come the three corners of the world in arms open to the sky, the only covered seats
And we shall shock them: naught shall make being the boxes, which were used by the
us rue
if England to herself do rest but true.' great people alone.
-Kin- ohn. But the audience were satisfied when they
had a Shakespeare -to show them, though by
How much it must have meant to them to .
How much it must have meant to the to words only, the sorrows of two young Italian

i peo i lovers, or the madness of poor old Lear, or
Which serves it in the office of a wallsea the horror of guilty Macbeth, or the despair
Or as a moat defensive to a house, of 'Hamlet, and to make them laugh softly
Against the envy of less happier lands.' with merry Beatrice and Rosalind, and louder
-Richard II. with Falstaff and the wild Prince, or cry over
It was the interest of the story, the wonderful sweet Desdemona and Cordelia and Ophelia;






SHAKESPEARE'S WORK AND LAST DAYS, 41
and the rest of the fair unhappy ladies whose lovers, rough peasant folk, merry girls, or
sad fates are as real to us as any story that- little children.
happens in what we call real life. We Thirty-seven plays Shakespeare wrote, or,
cannot know living people's true thoughts at-least, had a hand in. It is thought that







K _i __.



























'SHAKESPEARE'S MONUMENT IN STRATFORD CHURCH.

and motives, so that we very often do not the Tempest was his last work, and that,
understand the events of their lives. I perhaps, it was not written till about 1614,
But Shakespeare's great power is that he two years before his death. His hard work
seems to know just how each of his characters, had brought him both friends, and fame, and
being the man or woman they were, must money. He had not manyenemies apparently,
have thought and acted ; so that he takes us though in his early days in 'London, Greene,
right into their very hearts, whether they are when dying in poverty and misery in conse-
good or bad, great conquerors, passionate quence of the wild life he had led, seems to






42 THE GIANT'S IIJ3L.
have jealously scoffed at him as 'Shakescene' and sweeps over the country, bringing ruin
and 'Johannes Factotum.' By 1597 he had and destruction wherever it passes. Trees
money enough to buy New Place, one of the are torn up by the roots, huts blown to
best houses in Stratford, and afterwards he pieces, houses unroofed, or even blown corn-
bought land there, and also a house and pletely down. One hurricane blew down
land near St. Paul's, in London. He seems one hundred and fifty houses in St. Bartholo-
to have spent the greater part of his later mew, and destroyed the Fort at the mouth
years at Stratford, only going up to London of the harbour of the island of St. Thomas.
on visits. He also seems to have helped his
father to get back something of the position
THE GIANT'S HOLD.
he had lost, and himself to have been an
active citizen of Stratford. His only son, BY E. VINCENT BRITON.
Hamnet, died in 1596, a boy of eleven, and (Conlinuedrnomp. 26.)
though his daughters, Susanna and Judith, CHAPTER III.-ON THEIR TRAVELS AGAIN.
both married and had children, there are THE dawn was just beginning to break when
now no direct descendants of the great poet Rob and Jock and Alick laid their heads
left. He died on April 23rd (supposed to down to sleep for the first time in the land
be his birthday), 1616. It is said his illness their parents called home-the much-talked-
was a fever, and that two of his poet friends, of Old England. It had given them but a
Ben Jonson and Drayton, were visiting him cold welcome, had stuck out its sharp, rocky.
just before. Ben Jonson wrote of him, 'I sides, and seemed loath to receive them;
loved the man, and do honour his memory had cried out, 'I have boys enough here-
on this side of idolatry as much as any. He and more than enough; get you gone !'
was indeed honest, and of an open and free But Rob and Jock and Alick had taken this
nature, had an excellent phantasy, brave rough greeting in good part; and as they
notions, and gentle expressions.' And again, crept into bed, side by side, all three to-
'Thou art a monument without a tomb, gether, under the roof of a kindly coast-
And art alive still while thy book doth live guardsman, who had pitied the poor chil-
And we have wits to read and praise to give.' dren, and bidden his wife take them home at
He was buried near the north wall of the once, the three boys said English beds were
chancel of Stratford Church, and numbers very good indeed, better than any beds they
of people come every year to look upon his had ever seen in their lives before; and then
monument. A. E. S. they went to sleep, and slept on and on,
until the sun, after mounting high into the
A HURRICANE IN THE heavens, began to think about going off to
TUIC NE I lighten some other part of the world. Then
WEST INDIES.
they woke, all three together, sat up, and
THE West Indies are in the region ot the began to think they should like some
north-east trade wind. This blons steadily breakfast.
for about eight months in the year, with the The coastguard's wife fetched their clothes,
greatest force during the winter and spring, which had been drying in front of her fire,
and growing quieter during the summer. As and helped them to dress. Then they sat
autumn comes near there are calms, followed down with wonderfully good appetites to
by thunderstorms. In the month of Septem- large basins of bread and milk, and began to
her the winds shift to all quarters, and some- ask no end. of questions. First, about the
times a hurricane rises with great suddenness ship. Had she gone to the bottom? what






42 THE GIANT'S IIJ3L.
have jealously scoffed at him as 'Shakescene' and sweeps over the country, bringing ruin
and 'Johannes Factotum.' By 1597 he had and destruction wherever it passes. Trees
money enough to buy New Place, one of the are torn up by the roots, huts blown to
best houses in Stratford, and afterwards he pieces, houses unroofed, or even blown corn-
bought land there, and also a house and pletely down. One hurricane blew down
land near St. Paul's, in London. He seems one hundred and fifty houses in St. Bartholo-
to have spent the greater part of his later mew, and destroyed the Fort at the mouth
years at Stratford, only going up to London of the harbour of the island of St. Thomas.
on visits. He also seems to have helped his
father to get back something of the position
THE GIANT'S HOLD.
he had lost, and himself to have been an
active citizen of Stratford. His only son, BY E. VINCENT BRITON.
Hamnet, died in 1596, a boy of eleven, and (Conlinuedrnomp. 26.)
though his daughters, Susanna and Judith, CHAPTER III.-ON THEIR TRAVELS AGAIN.
both married and had children, there are THE dawn was just beginning to break when
now no direct descendants of the great poet Rob and Jock and Alick laid their heads
left. He died on April 23rd (supposed to down to sleep for the first time in the land
be his birthday), 1616. It is said his illness their parents called home-the much-talked-
was a fever, and that two of his poet friends, of Old England. It had given them but a
Ben Jonson and Drayton, were visiting him cold welcome, had stuck out its sharp, rocky.
just before. Ben Jonson wrote of him, 'I sides, and seemed loath to receive them;
loved the man, and do honour his memory had cried out, 'I have boys enough here-
on this side of idolatry as much as any. He and more than enough; get you gone !'
was indeed honest, and of an open and free But Rob and Jock and Alick had taken this
nature, had an excellent phantasy, brave rough greeting in good part; and as they
notions, and gentle expressions.' And again, crept into bed, side by side, all three to-
'Thou art a monument without a tomb, gether, under the roof of a kindly coast-
And art alive still while thy book doth live guardsman, who had pitied the poor chil-
And we have wits to read and praise to give.' dren, and bidden his wife take them home at
He was buried near the north wall of the once, the three boys said English beds were
chancel of Stratford Church, and numbers very good indeed, better than any beds they
of people come every year to look upon his had ever seen in their lives before; and then
monument. A. E. S. they went to sleep, and slept on and on,
until the sun, after mounting high into the
A HURRICANE IN THE heavens, began to think about going off to
TUIC NE I lighten some other part of the world. Then
WEST INDIES.
they woke, all three together, sat up, and
THE West Indies are in the region ot the began to think they should like some
north-east trade wind. This blons steadily breakfast.
for about eight months in the year, with the The coastguard's wife fetched their clothes,
greatest force during the winter and spring, which had been drying in front of her fire,
and growing quieter during the summer. As and helped them to dress. Then they sat
autumn comes near there are calms, followed down with wonderfully good appetites to
by thunderstorms. In the month of Septem- large basins of bread and milk, and began to
her the winds shift to all quarters, and some- ask no end. of questions. First, about the
times a hurricane rises with great suddenness ship. Had she gone to the bottom? what


















































A HURRICANE INTH-IE WEST INDIES.






44 THE GIANT'S HOLD.
had happened to this person and that? proceeded to decipher the-address, and copy
where all their toys had gone ? and Alick's it down on a piece of paper, with which he
face grew long and dismal as he inquired if soon after left the house, remarking to his wife,
no one had saved his tin soldiers ? To think "' Telegraph, that is the thing to be done.'
of them going down and down into the nasty The telegraph had been very busy in the
salt water, where they would find no one to village that day, but after some delay his
play with them, and never be able to stand message was despatched; and it was the
on their legs again as long as they lived arrival of this despatch which had broken
The thought was dreadful; but he dared not up the conclave in the kitchen, of Major
cry, because the coastguard, a big, rough Mackay's abode, and set the bells ringing.
man, had come in, and was looking very And thus it came about that just at the
gravely at the three boys as they sat at their time the cook, and the gardener, and Mrs.
bread and milk. Perhaps, like their father, Fareweatler, and old Simon were deciding
he hated crying; and if the soldiers were with one voice that some one must go and
really all drowned by this time, crying would fetch the children, the good wife of the
not bring'them back again. rough but kindly coastguard had come to
There was some quiet talk between the the same conclusion.
big man and his wife, and then the coast- 'Some one will come to fetch them to-
guard laid two brown, hard hands on Rob's morrow,' she said, as she watched the three
shoulders, and said:- boys romping about her kitchen with two
'You be the biggest: what can you tell us cats, also saved from the wreck of the
about yourselves? From what I can make Orient. 'They're only babes, the three of
out, you brought yourselves from India; and them; they can never take that long journey
nobody has got the care of you except the to the North all by themselves.' Anid her
captain of the Orient, who, being off his husband nodded gravely as he smoked his
head a'most about his ship, can't be bothered pipe by the fire.
about you. So tell us, if you can, what's the Untroubled by any fears of the morrow,
next thing to be done with you ?' Rob, Jock, and Alick were soon very much
'We've got to go to Uncle Will next at home in the coastguard's cottage. Some
thing,' was Rob's reply. Mother said he'd neighbours came to look at the three little
come and meet us at the ship; but father boys who had been saved from the wreck,
said, No, not he."' and cakes and sweets were given them to
'Who is he-this Uncle Will? and where celebrate the event, Altogether it was a
does he live ?' very jolly time; and Alick more than once
'We're addressed to him inside our hats put his arms round the good woman's neck,
and inside our boots,' said Jock, proceeding and said he should like to stay there always;
to take his boot off. 'Mother did that, and and perhaps some day those soldiers might
a good thing too, 'cause my hat blew away be washed ashore, did she not think so?
when we were in that boat last night.' Jock and Rob agreed that it would be alto-
'And I forgot to put mine on,' said Rob. gether very delightful, for they wanted to see
'And mine was left in the cabin full of my what would happen to.the Orient, which now
Idear soldiers,' said Alick, dismally. lay on the rocks close to the shore, her deck
'Well, if the name's in the boot that's the just visible as the waves broke over it.
great thing. Your mother had some sense, But all thoughts of a prolonged stay were
I take it.' And having, by this time, the banished the next morning. There was
little boot in his hand, the coastguardsman some whispered grumbling between their








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2f ^Eair onv t/ze "Thames X


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:*,. -4 '.,, ';I .. ,.,',.,,,, :.,','..,. .,, , .,, .-::-t1





THE GIANT'S HOLD. 45

kind friends when a telegram came, request- 'No; we're to get out'whenever it stops,'
ing that if possible the children might be corrected Rob.
Sent on at once. The message was full and We're not to go near the window,' added
,explicit; they must change at such-and-such Alick.
a place, and come by such a train from And then all three sat still for a long time,
Helston. and meditated over the perplexing counsel
'There's no mistake about it; I've shown they had received.
it to Passon, and he say the same,' the man I cannot write the history of the long
replied to his wife's indignant complaint; hours of that journey, nor tell you how
'this Major must needs be a terrible sharp many times the three small travellers got
man.' out when they should have sat still, or sat
'I'd. bid him send some one to fetch still when they should have got out; how
them; maybe he don't rightly know how soon they had devoured all their provisions,
little they be.' and how very hungry they. grew before the
'Passon said so too; "But," said he, "best day closed. How, when it grew dark, Alick
do as he says; guards and such-like are went fast asleep, so fast that though an old
good to children." So, wife, you'll just get gentleman sat down upon him he never
'em ready, and drive with them in the old stirred or made the least complaint'; how
cart to Helston, and speak to the guard Rob and Jock finally went to sleep too, and
about 'em.' never knew how the train went travelling on
And so that other journey began, which all night,. only.stopping now and then when
Jock tlled afterwards 'the second volume very tired to take breath and get a drink of
of our travels.' The drive in the cart was water.
altogether delightful; but then came the It was broad daylight when Jock woke up
parting with their new friends, by no means and crawled out from under the seat-he
so agreeable, since it. left them again feeling had rolled there in the middle of the night
lonely and deserted, half inclined to think -and climbed back to his original perch by
that no one wanted them. Alick's side, very much alive and ready to
'You'd best go to sleep, my dears,' the talk. Alick, too, was awake; only Rob still
good woman said, as she bade them good- slept soundly, stretched out at full length on
bye. Go to sleep as fast as ever you can; the opposite seat, an old gentleman and lady
but be sure you wake up at the places where being also sound asleep in two corners of
you have to change and get out quickly, for the carriage.
trains are bothersome things, and are always" The two little ones.felt the chill of the
bent on leaving folks behind. And don't go early morning air, and being decidedly
near the windows, or you'll fall out and be hungry were rather inclined to be doleful.
run over, which happens to most children If we don't get to Uncle Will's soon we'll
who travel by themselves. It'll be a miracle be starved,' said Jock ; 'and this train goes
if you get there safe, and your uncle must be on and on, and does not seem as if it ever
a sad, careless body; but all the same, I meant to stop. I'm sick of it; I shall get
make no doubt it'll all end right-things out at the next station.'
mostly do.' And amid these contradictory 'The guard said we weren't to keep getting
assurances the train moved off, and the out,' replied more docile Alick; 'he said
three little men in it. he'd tell us the right place.'
'We've got to stick in this train until He's gone to sleep and forgotten,' was
SUncle Will comes,' reflected lock. Jock's reply; 'and of course he likes to






46 HE GIANT'S HOLD.
keep his train full; he won't let the people People very seldom arrived by that early
get out if he can help it.' train,- and the two porters had left off ex-
Alick pondered over this idea with all his pecting any one.
might. If the guard kept them in that train The guard had some joke with these two
for ever, life would not be a very cheerful about the three travellers he was bringing;
thing; for during the hours they had spent but the train seemed suddenly in a hurry,
there, they had thoroughly exhausted all and he swung himself up on to the step of
means of amusement had put down the his van, shouting, 'Take care of them, Tom,'
windows and pulled them up again, had and was whirled out of sight in another
tried the blinds and read the notices, minute.
climbed into the charming cage for rugs and 'No luggage, and you're for the Towers !
umbrellas, had almost succeeded in getting Major will be expecting of you,' said Tom,
far enough out of window to count the car- looking down at the three little boys with a
riages which composed the train-in fact, patronising air. 'Happen he'll be sending
nothing of that sort remained to be done, the dog-cart in to fetch you.'
and yet'the station which was to be the end 'Mother said he'd meet us; father said,
of their travels seemed as if it never would "Not he,"' Bob repeated, as he stood with
come. While he was thus ruminating the his feet very far apart and his head thrown
train was manifestly slackening speed. back, with the idea of looking very big and
'It's always doing that,' said Jock; 'that's manly.
why we are such a long while getting to 'Father will be right, I'm thinking,' said
Uncle Will. It's got a stupid, slow engine, Tom. 'Then as there ain't no vehicle here-
and I dare say the engine-driver has gone to about you'll be walking up to the house.
sleep. Why, we are coming to a big town It ain't more than two miles or so, and yoi
I wonder they are not ashamed to go into a can't lose your way if you don't take the
big station in this dawdling style. Now we'll wrong turn when you comi to. the cross
get out and look for Uncle Will, and when roads. I'd come along with you if I wasn't
we've found him we'll come back and wake wanted here; but you see t'other man's new,
Rob. Guard! guard please open the door !' and trains are ticklish things.apd won't bear
'No, no, stay where you are; next station no trifling with 'em-run off the lines if you
is yours. You'll be there before seven o'clock; don't look 'em straight in the face, which
sit still, young man.' And with a heavy groan t'other fellow can't do, seeing he's got a
the engine moved slowly off again, terrible bad squint in his eye. Yonder's the
Rob was.aivake by this time, and the old road; and if you meet anybody just ask the
lady and gentleman too. They must have way to the Major's, that's what they call him
been very patient, long-suffering people, I hereabouts. Queer old dog he be! Here,
am sure, for Jock had tumbled over their down these steps !' And off tramped our
feet half a dozen times at least, and Alick three little men.
had been wiping his feet all night on the old It was a glorious June morning when Rob,
lady's velvet cloak, and yet they had said Jock, and Alick had -their first walk along
nothing. Jock was inclined to think. they English country lanes. They often thought
were dumb. of it in after days, and remembered their
Here comes the next station!' burst out keen delight in being free to run and jump
Rob, exultantly, as they pulled up beside a after their long confinement in that weary
very tiny platform, where two porters stood train. If they had only had their.breakfasts,
waiting with their hands in their pockets. they would have liked to spend all their day






THE GIANT'S HOLD. 47

under the hedges, watching the birds and last they stood beside the door; 'I can't
filling their hands with wild roses and reach the bell! What's to be done now?'
meadowsweet, running up and down the A new perplexity, but Jock was equal to
banks, or standing on the edge of the river it. There's another door round there; this
that rippled by the road, watching the fish or is for the giant himself that isn't half so big,
throwing stones into the sparkling water, and there's. no bell. We can open it and
But when Alick had more than once as- walk in, I dare.say.'
serted that he wanted something to eat, Rob No sooner said than done. A side door
and Jock felt the necessity of pushing on; opening on the back passage that led from
and taking each a hand of the little one, the kitchen to the dining-room was what it
trudged gravely forward, until the cross proved to be. The three small travellers
roads, of which Tom, the porter, had spoken, rubbed their feet very hard on the mat, and,
suggested a difficulty which seemed at first walking on tiptoe, passed down the passage
insurmountable. The road was a lonely one, until they reached a door.. Clutching the
scarcely any one had passed them since they handle with both hands Rob turned it
left the station, and the three children felt boldly, and followed closely by Jock and
much at a loss. Alick entered the room. A table spread for
I think that's the right way,' said Jock. breakfast was a pleasant sight to the hungry
'How can you know ? I think this is the boys, and Alick felt that all his troubles were
way,' said Rob. over from that minute. Not so Rob and
But as no one could decide the matter, Jock, for standing in the window, with his
they wisely determined to sit down and wait back towards the door, was a very tall man,
a bit. Alick would fain have gone on, and with broad shoulders and long dark beard,
tried first one road and then another, but who turned round at the sound of the open-
Rob would not consent. 'You'd get awfully ing of the door, and looking at the three as
tired, and we should have to carry you. they came in, said, in a terribly grave, stern
We'll wait a bit.' manner:-
And so they did, and before very long 'So you have come Shut the door; and
there came by a shepherd with a small flock sit down and eat your breakfasts !'
of sheep who knew where the Major lived (To be con iinued.)
well enough, and had much to say about
him, seeing he'd known him all his life; and THE CHILDREN'S WATER-COLOUR
from.him the children learned their way. CLUB.
SDown that there lane, through a dark bit THE cards have now been forwarded to all members.
The card of Clouded Tigers, which appeared in the
of wood, and then straight up the hill. But, February number, is the subject for the first competi-
mercy on us to think of you bits of children tion. Full directions for colouring the picture and
going to live with the Major !' painting the border in gold are sent with the cards.
It did not sound very encouraging, and The first card must be sent in by March o1, with
the dark bit of wood was very dark indeed, the competitor's name and age in years.and months -
Swritten on the back. A parent's certificate is to be
and the old house that stood on the top of sent with each card, stating that it was colbured with-
the hill looked very old and gloomy, half out help.
covered with ivy, and with strange-shaped, Subscribers to the magazine who wish to join'the
narrow, prison-like windows. Rob, Jock, club and send in their names and subscriptions at once
and Alick grew very silent as they drew will be in time for the first competition.
There will be four competitions in the year, and in
near. each three prizes of twenty shillings, ten shillings, and
'And here's a go!' said Rob, when at five shillings will be given.









Words by G. E. PATERSON. THE CRIPPLE. Adapted from NEOKOIIM.
^Allegretto.


I. Oh, wer, I born a mar in er I'd plough the grey salt sea, Where
2. Oh, we'e I born a sol dier brave, With strength for no ble deeds, Though
3. Oh, were my bo dy born as strong As are my dreams of life, With


it

1 -U-





ne. ver yet dis cov er er Had left his mark for me; My ship shouldflaunt her
glo ry lay be yond the grave, I'd ride wherehonour leads, cres. And at the end of
feet to find no road too long, With fin gers nerv'd to strife; My stead fast will could



-rF
S- '- -- -


-U7



wand'-ring sails, In 'rop -ic seas un known, Wherechartis blank and pi lot fails, I'd
bat tie still My ears should find most sweet Thep call well known of bu gles shrill, The
ne ver tire, If I might but at tain The strength to seek my heart's de- sire, To



I- *--.^s^^^sI I r r i r- -







make each wave my own; But now I dream of trav'l-ler's tales Laid in my bed a lone.
tramp of march -ing feet ; Ifpcan but climb the win -dow'sill As troops passdown the street.
strivewith heart and brain; My spi-rit bids me to as-pire, My fate--to con-quer pain.





S; 14- '- 1








THE CASTLE OF CHILLON.
THIS famous old castle stands on the shore the rack he was told he might depart as he
of the lake of Geneva, not far from the head had confessed nothing, and the door of the
of the lake, where the river Rhone runs into dark staircase was opened and immediately
it. You see that the water washes its walls. closed after him. But there were only a few
It stands-on a rock few yards from the stairs, and then the poor man fell down into a
shore, and .you can only enter it by passing vault, where, if the fall did riot kill him, he




V A -.-- _
- --~ -- --~,~ ---- --- ~-. --z_-- - -.-_-
:._ .:------

--~ ;~~~- -- L '~- -." ". ""-t','-X ....













------- .. ...- -



THE CASTLE OF CHILLON.

over a bridge. In the dungeon of this castle, was left to die. That, at least, is the story
below the level of the lake, and chained to a they still tell at Chillon.
pillar, Prior Bonivard was imprisoned by the If you go in a steamer up to the head of
Duke of Savoy for six years. He was rescued, the lake it is curious to see the Rhone flowing
in 1536, by the armies of Berne and Geneva, into it, for its muddy stream does not at once
and lived for thirty-five years after his ter- mix with the beautiful clear blue water of the
rible captivity, dying at the good old age of lake, and you can trace its course distinctly.
seventy-five. Visitors to the Castle of Chillon
are shown the old torture chamber, and a
dark staircase leading from it. It is said that BEFORE THE REVOLUTION.
in the old days of cruelty, when a prisoner ITris just a century this year, 1889, since ihe
had been tortured, it was thought prudent to outbreak- of the French Revolution, when
get rid of him, even if he had confessed no old France came to an end and new France
crime, lest he should stir up rebellion by the began.
tale of his sufferings. So when released from For many hundreds of years things had
VOL. II. 4
darkstarcas ledin fro it Itis sid hat EFO E T E RE OLU IO4








THE CASTLE OF CHILLON.
THIS famous old castle stands on the shore the rack he was told he might depart as he
of the lake of Geneva, not far from the head had confessed nothing, and the door of the
of the lake, where the river Rhone runs into dark staircase was opened and immediately
it. You see that the water washes its walls. closed after him. But there were only a few
It stands-on a rock few yards from the stairs, and then the poor man fell down into a
shore, and .you can only enter it by passing vault, where, if the fall did riot kill him, he




V A -.-- _
- --~ -- --~,~ ---- --- ~-. --z_-- - -.-_-
:._ .:------

--~ ;~~~- -- L '~- -." ". ""-t','-X ....













------- .. ...- -



THE CASTLE OF CHILLON.

over a bridge. In the dungeon of this castle, was left to die. That, at least, is the story
below the level of the lake, and chained to a they still tell at Chillon.
pillar, Prior Bonivard was imprisoned by the If you go in a steamer up to the head of
Duke of Savoy for six years. He was rescued, the lake it is curious to see the Rhone flowing
in 1536, by the armies of Berne and Geneva, into it, for its muddy stream does not at once
and lived for thirty-five years after his ter- mix with the beautiful clear blue water of the
rible captivity, dying at the good old age of lake, and you can trace its course distinctly.
seventy-five. Visitors to the Castle of Chillon
are shown the old torture chamber, and a
dark staircase leading from it. It is said that BEFORE THE REVOLUTION.
in the old days of cruelty, when a prisoner ITris just a century this year, 1889, since ihe
had been tortured, it was thought prudent to outbreak- of the French Revolution, when
get rid of him, even if he had confessed no old France came to an end and new France
crime, lest he should stir up rebellion by the began.
tale of his sufferings. So when released from For many hundreds of years things had
VOL. II. 4
darkstarcas ledin fro it Itis sid hat EFO E T E RE OLU IO4






50 BEFORE THE REVOLUTION.

gone on without much change in France. because they would have had to give up some
The same laws and customs .were still in use of their privileges; and when the plan was
as in old feudal times. The King and the bad, and was tried, it did more harm than
nobles had all the power, and the peasants good.
and common people had no way of getting At last-after the Parliament of Paris had
their complaints heard or set right. The lot been called together, which was not like our
of the peasants was especially hard, because Parliament, but only a sort of assembly of
the nobles on whose lands they lived had all lawyers, and could not help much; and the
kinds of rights and privileges over them, and Assembly of Notables, or chief men of each
it was the peasants and not the nobles who district, which also failed-there was a cry
paid almost all the taxes. Besides this the that the States General, which had not met
nobles, or at least most of them, scarcely for more than a century and a half, should
ever came near their country estates. They be called together. In this, which was some-
cared for nothing but living in Paris and thing like our Parliament, there were three-
making a fine show at Court, so as to draw estates-the Clergy, the Nobles, and the-
the notice of the King and get all sorts of Commons; and the TiersEtat, or.Commons,
places and offices which would make them would be able to show what were their-
richer still. If they came to their chateau grievances, and the nobles would no longer
sometimes, it was only to hunt, and make have it all their own way. The King,
the peasants do all sorts of service for them Louis XVI., who really wished his people-
without paying them for it. The peasants, to be happy and well governed, consented,
in fact, were treated as if they had no rights, and the States General accordingly met in,
and sometimes much worse than their masters 1789.
would have thought of treating their horses At this time the man who had the greatest
and dogs. influence over the French was the Comte de-
But all the while the taxes had to be Mirabeau. He was full of energy and genius,
paid, and it is easy to see that farmers and and saw better than any one what was really
labourers who lived in such a way would find wanted. His early life had been very wild.
it hard to do their work with much spirit. He had spent his youth. among the gay
Nearly all they earned by their toil would ladies at Versailles, where the wicked old
have to be paid away either in the taxes or King Louis XV. and his courtiers were
to their hard masters, so that in the long in- living, as if there was nothing worth having
glorious reign of Louis XV. the peasants were in life but pleasure, quite blind to the storm,
sometimes so poor that they were only just which was slowly gathering over the country,
not starving. In very bad seasons numbers and which was to sweep away King and
did die actually of want of food; and the nobles together before twenty years were-
French armies were not winning victories over.
abroad to make the people forget their dis- Mirabeau was so violent and ungovern-
content at home. But the rulers and the able that he had passed a good deal of his.
courtiers at Paris went on as if everything time in prison, where his father had had,
was right, till every year it grew harder to get him sent to be out of the way. But he-
enough money to carry on the government, had at one time visited England, where he-
First one of the king's ministers and then had made friends with some of the greatest-
another tried to make some plan to put and best of Englishmen. What he wanted
things straight, but when the plan was good France to have was a constitution and laws.
the nobles could not be got to consent to it, something like ours. But that was not am











je --a





















T..




A,,
Ir F., 1"1", 1


wsi

THE GY COUT ATVERSALLFS






52 OF A. GRECIAN SAGE WHOM A KING HELD IN PRISON.
easy thing to manage. It had taken many how he had been nourished, and they. found
hundreds of years to give England her free- that the mare was dead, and the foal had
dom, and now many people wanted to give been in truth nourished on-asses' milk. This
freedom to France at one blow. the king held for a great marvel, 'and .he
commanded that there should be given to
OF A GRECIAN SAGE WHOM the Greek half a loaf daily at the expense of
A KING HELD IN PRISON. the court.
Again, it fell upon a day that the king
HOW HE JUDGED" OF A BATTLE-HORSE. collected together his precious stones, and
IN olden times, when not even the greatest sent for this Grecian prisoner, and said,
lords could always read, but when people 'Master, thou hast much learning, and I
were quite as fond, if not fonder, of stories believe thou understandest all things. Tell
than they are now, wandering minstrels and me then, if thou art wise in the virtues
troubadours used to roam about the country, of stones, which of these seems to thee of
stopping at every castle or great house they the richest value ?' The Greek looked, and
came to, where they were sure to be eagerly said, Sire, which is the dearest to your
welcomed for the sake of their songs and Highness?' Then the king took one stone,
tales. In Italy the nobles even kept a among all the others most beautiful, and
'Novellatore' (that is, story-teller) of their said, Master, this seems to me most beau-
own, whose business it was to amuse them tiful and of the largest worth.' The Greek
with stories at feasts, or when they went to received it, and grasped it in his hand and
bed. Here is an old story they used to pressed it, and put it to his ear, and then
listen to :- said, Sire, there is a worm here.' Then
In the Grecian country there was a lord the king sent for craftsmen and had it split
who wore the crown of a king, and had a in two, and they found in the said stone a
great realm, though he was of obscure birth; worm. Then he praised the Greek for his
his name was called Philip, and for some marvellous perception, and decreed that a
misdeed committed he held in his prison a whole loaf should be given him each day at
Grecian sage who was of such wisdom that the expense of his court.
in his intellect he passed beyond the stars. Then, after not many days, the king sent
It befell on a day that there was for this Greek and had him into a secret
brought to this lord from the Spanish place, and began to speak, and said, 'In
country a very noble battle-horse, of great sooth, I deem thee a learned doctor, and
strength and beautiful form. The king manifestly have I seen it in the things which
asked for mareschals to know of the virtue I asked thee. I will now that thou tell me
of the steed. It was told him that in his whose son I was?' Then the Greek replied,
prison he had the supreme master under- 'Sire, I say that you were the son of a
standing all things; so he had the Greek baker.' Then said the king, Dear master,
drawn from prison and led to the camp, and great proofs have I seen of thy wisdom :
said to him, 'Master, look me at this battle- prithee, tell me how thou knowest all these
horse, for it is told me that thou art very things?' Thereupon the Greek made answer,
learned.' The Greek' looked at the horse, 'Sire, I will tellit you. -I discerned the horse
and said, 'Sire, the horse is well-formed, but to have been nourished on asses' milk by
so much, I tell your Highness, that the horse my own natural sense, in that I saw he had
has been nourished on asses' milk.' drooping ears, which it is not the nature of a
Then the king sent into Spain to inquire horse to have. The worm in the stone I




































































COTTAGE CHILDREN. Bv Gainsboroigh,






THE WOLF CHILD. 55

knew, because stones are naturally cold, and he saw any one with a face or a figure that
that one I found warm ; warm it cannot be lie liked; he used to ask him to come to his
naturally, except by reason of a live animal.' house to be painted. Once he found a boy
'And me, how didst thou know me for the with a nice chubby face wandering in the
son of a baker?' Thereto the Greek, 'Lord woods at Richmond, and took him home
king, when I showed you this marvel of the and kept him in his family for a good while,
steed you decreed me a reward of half a loaf just to have the pleasure of painting him.
a-day; and then when I told you of the stone Gainsborough had a very lively, happy
you decreed me a whole loaf; know that then disposition, and was very fond of music.
I perceived whose son you were, for had you Many of his pictures show plainly how much
been son of a king it would have seemed he enjoyed painting them. Any one who
little to you the giving me a noble city, but understands painting can see what delight
to your nature it seemed enough to reward he took in using his brush so skilfully and
me with -bread, which your father used to easily.
bake.' Then did the king perceive his own
baseness, and took him from prison and THE WOLF CHILD.
rewarded him right. royally. F. P. I SUPPOSE you have heard of Romulus and
Remus, the founders of Rome, who are said
COTTAGE CHILDREN. to have been brought up by a wolf? Many
people say that that story was only a fable,
BY GA SBOROGH but there are some people in India who
You will remember the three great portrait would not doubt it. I'll tell you why.
painters mentioned in our January number It has been a cruel custom in India to
-Reynolds, Gainsborough, and Romney. desert as well as to kill little babies; and there
English children should learn to know well are wolves in India, who, though they would
the names of these famous English artists, not desert their babies, sometimes lose them.
We have given already this year a beautiful When the natives find out holes or caves in
picture by Romney, and another by Reynolds, which wolves live they bring torches and try
and now here is one by Gainsborough. He to smoke them out. The wolf and her young
painted not only portraits of ladies and ones cannot breathe inside; and they come
gentlemen, but charming pictures of country out for air, 'and then the men kill them. But
people and their children, and beautiful land- once when the young cubs came out of the
escapes. Look at this country girl teaching hole, out came amongst them a boy on all
her little brother to ride on a donkey. We fours. The natives stopped and did not kill
wonder how Gainsborough could have got him. They took him off to a mission school
them to stand still to be painted; but he was But he was very miserable for a long time.
wonderfully quick in sketching what he saw. He would go on all fours, he made noises
When he was only a boy he was once drawing like a wolf, and could not talk. He did not
in a summer-house overlooking an orchard, care for the other boys; he wanted his young
and he saw a man leaning over the wall and wolf-brothers. In short, he gave a deal of
staring at the fruit. Presently the fellow began trouble; for he was wild and like a beast in
to climb quietly over to steal some pears, his nature, and hard to teach. He could not
but the young artist had already got a sketch bear to have to stand on two legs. Lots of
of him, which has been preserved to this people went to see him and told his history;
day, and is called Tom Pear-tree's Portrait. but I cannot tell you whether he ever grew to
When Gainsborough was walking about, if be like another boy. M.






THE WOLF CHILD. 55

knew, because stones are naturally cold, and he saw any one with a face or a figure that
that one I found warm ; warm it cannot be lie liked; he used to ask him to come to his
naturally, except by reason of a live animal.' house to be painted. Once he found a boy
'And me, how didst thou know me for the with a nice chubby face wandering in the
son of a baker?' Thereto the Greek, 'Lord woods at Richmond, and took him home
king, when I showed you this marvel of the and kept him in his family for a good while,
steed you decreed me a reward of half a loaf just to have the pleasure of painting him.
a-day; and then when I told you of the stone Gainsborough had a very lively, happy
you decreed me a whole loaf; know that then disposition, and was very fond of music.
I perceived whose son you were, for had you Many of his pictures show plainly how much
been son of a king it would have seemed he enjoyed painting them. Any one who
little to you the giving me a noble city, but understands painting can see what delight
to your nature it seemed enough to reward he took in using his brush so skilfully and
me with -bread, which your father used to easily.
bake.' Then did the king perceive his own
baseness, and took him from prison and THE WOLF CHILD.
rewarded him right. royally. F. P. I SUPPOSE you have heard of Romulus and
Remus, the founders of Rome, who are said
COTTAGE CHILDREN. to have been brought up by a wolf? Many
people say that that story was only a fable,
BY GA SBOROGH but there are some people in India who
You will remember the three great portrait would not doubt it. I'll tell you why.
painters mentioned in our January number It has been a cruel custom in India to
-Reynolds, Gainsborough, and Romney. desert as well as to kill little babies; and there
English children should learn to know well are wolves in India, who, though they would
the names of these famous English artists, not desert their babies, sometimes lose them.
We have given already this year a beautiful When the natives find out holes or caves in
picture by Romney, and another by Reynolds, which wolves live they bring torches and try
and now here is one by Gainsborough. He to smoke them out. The wolf and her young
painted not only portraits of ladies and ones cannot breathe inside; and they come
gentlemen, but charming pictures of country out for air, 'and then the men kill them. But
people and their children, and beautiful land- once when the young cubs came out of the
escapes. Look at this country girl teaching hole, out came amongst them a boy on all
her little brother to ride on a donkey. We fours. The natives stopped and did not kill
wonder how Gainsborough could have got him. They took him off to a mission school
them to stand still to be painted; but he was But he was very miserable for a long time.
wonderfully quick in sketching what he saw. He would go on all fours, he made noises
When he was only a boy he was once drawing like a wolf, and could not talk. He did not
in a summer-house overlooking an orchard, care for the other boys; he wanted his young
and he saw a man leaning over the wall and wolf-brothers. In short, he gave a deal of
staring at the fruit. Presently the fellow began trouble; for he was wild and like a beast in
to climb quietly over to steal some pears, his nature, and hard to teach. He could not
but the young artist had already got a sketch bear to have to stand on two legs. Lots of
of him, which has been preserved to this people went to see him and told his history;
day, and is called Tom Pear-tree's Portrait. but I cannot tell you whether he ever grew to
When Gainsborough was walking about, if be like another boy. M.







A FANCY BALL.
Words by G. E. PATERSON. Arrangcd from MOZART.

~ ~Jq-- VsV---j
I. A -cross the thrcs- hold of the door The mnr ry \altz es chime, Lifht
2. Two proudCourt beau- ties now ad-vance,Whose old morld fame lives yet, .lo
3. Con flic ting el e ments a while Are linked in va rious parts, lie -


IV. -
JT^n7----- 1 ----------I--^-- ..--- --I ------- ---r--- ,--- ----- ----





- J c. : _______ ~3_____--7____i ______--l



feet up -.on the pol ish'd floor Ad vance, re treat in time; .
quaint old me lo dies from France'They step a mi nu et ; .
re di- ta ry foe- menrsmile, As ce tics stoop to tarts; .





7-I
____ g E______-__ _
-' -

_ __-_ ____ --




Prin ces come from land of fair y, Sprites that flit with pin ions air -y,
Dan dies bow with mo tion state- ly, Red-heel'dshoes trip most se-date ly,
Oh, they say that he who ga zes On Earth'sstrange and shift -ing ma zes,
/ ::: J a- I -- ? -| -- ,- !. --- ^ ---_--- --i"^ ,*"1 -,__-- "--!,-_^---- _

lei-- I g I W A W a a ,-' IF ',




II i r I |
i 1 1 -- -- -7"




Milk maids ne ver seen in dai ry, Sea sons pre ma ture;
Fa ces mis chie- vous but late ly Gray i- ty main tain;
Finds in life as ma ny pha ses As we see to night;





*- *__ _
V W orr






A FANCY BALL. 55



'High way-men in threat 'ning vi zards, Monks, and jol t tars, and wiz yards,
Wat teau fan with flowered sacque match es, Pow der'd curls, :.- witch ing patch s :
Yet hath Har mo any's rich trea sure Lent such charm t -u -u sic's mea sure,












That no woes dis -turb our plea- sure Quar rels our de -light.
-f_/N.a-_ _+__-- -!-p---=-----I --- i-----d_-- i -- -"'-------- ^--- .---^ ---- -











S__ _-_ ----------
S ----- ----- --___-____--__----_ -
" ------------- z U -- --

-*iar Ie-quins that glint like liz- yards, Pu ri tans de iure. .











A FANCY BALL.
BY G. E. PATERSON.
ACROss the threshold of the door Faces mischievous, but lately
The merry waltzes chime, Gravity maintain;
Light feet upon the polish'd floor Watteau fan with flower'd sacque matches,
Advance, retreat in time; Powder'd curls, bewitching patches;
Princes come from land of fairy, Hilts, whose blades would scarce give
Sprites that flit with pinions airy, scratches,
Milkmaids never seen in dairy, lash and flash again.
Seasons premature;
Highwaymen in th'reat'ning vizards, Conflicting elements awhile
Monks, and jolly tars, and wizards, Are link'd in various parts,
Harlequins that glint like lizards, Hereditary foemen smile,
Puritans demu-re. Ascetics stoop to tarts;
Oh, they say that he who gazes
On earth's strange and shifting mazes,
Two proud Court beauties now advance, Finds in life as many phases
Whose old-world fame lives yet, s we see to-night;
To quaint old melodies from France Yet hath harmony's richftreasure
They step a minuet; LPent such charm tobmusic's measure,
Dandies bow with motion stately, That no woes disturb our pleasure,
R-ed-heel'd shoes tri most sedately, Quarrels our delight.
!ed-heel'd shoes trip most sedately, Quarrels our delight.






56 A BRAZILIAN FOREST.

FALCONRY AMONG THE hawk a great deal of trouble and fatigue.
When a flock of bustards rises the hawks are
ARAB. released and soon single out one unfortunate
FALCONRY has almost gone out of fashion bustard for attack, and this one they follow,
in Europe, but the Arabs still practise it. in though it continually tries to hide itself
Africa, and a meet is a very picturesque amongst its friends, or shoots upwards to-
thing. The Arabs look very fine in their wards the sky and tries to keep the hawks
flowing burnouses and white turbans, and as below it. But the hawk ordinarily contrives,
the horses are mostly white, the ornamented after a time, to get above the bustard, and
saddles and splendid trappings add much to giving it a blow, falcon and bustard flutter
the gaiety of the scene, for a moment and then descend with such
It is a good deal of trouble to train the velocity that sometimes the hawk is killed
hawks, but it is accomplished within two by the concussion of the fall. If not, it is
months at most; and even in little more quickly on its trainer's wrist, to be praised
than a fortnight a skilful falconer will have and caressed, and fed with some dainty when
taught the hawk to recognize its master it has got its breath.
amongst a crowd of twenty or thirty men, Not unfrequently the bustard varies its
to sit on his fist, and to obey his whistle or tactics by making for the nearest hills, going
call. The poor bird is kept without light or at such a pace that the horsemen are soon
food for the first few days, and when it has distanced. Not the falcon, however, who
lost much of its savageness, a little food is generally brings his prey down, though,
given to it, and its training begins, perhaps, after a chase of three or four hours.
In Northern Algeria falcons are used to
pursue the partridge and the hare, and on RA IAN T
the south side of the Atlas they hunt the hare A AZI AN .
and bustard. The Arabs assemble where SUCH a forest as this can only be seen in a
hares are known to be plentiful, and as soon tropical country. These enormous trees, and
as one is started they manoeuvre so as to wonderful ferns, and monstrous creepers can-
form a large circle of horsemen round poor not grow without abundance of sunshine.
pussy. If the hare takes to flight the hawk So in the same country are found the most
swoops down upon it, and strikes it with its intense heat and the deepest shade. The
claws; but if the hare crouches and will trees are crowded so closely together in
not move, a number of hawks are let loose places that the sun's rays can scarcely pierce
upon it. them, and some are so lofty that'a bird on
Sometimes the hare takes refuge under a the upper branches is out of gunshot, and
horse, and then the hawk will not attack it. the trunks are so huge that a dozen men
When this happens, however the horseman standing with outstretched arms cannot en-
may manoeuvre, the hare will follow under- circle them. Birds of brilliant plumage fly
neath, as a spotted Dalmatian dog follows its about among the leaves, monkeys chase each
master's carriage. Then the Arab dismounts other from branch to branch, and squirrels
and throws it into the open, to be seized by scamper up and down. Butterflies of the
the hawks. One would wish that the clever richest colours, and as large as one's hand,
little thing might be allowed its life after flutter past, and green and gold lizards dart
such a pathetic struggle for it Bustard about on the sand. In the morning the
hunting is more exciting, for the bustard is forest is filled with the voices of its inhabi-
a powerful bird, and can, at least, give the tants, but in the midday hours they rest in






56 A BRAZILIAN FOREST.

FALCONRY AMONG THE hawk a great deal of trouble and fatigue.
When a flock of bustards rises the hawks are
ARAB. released and soon single out one unfortunate
FALCONRY has almost gone out of fashion bustard for attack, and this one they follow,
in Europe, but the Arabs still practise it. in though it continually tries to hide itself
Africa, and a meet is a very picturesque amongst its friends, or shoots upwards to-
thing. The Arabs look very fine in their wards the sky and tries to keep the hawks
flowing burnouses and white turbans, and as below it. But the hawk ordinarily contrives,
the horses are mostly white, the ornamented after a time, to get above the bustard, and
saddles and splendid trappings add much to giving it a blow, falcon and bustard flutter
the gaiety of the scene, for a moment and then descend with such
It is a good deal of trouble to train the velocity that sometimes the hawk is killed
hawks, but it is accomplished within two by the concussion of the fall. If not, it is
months at most; and even in little more quickly on its trainer's wrist, to be praised
than a fortnight a skilful falconer will have and caressed, and fed with some dainty when
taught the hawk to recognize its master it has got its breath.
amongst a crowd of twenty or thirty men, Not unfrequently the bustard varies its
to sit on his fist, and to obey his whistle or tactics by making for the nearest hills, going
call. The poor bird is kept without light or at such a pace that the horsemen are soon
food for the first few days, and when it has distanced. Not the falcon, however, who
lost much of its savageness, a little food is generally brings his prey down, though,
given to it, and its training begins, perhaps, after a chase of three or four hours.
In Northern Algeria falcons are used to
pursue the partridge and the hare, and on RA IAN T
the south side of the Atlas they hunt the hare A AZI AN .
and bustard. The Arabs assemble where SUCH a forest as this can only be seen in a
hares are known to be plentiful, and as soon tropical country. These enormous trees, and
as one is started they manoeuvre so as to wonderful ferns, and monstrous creepers can-
form a large circle of horsemen round poor not grow without abundance of sunshine.
pussy. If the hare takes to flight the hawk So in the same country are found the most
swoops down upon it, and strikes it with its intense heat and the deepest shade. The
claws; but if the hare crouches and will trees are crowded so closely together in
not move, a number of hawks are let loose places that the sun's rays can scarcely pierce
upon it. them, and some are so lofty that'a bird on
Sometimes the hare takes refuge under a the upper branches is out of gunshot, and
horse, and then the hawk will not attack it. the trunks are so huge that a dozen men
When this happens, however the horseman standing with outstretched arms cannot en-
may manoeuvre, the hare will follow under- circle them. Birds of brilliant plumage fly
neath, as a spotted Dalmatian dog follows its about among the leaves, monkeys chase each
master's carriage. Then the Arab dismounts other from branch to branch, and squirrels
and throws it into the open, to be seized by scamper up and down. Butterflies of the
the hawks. One would wish that the clever richest colours, and as large as one's hand,
little thing might be allowed its life after flutter past, and green and gold lizards dart
such a pathetic struggle for it Bustard about on the sand. In the morning the
hunting is more exciting, for the bustard is forest is filled with the voices of its inhabi-
a powerful bird, and can, at least, give the tants, but in the midday hours they rest in


















































AAB3S HAWKING.






58 TAKING CARE OF 'THE KITTENS.
the deep shades, and all is silent. Then, as was bought for me, and sent to the stables,
evening draws on, they rouse again, and by- where she was groomed and looked after
and-by the bats and vampires come out and like a pony.
chase the moths, and the cricket chirps, and I was warned not to let her go rear the
the bull-frogs croke all through the night. field where tile artillery battery, practised, or
to hear their bugles when she was out, or
MY ARTILLERY PET. she would be sure to try and rejoin them,
though by that time a new battery had re-
BY 'STRIX." placed her old friends; and for some time
MY own children are so fond of hearing ile all- went well. But one unlucky day I wav
tell them stories of my pets, that I dare say out riding Miss Jenny on the high road,
you may like to hear some of them also. when we heard the bugle, and, alas! the
My dearest pet was my donkey, Jenny, battery had gone to the field near our house
when I was a little girl, and this is how she for their drill. Jenny first stood stock-still,
became mine. 'ears up, and then, with a squeal of delight,
I wanted a pony, a pony of my own, to off she set, as hard as she could go, jumped
ride about the country on, with a long tail the bank in fine style, and galloped right up
-that was a great point ; the colour I to the Colonel, I pulling with all my might
should have preferred would have been to stop her. The Colonel knew me, and saw
cream-colour, like a beautiful circus pony. I was there much-against my will, and all
However, I was told I could not have a the men in the battery were evidently much
pony, so my dreams came to an end-but amused at my military tastes, and at the
somebody who was kind said that a baker precision with which the donkey at once
in the neighboring town had a charming followed up the manceuvres. I had to ex-
donkey to sell, by no 'means a common plain how the donkey had been brought up in
donkey, as it had been brought up, since the barracks, and had been always used to drill
it was a foal, in the artillery barracks near with the former battery. I could not get
the town, as the men's pet, and was therefore Jenny away, and so the Colonel sent an
highly educated, full of clever tricks, but officer to escort me off the ground; but,
quite quiet and fit for a little girl-to ride. when Jenny found that the rest of her friends
I have ridden a great deal since that time,, did not come as well, back she went to them,
and I know that if I were given this character and I had to send for help to the lodgekeeper,
of a donkey for my little girl to ride, I should- and, finally, I and my warlike steed were led
be doubtful about its quietness, as a donkey home ignominiously, Jenny in a sad, sulky
left to itself, without any military education, temper at being taken away from her soldiers;
generally invents quite enough tricks of its but this was not the last time we joined the
own. However, this donkey was sent up to army, Jenny and I, as I will tell you later, if
be seen, and never shall I forget my delight you care to hear more of my clever donkey.
at seeing Jenny soberly walking about the
carriage-drive, nicely groomed, and looking
as mild as it.was possible for a- donkey to TAKING CARE OF THE
look. She was grey, of the usual size, with KIT FENS.
good points and a handsome head, and be- WE hear people talk of a 'cat-and-dog life,'
haved beautifully when I got on her to try and we know this refers to the snarling and
her paces; walked, trotted, galloped-not a growling that goes on between cats and dogs
kick or a shy-and the result was that she when they are strangers. But, happily, when






58 TAKING CARE OF 'THE KITTENS.
the deep shades, and all is silent. Then, as was bought for me, and sent to the stables,
evening draws on, they rouse again, and by- where she was groomed and looked after
and-by the bats and vampires come out and like a pony.
chase the moths, and the cricket chirps, and I was warned not to let her go rear the
the bull-frogs croke all through the night. field where tile artillery battery, practised, or
to hear their bugles when she was out, or
MY ARTILLERY PET. she would be sure to try and rejoin them,
though by that time a new battery had re-
BY 'STRIX." placed her old friends; and for some time
MY own children are so fond of hearing ile all- went well. But one unlucky day I wav
tell them stories of my pets, that I dare say out riding Miss Jenny on the high road,
you may like to hear some of them also. when we heard the bugle, and, alas! the
My dearest pet was my donkey, Jenny, battery had gone to the field near our house
when I was a little girl, and this is how she for their drill. Jenny first stood stock-still,
became mine. 'ears up, and then, with a squeal of delight,
I wanted a pony, a pony of my own, to off she set, as hard as she could go, jumped
ride about the country on, with a long tail the bank in fine style, and galloped right up
-that was a great point ; the colour I to the Colonel, I pulling with all my might
should have preferred would have been to stop her. The Colonel knew me, and saw
cream-colour, like a beautiful circus pony. I was there much-against my will, and all
However, I was told I could not have a the men in the battery were evidently much
pony, so my dreams came to an end-but amused at my military tastes, and at the
somebody who was kind said that a baker precision with which the donkey at once
in the neighboring town had a charming followed up the manceuvres. I had to ex-
donkey to sell, by no 'means a common plain how the donkey had been brought up in
donkey, as it had been brought up, since the barracks, and had been always used to drill
it was a foal, in the artillery barracks near with the former battery. I could not get
the town, as the men's pet, and was therefore Jenny away, and so the Colonel sent an
highly educated, full of clever tricks, but officer to escort me off the ground; but,
quite quiet and fit for a little girl-to ride. when Jenny found that the rest of her friends
I have ridden a great deal since that time,, did not come as well, back she went to them,
and I know that if I were given this character and I had to send for help to the lodgekeeper,
of a donkey for my little girl to ride, I should- and, finally, I and my warlike steed were led
be doubtful about its quietness, as a donkey home ignominiously, Jenny in a sad, sulky
left to itself, without any military education, temper at being taken away from her soldiers;
generally invents quite enough tricks of its but this was not the last time we joined the
own. However, this donkey was sent up to army, Jenny and I, as I will tell you later, if
be seen, and never shall I forget my delight you care to hear more of my clever donkey.
at seeing Jenny soberly walking about the
carriage-drive, nicely groomed, and looking
as mild as it.was possible for a- donkey to TAKING CARE OF THE
look. She was grey, of the usual size, with KIT FENS.
good points and a handsome head, and be- WE hear people talk of a 'cat-and-dog life,'
haved beautifully when I got on her to try and we know this refers to the snarling and
her paces; walked, trotted, galloped-not a growling that goes on between cats and dogs
kick or a shy-and the result was that she when they are strangers. But, happily, when









































































A BRAZILIAN FOREST.






6o THE GIANT'S HOLD.
they live together in the same house, and in our beds. Poor little dears, they'll be tired
have learnt to know each other, there is to death!'
often a devoted friendship between them, 'Not a bit of it, but as hungry as hunters;
and the old dog is proud to have the care of how they did eat, never speaking a wdrd, and
the kittens, as in our picture, while mamma when they'd done they just got down off their
goes out for a walk. The kittens evidently chairs and said, And now we're ready for a.
know they are well cared for, and one of walk, uncle," and off they went.'
them is purring a pretty song of gratitude, 'And the master, too? Well, I never !'
while the other shows its confidence by He looked a bit bothered, did the master,
dropping off to sleep, but he went all the same: and now, Mrs.
Fareweather, there's a sight of things to think
of; as cook says, no time to lie in bed now.'
THE GIANT'S HOLD. 'She's getting up, Sally told me.'
BY E. VINCENT BRITON. 'Aye, she's a fine woman is cook. Says
(Continuedfraornt. 47.) she, when Sally told her that the children had
come, "Then if I was in my coffin I couldn't
CHAPTER IV.-THE FIRST DAY IN THE stay there. Master Alick's children must
GIANT'S HOLD. have a pudding to their liking, and it isn't
'WELL, go on, Mr. Simon,' said Mrs. Fare- you, Sally, that I can trust to make it;" and
weather, smoothing her black silk apron over she's right, children must be well fed if they're
her knees, and looking at the old butler over to thrive, and these are a good sort, as I said
the tops of her spectacles; 'you answered before. But, mercy on us what's amiss now?
the bell, and found the three blessed children I'11 be bound it's that daft cow has got into-
sitting at the table, for all the world as much the house, and is coming up the front stairs.'
at home as if they'd never sat before any Nothing of the sort-'tis the children,
other table in their lives-it's just wonderful, bless them! hark to their tongues.'
and shows what clever boys they must be !- The Major will be beside himself, such a.
and the master bid you bring some cups and quiet house as he has had all these years. I
plates, and you took them in; go on !-what reckon he'll have to get them a nurse. Hark L
next?' how they do jump and screech!'
'Well, Mrs. Fareweather-would you be- While Simon, old and feeble, was listening;
lieve it ?-there was the biggest standing up with some alarm to the new and undreamt-
mighty tall, cutting away at the loaf, and the of sounds which were making the old house
next size smaller perched on the chair where echo, Rob, Jock, and Alick were eagerly
the Major had been sitting, a-pouring out the exploring their new home. Alick's careful
tea, and-the little one sitting back with a pair scrutiny of his giant uncle had ended inr
of dirty little hands- folded in front of him, the determination, secretly and deliberately
staring with all his might at the Major, and the made, that since people always said it was.
Major, as solemn as possible, he stared back best to look a mad bull in the face, and very
at him But it's not as it should be; no, it foolish to run away, he would at least put on
isn't, for Master Alick's boys to arrive in this the appearance of"not being afraid, and try
out-of-the-way fashion, as dirty as if they'd to behave as if he were quite used to giants,.
been dug out of the bowels of the earth, and and had played with dozens of them every
coming in at the door at this unearthly hour. day. It was a good idea, and though his.
I hope as nobody will have heard on't.' little heart went pit-a-pat, he put his dirty
'Travelling all night, to think of it,'and we little paw into the big hand of Giant Grim,







































































TAKING CARE OF THE KITTENS.






THE GIANT'S HOLD. 61

as he echoed Jock's more courageous, 'Now, occurring to him that he had heard that
uncle, we're quite ready to go for a walk.' some boys were always in mischief, and others
And he held it tight during their wandering were always hurting themselves. If so, there
round the house, but left the talk to his might be small peace for him, even in his
brothers, who had many questions to ask. smoking-room. Still those screams, those
' Where were the rooks' nests that father had heavy thuds! well, he must go and see. He
pillaged? the stream where he had fished? opened the door, rapidly planning in his
the barn where the rats played? the pony mind the form of the telegram he should
he had ridden?' &c. &c., to most of which dispatch'to India, announcing the death of,
inquiries the Major replied briefly, as was his was it Rob, or Jock, or Alick-or all three?
wont, and yet felt before the morning was and as he passed out into the passage which
over as if he had never talked so much before communicated with the square front hall, he
since the days of his own foolish boyhood. was jostled and roughly pushed on one side
He was glad when the little tyrants declared by cook, who, followed by Sally, the kitchen-
themselves tired, and wished to return to the maid, and more deliberately by Simon, and
house. the boy who was always losing himself,
'We can play hide-and-seek in that big rushed past him to see what was the cause
house, and I want to see all the people there,' of the tumult. Well, if they aren't bent on
said sociable Jock. 'I know their names- killing themselves !' was the first word that
father has told us all about them ;' and the reached his ear; it was cook's voice, and
Major heaved a sigh of relief as he released brought some sense of relief, implying that
Alick's hand, and left them to run about no great catastrophe had yet occurred, and
the house, while he betook himself to his another moment brought him to the spot.
smoking-room. The three boys had discovered that much
His long reign of peace and quiet had delight was to be obtained by running up
come to an end, he told himself. He had the wide stone staircase which led from the
not known until now how much he loved it, entrance-hall to the first floor, and having
and how entirely satisfied he had been with reached a considerable height jump down
his own company. Well, he could still keep his again. Up and down they went, laughing
own room to himself, the boys would, not ven- and screaming, descending sometimes on
ture there, or, if they did, he would let them their feet, more often on all fours, more than
know that he could not have them. Children once head foremost, while tearing up and
were only intolerable if they were spoiled, down.like a wild beast among them was the
and most certainly he would never spoil any- Major's huge mastiff, Wolf.
body. And then he thought of little Alick, It was a lively scene-such a scene as that
and his heart misgave him that he might, gloomy old house had not witnessed for
perchance, be betrayed into some foolishness mnany a long day.
with regard to him. 'Well, I never i' said Simon
And thus thinking, he began to wonder if 'Who'd have thought it !' cried the boy.
all boys were as dirty as these three nephews 'Mercy on us what dust them carpets do
of his. He had a misgiving that they were hold !' exclaimed Sally.
inclined to err in that direction, which would They'll break every bone in their bodies !'
be a plague certainly. And here his thoughts protested cook. While the feeble voice of
were disturbed by a loud scream and a heavy Mrs. Fareweather, who had dragged herself
thud, rapidly followed by another, and another; -to the top of the stairs, supported on two
he started up, the disagreeable reflection sticks, was heard exclaiming, 'It was down






62 THE GIANT'S HOLD.

those very stairs that the Major fell thirty may I seal them for you, and stick the stamps
years ago, and nearly broke his neck !' on ?'
'Whoop whoop!' shouted Wolf, beside 'No, no; run away and play.'
himself with delight, as he bounded.up and Jock looked confounded, and Rob some-
down the broad stairs, until now forbidden what sulky ; Alick was about to speak,
ground to him, but his master's presence when old Simon interfered. I'm terribly
aroused the conscience which had been busy,' he said; 'suppose you all come along
silent for the time being, and at sight of with me. Plate to clean-no end of things
him the dog's uproarious sport was checked ; to do.'
he descended the stairs with a limp and A charming proposal. The Major was
dejected mien, and came to crouch at his once more in peace. He returned to his
feet. room, his books, and his pip:, but as from
'What's the matter?' said little Alick, time to time the sound of a child's voice, or
pausing also; 'is he hurt, that nice dog?' a child's tripping footstep reached his ear, an
Oh, Uncle Will, he wants you to come too, ever-increasing uneasiness took possession of
that's all. Oh, that would be jolly, if you, him. People had often said in his hearing
and Simon, and Joe, and Sally, and Mrs. that children were plagues; hitherto he had
Cook, would all come and play; it would laughed at the idea, he was beginning to
be real fun. What! don't you like jumping change his mind, and though they had not
down stairs? it doesn't hurt much if you do been six hours under his roof was already
tumble, if you take care not to bump your inclined to regret his hospitable offer to give
head.' them a home.
But the Major's face showed no delight 'Their mother has spoiled them of course,
at the prospect of sharing in the game; he and so has Alick. I'll tell him so when I
glanced at old Simon, and there was a twinkle write. It's a plague; but they'll get nothing
in the old man's eye that roused him to of the kind here. What's up Simon's step
action. These children would make him -have they tumbled into the fire or down
ridiculous if he did not put a stop to their the well ?'
nonsense. 'If you please, sir, I came to know what
'Simon and I,' he said, sternly, 'have time you'd dine?'
something else to do besides running up and What time I'll dine? Same time as usual.
down stairs all day.' What do you mean?'
'Better say at once, Major, that we can't 'The children, sir, seem to prefer an early
jump like that young one.' Rob had just dinner; and cook, sir, she says, of course, it's
alighted at his feet, and the old man was better for them.'
eyeing his performances with delight. 'Hang the children; dinner at seven.'
We have something else to do,' repeated 'They're used to go to bed at seven,
his master, emphatically; adding, as he re- Major.'
leased his hand from Alick's caressing grasp, 'Then they'll go without.dinner.'
'and you children must not disturb us with But if you'll excuse me, sir, that isn't good
your noise.' for growing children; they want regular feed-
Three sober faces were upturned to his at ing, sir.'
once, and Jock replied, penitently, 'We forgot. 'Then feed them regular; who hinders ?'
There must be an awful lot to do in this big 'But you see, sir- '
house; we'll come and help. What were you 'I don't see anything but that I won't have
doing, uncle ? Writing letters, I suppose; the children spoiled ; do you hear'?'






STORY OF A ROBIN. 63

'Dear me no, sir, on no account; but cook said he wasn't at all a bad man if he
about dinner-cook wants to know?' was managed properly, and cook must know,
Well, tell her.' as she had lived with him all his life. It was
Simon shook his head. It won't be no a pity he wouldn't eat his dinner when he
use, Major, cook's a woman with ideas, she'll was told, but cook said he would get no
cook what she likes and when she likes. The pudding to-day if he didn't, so most likely he
children and she have settled all about dinner; was very sorry by this time.
it's ducks and peas and jam pudding, and one So they chattered as they lay in the three
o'clock's the time.' large beds which Mrs. Fareweather had
The Major was silent for full five minutes, caused to be prepared for them in the huge
perhaps he was trying to remember what a bedroom, which until now had never been
jam pudding was; at last he spoke, slowly occupied by any but most highly honoured
and with great decision : 'Then cook and guests; and before long they fell fast asleep:
the children can eat it.' while downstairs Giant Grim sat and thought,
'The ducks are first rate, Major. You not altogether cheerfully, about the future; and
might take your lunch along with them.' though the pudding was not much in his mind,
The Major never ate lunch and abhorred cook was, and he was half inclined to wish
the very word. He took up a newspaper as that she would take to her bed again or get
if to close the discussion, and without turning married. Somehow or other his servants
his head, said, 'Dinner at seven.' always stayed with him whether he wished it
The old man lingered a few minutes, then or not; in fact, it never entered his head to
slowly and reluctantly went his way. You tell any of them to go. He was, as they often
-may be interested to know that the ducks said, a gentleman, and would have thought it
and green peas and jam pudding were first rude to let any one feel he was not wanted.
rate, that dinner came off at one, and the Mrs. Fareweather and Simon, aye, and cook,
Major dined at seven, and he, too, had duck too, were in the house before he was born,
for his dinner, but it was hashed duck and and would, of course, stay there until they
only half warm. I fancy the jam pudding died; the worst he ever hoped for any one
had all been eaten, but that he did not much was that he or she might get married, and
mind. even then he always felt rather ashamed of
The children had gone to bed when his himself, as if he had done a very dreadful
dinner was over. Their night in the train thing.
had .made them sleepy, and when the difficult And while the children slept, he thought
question, 'what they were to sleep in, had of all these things, and grew more and more
been solved, seeing that the fishes had got perplexed; marriage was not in cook's way,
their night-shirts, as Alick remarked, they therefore, of course, she would stay.
were ready enough to go. (7o be confined..)
It was such fun to put on uncle's night-
shirts, and their bedroom was so funny;
everything was funny in this queer old house STORY OF A ROBIN.
except uncle,-they weren't quite sure about SOME years ago I lived in a pretty old-
him. Poor man he had lived alone so long, fashioned cottage in the country. It stood
and had nobody to play with him, he had in the midst of a beautiful garden. In the
quite forgotten how to jump and run. They summer-time this garden was a perfect thicket
were sorry for him, and knew quite well now of rose-bushes. There were also plenty of
why mamma called him Giant Grim. But trees laden with fruit, not to mention most






64 STORY OF A ROBIN.

prolific strawberry-beds. These, of course, and a scare in the little group. Bobby and
proved a great attraction to. numberless birds; one of the young ones flew straight into the
and when the winter came, our little feathered filbert-tree, and from thence to the creepers
friends found a snug and cosy retreat in the on the house. Mamma Robin, in evident
overhanging ivy of the old walls, which shut distress, was apparently urging the other
in one side of the garden. Our dining-room little bird to fly away with her, but all in
had a large bay window, coming quite down vain ; the little creature stood as if stupefied,
to the ground and opening like doors on the with all its feathers puffed out until it looked
lawn. The little birds soon found out that like a ball of fluff. Then his mother slipped
in frosty weather they were sure to find behind him and gave him a sharp peck. Still
crumbs and dainty morsels spread for them the little bird did not move. Peck, peck,
outside this window. They grew very know- peck, but still in vain. At last one sharp
ing, and whenever they saw the white cloth peck, more vicious and savage than the
on the dining-table, they considered it a others, sent poor Dicky flying up into the
signal for them, and down they flew from filbert-tree, followed by his mother, ready
every part of the garden. Such a motley -to administer fresh punishment if necessary;
crew they were-pert chaffinches, sober lin- but Dicky having made a first effort soon
nets, sombre blackbirds, speckled thrushes, made another, and rejoined his father and
pretty starlings, and, of course, the bold and brother in the creepers, followed by his
quarrelsome robins and sparrows. Down mother.
they came, and never were such chirping and At the same moment a strange white cat
twittering until the coveted morsels were came stealing round the corner of the house.
thrown out. Then'came a good deal of Evidently he had been watching the group
scrambling and some little fighting before from a distance when Bobby gave the first
all were satisfied, alarm, and the poor mother in her distress
Among these little pensioners we had a had been cruel only to save little Dicky's
favourite, a very handsome robin. He was life. Was it not very clever of her, when
a bright, friendly little fellow, and if we left he was too terrified to move, to give him a
the window open, he would hop into the sharp taste of pain, and thus induce him to
dining-room and help himself to anything he fly away beyond the reach of his enemy-the
could find. white cat ? CRoss KEY.
When the spring-time came Bobby took a
mate and built his nest in a filbert-tree, whose THE CHILDREN'S WATER-COLOUR
branches almost touched the dining-room CLUB.
window. In due time the fond parents THE names of the winners in the first competition
could be seen teaching their two young will be found on the wrapper.
ones to flit from bough to bough. The second card to be coloured is Taking Care qo
At last the whole family appeared one day the Kittens. The competitors are to show their skill
in front of the dining-room window. I verily in choosing their colours. All the objects in the
picture are familiar to them, and they will have no
believe Bobby brought them all in the pride difficulty in deciding on proper colours. But this is
of his heart to show them to us. Of course not enough. They are to choose them so that the
we threw out some crumbs. Master Bobby picture when finished shall be pleasantly coloured.
seemed quite elated as his young ones and They might colour everything naturally and yet make
their mother feasted to their hearts' content. a very dull picture. north coloring of the border
directions are given with the cards. Children who
He was more moderate and seemed to be on take in the magazine and wish to join the club should
guard. Suddenly there was a commotion send in their names and subscriptions at once.






THE PUMA.
SOME people call this the American lion, but for their prey. They very seldom attack
his cousins of Asia and Africa would scarcely men, or any animals that can defend them-
acknowledge the relationship; for he is a selves, but carves and sheep they delight in;
fierce and cowardly creature, without the and unfortunately for the farmers in the wilder
strength and courage of the lion. If you stare parts of America, they kill for the sake of
at him in a determined manner he will walk killing, and a pair have been known to kill





















THEi PUMA.
away, just as we are told cows or bulls will fifty sheep at a time. They have a thrifty
do in England, though it is safest not to try the turn however, for sometimes they~hide what
experiment, unless there are no other means they do not want at the time, to serve for
of escape. The pumna, however, is like the other meals. But most disagreeable-people
lion in one thing, for his body is unmarked have a pleasant side, and so the pumrna,
and of a plain fawn colour. Nearly all if caught young, may be easily tamed, and
the animals of the cat tribe are marked with has been known to play in a most friendly
stripes or spots, as our cats are; and pumas way with dogs and monkeys, to enjoy a game
are like our pussies in climbing trees, and of ball, and to do what pussy would not like
in their stealthy ways. They generally live at all-to jump in and out of a large tub of
amongst underwood, in which they can watch water with great delight and glee.

THE WRECK OF THE UNDINEE.'
BY MRS. FRANK COWPER.
PERHAPS I have gone rather too far in Certainly it was only by the merest accident,
calling this little adventure the 'Wreck of or we will say 'Providence,' that she was not
the Undine;' however, if I tell you all about entirely wrecked.
it, you will be able to judge for yourselves. The Undine was, or rather is, a pretty
VOL.' II. 5
lion in oe thing, or his boy is unm rkd hvapesntsendotepu,
andofa lan aw clor.Nerl al f cugt ougma b esiy amdan
th aimlso te attib ae are wth ha ee kow t la i amstfrenl
stries r sptsas or cts r n ua a ihdg n okyt no an






THE PUMA.
SOME people call this the American lion, but for their prey. They very seldom attack
his cousins of Asia and Africa would scarcely men, or any animals that can defend them-
acknowledge the relationship; for he is a selves, but carves and sheep they delight in;
fierce and cowardly creature, without the and unfortunately for the farmers in the wilder
strength and courage of the lion. If you stare parts of America, they kill for the sake of
at him in a determined manner he will walk killing, and a pair have been known to kill





















THEi PUMA.
away, just as we are told cows or bulls will fifty sheep at a time. They have a thrifty
do in England, though it is safest not to try the turn however, for sometimes they~hide what
experiment, unless there are no other means they do not want at the time, to serve for
of escape. The pumna, however, is like the other meals. But most disagreeable-people
lion in one thing, for his body is unmarked have a pleasant side, and so the pumrna,
and of a plain fawn colour. Nearly all if caught young, may be easily tamed, and
the animals of the cat tribe are marked with has been known to play in a most friendly
stripes or spots, as our cats are; and pumas way with dogs and monkeys, to enjoy a game
are like our pussies in climbing trees, and of ball, and to do what pussy would not like
in their stealthy ways. They generally live at all-to jump in and out of a large tub of
amongst underwood, in which they can watch water with great delight and glee.

THE WRECK OF THE UNDINEE.'
BY MRS. FRANK COWPER.
PERHAPS I have gone rather too far in Certainly it was only by the merest accident,
calling this little adventure the 'Wreck of or we will say 'Providence,' that she was not
the Undine;' however, if I tell you all about entirely wrecked.
it, you will be able to judge for yourselves. The Undine was, or rather is, a pretty
VOL.' II. 5
lion in oe thing, or his boy is unm rkd hvapesntsendotepu,
andofa lan aw clor.Nerl al f cugt ougma b esiy amdan
th aimlso te attib ae are wth ha ee kow t la i amstfrenl
stries r sptsas or cts r n ua a ihdg n okyt no an






66 THE JRRECK OF THE UNDINEE.'

:little yacht, so small that we only call her Cowes and all the pretty island creeks and
*a sailing boat, though her name appears in headlands, with the breeze nearly behind us,
*the various yacht lists. She is a cutter, and the sea blue and rippling; past the
which means .that she has only one mast, quaint little town of Yarmouth, and through
which holds up the big sail called a main- Hurst Roads, where the big portholes for
sail, and two more sails in front, stretching the guns looked so frowning and fierce all
out to the bowsprit, the long spar which along the massive walls of the fort, in con-
projects over the bows. Sometimes, in fine trast to the smiling, dancing, little waves
weather, she carries a topsail, a small sail that washed over the shingly beach at its
above the mainsail. I expect most little foot.
boys who have boats understand exactly We were going to visit some friends who
what I mean, for toy boats are most often lived between Hurst Castle and Christchurch,
rigged as cutters, and only the larger models and found we had come so fast that we
follow the style of schooners, with two masts, anchored, went ashore, and reached their
or yawls, with one tall mast and one-very house by two o'clock in the afternoon.
short one close to the stern. That afternoon they drove us into Christ-
Well, to return to the Undine; she is church, where, perhaps you know, there is
quite comfortable for two people to live on. a most beautiful minster, or church, and we
She has two cabins, two seats that turn into thought it so pretty that .we made up our
beds, a very nice little stove, and all kinds minds to try and sail up to Christchurch
of shelves and places to put things away in; next day, though we knew well that the
because, of course, in a small place like a entrance was extremely difficult, and the
boat, if you did not have a place for every- channel of the river always shifting.
thing and everything in its place, you would Directly after breakfast the next day we
be in hopeless confusion always. She is started. The day was lovely, but looked
twenty-six feet long, and eight and a half unsettled and promised wind; unfortunately,
feet wide; so now if you have anything to too, we were a little late for our tide, and
measure by, you can exactly judge how should get there when it was just high.
much room we had. She is painted black However, on we went, and ran down to
with a gold line round, and is said to be a Christchurch Bay in about half an hour.
very prettily shaped craft, besides being a All the shore hereabouts is formed by
fast one. We have had many'adventures piles of sand continually changing. My
and voyages in her, but the particular one husband had been here a few 'years be-
that I am going to tell you about now fore, but then the entrance was quite
nearly put an end to our sailing in her for different, running along close under the
ever. cliff with a bank of sand outside towards
It was the second week in August, and the sea. As we sailed down we could
the weather was most lovely, wheh we plainly see that all this was gone, and there
started westwards from the Isle of Wight. we were, with a most dangerous coast in
At first it was almost too calm, and too hot, front, surrounded by sandbanks and shallows
to be very pleasant, but as the day drew on which we could not distinguish because it
it was cooler, with a soft little breeze, and was high water and the sea covered all alike.
also it was such fun watching the beautiful It seemed so funny to see the entrance there
yachts and steam launches sailing and steam- in front of us, with a little wharf and inn on
ing up and down in the Solent. We went a one side, and a spit of sand on the other,
long way that day, nearly twenty miles; past and yet to know that you could not go to it,






'THE WRECK OF THE UNDINEE. 67

because in all that wide stretch of water should force the boat over the bank; but
around us there was only one narrow, wind- finding it useless, we lowered all the sails.
ing channel in which we could float, and all My husband pushed with one of the long
but that little river would be dry land in a oars called sweeps (though they were painted
few hours. We 'lay-to,' that is to say, we white) till he nearly burst a blood-vessel,
arranged the sails so that we hardly moved, but it was no use. There we were, stuck
and looked about for some one to give us firm on a sandbank, the wind rising, the tide
information, falling, so that instead of getting deeper, the
There were two men in a boat not far off, water would get shallower, and soon leave us
so we hailed them. They rowed up and altogether. What was worse, the Undine
stared at us, and gave us some very confused was' stuck by the front part-her bows-but
directions. The only part we could possibly floating at the stern. Every moment the
make out was, to keep the buoys on the waves became rougher; they were horrid
'starboard hand,' that is, on the right side of rollers, such as one always sees over shal-
us. We looked about anxiously, and soon lows, and each one that came raised up the
discovered several buoys, but they appeared stern of poor Undine, and rolling past, let
to be dotted about; we did not see how we her fall again on the hard sand with a thump
could keep them all in a line on one side. that shook her from end to end.
We shouted questions to the men, but they Bang! Down went the portmanteau.
were not very civil, or clear, and would not Smash went the cups and jugs. I crawled
say any more. Time was going, and the over the deck holding on, and went below
tide was quite high, a very bad thing, to try and pack things firmly, and was nearly
because, you see, supposing we struck on a battered to pieces. It was quite frightful to
sandbank the water would leave us for see the lurching of the poor boat. You
twelve hours. Worst of all, the sky had would have thought her mast would be
clouded over, the wind was rising, and came wrenched right out of her. And every time
in puffy gusts from just the wrong quarter, she came down on the sand with a fresh
that was, behind us, so that it was now bump, she shivered from one end to the
blowing straight on shore, making the grey other.
waves roll and tumble in lines of spray and Presently I heard my husband calling,
foam, that warned us of the dangerous and put my head out of the cabin, getting
shallows beneath. my hat knocked in, by the way. He found
There was nothing for it. We pulled the all his pushing in vain, and told me the tide
foresail over and ran on, passed the first was falling fast, and the wind rising; I must
buoy, then another, keeping them, as the put some food in the basket, and come
man said, on the right-hand side. Of course, ashore quickly in the little boat. He would
we were not quite close to them; about ten come off again and fetch some of the things,
yards or so from them, as we concluded the and there was nothing to be done but to sit
channel must be fairly wide. Some more on the shore and watch our pretty Undine
men in a boat shouted to us as we rushed break up, a complete wreck on those
by them on the freshening wind, but we horrible shifting sands. I looked up at the
could not hear a word, and in another sky, and round at the tumbling water; the
Minute we felt a slight shock; the Undine sun was gone, the clouds were driving over-
heeled over. In a moment all was excite- head, and the rising wind whistled through
ment and rushing to and fro. We let out the ropes; the grey sea was covered with
the mainsail so that the pressure of the wind foam, and I saw it was hopeless. Wi h -a






68 THE WRECK OF THE UNDINEE.'

sad heart I put some food into 'a little here was just a hope of saving poor Undine.
basket; and then came the difficulty of Off went my husband along the shore in the
getting into the dingey (the little boat we direction of the little inn. I remained in
towed behind), which was made. of light- charge of the boat, and waited to see what
coloured, varnished wood, and so small that would happen. Presently I saw him meet
she would only hold two. two men, and stand talking; then I 'saw them
It was horrid, and made me feel quite all three get into a large boat and row off
giddy, for the little cockle-shell rose on the towards Undine. When they drew up along-
top of every-wave, while poor Undine rolled side they made their boat fast, all got on
this way and that. At last I jumped, com- board the yacht, and disappeared into the
forting myself with the thought that if I did cabin. I could not think what they were
fall into the water it was not more than four doing. They all remained down below
and a half feet deep, and would only mean a some time, and then one by one their
ducking. However, I got safely into the little heads appeared. They each put down
boat, getting very wet, but nothing worse, and something on the deck as though it were
we rowed off towards the shore, dancing and a heavy weight, and then disappeared again.
swaying over the waves,, and getting splashed This continued for some while. At last they
with the driving spray. all came out together. One man got into
In front of us the cliffs dwindled down to the large boat, and the other two handed
a low line, at the foot of which there was a him down these weights, which he stowed
beach of shingle and fine white sand. Here away in his boat, till I could hardly see the
we landed, pulled up the boat, and sat on gunwale or edge of it above the water.
the ground sadly, eating meat pies, and Then they handed him in a large anchor,
watching the frightful pitching and lurching and he rowed away with difficulty (for the
of poor Undine on the distant sandbank, boat must have been frightfully heavy), and
and the violent swaying of her tall mast. when he had got into deeper water he
The tide was going down and down. dropped the anchor over into the sea.
'There is no hope for her,' said my Then my husband and the man left be-
husband-; 'by the time the tide rises again hind on the Undine hauled with all their
she will be a complete wreck!' strength on the rope fastened to the anchor,
Presently a sort of change began to come in order, if possible, to pull the Undine into
over the scene. The wind lulled, came in the deep water. By this time I understood
little puffs, and then dropped. The sun what they had been doing. Nothing less
came out so bright and warm -that the day than taking the whole of the ballast, con-
looked quite different. The sea seemed sisting of about a ton of iron and lead, from
smoother and bluer. I .watched the little the hold, and had put it all into the small
Saves rippling up, and presently noticed a boat to lighten Undine.
curious thing. The tide was not going I became so excited that I could hardly
down any longer, but actually coming up. sit still, and when, after about half an hour
I called my husband's attention to this, and of tremendous effort on the part of the men,
he immediately said there must then be a I saw Undine slide off the sandbank into
second tide. This is not an uncommon the channel, I simply clapped my hands,
thing in many bays and creeks. The water waved my handkerchief, and shouted for
goes down for about an hour, then rises joy.
again fast, sometimes higher than the first Then I got into the dingey, pushed her
tide. There was not a moment to lose, for off, and rowed after them, so that we formed












i5~1
. I, --
.,, .'- .' ;. -





















.- ;. 1-^ 51
--I
























B,. L- B S----.----.
'1-~









THE SENTINEL. By Sir E. Landseer






SOMETHING ABOUT NAMES. 69

quite a triumphal procession. Undine first, The two names seem to have been popular
with her flag flying, gliding along under her indeed, for in the..year 1300 it is said that
loose mainsail, towing'the heavy boat behind, one-third of the men of 'merrie' England
while I brought up "the rear, with a light were called by them; and at a Court banquet,
heart to think that. the danger was past. given by Henry II., one hundred and twenty
knights bearing the name of William sat down
THE, SENTINEL. to dinner together in the Great Chamber.
SPeople were fond of calling their children
A CAVALIER has thrown his plumed hat down after the Saints, or noted men and women.
upon a table and propped up his gold-headed Thus Thomas became a favorite on account
cariE against it, and left one of his gloves of Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury;
Tllying on the ground, and told his great dog unfortunate Charles I.
Charles, from the unfortunate Charles I.;
to take care of everything until he comes George, from the four monarchs of that name.
back. Look at the dog's great head resting
back. Lookh at the dog's great head resting Jane came into fashion when sweet Lady Jane
on his paws, and his watchful eyes. It would
be bad for any thief waho tried to carry ou Grey had ended her short life on the scaffold,
be bad for any thief who tried to carry off leaving behind her a lasting memory of her
the master's property. Nothing will tempt e h
the msentinel ay rome. his ng will tempt gentleness and piety; and the queens, Eliza-
the sentinel away from his post. There he beth, Mary, and Anne, gave their names to
beth, Mary, and Anne, gave their names to
will stay till his master's return. Even his hundreds of girls, Anna Maria and Mary Anne
little friends, the King Charles's spaniels, can- eing aong he earlier doule n s
So g u being among the earliest double names used.
not persuade him to get up and have a game Among the Saxons, Matilda, Emma, Isa-
with them. Among the Saxons, Matilda, Emma, Isa-
bella, and Cecilia were the four names most
in favour for girls; in Elizabeth's reign we
TABOU find the curious name of Sense, while Frank
NAMES. was used for boys and girls alike. Adam
'WHAT are we going to call our new baby?' and Eve were always popular, and in some
This is always a question of great importance, parts of England twins were often called
not oply to baby's brothers and sisters, but to John and Mary. One pair of twins brought
baby's older relations; and before the day for to the font was to receive the names of Jupiter
the christening arrives a long list of names and Orion, because their parents had 'heard
has usually been talked over and discussed. on them' and thought they sounded well.
Sometimes only one is chosen, sometimes After the Reformation scriptural names
two, or even three; while if the dear little became more common than any others, and
soft bundle, tucked up in the cradle, be a we had Job and Noah, Deborah, Priscilla,
prince, he will most likely have five or six Matthew, Mark, Luke, Paul, and Timothy.
given him. The Puritans went a step farther, and hunted
The favourite boy's name at the present up all sorts of scriptural phrases and out-of-
day is William, and next to it comes John; the-way titles by which to call their children.
and it is interesting to know that one of In old parish registers we come across such
these, namely, William, hpld the first place quaint appellations as From-above, Gyve-
at the time of the Conquest. thanks, Much-merceye, Fear-not, Tribulation,
In Domesday Book there are sixty-eight and Lamentations. One man christened his
Williams, forty-eight Roberts, twenty-eight four sons Love-well, Do-well, Die-well, and
Walters, and only ten Johns; but later on Fare-well; and two men, surnamed Pegden,
John came to the fore and William was left were respectively Acts Apostles and Pontius
behind, although merely for a time. Pilate. We are also told that Dust and






SOMETHING ABOUT NAMES. 69

quite a triumphal procession. Undine first, The two names seem to have been popular
with her flag flying, gliding along under her indeed, for in the..year 1300 it is said that
loose mainsail, towing'the heavy boat behind, one-third of the men of 'merrie' England
while I brought up "the rear, with a light were called by them; and at a Court banquet,
heart to think that. the danger was past. given by Henry II., one hundred and twenty
knights bearing the name of William sat down
THE, SENTINEL. to dinner together in the Great Chamber.
SPeople were fond of calling their children
A CAVALIER has thrown his plumed hat down after the Saints, or noted men and women.
upon a table and propped up his gold-headed Thus Thomas became a favorite on account
cariE against it, and left one of his gloves of Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury;
Tllying on the ground, and told his great dog unfortunate Charles I.
Charles, from the unfortunate Charles I.;
to take care of everything until he comes George, from the four monarchs of that name.
back. Look at the dog's great head resting
back. Lookh at the dog's great head resting Jane came into fashion when sweet Lady Jane
on his paws, and his watchful eyes. It would
be bad for any thief waho tried to carry ou Grey had ended her short life on the scaffold,
be bad for any thief who tried to carry off leaving behind her a lasting memory of her
the master's property. Nothing will tempt e h
the msentinel ay rome. his ng will tempt gentleness and piety; and the queens, Eliza-
the sentinel away from his post. There he beth, Mary, and Anne, gave their names to
beth, Mary, and Anne, gave their names to
will stay till his master's return. Even his hundreds of girls, Anna Maria and Mary Anne
little friends, the King Charles's spaniels, can- eing aong he earlier doule n s
So g u being among the earliest double names used.
not persuade him to get up and have a game Among the Saxons, Matilda, Emma, Isa-
with them. Among the Saxons, Matilda, Emma, Isa-
bella, and Cecilia were the four names most
in favour for girls; in Elizabeth's reign we
TABOU find the curious name of Sense, while Frank
NAMES. was used for boys and girls alike. Adam
'WHAT are we going to call our new baby?' and Eve were always popular, and in some
This is always a question of great importance, parts of England twins were often called
not oply to baby's brothers and sisters, but to John and Mary. One pair of twins brought
baby's older relations; and before the day for to the font was to receive the names of Jupiter
the christening arrives a long list of names and Orion, because their parents had 'heard
has usually been talked over and discussed. on them' and thought they sounded well.
Sometimes only one is chosen, sometimes After the Reformation scriptural names
two, or even three; while if the dear little became more common than any others, and
soft bundle, tucked up in the cradle, be a we had Job and Noah, Deborah, Priscilla,
prince, he will most likely have five or six Matthew, Mark, Luke, Paul, and Timothy.
given him. The Puritans went a step farther, and hunted
The favourite boy's name at the present up all sorts of scriptural phrases and out-of-
day is William, and next to it comes John; the-way titles by which to call their children.
and it is interesting to know that one of In old parish registers we come across such
these, namely, William, hpld the first place quaint appellations as From-above, Gyve-
at the time of the Conquest. thanks, Much-merceye, Fear-not, Tribulation,
In Domesday Book there are sixty-eight and Lamentations. One man christened his
Williams, forty-eight Roberts, twenty-eight four sons Love-well, Do-well, Die-well, and
Walters, and only ten Johns; but later on Fare-well; and two men, surnamed Pegden,
John came to the fore and William was left were respectively Acts Apostles and Pontius
behind, although merely for a time. Pilate. We are also told that Dust and






70 A BRAVE MOUSE.

Ashes were used. as christian names in the dreaded footstep. Puss is a thief, and he
reigns of Elizabeth and James. knows it, but though his conscience pricks
It was a favourite custom among the him, he cannot resist the delicious cream
poorer classes to open the Bible at random which he has cleverly learnt to steal. Finding
and take whatever name seemed to be fore- that he could-not get his tongue low enough
most for their child. In consequence of this into the narrow-necked jug, he thought of
way of managing matters, a Derbyshire clergy- dipping his paw in, and licking the cream off
man was orice, much to his astonishment, it. There was a cat once who, having tried
asked to christen a baby Ramoth Gilead.' this plan, finally decided to drink always in
Hardly less surprised must the minister have the same way.
been who was called upon to give to one mite
of a child such a string of names as, 'Dancell- A BRAVE MOUSE.
Dallphebo Marke Antony- Dallery- Gallery-
Cesar !' This imposing .list belonged also I AM going to tell you about a very brave
to baby's father, whose surname was modest little mouse. It is a perfectly true story,
Williams, and who lived in the year 1676. and I think you will all agree that if courage
In 1804 we find in Beccles Church another and self-devotion make a heroine, this little
curious entry, showing how fond parents were mousey may well be considered one.
of fine-sounding names. 'Baptized Charles Many years ago I was sitting sketching a
Caractacus Ostorius Maximilian Gustavus little bit of Compton Castle, in Devonshire.
Adolphus, son of Charles Stone, tailor.' In This beautiful old feudal manor-house is situ-
this case the father was evidently determined ated in a retired spot. Very few visitors go
that his son should come off better than he to see it. It is quite out of the beaten track;
had himself. but the seclusion is another charm in the
It scarcely seems possible for a human eyes of those who know the beautiful old
being to go contentedly through life bearing ruin. On this particular afternoon I had
the comical title of 'Preserved Fish;' never- selected for my subject an old doorway and
theless such a person really existed, and his a broken stair or two leading to a ruined
name is entered in the New York Directory. turret. It was a. lovely day in early autumn,
The story runs. that a vessel was wrecked on everything was still and quiet, save the hum
the coast of New Jersey, and all on board of the bees and the twittering of the birds in
drowned with the exception of a little child, the ivy. I was quite absorbed in my work,
who was washed ashore still living. The when, presently, a rustling sound among the
finder of the boy, being fond of a joke it is to withered leaves at my feet attracted my at-
be supposed, gave him the name of Preserved tention, and looking down I saw, a few steps
Fish, and Preserved Fish he continued to be from me, a little field-mouse. It darted a
to the end of his life. SHEILA. quick glance at me from its bright bead-like
eyes, and then rushed across the enclosure
ST where I was sitting, carrying in its mouth a
THE DISHO T CA tiny ball. I watched it disappear under the
HAVE you ever noticed the curious way cats wall of the turret. It must be laying in a
have of putting back their ears when they are store for the winter,' thought I; 'but I am
frightened or distressed? This is, perhaps, surprised that the nuts should be ripe already.'
not so apparent in the picture as the miser- With this reflection I began to draw again.
able look in pussy's eyes; but it is there, Presently rustle, rustle went the dry leaves, and
and one sees how he is on the listen for the I looked up to see my little friend scariper






70 A BRAVE MOUSE.

Ashes were used. as christian names in the dreaded footstep. Puss is a thief, and he
reigns of Elizabeth and James. knows it, but though his conscience pricks
It was a favourite custom among the him, he cannot resist the delicious cream
poorer classes to open the Bible at random which he has cleverly learnt to steal. Finding
and take whatever name seemed to be fore- that he could-not get his tongue low enough
most for their child. In consequence of this into the narrow-necked jug, he thought of
way of managing matters, a Derbyshire clergy- dipping his paw in, and licking the cream off
man was orice, much to his astonishment, it. There was a cat once who, having tried
asked to christen a baby Ramoth Gilead.' this plan, finally decided to drink always in
Hardly less surprised must the minister have the same way.
been who was called upon to give to one mite
of a child such a string of names as, 'Dancell- A BRAVE MOUSE.
Dallphebo Marke Antony- Dallery- Gallery-
Cesar !' This imposing .list belonged also I AM going to tell you about a very brave
to baby's father, whose surname was modest little mouse. It is a perfectly true story,
Williams, and who lived in the year 1676. and I think you will all agree that if courage
In 1804 we find in Beccles Church another and self-devotion make a heroine, this little
curious entry, showing how fond parents were mousey may well be considered one.
of fine-sounding names. 'Baptized Charles Many years ago I was sitting sketching a
Caractacus Ostorius Maximilian Gustavus little bit of Compton Castle, in Devonshire.
Adolphus, son of Charles Stone, tailor.' In This beautiful old feudal manor-house is situ-
this case the father was evidently determined ated in a retired spot. Very few visitors go
that his son should come off better than he to see it. It is quite out of the beaten track;
had himself. but the seclusion is another charm in the
It scarcely seems possible for a human eyes of those who know the beautiful old
being to go contentedly through life bearing ruin. On this particular afternoon I had
the comical title of 'Preserved Fish;' never- selected for my subject an old doorway and
theless such a person really existed, and his a broken stair or two leading to a ruined
name is entered in the New York Directory. turret. It was a. lovely day in early autumn,
The story runs. that a vessel was wrecked on everything was still and quiet, save the hum
the coast of New Jersey, and all on board of the bees and the twittering of the birds in
drowned with the exception of a little child, the ivy. I was quite absorbed in my work,
who was washed ashore still living. The when, presently, a rustling sound among the
finder of the boy, being fond of a joke it is to withered leaves at my feet attracted my at-
be supposed, gave him the name of Preserved tention, and looking down I saw, a few steps
Fish, and Preserved Fish he continued to be from me, a little field-mouse. It darted a
to the end of his life. SHEILA. quick glance at me from its bright bead-like
eyes, and then rushed across the enclosure
ST where I was sitting, carrying in its mouth a
THE DISHO T CA tiny ball. I watched it disappear under the
HAVE you ever noticed the curious way cats wall of the turret. It must be laying in a
have of putting back their ears when they are store for the winter,' thought I; 'but I am
frightened or distressed? This is, perhaps, surprised that the nuts should be ripe already.'
not so apparent in the picture as the miser- With this reflection I began to draw again.
able look in pussy's eyes; but it is there, Presently rustle, rustle went the dry leaves, and
and one sees how he is on the listen for the I looked up to see my little friend scariper


















I IW1 k
L'. l t i' l' '












































THE DISHONEST CAT.
~ so s .'['.






72 THE GIANT'S HOLD.

back over the same ground and disappear AFTER THE BATTLE.
through a ruined archway on my right hand. WHEN the excitement of the .fight is over,
I had scarcely drawn another stroke before then comes .the sad time-sad even for the
Dame Mousey reappeared, with burden num- conquerors, for many of their comrades are
ber two. I was now thoroughly interested, wounded and many are killed. In the picture
and resolved to watch her movements closely. a regiment of French soldiers has just carried
Poor little creature she was evidently afraid a fortified. position, and their colours wave
of me, for she dropped her load half-way and over.it. You may see the French eagle over
turned a keen, searching glance upon me. -the tattered flag. Leaning on a gun is the
Then, as if reassured, she picked up her colonel who has won the victory. He is
burden, hastened to the hole in the. tuiret badly wounded, and may not live to receive
wall, deposited her treasure, aid darted back the honours he has earned. His men crowd
through the archway once more. Hardly a round him trying to help him, but on the
moment passed before she returned with ground lie several poor soldiers who are past
another little ball in her mouth. This time all help. What a different scene it was when
she did not stop to look at me, but made the regiment marched to the war, with trum-
straight-for the wall. I sat motionless and pets blowing and drums beating, and banners
watched, but when she reappeared with her waving! But soldiers- know that they are
sixth burden,. my curiosity had grown so going to face danger and death; and a brave
strong that I. rose and stood between her man does not complain, if only he has done
and her retreat. She stopped at my feet, his duty.
dropped her load, a tiny, tiny mouse, and
looked at me with beseeching eyes. Finding THE GIANT'S HOLD.
I did not stir, she picked up her little trea-,
sure and carried it off. I waited and waited; BY E. VINCENT BRITON.
she did not reappear, so I felt sure she had (Continuedfrom p. 63.)
gathered all her -little brood in safety around CHAPTER V.-OUT SHOPPING.
her. Then it struck me as odd that she THE children had been nearly a week in
should thus carry her young ones to a new their new homes, when a solemn discussion
home. It was evidently a hard task, for the was held in the housekeeper's room between
poor little mouse was panting terribly as she Mrs. Fareweather, cook, and old Simon, and,
stood at my feet. as it was concerning the children, you may
I wondered what could have disturbed her like to hear about it.
in her former home, and going cautiously 'It's a thing as must be done,' says cook,
through the archway, under which she had 'for though most wonderful things do happen
passed so many times, found the mystery nowadays, it isn't to be expected that the
solved at once. A large cat lay basking in children' luggage will come floating ashore,
the sun, happily for Dame Mousey fast and their things are that dirty I'm ashamed
asleep. No doubt he was lying close to her that Sally should see them; and as for the
former nest, and the poor mother's heart girl that fetches the pigswash, there's no
must have beat with terrible anxiety as she knowing what nasty story she has set afloat
made that perilous journey six times, at the in the parish by this time. New clothes they
risk of life and limb, for the sake of her little must have, and it's your duty, Mr. Simon, to
brood. tell the master so, and make him see to it.'
Am I not right in saying that she was a 'Children's clothes aren't much in my
heroine? CRoss KEY. way,' said Simon, in reply; 'seems to me,




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