• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 The holiday trip
 Some rat stories
 A ride on the elephant
 The performing bear
 Comical cats
 George's guinea-pigs
 Summer holidays
 The thrush
 The Sunday rest
 Mr. Pratt and his sly cat
 Selfish little monkeys
 The useful bullocks
 Queen Victoria and her animal...
 Neddy and Teddy
 Only a poor little mouse
 The king of beasts
 The swan and its young
 The birds in the old box
 Bondage and liberty
 "Brave Bobby"
 The elephant
 The tiger
 Nine cold monkeys
 The camel
 Minnie and the fowls
 The disobedient donkey
 Charles hunts pet lamb
 The beaver
 The imprisoned lark
 The frozen bird
 The cow and her calf
 My dog Tray
 Horses and pigeons
 Something to do
 Tara-tan-tara
 The squirrel
 Harry's dream
 The dog and canary
 Robert and the bears
 Leonard's pets
 Trusty, the carrier's dog
 Master Bobby
 Sheep and lambs
 The three friends
 The cats and the ape
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Holiday hours in animal land
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00065349/00001
 Material Information
Title: Holiday hours in animal land
Physical Description: 94, 2 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Uncle Harry
S. W. Partridge & Co. (London, England) ( Publisher )
Hazell, Watson & Viney
Publisher: S.W. Partridge and Co.
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Hazell, Watson & Viney,Printers and Binders
Publication Date: [1889?]
 Subjects
Subject: Animals -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Animal welfare -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Pets -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Human-animal relationships -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1889   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1889
Genre: Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
England -- Aylesbury
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Uncle Harry.
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
General Note: Contains prose and verse.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements on endpapers.
General Note: Baldwin Library copy lacks frontispiece?
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00065349
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002239089
notis - ALH9614
oclc - 70706879

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
        Page 6
    The holiday trip
        Page 7
    Some rat stories
        Page 8
        Page 9
    A ride on the elephant
        Page 10
        Page 11
    The performing bear
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Comical cats
        Page 14
        Page 15
    George's guinea-pigs
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Summer holidays
        Page 18
        Page 19
    The thrush
        Page 20
        Page 21
    The Sunday rest
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Mr. Pratt and his sly cat
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Selfish little monkeys
        Page 26
        Page 27
    The useful bullocks
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Queen Victoria and her animal friends
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Neddy and Teddy
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Only a poor little mouse
        Page 34
        Page 35
    The king of beasts
        Page 36
        Page 37
    The swan and its young
        Page 38
        Page 39
    The birds in the old box
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Bondage and liberty
        Page 42
        Page 43
    "Brave Bobby"
        Page 44
        Page 45
    The elephant
        Page 46
        Page 47
    The tiger
        Page 48
        Page 49
    Nine cold monkeys
        Page 50
        Page 51
    The camel
        Page 52
        Page 53
    Minnie and the fowls
        Page 54
        Page 55
    The disobedient donkey
        Page 56
        Page 57
    Charles hunts pet lamb
        Page 58
        Page 59
    The beaver
        Page 60
        Page 61
    The imprisoned lark
        Page 62
        Page 63
    The frozen bird
        Page 64
        Page 65
    The cow and her calf
        Page 66
        Page 67
    My dog Tray
        Page 68
        Page 69
    Horses and pigeons
        Page 70
        Page 71
    Something to do
        Page 72
        Page 73
    Tara-tan-tara
        Page 74
        Page 75
    The squirrel
        Page 76
        Page 77
    Harry's dream
        Page 78
        Page 79
    The dog and canary
        Page 80
        Page 81
    Robert and the bears
        Page 82
        Page 83
    Leonard's pets
        Page 84
        Page 85
    Trusty, the carrier's dog
        Page 86
        Page 87
    Master Bobby
        Page 88
        Page 89
    Sheep and lambs
        Page 90
        Page 91
    The three friends
        Page 92
        Page 93
    The cats and the ape
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
    Advertising
        Page 97
        Page 98
    Back Cover
        Cover
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text








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HOLIDAY




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CONTENTS.



THE HOLIDAY TRIP. 7
SOME RAT STORIES 8
A RIDE ON THE ELEPHANT O0
THE PERFORMING BEAR 12
COMICAL CATS 14
GEORGE'S GUINEA-PIG 16
SUMMER HOLIDAYS 18
THE THRUSH 20
THE SUNDAY REST 22
MR. PRATT AND HIS SLY CAT 24
SELFISH LITTLE MONKEYS 26
THE USEFUL BULLOCKS 28
QUEEN VICTORIA AND HER ANIMAL FRIENDS 30
NEDDY AND TEDDY 32
ONLY A POOR LITTLE MOUSE 34
THE KING OF BEASTS 36
THE SWAN AND ITS YOUNG 38
THE BIRDS IN THE OLD BOX 40
BONDAGE AND LIBERTY .~, 42
" BRAVE BOBBY 44
THE ELEPHANT 46
THE TIGER .. 48









NINE COLD MONKEYS 50
THE CAMEL 52
MINNIE AND THE FOWLS 54
THE DISOBEDIENT DONKEY 56
CHARLES HUNT'S PET LAMB 58
THE BEAVER 60
THE IMPRISONED LARK 62
THE FROZEN BIRD 64
THE COW AND HER CALF 66
MY DOG TRAY 68
HORSES AND PIGEONS 70
SOMETHING TO Do 72
TARA-TAN-TARA 74
THE SQUIRREL 76
HARRY'S DREAM 78

ROBERT AND T-HE BEARS 82
LEONARD'S PETS 84
TRUSTY, THE CARRIER'S DOG 86
MASTER BOBBY 88
SHEEP AND LAMBS 9
THE THREE FRIENDS 92
THE CATS AND THE APE 94
GERTIE'S DREAM 96






-.-- -.
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THE HOLIDAY TRIP.
UP the hill, up the hill!
Off they go, Tom and Will,
Off on bonnie, bright morningof May;
Jane and her brother Jem
Go trotting after them,
Up o'er the green hill, away and away!
Mary Ann and her cousin
Make up the half-dozen;
SUp the hill, over
theheather
they go:
Uncle Harry,
and Tony,
Strapped on
tohispony,
Follow behind them, the last of the
row!





8
SOME RAT STORIES.

OT many of us would like to keep a rat as a pet;
." but rats can be tamed with kindness, as the fol-
lowing stories will show. A gentleman travel-
ling in Germany stayed one night at an inn, where
S' he was much astonished to see a cat and dog and
y a large rat quietly eating out of the same dish.
.Upon inquiry of the landlord how it was that
Wp- such different animals agreed so well together, he
,i'' was told that the house used to be much troubled
)"3-_ by rats, until the landlord caught one when very
young and brought it up with its present friends.
When quite tame, he put a. bell round its neck, and turned it
loose, and the noise it made when running about quite
frightened all its brother rats away.
An omnibus driver once trained a rat to guard his dinner,
which he placed in the box beneath his seat. The rat honestly
did its work, except when a piece of plum-pudding had been
put in the bag. This it found too great a temptation to resist,
and when its owner came, he always found that his plum-
pudding had disappeared.
The rats in our picture have undertaken a hard task, but as
they are very clever and persevering, they will accomplish it.
One of them is standing on its hind legs pushing an egg
towards a friend, who stands on the stair above. The other is
doubtless waiting to give help to either of its companions that
may need it. Can we not learn a lesson from these little
creatures ? Our tasks may seem hard and difficult to us, but if
we. persevere we shall overcome them. Perseverance is the
forerunner of success.









I
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CLEVER RATS.
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10
A RIDE ON THE ELEPHANT.

A RIDE upon the elephant,
That is indeed a treat!
George, Ada, Ted, and Auntie
Jane
Are mounted on the seat.
How large the curious creature is-
How gentle and how strong!
How sensibly he looks around,
And picks his way along!
He moves his funny trunk about,
And begs for bits of cake;
But things that are not given him
He does not try to take.
He knows his way, and goes his round
At a good steady pace;
The children then are lifted down,
SAnd others take their place.
Ada, who felt afraid at first,
Has quite enjoyed the fun,
And gave the clever elephant
A biscuit and a bun.



















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A RIDE ON THE ELEPHANT.
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12

THE PERFORMING BEAR.

-'APA," said Bertie Graham, "do tell us a bear
Story. See, here is a picture of one of them
dancing, and all the people are laughing at it."
Mr. Graham had been a great traveller, and
he often told his son and daughter tales of
S wondrous sights he had seen, and nothing gave
the children greater delight than to listen to
him.
-.- Yes, Bertie, that is a bear which has been
taught to dance, but before it learnt to do so its
masters were guilty of many cruel acts towards
it. It was made to walk over hot plates, the
heat of which caused the poor animal to leap
about. The men who trained it could not have
S had the fear of God in their hearts, or they
would not have hurt one of His creatures. I was on a ship
where the sailors had a pet bear which used to roam about the
ship and do just as it liked. When it was thirsty, it would
go to the tank and turn on the tap, letting the water run into
its mouth until it had had enough. One Sunday, during
Divine Service, it came down the ladder and slily entered the
cabin just behind the minister, who was giving out the number
of the first hymn. Some of the. sailors saw it, and watched
its movements; but when it mounted the pulpit and tried to
push the minister out, they hurried forward and offered it some
sweets in order to entice it away. As it was very fond of sweet
things, it quickly followed the sailors. Mr. Bear never had the
opportunity of attending another Sunday service, as great care
was afterwards taken to see him well secured on that day.










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THE PERFORMING BEAR.





14
COMICAL CATS.

,-. ;.7 OME years ago these comical cats used'
to be exhibited in various places in,
;2 EEngland. They were called "the Bell-
ringers," and were named Jet, Blanche,
Tom, Mop, and Tip. Five bells were
hung on a round hoop, above the plat-
form onwhich the cats were seated. At
a signal from their master they sprang
S- Iup and advanced to the ropes, and,
'I standing on their hind legs,' fixed their
claws in the ropes. Then No. i pulled the rope attached
to the largest bell, No. 2 followed, then No. 3, and so on
till a regular peal was rung, with almost as much spirit as
it would be by boys or men. Sometimes one of the cats
made a slight mistake in pulling a rope too soon, but this
did not often occur. After a few minutes they dropped
the ropes, and retired one by one behind a curtain.
The gentleman who trained these cats said that he
had taught them many funny tricks entirely by kindness.
If one was attentive, and evidently tried to do the work
to which it was- put, it was always rewarded with a meal
of fish, of which cats are very fond. Sonetines the
performers were brought out after the bell-ringing was
over for the children to look at; but as they were very
shy, they would not let the visitors stroke them.
It is thought that cats are not as intelligent as dogs, but
this story shows they are good scholars if kindly treated.















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THlE BEULL RINGERS.






16
GEORGE'S GUINEA-PIGS.

ERY pretty were George's guinea-pigs, and very
3! fond he was of them. He was a poor boy whose
mother could not afford to give him pocket-money,
but sometimes he earned a few pence by doing odd
jobs for the neighbours. At last he saved enough
to buy two guinea-pigs. Then he made a little
hutch and filled it with fresh hay, and putting the
S wee piggies in their hutch, he took them indoors
to show to his mother and sister. His sister had
been ill for a long time, and George, who loved her dearly,
was pleased to see how she brightened up at the sight of his
new pets.
As he was walking through the village next day with the
hutch slung in front of him, he met two boys who lived at the
Manor House close by. They were very pleased with the pigs,
and said they would like to buy them. George told them he
had been a long time saving the money, and he would not like
to part with them so soon. "And besides," said he, "my
little sister, who is ill, will miss them." But the boys offered
so good a price that George hesitated, for he remembered his
mother was not able to buy all the strengthening food his
invalid sister needed, and this money would help her to do so.
So he parted with his pets, with tearful eyes, but with a glad
heart, rejoicing that their sale would be the means of doing his
sister good.
When he explained to his mother what he had done, she
thanked him for the loving thought that led him to forget his
own pleasure in the desire to help others.




























-ti-































































GEORGE AND HIS GUINEA-PIGS.
Holiday Hours. B






SUMMER HOLIDAYS.

V,'i EONARD and Mary Morris were spending their
summer holidays with their parents at a pretty farm-
house in the country. Mrs. Morris had been unwell,
and her husband hoped that the quiet rest of the
country would restore her to health. The children
were at first disappointed at not going to the seaside as usual,
but they soon got over their disappointment, and found great
pleasure in the beautiful lanes and woods near at hand. Mary
spent her time in gathering the wild flowers which grew along
the hedges, and in listening to the sweet notes of the birds ; or,
when her mother was tired, in sitting by her side watching the
labourers at work. Leonard, however, preferred to walk with
his father through the fields and woods, and watch the rabbits
run across the paths, or scamper into their holes directly they
heard a footfall. Sometimes a squirrel would peep out of the
branches just above their heads, and then dart away as if play-
ing at hide-and-seek. And one day they came across a black-.
bird's nest in a bush. The tiny birds could just be seen peeping,
from under their mother's wing, and the parent-bird looked at
Leonard as if she was afraid he might try to rob her of her
little ones. Just as they were about to move away, a large.
rabbit put its head out of a hole close by, and began to nibble
the tender grass; but directly they moved it drew back into its.
hole. They stayed a little while, hoping it would come out
again, but it did not do so. The next afternoon Leonard took.
his sister with him to see the blackbird's nest, and she was.
delighted to find that the bird did not fly away from her.
When the holidays were over, both the children said they were.
the happiest holidays they had,ever spent.
















































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HE ABBT AND IRD.
'IHE KABBIT AND BLACKBIRD.





20

THE THRUSH.


-- THERE'S a merry brown thrush sitting
Ii ^up in the tree;
He's singing to me, he's singing to me.
-z .And what does he say, little girl, little boy?
," Oh, the world's running over with joy !"
Don't you hear ? Don't you see ?
'' ... Hush! look! In my tree
I'm as happy as happy can be.


And the brown thrush keeps saying, A nest do you see,
And five eggs, hid by me, in the old oak tree!
Don't meddle don't touch little girl, little boy I
Or the world will lose some of its joy!
Now I'm glad! now I'm free !-
And I always shall be,
If you never bring sorrow to me."


So the merry brown thrush sings away in the tree,
To you and to me, to you and to me;
And he sings all day, little girl, little boy-
Oh, the world's running over with joy !
But long it must be,
Don't you know? don't you see?
Unless we are good as good can be "

















i ~























THE SONG OF THE THRUSH.





22
THE SUNDAY REST.

", 'l HE two horses we see so quietly lying down in
their stable know this is a day of rest for them
S as well as for their master and mistress. On
,i! other days at this time, Jim, the ostler, would be
busy giving them their corn, or brushing their
S shining coats, in order to fit them to take their
mistress out for her morning drive. And many
coachmen as they pass by turn to look at these
Swell-kept horses, and wish theirs looked in as
-- good condition.
On Sunday their master goes into the
stable with some nice fresh hay, or something he knows his
horses like, and feeds them with his own hands, and the
sagacious animals look for him on that day. Jim sometimes
teases them by offering their corn first, as on week-days,
but they will not take it from him. They wait, and listen
for their master's step; and when he has given them their
special Sunday treat, they are ready to take their usual food
from Jim.
If God's holy law were obeyed-" Six days thou shalt do
thy work, and on the seventh thou shalt rest, that thine ox and
thine ass may rest"-how many men and animals who now
know no difference between week-days and Sundays would be
bright and happy! Every child can help to bring this happy
time nearer. If my readers resolve never to ride on the
Sabbath day, perhaps some of the cabmen and omnibusmen
may be able to spend Sunday at home with their children, and
the horses they drive may be able, like those in our picture, to
enjoy the Day of Rest.







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THE SUNDAY REST.




24

MR. PRATT AND HIS SLY CAT.


...." pUSS! Puss! Puss!
Where can you be ?
t Are you on the house-top ?
I will go and see."
Out he popped his bald head,
/ But no cat could he spy;
He closed the garret window,
And felt that he could cry!


" Puss! Puss! Puss I
Where can you be ?
Are you in the cellar ?
How you bother me!"
So he took a candle,
Went sadly down the stair,
Calling, Pussy Pussy "
But pussy was not there.





25
Puss Puss! Puss!
:---.-- :. Il(--------
j Aren't you a tease! "
fi, He looked in the cupboard,
j l;l .''Mong the bread and cheese.
SI'" Come to me, dear pussy! "
But he got no reply.
-" I fear that you are starving,
Poor thing, and that you'll die!"

He went to the parlour- .
What did he see ? .
Pussy on the table,
Jolly as could be !
"Where is my mutton-chop?
You bad cat! tell me true."
Slypussy licked his whiskers,
And said, "Mee-ow, '
mee-ew!"






26

SELFISH LITTLE MONKEYS.

i -- -' AGGIE had been very good with her lessons, so
her mamma took her and her brother Mark to
the Zoological Gardens, at Regent's Park, Lon-
'- don, to see the monkeys in their new house. The
., children were delighted with the funny tricks
and playful ways of these animals. Sometimes
-- (C the monkeys ran round the cage as though they
\i were playing games such as children play at
L-' I school; then they seated themselves on the
/ ~floor, and with solemn faces had a long chat.
Some of the visitors had brought cakes and
nuts with them; and when they gave a cake
to a little monkey that came near, the bigger ones
would try to snatch it away. One of them snatched a
pretty piece of ribbon from a little girl's hat, and ran
With it to the top of the cage, where the mischievous
s- creature tried to tie it round its head. Another
monkey ran after this one and got the ribbon away from
it; then the others tried to get hold of it, and at last there
was a regular scrimmage. How selfish they are to take
things away from the little ones," said Maggie. Yes,
my dear," replied her mamma; "but they do not know any
better, and cannot be taught as you can." This set Maggie
thinking, for sometimes she did not like to give up her play-
things to her little brother. As they returned home, Maggie
whispered to her mamma, I should not like to grow up selfish
like the monkeys; I will try to make others happy." And in
many little acts of kindness at home, Maggie showed that her
visit to the monkey-house had taught her a good lesson.







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AIONI(EYS FEEDING.





28
THE USEFUL BULLOCKS.

DOSA BONHEUR has given us a
very fine picture of two bullocks
'' harnessed to a cart, waiting for their
master to finish loading. When he
-- has done so, he will drive them to the
i i." nearest market-town, where he will be
J able to sell his charcoal.
Perhaps some of my readers, when
they are older, may visit foreign lands, and if so they will see
some strange sights, such as they may never see in England.
In many parts of the world, bullocks are used as the chief
beasts of burden; they draw heavy loads along the badly-made
roads, doing the work usually done by horses here. They are
yoked by means of their horns to a waggon or plough, and
their great strength enables them to do work which a horse
would find very toilsome. In some parts of South Africa,
where the roads are little better than ruts, frequently as
many as sixteen or twenty bullocks are harnessed to a waggon,
and yet the wheels often get fixed in the mud, and it takes
many hours of hard work to get them out again. Dr. Living-
stone, the missionary, had a favourite bullock, which he used
to ride when on his journeys, and to which he was very much
attached.
In Eastern countries the bullock, or ox, used to help in
the barn for treading out the corn, after the harvest had been
gathered in; and in the Bible we read, Thou shalt not muzzle
the ox which treadeth out the corn." He was to be allowed to
eat the corn if he wished to do so.





















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THE PATIENT BULLOCKS.





30
QUEEN VICTORIA AND HER ANIMAL FRIENDS..

HEN Queen Victoria was a little girl, she lived
S with her mother, the Duchess of Kent, at Ken-
sington Palace. Her uncle, the Duke of York,
who, you know, was a son of King George the
III., gave her a very pretty donkey; and when
the weather was fine enough the future Queen
S was permitted to ride upon this donkey in the
gardens. Our artist shows her gaily chatting
with her mamma. This little lady would say,.
"Good morning;" and smile to all the children
or friends who recognized her. The love-
of animals, which was so marked in Queen
") Victoria as a child, is still very strong. When
the Prince Consort was alive, the Queen took
many pleasant journeys over the Scotch hills, mounted on al
sure-footed donkey. Queen Victoria has many beautiful dogs,
which accompany her in her walks, and which she greatly-
values.
For many years, also, the Queen has taken an active interest
in the work of the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to
Animals, a Society that not only takes steps to get cruel men
punished, but encourages the love of animals in the young.
The Society offers many prizes to school children for the best.
essays, written by themselves, on kindness to animals. Some--
times the Queen is present at the yearly meeting of prize-
winners, and it is hoped that some of our readers will try to-
earn a prize, and that it may be presented to them by the::
Queen, or by one of her daughters.










































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S N"ESS~ '. ,' 1 ~ ..I.. , ,,PACR E

PRINCESS VICT]_ORIA RIDING IN/ KENSINGTON PALACE GAR.DENS.





32
NEDDY AND TEDDY.

--: COME, Annie, and see the beau-
,' tiful donkeys papa has brought
S" for Nelly and me," said Flossie Hill
'' to her cousin, "You know papa
-- promised us a pair when he was able
S- to live in the country; and yesterday
S after tea he told us to go to the
stable, and there we saw two such
lovely donkeys. And mamma has bought a donkey-carriage,
and says that we may go for a drive this morning. John,
the gardener, will go with us, and teach us how to drive."
Away ran the children to the stable, where they saw Neddy
and Teddy, with their heads hanging over the gate as if they
expected visitors. The two sisters had asked John for some
hay to feed their pets with. Cousin Annie was a little afraid at
first; but before her visit came to an end she was as ready to
feed the donkeys as her elder cousins were.
Every fine day, except the Sabbath, these two children
might be seen driving through the country lanes, ofttimes being
made messengers of mercy to some poor cottager living in a
neighboring village, to whom Mrs. Hill wished to send a
useful present or some dainty food. At other times they would
give some of the village children a ride, and take them home
to tea, which mamma prepared in the garden.
Mr. Hill never allowed his children to carry a whip, and
the donkeys never needed one. The lessons of love and mercy
which they learned as children are now bearing good fruit in
the earnest lives of Flossie and Nellie, and in the work they
are doing for the good of others.
















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NEDDY AND TEDDY.
Holiday Hours. C





34
ONLY A POOR LITTLE MOUSE.

1 I'M only a poor little mouse,
ma'am !
I live in the wall of your house,
ma'am!
SWith a fragment of cheese,
and a very few peas,
I was having a little carouse,
ma'am!
No mischief at all I intend, ma'am!
I hope you will act as my friend, ma'am!
If my life you should take, many hearts
it would break,
And the troubles would be with--
out end, ma'am.
My wife lives there in the crack, ma'am !
She's waiting for me to
^ -v come back, ma'am!
She hoped I might find a bit
of a rind,
-. ~ For the children their
dinner do lack, ma'am.





35
I never was given to strife, ma'am !
Don't look at that terrible knife, ma'am!
The noise overhead, that disturbs you in bed,
'Tis the rats, I venture my
'.,,. life, m a'am .


Wl r In your eyes I see mercy
I'm sure, ma'am!
S~()Oh, there's no need to open
i -the door, ma'am!
/ Ill lip through the crack, and
I'll never come back,
I'11 never come back any
more, ma am.






36

THE KING OF BEASTS.

"- HAT wonderful strength the lion possesses. See
:' Vhis great head and powerful claws. And what a
magnificent mane he has Perhaps he is waiting
S -, for a deer to come and drink of the water that
". runs past the foot of the rock. Then those
-': 1 eyes which now look so sleepy will be wide
-, open, and the lion will spring upon his prey,
S carrying it off to the cave in the rock, where the
lioness and young lions are waiting. When you
visited the Zoological Gardens, did you not feel very thankful
that the cages were so strong? And did you notice how
your little brother and sister crept up closer to papa, and held
his hand tightly when the great lion roared for his food ?
In olden times men who had been taken prisoners in war,
or who had displeased those in authority, were sometimes
thrown to the lions, or made to fight with them. You know
the story of Daniel. He was cast into the lions' den because
he obeyed God rather than the king. But God watched over
Daniel, and when the king came in the morning he saw him
sitting in the midst of the lions unhurt.
Some of you may have seen the picture of the Christian
martyr who was condemned to death for confessing his love to
Christ. He is lying quietly asleep on the hard ground, although
the lions are roaring near him. He had lain down to sleep
knowing that God was near; and trusting in God he could sleep
peacefully, though such an awful death awaited him on the
morrow.











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THE iNGO ESS






38
THE SWAN AND ITS YOUNG.

7 [OST young folks have seen the
-- swan as it floats majestically
S .either on the lake or river. The
S, swan in our picture has made her
nest in a secluded nook on one of
the banks of the river Thames. The
*_ -nest is surrounded by willows and
long grasses. Mrs. Swan has got a
family of five little swans, which, you
know, are called cygnets. They are too young to feed them-
selves, so Mamma Swan has to search round for the tenderest
grass-tops with which to feed her family. How pretty they
look as, with bills wide apart, they wait for the grass to fall
from their mother's bill !
Have you heard the story of how a swan once saved the
life of a rat? Well, Mrs. Rat had built her nest on a very
small island in the river, but, through the flood, the river
overflowed the island and washed the nest away. The rat was
in danger of being drowned. But at that moment a swan floated
by, and the rat seized this opportunity for escaping. She jumped
upon the back of the swan, and was borne quickly and safely
down the stream. The swan presently reached a part of the river
where the banks were higher and the water less turbulent. The
rat then leaped to the bank, and disappeared among the grass.
Swans may be seen in great numbers on the upper portion
of the Thames, and are very tame. They delight to come across
a boating party who have landed and are picnicing on the
bank. There they will wait and eat any morsel which may
be thrown to them.











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THE SWvAN AND HER FAMILY.





40
THE BIRDS IN THE OLD BOX.

WHAT strange places birds some-
times select for their nests.
An old kettle, thrown out into the
fields, made a cosy home for a pair
-- of robins; and two swallows built
their nest in the corner of an old
picture-frame. They found a window broken, and, having
entered the room, soon found material for the nest. Here
they came for three successive years, and then the owner of the
house, who had been away from home,returned, and noticing
the broken window, had it repaired and the birds had to seek
a new abode.
Our little friends in the picture have taken possession of an
old box, which hung on the wall of a fruit garden, and there
they reared their little ones until they were big enough to
go out and get their own living. The gardener did not try to
drive them away, for he knew they would destroy the grub
which so often injured his trees. His children used to save the
crumbs from the breakfast-table and spread them on the ground,
and then watch the old birds hop down and pick up the choicest
bits, which they carried up to the nest for their young. Chil-
dren living in towns may not be able to find nests in their
gardens, but they can think of the birds as the gardener's
children did. When the snow is on the ground they should
save the crumbs and put them on some part clear of snow.
Then the sparrows, and, perhaps, a redbreast, will quickly hop
down to get a meal. And what a pleasure it will be to watch
them, and think that the crumbs thus scattered will keep the
pretty birds from suffering hunger.






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42
BONDAGE AND LIBERTY.


HAT a pretty picture Mr. Harrison Weir
-'has given us of a goat resting with its
..' young, under the shadow of a rock, sheltered
S---- from the hot sun. How peaceful, well-fed,
and contented they look! The little ones have
no fear, for they know their mother is always
on the alert to shield them from harm. When they have
rested they will have a good game together, perhaps hiding
themselves in the fern; and when their mother calls them they
will jump out and run to her side. They are pretty, graceful
little creatures when in a state of liberty, but how changed
they often are when in bondage.
The second picture shows a poor goat harnessed to a
children's carriage. Weary and jaded, and with a parched
tongue, the poor creature has fallen down in agony. I have often
seen poor goats harnessed to carriages at the seaside-no cool
water to refresh them, no food, and no shelter from the hot sun.
How sad, very often, is their condition-hard fare, hard work,
and often hard blows. At Margate, a few years ago, a cruel
lad broke the jaw-bone of a beautiful goat by shamefully
beating it with a stick. Such cruelty as this might be prevented,
if little children,when they are about to have a ride in a goat
carriage or on a donkey,would say to the driver, "Please do
not whip it."
I hope that none of my young friends will ever get into a
goat carriage, and allow the driver either to overload it, or to
beat the goat, I feel sure that your ride will be a more
enjoyable one by knowing that you have prevented wanton
cruelty.



















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BONAGEANDLIBRTY





44
"BRAVE BOBBY."

UCY GRAY was very fond of playing by the side of
the pond, and watching the ducks swimming on its
surface. One day she saw a little boat, not far from
.i. the edge, which some boy had lost. She tried to
-.,' --' get it, so that she might .return it to its owner, but
.ri_ ...~ in doing so she fell into the water. Her mother was
,,- looking out of window and saw her sinking. She
screamed to the servant, and both rushed to the pond;
S but as it was some distance from the house they
feared poor Lucy would be drowned before they could reach
her. But another had reached the pond before them. Bobby,
a fine Newfoundland dog belonging to a neighbour, had seen
the accident, and had plunged into the water, and was holding
Lucy up. She was quickly taken out, carried home, and put
to bed, and in a few days she was none the worse for her bath.
When Mr. Gray came home he was very thankful that the
dog arrived just at the right time to save his little daughter
from death.
Bobby and Lucy are now great friends. Whenever Lucy
goes out Bobby trots by her side, and Mrs. Gray has no fear
that her daughter will come to harm. Lucy and the dog may
often be seen racing across the common together, and it
is very pretty to see her walking with her arm round its neck,
whispering some secret into its ear, or praising it for the
clever way in which it picked up the handkerchief she had
dropped on the road. If you asked Lucy the name of her
preserver, she would tell you it is "Brave Bobby,"., because
it rescued her when she fell into the pond, and was in danger
of being drowned.










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"(BRAVE BOBBY."
AFrom; Sir Edwin Landseers Pinting. By 2erdiss."hn 0 212r Grav2s.





46
THE ELEPHANT.

S EARLY all the young folks who see this book
(/" \ ii will be able to tell the name of the animals our
/ artist has shown. The elephant is the largest
'' quadruped now found in the world. Most young
I people have seen it; perhaps, when it passed
through the town in which they live when Mr.
Sanger's menagerie came.
The elephant is very docile when tame, and
often shows much affection for its keeper. When
-. / Jumbo, the great elephant from the Zoological
-' Gardens, London, was taken away to America, its
keeper had to be taken with it, as it might have been difficult
to find a new keeper to whom Jumbo would have given
ready obedience.
Many interesting stories are told of the elephant's memory,
,especially of its remembrance of kind or cruel acts. An
Indian elephant, at one time, used to pass through a market-
place, where a kind-hearted woman kept a vegetable stall. She
made it a rule to give him a handful of fresh vegetables when
he went by. One day this elephant got into a great rage, and
dashed through the market, frightening the people so greatly
that they all left their stalls. The kind-hearted woman ran with
the rest, and in her fright forgot her child, which was sleeping
by the side of the stall. The elephant came up to the baby,
lifted it gently with its trunk, and laid it safely down on a stall
away from all danger.
When the poor mother returned to the market-place and
was told her baby was safe, we are sure she felt amply repaid
for her acts of kindness to the elephant.

























































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THE ELEPHANT AND ITS YOUNG.





48
THE TIGER.

{ 1, HILDREN who have not seen many foreign animals
1m may easily mistake those on the opposite page for
'i large cats; but they are not cats, although of the
cat tribe. They are tigers. These tigers are marked
with dark bands and stripes, like some of the pussies of which
my young friends are fond. The tiger is very fierce, and people
living in the countries where it is found dread its appearance
in their villages. It not only kills sheep and cattle when left
unprotected, but will even attack men, and it has been known
to pull a man down from off an elephant, and carry him away
in its mouth.
It has often been stated that a cat does not like to wet its
feet, but it will do so when tempted to get something it very
much likes. So the tiger will follow its prey into the water at
times, as the following anecdote will show. Two gentlemen
were once sailing up a river in India, when one of them
went ashore to get food. He had only taken a few steps when
he met a large tiger. He quickly turned and ran to the river,
into which he plunged, not expecting the tiger to follow, as.
he had been told that tigers did not like to wet their feet.
This tiger, however, entered the water, and was gradually
drawing near to the gentleman, when he, being a powerful
swimmer, took a long dive, and thus escaped. When he came
to the surface he was thankful to find that his unpleasant
follower had turned back again.
A lady who lived in India frightened a tiger, which was
about to spring upon her, by opening a large umbrella she had
in her hand. This act so frightened the tiger that it turned
round and crept away.








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Hoda Hur TGRSONTH "ACHFO PEY





50
NINE COLD MONKEYS.

C-r" EE! nine chilly monkeys all sitting in
'-. a row !
::i' What they are all thinking of I should
-& is like to know.
Is it about Africa and the palm trees
71 high,
And the sandy deserts beneath the
tropic sky ?
Is it about Asia, where their kindred
.climb
/ ." Around the ruined temples of a by-gone
Time ?
Or South America, where roll the rivers broad
Through valleys where the feet of white man
never trod'?
Is it about Gibraltar, from whose rocky seat
They look down where an ocean and a vast sea
meet ?
You and I will never know what they think about;
If they could but speak, perchance, we'd find the
secret out.
They chatter to themselves; their meaning we
don't know-
Perhaps we'll understand it when we wiser grow.
I've found it out, I think! I'll whisper it to you :-
'Tis of the nuts the children bring them to the Zoo!






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A COLD DAY IN THE ZOO.
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A COD DA I THEZOO






52
THE CAMEL.

\ NAME given to the camel by those who know
','- its value in dry and sandy lands is "The Ship
Sof the Desert." It is not possible to cross
these trackless wastes except when mounted on
camels. There are no pleasant green fields-only
S miles of dry, soft sand. The sand is often blown
about in great clouds, and if one tried to walk
over it alone, he would get lost and die of thirst.
Let us look at a caravan just getting ready to
A start on a long journey. The camels are kneeling
C _. down in front of a merchant's house, and the
servants are fastening the loads of goods upon
.. their backs. Before starting, the men bring water
for the camels to drink,, and as we watch them
drinking, we wonder how it is possible for them to take so
much. But a wonderful provision of nature enables them
to take in a large supply, and store it up in tank-like
structures inside their bodies until they have need of it.
They are starting now, and we will follow them for the first.
day. How dreary the desert looks! No trees, such as we
have in our land; no shelter from the sun. The drivers.
halt for a time to take the midday meal, but the stay must
be brief, as they wish to reach a well they know of, where they
purpose staying, for the night. On they go, and just as the
sun begins to sink, they see right in front a few palm trees
waving their lofty heads, and then they know rest is at hand.
The camel in the picture belongs to some wandering Arab.
who is moving his family to a new home. We see that
the children are packed in baskets for safety.


















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54
MINNIE AND THE FOWLS.

MINNIE HAMILTON was on the
-- way to Australia with her mother.
SHer father had died the year pre-
---"- ,JE viously, and Minnie and her mother
were going to live with an uncle who,
" -,-a1--" ... had a farm near Melbourne. When
her father was living, Minnie had a
bright and cheerful home, with pets of all kinds; and as she
was a loving little girl, she had many friends. But on the
ship she was alone most of the day, as her mother was not
well enough to leave her cabin, and Minnie found it very dull
for want of a companion.
But one morning she found some work to do. The
steward took her to the place where the fowls and ducks were
kept. On large steamers these are taken in order that the
passengers may have eggs or fresh food on the voyage. The
fowls stretched out their heads when Minnie came near, hoping
she had brought some food for them. She asked the steward
whether she could have some Indian corn and water,
and whether she might come each day to feed them. The
steward had little children of his own, whom he had left
at home in England; so he very gladly gave her the food, and
Minnie attended to her new duties very well. See how
serious she looks as she watches the fowls eating out of her
hand. But she was happy in being useful, and having some-
thing to care for. We are sure Mrs. Hamilton was pleased
to see the happy change in her little daughter, for she knew
how much Minnie needed something to occupy her attention
while on the voyage.







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56
THE DISOBEDIENT DONKEY.

\ EDDY, the disobedient donkey, belonged to Mrs.
/ (, Grey. One morning her son Tom was cleaning
the stable, while Neddy was outside nibbling
)"o the grass. All at once Neddy started down the
Road at a gallop, and before Tom knew it,
."1/ Neddy was out of sight. He soon came to an
'1 open gate, leading to a field of corn that belonged
i'" to Farmer Brown. "Here's a treat," thought
Si Neddy; "I'll go in and have a feast." He spoilt
4' his back, kicked his heels in the air, and brayed
loudly. The noise brought policeman White, who cap-
tured Neddy and led him down the road in triumph. Caw,
caw; you won't do that any more," croaked an old crow, who
had been watching Neddy for some time. "Remember,
thieves never prosper."
Poor Neddy felt much too downcast to reply, as he would
have done at another time. He was soon locked in the
pound, and there left until his mistress should obtain his
release.
Mr. Green, the pig dealer, was passing at the time, and,
turning to the pig he held by the leg, said, "You see what
comes of disobedience. You are always trying to get your
own way. I can only make you go forward by pulling you
backward." This lecture, however, did not do piggy much
good, for when Mr. Green gave the string a tug, he squealed
and ran away. Neddy was soon released, and ever afterwards
had a great aversion to pass the village pound. He is no
'longer a disobedient donkey.















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Tx4 POUND









THE DISOBEDIENT DONKEY.







CHARLES HUNT'S PET LAMB.

'._ ', (CHARLEY HUNT'S father was a shep-
!l,, v herd on a large farm in Surrey. One
day he was out looking after some of his
S flock, which had strayed away from the
fold, when he heard the bleat of a lamb.
He went into the wood from which the sound seemed to come,
and there found a little lamb, evidently very tired and weak,
lying under a tree. Mr. Hunt took it up in his arms and
carried it to his cottage. Just as he entered the door he heard
his son Charles asking his mother whether he could do any-
thing to help her. "Here is some work for you to do, Charley,"
said his father. "Take charge of this lamb. It has lost
its mother, and needs some one to feed it, and to make a nice
bed of fresh grass for it to rest upon. Will you do it ?"
"I will try, father," replied Charles. The work was very
pleasant,.for he felt thankful that his father trusted him, so
he gave up all his spare time to his new duties. The lamb soon
grew strong and learned to follow its young master just like
a dog. Sometimes it would go with him to the village school,
and as soon as Charles entered the door of the school it would
return home, and rest patiently till lessons were done and
the boys were coming out, when it would trot to the gate and
wait till its youthful owner came in sight. The neighbours
knew when they saw Charles walking down the village street
that the lamb was not far away.. Charles has now been made
the under-shepherd on the farm where his father was ; and. his
master knows that he can fully trust him, for he always
shows the same tender care for the sheep of his flock that
he did for his pet lamb.

















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CHARLEY ATD H-1S PET LAMB.
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6o
THE BEAVER.

.' ROBABLY none of my young readers have seen a
Beaver in its native state. Many years ago, before
England was as crowded as it now is, and before
Ssteamboats had been invented, beavers could be
;, ,;' seen in some of our rivers, far away from human
S habitation, building their homes of wood and
Smud. They have very strong, sharp teeth, with
S ., which they can gnaw through small trees. They
-l A ,-,. generally select the birch or poplar, as these trees
"'- will often grow after being planted in the water.
When the beavers have almost bitten the tree
through, so that it is in danger of falling, they go to the other
side and gnaw away that part which still holds the tree up,
when down it comes with a crash. If it is too large to drag
away, they divide it into logs, which they roll down to the
water's edge. When the winter is coming on, the beaver covers
his house with fresh mud, and it is said that when finished, it
looks like a bird's nest turned upside down. The roof is
sometimes five or six feet thick. What wonderful patience
these animals must have !
In North .America, the Indians pursue the beavers for
their fur, which they give to the traders in exchange for food
or useful tools, as the natives of that far distant land have no
gold or silver money to purchase food with, as we have in our
own civilised-countries. When they catch young beavers
they take them home as pets for their wives and children,
and the little beavers get so tame that they answer to their
names when called, and play with the children just as our pet
animals do.




































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62

THE IMPRISONED LARK.


A ARRY, Tom, and their little sister
.Mary were very fond of birds.
When out rambling in the fields they
often stood quietly listening to the happy
B song poured out by a lark, and they
-- wondered how so small a bird could sing
so loudly. The boys determined to catch one, if possible, as
they believed it would please their mother and little Mary to
have a lark in a cage at the cottage door. So one afternoon,
when going to school, they set a brick trap in a field. They
were thinking of the trap all the afternoon instead of attending
to the lesson, and were scolded by the master.
When school was over they hurried away to the field, and
jiu-t as they reached it little Mary met them. Of course they
told her what they had done, and to their surprise she begged
them not to keep the bird if it were in the trap, but to set it
free, that they might listen to its song as they had so often
done before. At first they did not wish to do this; -but.Mary
said, "Suppose-some man caught me in a trap and would not let
me go, what would mother and you do ?" The boys who loved
their sister dearly could not resist this appeal; so Harry
walked quickly to the trap and lifted it up, when out flew a
bird; and when almost out. of sight, the children heard it
singing its happy song of freedom.

Oh, who would keep a little bird confined
In a cold wiry prison ? Let him fly,
And hear him sing, How sweet is liberty."





















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SET FREE.





64

THE FROZEN BIRD.

:- O NE bitterly cold day, Freddy Clark went
: s running home from school. He had
':- nearly reached his mother's house when he
I ', saw a bird, that seemed.as though it were
dead, lying at the foot of a tree. He picked
it up tenderly, and looked to see if it opened its eyes. But
they were fast closed, so Freddy ran with the poor bird as hard
as he could to his home. He found his mother in the kitchen,
and showed her the bird, and asked if he might put it near the
fire. "I am afraid, dear, it is dead," said his mother; "but
we will see if the warm fire will restore it." But the bird was
dead, so Freddy had to take it up again, and bury it in the
garden.
Now, Freddy had a tender heart, and thought he would
try to get some of the pretty birds to come into his bedroom
and sleep there at night. So he put some crumbs on the-
window-sill, and then on the table just inside.. At first the
birds were very shy, but one afternoon Freddy found all the
crumbs had gone. When he returned from school the next
day, he went up to his bedroom and waited quietly in a.
corner 'where he could watch the window without being
seen. First one little bird hopped down and began to feed
on the window-sill, then others ventured in to pick up some
of the crumbs on the table. Freddy moved forward noise-
lessly and managed to close the window while a few birds.
were in the room. In the morning he fed the birds, and
let them out again. Now they come to see him every
day, and one little robin.- even perches on his finger and.
sings.












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66
THE COW AND HER CALF.

HE cow is a most interesting animal, so quiet and
docile, so gentle and useful. Her milk is one of the
.. best and most nourishing diets for the young; and how
i' much we should miss it were we unable to get supplies
for breakfast or tea, or for mother to make puddings with.
You know that cheese and butter are made from milk;
but many are not aware that the glue the carpenter uses
is made from cows' horns and hoofs, and that the hair from '
their hides is mixed with plaster used for making ceilings. In
fact, every bit of the cow, from the tip of its tail to the end of
its nose, is useful in some way or other.
The following instance showing the sagacity of a cow
was witnessed by a gentleman. Several sheep were standing
ip a field near a cow, looking very intently at her as she
was grazing. Evidently she knew what they wanted, for
when she raised her head and saw them standing in front
of her, she marched across the field to where an old ewe had
fallen on its back and was struggling unsuccessfully to get up
again. The cow put her head under the side of the sheep, and
with a slight toss turned it over on its feet. In the picture we
see a cow with her young calf. With what motherly pride she
leans over her young son and fondles him, as though she
thinks him to be a very handsome fellow. And so he is, and
promises by-and-by to grow up into a strong young bull.
And he, for his part, seems quite aware that his mother is
fondling him. Many a thoughtless boy and girl might learn
a-lesson from. this young animal. Be loving and obedient to
your mother, save her all the trouble you can, and your life
will be the happier for so doing.










































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T.--HE O W R1 CLF.





68

MY DOG TRAY.


THIS is my dog, good honest
Tray,
SLooking as if he meant to say,
I wish that I could speak, I do
"^' That I might tell my love for
you.
My dog, I understand it all,
It really needs no words at all-
Ready to serve me and obey,
Watching and guarding night and day;
Your trustiness and eager zeal
Show very plainly what you feel,
And deeds, dear Tray, much better are
Than any fine professions far.
Besides, he must be blind indeed
Who in your bright eyes cannot read,
And gather from their earnest beauty,
Lessons of truth, and love, and duty.

















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70
HORSES AND PIGEONS.

I THINK I can hear some of my readers
saying, "Uncle Harry, this is the
,\ prettiest picture in the book." I quite
agree with you, for I love horses very
S' much, and nothing grieves me more
-- v than to see careless drivers treating their
\horses cruelly. Let us remember that
horses are living creatures sent by God
|, for our use, and that they can feel pain
/,/ just as we do. These horses have a
Kind master, who will not allow them
i -- to be ill-treated. The coachman is not
allowed to use a bearing-rein to keep
their heads up, but leaves their heads
quite free. And well do the horses
repay their kind master for his care.
Sunbeam has first heard her master's step, and has got
her head outside the door, waiting for the carrot or apple he is
sure to bring. Bonnie Prince Charley stands just behind. He
is not impatient, for he well. knows that he will be remembered.
And the pigeons, too, will have some corn, for none are
forgotten.
When I was a boy, as young as most of my readers are,
it gave me much pleasure to save an apple in my pocket, and
when I saw a horse standing by the kerb, to put the apple on
the palm of my hand for the horse to eat. If we learn to deny
ourselves of- some of our pleasures, we may often help to
brighten the life of some dumb animal, or of some poor boy or
girl who sadly needs a friend.











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HORSES AND PIGEON~S.





72

SOMETHING TO DO.


.HERE is something on earth for
.. children to do;
For each child should be striving
;.- to be
Like the One who once murmured in
accents of love,
'' T" Let the little ones come unto Me."
!t'' There are sweet, winning words, to the
,i". weary and sad
li ^ By their kind, loving lips to be said;,
There are hearts that are waiting by some little
hand
To Jesus the Lord to be led.
There are lessons to learn both at home and at
school,
There are efforts to make for the right;
There's a watch to be kept over temper and
tongue,
And God's help to be asked day and night.
There are smiles to be given, kind deeds to be
done,
Gentle words to be breathed by the way;
For the child who is seeking to follow the Lord
There is something to do every day.
























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PITYZING THE WOUNDED COCK.















TARA-TAN-TARA.

THE sun is peeping o'er the hill
To see our grand display;
Ho! pipers, blow both loud and shrill!
Ho! drummer, thump away!
Ho! wave the banners in the air,
And toss the broom on high;
Come, all good people everywhere,
And see us marching by!
We are the boys that fear no noise,
For bold and brave are we,
'And on we go to fight the foe,
No matter who he be!






" Hallo! hall !" the captain cried.
"What is that noiseI hear ? ">.
" Hee-haw! hee-haw!"-"how fierce it sounds!
I think the foe is near! "
" Hee-haw hee-haw! My gallant lads!
Do say what's to be done ?
Though you and I are not afraid,
Perhaps we'd better run I "
The captain flung his flag away,
Drummer and piper fell,
The sergeant dropped his broom, as they
All hurried off pell-mell.






HE E AW!
i. 'i/ .







FLHEE -HAW -





76
THE SQUIRREL.

.' HIS is one of the prettiest animals to be found
Sin our English woods. Look at the picture! See
how bright the squirrel's eyes are, and what a
fine bushy tail it has. Its little ears stand erect,
Sas if listening for the boys who are now search-
i, ing the woods for nuts. If they come too near
S" the tree on which the squirrel is perched, it will
dart away to its nest, so as to be out of sight till
all danger is past. If we could look into its
nest we should see a good store of nice hazel
/ nuts and acorns, which Mr. Squirrel is putting
by for the use of his wife and family during the coming
winter. As the nest will not hold a large store, this wise little
animal seeks out small holes in trees, and sometimes in the
ground, where it hides a further supply of food. God has
placed in the squirrel the instinct of thrift, so, in the bright
summer weather, it saves up food for the winter, when no nuts
or acorns can be found. Sometimes it seems to forget where
it hid its winter store, and then the nuts, if in the ground,
germinate and spring up and replace those trees which the
cold weather withered up. If the weather is very severe, the
squirrel will close up the entrance to its nest with leaves, roll
itself together, and sleep till the warm weather comes. Its
bushy tail helps to keep it warm and comfortable.
Some boys keep a squirrel as a pet, but it is cruel to
put the active little creature in a wire cage, and then take
pleasure in watching it turn the wheel. It is much better to
see the squirrel leaping from bough to bough in freedom
than to shut it up in a prison cage.

















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THE SQUIRREL.





78
HARRY'S DREAM.


Sj HARRY ASHLEY had been having
... some fun, as he called it. As he came
From school, he saw a kitten, and ran
A --"
.. after it. The kitten was so frightened
that it fled away and could not be
Found when night came on. He also
,.- threw his cap at an old cat that was
S' quietly enjoying the sunshine in the
garden, and made it jump. He was
not really a cruel boy, but was very
thoughtless; and although his mother often scolded him, he
soon forgot her advice and acted just as badly as ever.
Now, on this same evening, Harry had gone to bed, and
had fallen fast asleep, when he dreamed that the old cat, at
which he had thrown his cap, came into his bedroom and ordered
him to get up. He followed the cat to a large house, in one
of the rooms of which he saw a number of other cats that lived
in the neighbourhood. One was in a chair and looked like a
judge; and this cat ordered Harry to stand in a box, facing
twelve cats, who were to act as the jury. The kitten was called
in to give evidence, and it related how greatly it had been
frightened by Harry's rough ways. But a little cat followed,
which said that Harry was not always cruel, as he had been very
kind to her when her paw was hurt in a trap. And Harry,
in his dream, thought he heard the judge growl out, Well, we
will let him off this time, but he must take care not, to come before
us again.", This woke Harry, who saw that the sun was
shining into his bedroom, and he knew his trial by the cats
had only been a dream.














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8o
THE DOG AND CANARY.

HEN Nelly Clark was ten years old, her aunt
Mary sent her a canary in a cage for a birthday
present. It soon learned to know her, and after
a few weeks Nelly was able to let it out of its
cage, when it would perch itself on the tea-
table and peck at the sugar, afterwards singing
quite merrily. But one day the window was
open, and the canary flew out. It rested on
one of the branches of a tree at the back of
the house. So Nelly put the cage into the
garden, hoping that her pet would quickly
return, but to her great grief it did not do
) so; then she feared she would never get her
bird again.
But a few days afterwards she saw her elder brother's
large curly dog walking up the garden path with a bird in his
mouth. Nelly was very much concerned as to the safety of
the bird, and ran downstairs, intending to release it, when she
saw it was her own, dear canary. The dog had caught
the bird very carefully across the wings, and had not hurt
it in the least.
No doubt he had seen it hopping about in the lane close
by, and had managed to catch it; perhaps Master Dicky was
not sorry to get into the care of friends once more. Nelly was
delighted, and she was very careful afterwards' to see that the
window was shut when her canary made an excursion round
the tea-table. But if by accident the window was left open,
the canary carefully avoided flying near. It was evident he
did not wish to play truant again.









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82
ROBERT AND THE BEARS.

IT was a fine day last spring when Robert
: Mason first saw a brown bear. His father
3. took him for a visit to the Crystal Palace, and
when walking in the gardens, Robert saw a
big animal pressing its nose against the bars
of a cage. Now Robert is very fond of
animals, either little or big. All the cats and
S dogs in the street know him; and when
walking with his mother, he will often run
.--- from her side to give a dog a pleasant
.*W pat. Robert ran to the cage to see what the
animal was like, and saw it was a brown bear.
He knew it at once, for he had often seen a picture of a bear
at school. Mr. Mason had a good supply of cakes in his
pocket, for he knew Robert, like other little boys, was fond of
sweet things. Robert soon found that bears like cakes quite
as much as boys do. When he had given away all he had,
his father thought it was time to see some of the other sights.
They then visited the parrots and monkeys; Robert wished to
stroke one of the parrots which looked very quiet and tame,
but his father thought it would not be safe to do so. Robert
wanted to know more about the strange animals he had seen,
and his father promised to buy him a book on Natural
History, full of coloured pictures and interesting anecdotes
about animals.
When Robert reached home he was very tired, but before
he went to bed he told his mamma all about the bears and
parrots and monkeys he had seen in the wonderful palace at
Sydenham.
















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I B W E














THE BRO\WN BEAR.





84
LEONARD'S PETS.

I T is Leonard Moore's birthday. When he came
downstairs this morning, his father, mother, and
-'I sister Mary wished him Many Happy
Returns of the day." And little Mary was
A, eager to give him the present she had bought.
\ Ii--! When Leonard opened the parcel he found a
pretty coloured text, nicely framed, with the
.'words, Blessed are the merciful upon it. It
i was just the size to fit a tiny recess over his bed.
Another parcel on the table was from his mother;
it contained a handsomely bound copy of Long-
fellow's poems. When Leonard had thanked
his mother and sister for their pretty and useful
gifts, his father told him that he too had bought a
present, but he could not bring it into the room;
he would show it to Leonard after breakfast..
When the meal was over, all went into the garden, and
there Mr. Moore showed Leonard a fine rabbit-hutch, and
upon opening the door he saw two pretty white rabbits..
Leonard was delighted, for since the holidays of last summer
he had often wished to have some rabbits, and now his wish
was gratified. After school was over, Leonard brought some
of his young friends home with him to share in his pleasure.
They had a nice tea, then they went into the garden. Mr.
Moore had fenced off a small portion, so that the rabbits
might run about there; and the boys and Mary spent the re-
mainder of the day in feeding and stroking the new pets.
Leonard keeps the rabbit-hutch clean, and is very careful to,
feed. his rabbits every morning before having his own breakfast..

















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LEON.ARD'S PETS.





86
TRUSTY, THE CARRIER'S DOG.

R. REED, the carrier, is a very important man.
T. He travels between York and the villages round
'.'-.., about that city, to which the railway does not
run. His coming is eagerly watched for by
those who are expecting goods from the city, or
S who wish to send presents to their friends or
children away from home. Sometimes he takes
\ i passengers ; and although the journey is very
slow, they like to travel with him, for he is a
happy man, full of quiet fun and kind deeds.
Trusty, his dog, is loved by all the children, but
dreaded by evil-doers. When Mr. Reed leaves the
van to deliver parcels or stays at a coffee-tavern to get
his dinner, Trusty is left in charge, and right well
Does he do his duty.
One day, a mischievous boy, seeing Trusty appar-
ently asleep, pretended to take a parcel out of the van.
But Trusty had certainly one eye open; for as soon
as the boy touched the parcel the dog -caught him by the
coat, and would not let him go till Mr. Reed came out and
released him.
Often when jogging along the roads some poor weary man
or woman looks up as the van comes near, and Mr. Reed
delights to give them a ride, if they happen to be going his
way. Trusty always has a good look at these people, and if
satisfied with them he takes no further notice; but if he thinks
they are not honest folk, he sits by their side, and watches
their every movement. It is remarkable what instinct dogs
have in judging good and evil intentions.















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TRUSTY GUARDING THE CA&RT.





88
MASTER BOBBY.

OBBY is a very young cat, which has yet to learn to be
quiet and sedate, like his mother, and to apply himself
to his special cat duties of keeping the house free from
mice. At times Master Bob makes a great effort to
catch his own tail. He races round and round the
room after it, but finds that however quickly he
moves the tail moves just as fast. One day he
tried to do this until he was quite tired, then he
strolled leisurely to the garden in order to have a rest in the
sunshine. But a pretty moth was fluttering roind the spring
flowers, and Bob had never seen one before; so he at once
gave chase. He shook his fat paw at the moth, and opened
his mouth, perhaps hoping that the moth would fly in, but I
am glad to tell you the moth was no easier to catch than Bob's
own tail had been, so he gave up the attempt, and selected the
most sunny spot in the garden, and fell asleep. When he
awoke he went into the house to try and visit his little
master Freddy, who was ill in bed. Freddy and he were
playmates, and Bob had missed his friend very much during
the week poor Freddy had been ill. Bob had been kept out of
the bedroom, as Freddy's mother thought the playful ways of
the kitten would excite her little son and do him harm. But
this day Bob got into the room without being seen. Hejumped
on the bed and had a good game with his young master,'and
when the doctor came a little later he said Freddy was looking
much better. He thought that Bob's playful tricks had
done his patient almost as much good as the medicine. Freddy
is now quite well, and he and Bob enjoy many a good romp
together.
















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PUSS AND THE MOTH.





90
SHEEP AND LAMBS.

IS not this a pretty family picture ? Such sights
:. may often be seen in the fields in the pleasant
spring time. The lambs play and frisk about
".. just like little children do when out for a
i-' holiday, and the old sheep looks on quietly
to see the lambs come to no harm. What
a hard heart it must be that can feel pleasure in giving pain to
animals so gentle and pretty. It is a painful sight to see
these dumb animals driven through the streets by a barking
dog and an unfeeling man. I have seen boys hunting the poor
sheep along, and beating them if they had the chance. When
the drover is a thoughtful man he does not permit such cruelty.
At the time of year when the sheep are shorn of their
thick wool, the lambs are sent into a field alone to wait for
their mothers' return. As soon as the sheep is shorn, it is
sent out to find its little one. The moment the lamb hears its
mother's voice it rushes out to meet her; but instead of finding
the well-clothed mother it left a few hours before, it meets a
poor, naked, shivering creature. Not recognizing its mother,
it turns round, and runs away. But again the mother's voice
stops it, and the lamb often repeats this stopping and running
as many as ten or twelve times before a reconciliation is effected.
In the Holy Land the shepherd goes before his sheep, and
they know his voice, and follow him like a dog would follow
its master. When one of the lambs is tired and footsore
the shepherd takes it up on his strong shoulders and carries it.
Sheep and lambs are often mentioned in the Bible. It would
be a pleasant task to search for these Bible texts, and especially
for that where Jesus says I am the good Shepherd."









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A HAPPY FAMILY.
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A WAPPY FAMILY.






92
THE THREE FRIENDS.

". TURING a very severe winter in France, Marie, a
/ kind-hearted servant-girl, when crossing the com-
mon near her home, saw a lapwing evidently
'- almost frozen. After a little time she caught it,
and wrapping it in her shawl, took it to the farm-
i\ house where she worked. She carried it into the
kitchen, intending to put it near the stove, but
S,- she found the dog and cat belonging to the house
S were already roasting their faces in front of the
tire. The dog and cat were old friends, having been brought
up together. Marie put the bird on the table, from which
he eyed the two friends evidently,wondering how they would
receive him. After a little time he jumped down from the
table as if he would like to get nearer the fire, but Miss Pussy
did not seem over friendly, so the lapwing hopped over to the
dog's side. The dog was far easier to manage, and allowed the
bird to stand by its side without taking much notice. Pussy,
finding that her friend did not object to the bird's presence,
began to settle down quietly to enjoy a nap. When she awoke
the lapwing was quietly picking a bone which the dog had
put by for its supper.
In a ve-y few days the bird forgot all its fear, and would go
to rest between the cat and dog. It ate out of the same dish,
and usually took the choicest morsels for its own use without
any objection being made by its companions. When the
winter was over the bird used to sleep in a tree at the back of
the house, and only come in to meals. Is it not a pleasant
sight to see those who are usually enemies forget their enmity,
and.live in peace and happiness together?

































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T R F IN





94
THE CATS AND THE APE.

SI- HE picture on the opposite page is intended to
L teach young folks a lesson. Miss Ellen Tucker
Swa s seven years old, and her mother had invited
"I ', a few friends to her birthday party. A nice cake
S had been placed on the table, and after'all the
children had been served with it, Ellen begged
her mother to give her a piece for each of her
favourite cats, Tabby and Patch. The two cats
were in the kitchen looking very grumpy. Ellen
/ i' thought they were disappointed at being kept
:' out of the rooms upstairs, and at not being al-
lowed to join in the fun while her young friends were there,
so she stroked their fur and promised them a good frolic in
the garden on the next day.
They waited till their mistress had left the room, then
Patch growled, "What a shame it is, Tabby; your- cake is
bigger than mine." Tabby was not sure about that, he
thought Patch's was the larger and had the most plums in it.
So after much contention, they agreed to ask Smut, the ape,
to give his opinion. He was quite willing to do so. Tabby,"
said he, yours is the larger, I will make it equal to Patch's
by biting a piece off." After this was done he said Patch's was
now too large, so he bit a piece off hers. As, Tabby still
grumbled the ape tried again and again, until only a small
portion of each piece of cake remained. Then turning to the
cats he said, I cannot afford to give advice free, I shall take
what remains to pay me for my trouble." Patch and Tabby
saw how foolish they had been, and from that day they re-
:solved to be content with what was given them.












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THE CATS AND T14E APE.
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THE CATS AND TH.E APE.














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