• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 The unwelcome guest
 A word to the curious
 Benefits of union
 Look up as well as down
 The donkey philosopher
 Bad tempers make black looks
 A living dog better than a dead...
 An open enemy the best
 How much fruit?
 Willow-stump and the finger-po...
 Excitement
 How can the blind see?
 Above the cloud
 The way to conquer
 How Drover got a dinner
 Moralising comfortably
 The best market
 How to know a goose
 The horse was stolen
 Jumping to conclusions
 Business first and pleasure...
 Doctors seldom like their...
 Unfortunate coincidence
 The furnace for gold
 Payment in kind
 What's law for thee is law for...
 The panic; or, what's it all...
 A cheerful view of things
 Old dogs and young
 How to work
 Make the best of it
 The mill-horse and the racer
 Where to beg and prosper
 The council of ignorance
 The reflections of a peacock
 The cock corrected
 The squirrel and the mastiff
 How Ned showed himself a donke...
 The thrush and the caterpillar
 Test of friendship
 A new light on things
 Not quite so bad as reported
 Look at home
 Circumstances alter cases
 More winter before spring
 The swallows
 Vain-glorious boasts end in...
 A hint to teachers
 Trifles! Trifles!! Trifles!!!
 Two sides to a tale
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Original fables
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00065346/00001
 Material Information
Title: Original fables
Physical Description: 96, 16 p. : ill. ; 20 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Griset, Ernest Henry, 1844-1907 ( Illustrator )
Weir, Harrison, 1824-1906 ( Illustrator )
Religious Tract Society (Great Britain) ( Publisher )
Pardon and Sons ( Printer )
Publisher: Religious Tract Society
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Pardon and Sons
Publication Date: c1889
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Fables -- 1889   ( rbgenr )
Children's stories -- 1889   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1889   ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1889   ( rbprov )
Bldn -- 1889
Genre: Fables   ( rbgenr )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance)   ( rbprov )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
General Note: Date of publication from prize inscription.
General Note: Some illustrations by Ernest Griset and Harrison Weir.
General Note: Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility: by Mrs Prosser.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00065346
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002236331
notis - ALH6802
oclc - 70706914

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Preface
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Table of Contents
        Page 7
        Page 8
    The unwelcome guest
        Page 9
    A word to the curious
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Benefits of union
        Page 12
    Look up as well as down
        Page 13
    The donkey philosopher
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Bad tempers make black looks
        Page 16
    A living dog better than a dead lion
        Page 17
    An open enemy the best
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    How much fruit?
        Page 21
    Willow-stump and the finger-post
        Page 22
    Excitement
        Page 23
    How can the blind see?
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Above the cloud
        Page 26
    The way to conquer
        Page 27
    How Drover got a dinner
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Moralising comfortably
        Page 34
    The best market
        Page 35
    How to know a goose
        Page 36
    The horse was stolen
        Page 37
    Jumping to conclusions
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Business first and pleasure after
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Doctors seldom like their own physic
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Unfortunate coincidence
        Page 45
    The furnace for gold
        Page 46
    Payment in kind
        Page 47
    What's law for thee is law for me
        Page 48
        Page 49
    The panic; or, what's it all about?
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
    A cheerful view of things
        Page 54
    Old dogs and young
        Page 55
        Page 56
    How to work
        Page 57
    Make the best of it
        Page 58
        Page 59
    The mill-horse and the racer
        Page 60
        Page 61
    Where to beg and prosper
        Page 62
        Page 63
    The council of ignorance
        Page 64
        Page 65
    The reflections of a peacock
        Page 66
        Page 67
    The cock corrected
        Page 68
    The squirrel and the mastiff
        Page 69
        Page 70
    How Ned showed himself a donkey
        Page 71
    The thrush and the caterpillar
        Page 72
    Test of friendship
        Page 73
    A new light on things
        Page 74
        Page 75
    Not quite so bad as reported
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
    Look at home
        Page 80
        Page 81
    Circumstances alter cases
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
    More winter before spring
        Page 85
        Page 86
    The swallows
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
    Vain-glorious boasts end in shame
        Page 90
    A hint to teachers
        Page 91
    Trifles! Trifles!! Trifles!!!
        Page 92
        Page 93
    Two sides to a tale
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
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THE UNWELCOME GUEST.










AA









ORIGINAL FABLES.




BY MRS. PROSSER,
AUTHOR OF
Dearest of Daisies," "The Echoed Song," Etc.











THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY,
56, PATERNOSTER Row; 65, ST. PAUL'S CHURCHYARD;
AND x64, PICCADILLY.

















PREFACE.


F it be asked whether a book of
Fables ought to find a place among
the publications of a Society
pledged to put forth.nothing but
what may in some way conduce to the spread
of the Gospel, let the question be met with
another, What 'is the purpose of these
Fables ?" and the answer is, They aim to
inculcate Divine truth by illustrating it
through natural objects."
Then, it may be said, they are not fables but
parables, for the true definition of the fable
is that it never lifts itself above the earth,"
and "that it inculcates prudential morality at
the expense of the higher virtues." Be it so,
let them be parables in name, as they are in
nature, and any scruple advanced on that point
is answered.
"But they are too trivial, too unimportant
to take place among the books of this Society ?"
Here is a possible objection, to which it is






6 PREFACE.

answered, "May not the command gather up
the fragments, that nothing be lost,' be applied
to spiritual as it was to natural bread? Are
there not grains of Divine truth to be gathered
up which lie outside the region appropriated
to the professed theologian ? Are there not
suggestions too homely, too small for the
sublime strains of Spiritual Poetry?" Well,
as the gleaning of these and the offering them
to the Church cannot offend, neither can it be
profitless-for there are times of weakness and
dulness to the strongest and the loftiest, when
golden theology in the mass is too heavy to
bear, and when there is no power to soar. In
such moments the parable puts in its humble
claim to usefulness, and the claim has often
been gratefully acknowledged.
The sovereign said contemptuously to the
farthing, You are not counted among us -
you are not of precious metal; your value is
as nothing !"
Sir," replied the farthing, humbly, "it is
true that I am neither silver nor gold, but I
bear Her Majesty's face as my warrant, and I
am as good for a fourth of a penny-loaf as you
are for a bag of wheat, so I am counted among
the coins of the realm, being, according to my
power, useful, and as fully licensed as your-
self."





















CONTENTS.




PAGE
ABOVE THE CLOUD 26
BAD TEMPERS MAKE BLACK LOOKS. 16
BENEFITS OF UNION 12
BEST MARKET, THE .35
BUSINESS FIRST AND PLEASURE AFTER 40
CHEERFUL VIEW OF THINGS, A 54
CIRCUMSTANCES ALTER CASES 82
COCK CORRECTED, THE .. 68
COUNCIL OF IGNORANCE, THE .64
DOCTORS SELDOM LIKE THEIR OWN PHYSIC 43
DONKEY PHILOSOPHER, THE. 14
EXCITEMENT 23
FURNACE FOR GOLD, THE. 46
HINT TO TEACHERS, A 91
HORSE WAS STOLEN, THE ... 37
HOW CAN THE BLIND SEE? 24
How DROVER GOT A DINNER 28
HOW MUCH FRUIT? 21
How NED SHOWED HIMSELF A DONKEY. 71
HoW TO KNOW A GOOSE. 36
How TO WORK 57
JUMPING TO CONCLUSIONS. 38
LIVING DOG BETTER THAN A DEAD -LION, A. 17
LOOK UP AS WELL AS DOWN 13








8 CONTENTS.
PAGE
LOOK AT HOME. ... .80
MAKE THE BEST OF IT 58
MILL-HORSE AND THE RACER, THE 60
MORALISING COMFORTABLY 34
MORE WINTER BEFORE SPRING 85
NEW LIGHT ON THINGS, A 74
NOT QUITE SO BAD AS REPORTED .. 76
OLD DOGS AND YOUNG 55
OPEN ENEMY THE BEST, AN .. 18
PANIC, THE; OR, WHAT'S IT ALL ABOUT? 50
PAYMENT IN KIND 47
REFLECTIONS OF A PEACOCK, THE 66
SQUIRREL AND THE MASTIFF, THE 69
SWALLOWS, THE. 87
TEST OF FRIENDSHIP. .73
THRUSH AND THE CATERPILLAR, THE 72
TRIFLES TRIFLES TRIFLES !! . 92
TWO- SIDES TO A TALE 94
UNFORTUNATE COINCIDENCE 45
UNWELCOME GUEST, THE . 9
VAIN-GLORIOUS BOASTS END IN SHAME 90
WAY TO CONQUER, THE 27
WHAT'S LAW FOR THEE IS LAW FOR ME 48
WHERE TO BEG AND PROSPER. .. 62
WILLOW-STUMP AND THE FINGER-POST, THE 22
WORD TO THE CURIOUS, A 10







4--






ORIGINAL FABLES.


THE UNWELCOME U1UEST.
OPE I don't intrude ?" said the
magpie, as she hopped jauntily
on the edge of the pan that
Snap and Growler were break-
fasting at.
Growler went back and showed his teeth;
Snap gave an unmistakable short bark.
"I don't seem welcome?" said Mag,
eyeing them before she ventured to dip for
a sop.
Seem welcome, indeed?" cried Snap.
" I wonder you expected a welcome. People
should stay till they're invited."
Mag thought that under those circum-
stances she might have waited a long
time; but, taking to her usual resort, im-
pudence, she replied: Really, friends, you
surprise me; one would have expected that







10 ORIGINAL FABLES.

a person of my appearance and bearing, such
a figure, so well dressed, and such winning
manners, would find a welcome anywhere."
"Among ignorant simpletons," said Snap.
"Manners, a good figure, and fine clothes
may be highly prized, but people with brains
don't think them worth entertaining at the
cost of a breakfast. Depend upon it, a good
character to which you have no pretensions,
being known as a thief 'and a vagrant, is the
only passport into honest company; and so,
to be plain with you, the sooner you take
yourself off the better!"


A WORD TO THE CURIOUS,
HAT are the bells ringing for?"
said the young colt, standing
with his ears pricked up, staring
eyes, and distended nostrils, and
his mane and tail flying about in great
agitation. Mother, what are the bells ring-
ing for?"
How should I know ? said the mare.
But the colt took a gallop half round the
field, and strained his neck to look over the
fence into the road, where a cart was loading
with soil.






A WORD TO THE CURIOUS. 11

"Can you tell me what the bells are
ringing for?" he said to the fore-horse,
whose nose was in his bag, from which he
did not raise it to give any answer.
Rude !" said the colt, and applied to
the one behind him.
But the one behind was very deaf, and
looked sleepily on the ground.
Away went the colt to another part of
the fence, and saw a team coming.
Do you know," he asked breathlessly
of the whole party at once, why the bells
are ringing?"
Supposing that he meant the bells on their
collars, they merely shook them a little more
by way of answer, and passed on.
What insufferably dull animals !" said
the colt, and galloped off harder than ever,
till he came to the hedge that separated the
meadow he was in from the vicar's orchard,
in which the vicar's horse was grazing.
Now I shall have it," thought he. This
is none of your stupid, low-bred creatures, but
high-born and well-mannered, and sure to
know all about it."
"Pray, sir, may I trouble you to inform
me," he said, with much excitement, "why
the bells ring ? "
The vicar's horse with great gravity lifted







12 ORIGINAL TABLES.

up his head and said, "Do you particularly
wish to know ? "
"I do, indeed," said the colt.
"You won't mention it to anybody?"
said the horse.
Certainly not," said the colt, eagerly.
Well, then, it's because the men pull the
ropes.
"But," said the colt, rather staggered at
this, "may I ask, sir, why they pull the
ropes ?"
Ah," said the horse, now you go beyond
me. I've told you all I know, and what's
enough for me might be enough for you. If
you'll take my advice, as a rule, never trouble
your head about things that don't concern
you. You'll save yourself an immense deal
of trouble, and your friends too."



BENEFITS OF UNION,
ov do no work," said the scissors
to the rivet; "we don't want
you !"
"Where would your work be
if I did not keep you together?" said the
rivet. "There's nothing done by the sharpest
without union."






ORIGINAL FABLES. 13








,,.






LOOK UP AS WELL AS DOWN,

" 0n, father! oh, mother the moon is
drowned-she is, indeed; we have seen
her lying trembling in the lake," cried the
owlets, bustling back to the tower, where
their parents sat among the ivy.
"Children," said the old birds, you
looked down and saw the reflection in the
lake; if you had looked up you would have
seen the moon herself in the sky; but it is
the way with novices to be led astray by
representations of a subject which a little
further inquiry would have shown them
were wholly deceptive."






14 ORIGINAL FABLES.


THE DONKEY PHILOSOPHER.

OME close to the hedge, Teddy,"
said a worn-out horse to his
friend the donkey, with whom
he was picking up a scanty meal
by the roadside.
"Why? asked Teddy, following with his
measured pace.
"Look who's coming!" said the horse.
And there passed a well-conditioned cob
drawing a cart full of fresh-cut beans.
"How nice they smell!" said Teddy.
"I should think they must be very good;
but I never tasted any." .: ... :
"I used to get them in my better days,"
said his companion, sorrowfully, "but I can
never hope for them again."
"He's a happy fellow, isn't he ?" said
Teddy, turning his head slowly round to
watch the cart going up the hill.
Some are born to prosperity, some to
adversity," sighed the old hoise; And he
went on to entertain the donkey with his
recollections of the taste of beans, and to draw
comparisons between their condition and that
of the happy cob.
Some hours afterwards, while they were yet






THE DONKEY PHILOSOPHER. 15

in the road, the cart returned empty, and
while the driver stopped to chat with a friend
passing by, the horse walked up to the cob.
"Good evening, sir. Pray what have you
done with all your beans?"
"Left them behind," said the cob.
"Well, you're in very different circum-
stances from what you were when you passed
us this morning," said the old horse.
How so ? asked the cob.
"Can you ask? said the horse. "Were
you not drawing after you a burden of rich
delicacies that scented the air as you
passed ?"
"True, I was," replied the cob, "but
not for my own benefit. The most that I
have to do with beans is to carry them for
the use of others : it's seldom I get a taste
myself."
"Ah," said Teddy to the old horse, as
the cob's master drove him off at a smart
trot, how little we know of the truth of
things! I have often envied my cousin
Jack, that draws a cart full of delicious
vegetables along this road every Saturday,
but I shouldn't wonder if he would tell
the same story. No one can eat more than
enough; and although it looks fine to have
so much substance tacked to you, I dare






IC. ORIGINAL FABLES.

say in most cases where we see it others
get more good from it than he to whom it
seems to belong."
So he buried his nose contentedly in a
bunch of nettles; while the old horse stood
yet in a melancholy attitude, trying to
catch the last whiff of his lamented beans,
of which even the empty cart had left a
grateful odour.


BAD TEMPERS MAKE BLACK LOOKS.
SOBODY could think what made Mr.
Pug, the new pet's, nose so black.
"I know what it is," said Miss
Floss, the lap dog; "he's been
upsetting the ink, that's it "-a severe beat-
ing for doing the same in her lady's boudoir
being fresh in her memory.
N0o, miss, it's not that; he's been routing
among the pots," said the turnspit, who often
got a kick and a cuff from cook for meddling
with her affairs in that way.
"You're wrong, both of you," said Grumps,
the old house-dog, who was renowned for his
surliness; "it's his bad tempers-they've all
settled in his face: bad tempers always make
black looks!"









i'NN










A LIVING DOG BETTER THAN A DEAD LION,

THERE was a lion's image carved in stone,
fierce and terrible. It frowned and
looked sternly as it couched before the
palace gate.
Is he not great, mighty, and awful?"
asked one who stood by, of a poor low-bred
dog that looked, but unconcernedly, on the
image.
"He represents what is great indeed,"
answered the dog, "and if he were alive I
should be terribly afraid of him; but as he
is not alive, and I am, though I am but a
poor contemptible dog, I consider that I am
more to be envied and respected of the two:
for what is a fine outside show, pray, if it's
ever so fine, without any life within ?"
B






18 ORIGINAL FABLES.

AN OPEN-ENEMY THE BEST,
" ooD morning, miss," said the poacher's
dog to the tortoiseshell cat, who was
sitting on the garden wall watching a robin
picking up the crumbs that Miss Lily had
thrown to him.
The cat looked half-offended at the fami-
liarity of the salutation, and was quite dis-













gusted at being interrupted in her object; so
she winked, and turned her head away.
"Game at hand, I see," said the poacher's
dog, spying the robin; "sorry I disturbed
you. I'm afraid I've spoiled your sport; the
bird's off. I can sympathise with you; it's
very provoking to miss when you think
you're sure of luck."






AN OPEN ENEMY THE BEST. 19

"Sympathise! exclaimed the tortoise-
shell, opening her eyes as wide as the sun
would let her; I beg you will keep your
sympathy for your own disreputable class,
and not insult a member of this most respect-
able family with it."
"Take it easy, miss," said the poacher's















dog; "I was just looking on you as one of
us. On the whole, I must say, to be plain
with you, I don't see how you can make
yourself out to be any better."
"Jowler," cried the tortoiseshell to the
house-dog, who was dozing in his kennel
beneath her, "did you ever hear such im-
pudence ?"






20 ORIGINAL FABLES.

But Jowler kept his nose between his
paws, as if asleep, and said nothing.
"Well, miss," cried the poacher's dog;
"now look here. I, in the way of business,
for my master, lay hold of a rabbit or a
hare, or anything that falls in my way,-not
for my own benefit, you see, but purely as a
matter of duty; my work it is, for which
I am trained and fed. Whereas you, who,
I'll be bound, get your saucer of milk every
morning, and your scraps every day, and
are expected to make havoc among mice only,
are at this moment watching the robins that
Miss Lily is so fond of, and feeds with
crumbs that she may hear their songs.
What is that but poaching? And again, I
have heard that things are not safe in the
larder when somebody who shall be nameless
is there. And again-don't go yet, miss"
(for tortoiseshell was preparing to jump down
on the other side),-" it was reported that
the pretty linnet that hopped about in a cage
was missing one morning, and that, if the
thief hadn't prudently hidden, every bone in
her skin would have been broken! Which
of us is worse, Mr. Jowler?"
"Be off from the premises," cried Jowler;
"you're an open, scandalous thief, no doubt
about that: but as to you," he said to tor-






HOW MUCH FRUIT? 21

toiseshell, who was skulking behind him-
you are ten times worse: you take the pay
of the house, and purr, and look soft and
gentle before your mistress's face; but let
her turn her back and there's no wicked-
ness you wouldn't be up to. There's some
chance of guarding against an open enemy,
but a false friend is as dangerous as he is
hateful."
"What a spiteful temper he is in!" said
tortoiseshell, moving quietly off, too wise to
provoke more truth by an answer.



HOW MUCH FRUIT?
O.i. HAT fine tall fellows we are cried
the potatoes to their neighbours
over the hedge. You, gentle-
men, are poor stunted things;
we wonder you don't feel shy to be beside
us."
No, we are not shy," said the potatoes
over the hedge; "we don't make such a
flourishing appearance as you do, indeed, for
we care more for what is within than what is
without, and we don't want to turn out all
top, as we strongly suspect you will."






22 ORIGINAL FABLES.











_



THE
WILLOW-STUMP AND THE FINGER-POSTR

How wise I am "'cried the finger-post to
a willow-stump by his side.
"Are you ? said the willow.
"Am I?" indignantly retorted the post.
"Do you see my arms? are not the name
of the great town, the road to it, and the
distance from it, plainly written there ?"
"Ah, yes!" said the willow.
"Then you must acknowledge how
superior I am to you. Why, I am a
public teacher!"
"True indeed," answered the willow,






EXCITEMENT. 23

"and learned you are; but as to wisdom,
I see little difference between you and me.
You know the way to the city, and are
the means of enabling many to find it;
but here you have stood these twenty
years, and I don't see that you have got
a step farther on the road than I have,
who don't profess to understand anything
about it."


EXCITEMENT;

tr-Q FFr, puff, went the bellows.
Up went the flame.
Puff, puff, puff, went the
I- bellows.
The flame rose stronger and higher.
"Am I not bright, noble, genial?" cried
the fire.
Burn away," said the bellows, and stopped
blowing.
The flame faded, and the ruddy light grew
pale.
"So," said the bellows, "I don't think
much of your. brightness; you can only burn
while I blow. Give me the steady flame, that
keeps strong and clear without the help of
puffing."






24 ORIGINAL FABLES.
















HOW CAN THE BLIND SEE?

A COMPFNY of blind men sat talking together,
seeming well satisfied with their dis-
course.
"The world is square," said one.
"No doubt," said another.
"And grass- let me consider grass is
red," said a third.
"Certainly," cried a fourth.
"And there is darkness always," said a
fifth.
"There can be no question about that,"
chimed in a sixth.
And so they went on, making wonderful






HOW CAN TlE BLIND SEE ? 25

mistakes, and agreeing with one another most
cordially.
But suddenly one of them gained his sight,
and he saw that the world was round, the
grass was green, and that it was light
wherever the sun shone. So he ran to tell
his friends.
Oh, sirs, we were in a strange mistake
when we settled all those things, I assure
you! It arose from our being blind. I can
see now, and wish you to profit by my ex-
perience."
Do but hear him !" said one.
"l Ha ha ha !" laughed another.
"Conceited knave cried a third.
"Impudent impostor! said a fourth.
"Poor deluded fellow said a fifth.
"All cant! said a sixth.
"Would you believe it?" said the as-
tonished man to one who, like himself, could
see.
"Believe it was. the answer; "certainly:
I expected no other. If you want them to
believe you, you must see about getting them
eyes for themselves : they can't see out of
yours. You forget what you were when you
were blind."





26 ORIGINAL FABLES.




,,\ .








ABOVE THE CLOUD,
"/, OTHER, mother !" cried the young larks,
in great distress. "Look at father;
oh, he has gone now into that cloud, and we
have lost him. Oh, mother why did he
fly so high? why did he let the cloud swallow
him up? "
Foolish children," answered the mother
bird, "he is safe enough; I can hear him
singing even now; that cloud which looks so
gloomy to you, is dark only on the under
side; he is above it, and sees a brighter blue
sky than we do, who are down here. Be
content; he will return to us happier and
wiser than he left us, and tell us that if he






THE WAY TO CONQUER. 27

had not pierced that darkness he would never
have believed how much glory and beauty
were above it."

THE WAY TO CONQUER,
'LL master it," said the axe, and his
blows fell heavily on the iron;
but every blow made his edge
blunter, till he ceased to strike.
"Leave it to me," said the saw; and, with
his relentless teeth, he worked backwards and
forwards on its surface till they were all worn
down or broken:,.then he fell aside.
"Ha ha !" said the hammer, I knew
you wouldn't succeed: I'll show you the
way;" but at his first fierce stroke off flew
his head, and the iron remained as before.
"Shall I try?" asked the soft, small flame.
But they all despised the flame; but he curled
gently round the iron, and embraced it, and
never left it till it melted under his irre-
sistible influence.
There are hearts hard enough to resist the
force of wrath, the malice of persecution, and
the fury of pride, so as to make their acts
recoil on their adversaries; but there is a
power stronger than any-of these, and hard
indeed is that heart that can resist love.






28 ORIGINAL FABLES.

511-11 1














RAY, ma'am, may I inquire what affects
you ? said Drover to the black cat,
that sat on the step of a back kitchen door;
"you look melancholy."
Puss turned her head away and made no
answer.
Nay, ma'am," said Drover, as courteously
as any gentleman of high breeding, "I ask
pardon for intruding; but I felt sorry for
you, and thought a little sympathy might
cheer you."
Puss hoped he would go; but seeing he
stood still, and was bent on an answer, she
turned half round, and rather superciliously
asaygnlmno ihbedn," s
padnfo nrdigbt etsor o






HOW DROVER GOT A DINNER. 29

assured him she was neither ill nor melan-
choly, and wanted neither pity nor company.
"Madam," said Drover, respectfully,
"allow me-you are depressed in spirits-a
state in which a true friend is invaluable.
Open your heart to me; I may be so happy
as to help to relieve you."
"I tell you," said the black oat, "I am
not in want of a friend. I was just going to
sleep when you came."
"How vexatious said Drover; "but
that is a proof you are not well; for how
could any one with an appetite go to sleep
while that beautiful bone was close at hand.
"Bone!" said the black cat, contemp-
tuously turning to look at it; "I'm not
so fond of bones."
"Not fond of bones Well, that is surpris-
ing. I thought no one could resist a bone.
As for me, I can only say that (next to meat)
they are my favourite food, and I should
esteem the owner of a bone like that a
favourite of fortune."
"It may be all well that'a half-starved
shepherd's dog should think much of a bone;
but for the favourite cat in an establishment
like this to be put off with one, is in my
opinion a great slight; and, to tell you the
truth, Mr. Drover, I feel it very much."






30 ORIGINAL FABLES.

"Well, ma'am," said Drover, who had now
got the .cue to her ill-temper, there is much
truth in your remark that circumstances alter
cases; -but as to the facts you use to establish
it, allow me to say I am not half-starved.
There are times when I feed as well as any
noble in the land."
The black cat opened her eyes and looked
full at him.
Yes, ma'am, in lambing-time I often have
lamb for days together. My master, too,
frequently brings home a dead sheep, and
then I fare like a prince. Just now we are
not in our high feed; but I get bits and
scraps in sufficiency. This, I should say, is a
mutton bone ?" he said, inquiringly, with an
affectionate look at it.
I don't care what it is," said the black
cat; our cook is dining on turkey, and she
had no right to turn me out here with- this
bone, while she was enjoying herself in the
kitchen.?'
A selfish trick indeed, ma'am," said
Drover; "but no one is perfect; and
although she has failed in this instance, I
should say cook is very good to you."
"She does her duty-what is she for but
to wait on the family? "
True, ma'am," said Drover, who saw that






HOW DROVER GOT A DINNER. 31

the black cat was beginning to give vent to
some hidden grievance.
"And what if I did just look at the turkey
when it was hanging ? Was I to be cuffed
and turned out and made to starve on a bone
for that ?"
"Oh, sad, sad Most unjustifiable sever-
ity said Drover; "and you only looked at
the turkey ?"
Well, not much more; it wasn't my fault
if the hail was loose, and it came down at a
touch."
Oh, certainly not. So it came down !.-
of course you only touched it to see if it would
come down ? "
"Exactly that," said the black cat, with
animation.
"And when it was down ?" said Drover,
inquiringly.
"Why, I merely tried the head and neck.
I assure you what I. took was a mere
trifle."
"No doubt," said Drover; "but I wonder
you didn't try the breast; they say that is
the finest eating."
"Yes, it is," said the black cat, licking her
lips at the remembrance of it. I did have a
taste of it, I confess; but before I had had
time for a mouthful came cook: and really






32 ORIGINAL FABLES.

you would have thought I had eaten the whole
turkey, she said such things, and actually
hunted me out of the larder with a rolling-
pin."
Cruel! cruel! said Drover, his eyes
fixed on the bone.
She said, Who was going to eat things
after a cat ?'"
Oh, what a narrow prejudice!" said
Drover.
She threatened to hang me."
"It makes one's heart ache to think of it,"
said Drover.
I shan't forget it," said the cat.
She is but a woman," said Drover.
Oh, but she might know better. But I
know how I'll spite her-I won't eat her
bones. I'll pine first; and if my mistress and
kers sees me thin and ill, I know who will be
sorry for it."
"A very clever thought," said Drover,
with a quick glance at the bone. Not that
I would advocate retaliation; but, as you
observe, it might be as well to teach cook
not to give way to unrighteous wrath; for if
she had not left the larder open, you would
not have been able, you see, ma'am, to get at
the turkey? "
"No," said the black cat, indignantly.






HOW DROVER GOT A DINNER. 33

"And then she had no right to use bad
language, and cuff and give you a poor
dinner-three punishments for what was
merely an indiscretion, committed through
her inadvertency in leaving the door open."
"Oh, I'll starve to punish her," said the
black cat.
I certainly would not eat the bone," said
Drover. "It would be encouraging her in-
her unjust oppression."
"I won't," said the cat.
"No, don't," said Drover. And then, with
as much indifference as he could assume, he
added, Shall I take it away ?"
The black cat looked demurringly.
"Just as you please," said Drover; "I
thought it would be well for her to see your
determination at once. Shall I ? "-and he
put one paw on the bone. She did not forbid;






.

and, satisfied with that, he seized and ran off
with it at once, for fear she should change
C






34 ORIGINAL FABLES.

her mind. And no sooner was he gone, than
she began to repent. Cook left her to eat
her bone or go without till the next morning,
and she was obliged to sup on a mouse.
Drover kept out of her way for a day or
two; and it was long before she saw him
without an uncomfortable conviction that he -
had got a joke against her, and robbed her
of her dinner into the bargain.
Those who, under friendly guise, fan the
flame of anger, or pride, or other temper, may
be suspected of doing so with a bad and
selfish motive. It was only for the bone that
Drover descanted on the wrongs of puss and
the tyranny of the cook.


MORALISING COMFORTABLY
ATIENCE patience !" said an ox,
standing by while his companions
were yoked for the plough.
Patience is a fine thing for
us all."
"Yes," replied one, "you see the advan-
tage of it for us to-day. It's a pity you
didn't duly appreciate its value yester-
day, when you were grumbling and fretting
beneath the yoke yourself."






ORIGINAL FABLES. 3.

THE BEST MARKET,.
*HITHER away?" said one to a
neighbour about to depart.
"To market," was the answer.
What money have you to
buy with? "
"Money ? None-not I! "
"Then how can you trade?"
"Very well; my master merchant takes
other things in payment."
Good where are they ? "
"Oh, I have them in plenty."
Tell me what they are."
By all means, and what I shall exchange
them for, too."
"Yes, yes; let us have it all," said the
man.
"Then, first, I want rest: for that I am
going to exchange my burdens of sin and
sorrow and want. Second, I want life; for
that I shall part with at death. Third, I want
perfect clothing, clean and fair, for which I
shall exchange these filthy rags."
"Nay, but yours is a wonderful market."
"Wonderful indeed; we are bidden to
buy without money or price, and He whom
we buy of enriches us as much by what He
takes away as by what He gives."






36 ORIGINAL FABLES.















HOW TO KNOW A GOOSE,
OTHER! mother!" cried a young rook,
returning hurriedly from its first flight,
I'm so frightened; I've seen such a
sight "
What sight, my son ? asked the old
rook.
Oh, white creatures screaming and
running and straining their necks, and hold-
ing their heads ever so high. See, mother,
there they go "
"Geese, my son-merely geese," calmly
replied the parent bird, looking over the
common. Through life, child, observe
that when you meet any one who makes a






THE HORSE WAS STOLEN. 37

great fuss about himself, and tries to lift
his head higher than the rest of the world,
you may set him down at once as a goose."


THE HORSE WAS STOLEN,
HE horse will be stolen," cried all
the town; and they came to-
aK; ~gether to consult on the best
means of saving it.
"I will tell you," said the smith; "let me
put double bolts and locks, and a strong chain
across the door, and then he will be safe."
What an idea !" cried the carpenter;
" of course your only plan is to have wooden
shutters to the airholes and windows, and a
strong new door."
Nonsense! cried the mason. Wall
him up and feed him from the roof. I'll do
it; he'll be safe then."
And some took part with the mason, and
some with the carpenter, and some with the
smith; and they argued till they quarrelled,
and quarrelled till they fought. In the thick
of the fight one rushed in, exclaiming-
Sirs, you may save yourselves further
trouble; the gipsies have done it-the horse
is stolen 1"







38 ORIGINAL FABLES.














JUMPING TO CONCLUSIONS,
"THEY'RB going to hang Snap," said Frisk,
my lady's Blenheim, as she stood
wagging her tail with great animation on
the top of the kitchen steps looking out into
the yard.
Well, who'd have thought it said
Growler. "But I'm not surprised when I
reflect; that was what master and the groom
were talking about yesterday, no doubt, for
they looked at him."
"They're measuring his neck for a rope,"
said Frisk, scampering off.
Snap's going to be hanged," said Growler
to Tray.






JUMPING TO CONCLUSIONS. 39

Indeed! Well, I thought he looked very
low-spirited all day yesterday. I'm not
surprised at all;- bit -are you -sure?"
Oh, I fancy he has the rope round his
neck already."
Only think of Snap !" said Tray to Lion,
the Newfoundland dog.
What about him? said Lion, apparently
more inclined to think of something else.
Going to be hanged, that's all."
And enough too," said Lion. When ?"
Oh; I doubt if he isn't hanged already ; I
fancy the rope was about his neck some time
ago."
"Poor fellow what's it for? "
'' I can't exactly tell. The groom's been
complaining of him to the master, I believe,
from what Mr. Growler says."
"I thought he was a great favourite."
"Ah! but we've all seen a great change
lately."
"When did you notice it?"
"I don't think that it was spoken of till
this morning; but any one might have seen
it long ago."
I never saw it."
At this moment Snap ran into the;,yard
with a spick-and-span new collar on.
"Hey, what's this ? said Lion, as Snap






40 ORIGINAL FABLES.

trotted from one to another to show his finery;
while Frisk looked down from the top of the








steps and whispered rather sheepishly to
Growler, Who'd have thought they were
measuring him for a collar?"


BUSINESS FIRST AND PLEASURE AFTER,
"PUT the young horse in the plough," said
the farmer; and very much pleased
he was to be in a team with Dobbin and the
grey mare. It was a long field, and gaily
he walked across it, his nose upon Dobbin's
haunches, having hard work to keep at so
slow a pace.
"Where are we going now?" he said,
when he got to the top. "This is very
.pleasant."
"Back again," said Dobbin.
"What for ?" said the young horse, rather






BUSINESS FIRST AND PLEASUlR AFTER. 41

surprised; but Dobbin had gone to sleep, for
he could plough as well asleep as awake.
What are we going back for ?" he asked,
turning round.
"Keep on," said the grey mare, "or we
shall never get to the bottom, and you'll
have the whip at your heels."
"Very odd indeed," said the young horse,
who thought he had had enough of it, and
*was not sorry he was coming to the bottom
of the field. Great was his astonishment
when Dobbin again turned, and proceeded
at the same pace up the field again.
Iow long is this going on?" asked the
young horse.
Dobbin just glanced across the field as
his eyes closed, and fell asleep again as he
began to calculate how long it would take
to plough it.
"How long will this go on?" he asked,
turning to the grey mare.
"Keep up, I tell you, or you'll have me
on your heels."
When the top came, and another turn,
and the bottom, and another turn, the poor
young horse was in despair; he grew quite
dizzy, and was glad, like Dobbin, to shut
his eyes that he might get rid of the sight
of the same ground so continually.






42 ORIGINAL FABLES.

"Well," he said, when the gears were
taken off, if this is your ploughing, I hope
I shall have no more of it." But his hopes
were vain; for many days he ploughed, till
he got-not reconciled to it-but tired of
complaining of the weary, monotonous work.
In the hard winter, when comfortably housed
in the warm stable, he cried out to Dobbin,
as he was eating some delicious oats, "I








say, Dobbin, this is better than ploughing!
do you remember that field? I hope I
shall never have anything to do with that
business again. What in the world could
be the use of walking up a field just for the
sake of walking down again? It's enough to
make one laugh to think of it."
"How do you like your oats ?" asked
Dobbin.
Delicious !" said the young horse.
"Then please to remember, if there were
no ploughing there would be no oats."






ORIGINAL FABLES. 43

DOCTORS SELDOM LIKE THEIR OWN
PHYSIC.
ADDLE, my lady's lap-dog, and
Tom, her favourite cat, had
long entertained feelings of
jealousy and envy towards each
other; but at last they made it up, and
agreed to be friends. Instead of snapping
at Tom, to make him go farther from the
fire, that he might have the very front,
Paddle would merely nudge him gently
along, looking amiably at him at the same
time; and Tom, though he wouldn't give
way an inch farther than he was obliged,
made no warlike demonstrations, such as
putting up his back and swelling his tail.
"I think, dear friend," said Paddle one
day (not being yet quite satisfied with the
deference paid to him by his companion),
"we fail in showing the reality of our regard
for each other in one respect."
What is that ? asked Tom.
We are not candid with each other as to
our mutual faults. Don't you think it would
greatly improve us both if we acted the part
of honest reprovers to each other ?"
"I don't know but what it might," said Tom.
"Be assured of it," said Paddle; "and






44 ORIGINAL FABLES.

that we may no longer neglect one of the
most sacred duties of friendship, let us begin
this very day."
"With all my heart," said Tom; "and,
that being the case, do you know I've often
thought that when you-- "
Hush !" said Paddle: "everything in
order. You know, dear, I am older than you.
I may say I remember you a kitten; so let me
give you the benefit of my observations first."
Very well," said Tom; "I'm ready."
"Well, then. First, dear," said Paddle,
"you are too fond of the front of the fire,
and sit in such a way before it that I'm
obliged to have recourse to many gentle hints
before I can induce you to move. In the
next place, dear, when we go to dinner, you
invariably try to take the nicest pieces, which
I look upon as indelicate. In the third
place--"
"When will my turn be ?" interrupted
Tom.
"Stop," said Paddle; "I haven't done;"
and he went on to enumerate several other
infirmities in Tom's character, the exhibition
of which he considered in some way to affect
his own comfort.
Tom, with some effort, contrived to wait it
all out, and then asked, "Pray, is that all ?"






UNFORTUNATE COINCIDENCE. 45

"All I can think of at present," said
Paddle.
"Then," said Tom, drawing himself up,
"in the first place- "








"Thank you," said Paddle, interrupting
him; "you must excuse my staying now. I
hope you'll improve upon what I've said to
you; but I have an engagement, and cannot
stop any longer this time."


UNFORTUNATE COINCIDENCE,
ED, what an idle fellow you
are!" said the grey horse to
the donkey; "I never by any
chance look over the gate but
I see you gossiping about in the lane."
Ask your pardon, sir," said Ned, blinking
innocently; "but I was just saying to the dun
cow that I never came into the lane but I
found you looking over the gate."






46 ORIGINAL FABLES.
















THE FURNACE FOR GOLD,

THE ore lay in the goldsmith's shop, rude
and unrefined. How *the costly vessels,
pure and polished, glittered before it!
Ah that I were such as you cried the
ore. I am gold, even as you are; but
where is my beauty ? where is my glory?"
Wait awhile," said the shining vessels;
"your time will come. But if you would
really be as we are-a lot to which you- are
destined-remember not to flinch from the
process that awaits you."
So the ore was cast into the furnace, and it






PAYMENT IN KIND. 47

mourned aid bewailed the fierceness of the
flame.
"You were not satisfied when buried in
natural dross: you are not satisfied now,
while being forced to part from it," said the
shining vessels. "But when you come forth
from that furnace without blemish, ready to
be wrought into a king's crown, and take
your place by us, you will forget the flame
that scorched and purified you, and love the
refiner, who loved you too well to keep you
in the furnace one moment less than was
necessary."


PAYMENT IN KIND.
HY do you put your ears down,
pray?" said the young colt,
galloping up to the donkey with
a fierce, conceited air.
"Why do you put yours up, sir ? if I may
make so bold as to ask," said Ned, looking
demurely at him.
"Why? Because I like it," said the colt,
haughtily.
"Thank you, sir. The same reason will
do for me, by your leave. I'm sure your
worship wouldn't desire a better."






48 ORIGINAL FABLES.













WHAT'S LAW FOR THEE IS LAW FOR ME,
"T HATE flies! said a crop-eared mastiff, as
he lay basking in the sun one summer's
evening.
His companion, the house-dog, who had
been dozing by his side, merely licked one off
that had tickled his nose, and made no reply.
I can't see what use they are," said the
mastiff.
Can't you?" said the house-dog, seeing
he must answer before he could go to sleep
again.
"No-can you?" said the mastiff, snap-
ping angrily at two or three that buzzed in
his face.
Swallows like them," said the house-dog,
yawning, and flapping some off with his ears.






WHAT'S LAW FOR THEE IS LAW FOR ME. 49

Swallows, indeed and what's the use of
swallows ? Is all the world to be tormented
with flies because swallows like them ? They
do nothing but play, and put the housemaid
in a passion about the windows."
"Why don't you knock them off, as I
do?" said the house-dog, flapping his ears
again.
"I might if they'd left me my ears," said
the mastiff.
"Who cut them off?" asked the house-
dog.
Who ? why, my master, when I was a
pup. I wish he'd left them alone. I dare
say he'd have made a fine to-do if anybody
had cut off his."
"No doubt," said the house-dog, "he
would have told them they were too useful
to part with."
And do you suppose mine were not meant
to be as useful to me ?" said the mastiff,
angrily.
"Doubtless that's your view; but, you
see, it wasn't his. There's no accounting for
the different opinions of people: if you, for
instance, were to inquire of swallows and
flies, you might hear that they were as neces-
sary in the places they occupy as you would
find your ears at this present moment."
D






50 ORIGINAL FABLES.















THE PANIC; OR, WHAT'S IT ALL ABOUT?
" HAT's it all about ?" said one of Mrs.
SSell's ducks to her friend, as they
eagerly listened to a splashing noise in the
little brook dam.
"I cannot think," quacked duckey; "let's
go and see."
And they sailed down the brook to the
place, and found a great piece of wood which
had fallen across the bank, and the water
was splashing over it. The rest of the ducks,
seeing these two in such a hurry to get to
this spot, followed, supposing some fresh
plan of operations for the day was being
projected, or that a new nest of snails had






THE PANIC; OR, WHAT'S IT ALL ABOUT? 51

been discovered. So they waddled into the
brook, -and swam off in the same direction.
It was difficult for their two companions
to persuade them of the truth; and they all
quacked so loud in their inquiries, that a
hen, who was taking her ten little chickens
for a morning walk, told them to remain
very quiet under the wall, while she went to
the waterside to see what was the matter, and
to mind and not touch the corn that would
be thrown down for them, till she returned.
Whether her clucking and the increased
quacking were favoured by the wind I can't
say, but the sound went over the churchyard
into Freek the shepherd's garden, where
Drover lay dozing in the sun. He started
up, pricked up his ears, and bounded away.
A cow that was grazing in the lane, seeing
him scamper at such a rate, thought it wise
to follow him; so, having filled her mouth,
she walked deliberately round the corner to
the place that Drover seemed to make for.
In his way he saw the potter's horse standing
in the Bede House close. Hey, Drover,"
said the horse, "what's the matter ?"
"Who knows? said Drover; I'm going
to see. Don't you hear the noise? "
So the horse went up to the hedge of
the close, and looked over on to the brook;






52 ORIGINAL FABLES.

but, being old and tired, he couldn't make
up his mind to go any nearer.
"Have you heard ?" said an old crow.
"What ?" said the others.
"Oh, such a noise! A fight, I should
think. I saw Drover running as if to break
his neck, and the old cow and the potter's
horse are on the road, and I don't know
who besides."
Oh, let's go by all means," said the
crows. So they flew -off, and took possession
of the willows that hung over the brook.
What fun said a sparrow; the crows
have gone to see some grand doings some-
where: let us go too !" and away went
a whole flock of sparrows, who had been
busy a minute before with the vicar's currant-
bushes.
Very remarkable !" said an old jackdaw.
" what it can be about I cannot divine. I
propose, my brethren, to call a meeting,
and consult upon measures adequate to the
occasion." And so all the jackdaws might be
seen coming out of their holes in the church
tower, and ranging themselves solemnly
along the ledge near the top, on the side
facing the brook.
"Is it an invasion of the French ?" said
one. "Is it a company of masons coming to






THE PANIC; OR, WHAT'S IT ALL ABOUT? 53

repair the church ?" said another; "that
would vastly more interfere with us and our
nests."
Now, just as Drover got to the brook, the
two ducks having convinced their friends
that there was no secret cause for their
movement, the whole party were sailing
calmly down the stream, and the quacking
had completely ceased.
"What's it all about?" said Drover to
the last of them.
What ? said the duck.
"Why, the noise," said Drover.
Nothing said the duck.
"Nothing!" said the hen, going back
to her chickens.
Nothing !" said Drover, with a mixture
of contempt and vexation at having had his
run for nothing.
"Did he say nothing, Mr. Drover ?" said
the old cow, who immediately proceeded to
graze again.
Nothing called out the old horse from
over the wall. How glad I am I didn't go
any farther !"
"Nothing! nothing! jabbered the spar-
rows. What fun! Only think of taking
in all these good folks !" And off they flew
to the currant-trees again.






54 ORIGINAL FABLES.

"Nothing!" said the crows, who flew
over to Mrs. Sell's yard to pick up the corn
that was put for the chickens.
Nothing !" said the daws. "How exceed-
ingly impertinent to make such a fuss about
nothing !"
Very said Kitty Keelby's old brindled
cat, who had been feasting on some of the
deserted chickens, while their mother was
gone to find out "what the noise was all
about." And so theater went on splash-
ing over the wood; but there was an end of
the wonder.


A CHEERFUL VIEW OF THINGS.
ow dismal you look !" said a bucket
to his companion, as they were
going to the well.
Ah replied the other, I
was reflecting on the uselessness of our being
filled; for, let us go away ever so full, we
always come back empty."
"Dear me! how strange to look at it in
that way said the bucket. "Now, I enjoy
the thought that, however empty we come,
we always go away full. Only look at it in
that light, and you'll be as cheerful as I am."






0111GINAt PABtEP. 55















OLD DOGS AND YOUNG,

"WHAT have they brought in?" asked the
old cat of Tip, the worn-out terrier,
who had just been in the yard to see the
game-bags emptied.
Tip, not observing Forrest and Bluff, two
setters, following him, took his favourite place
before the kitchen fire, and, stretching out his
fore legs, laid his nose on his paws and
said, contemptuously : "1 Miserable sport,
hardly worth going out for."
Such bags as we used to bring in," he
continued; "that was something like sport.
Thought nothing of a dozen hares; and






56 ORIGINAL FABLES.

rabbits-scores of 'em-and pheasants too,
till we were fairly tired of picking 'em up."
Ah said the cat, who was nearly blind,
and almost asleep, "our days were different
from these. I was telling the grey kitten's
mother yesterday, that before I was her age I
had caught as many rats as she had mice."
But Tip was not interested in the degen-
eracy of breeds in cats. He went on still
more oratorically on the lamentable change
that had taken place among dogs, and describ-
ing his own prowess in his day. Forrest and
Bluff listened quietly..
"Do but hear him at last Bluff said.
"Now, wouldn't you believe he thinks there
is not a dog left worth following a gun ?"
Perhaps, Mr. Tip," said Forrest, "you
carried off so much game in your time that
you thinned the country, and left none for
us."
Tip looked disconcerted at this discovery of
having had more auditors of his boast than he
had reckoned on, and, dropping his eyelids,
pretended to be asleep.
"Never heed him," said Bluff, with a sly
glance, for he knew he was shamming; "it's a
way old dogs have got of fancying there must
be an end of good sport now they are past it.
They see double all the success they ever had,






HOW TO WORK. 57

and quite forget that they missed at any time.
Poor old dog! we must mind and not make
the same mistake,. Forrest, when we are in
Tip's condition."
Whether it was the fire that was too hot, or
the reflections of his two reprovers, somehow
Tip found it more pleasant to change his
place; and it was observed that, after that
time, he looked modest when the bags were
emptied, and was silent about the "doings of
his day."


HOW TO WORK,
UKEY, you've got an easy life
of it," grumbled the pot to the
kettle, sitting there like a lady
all day long, with nothing to do
but to boil a little water and sing a pretty
song."
"I do what is given me to do, and do it
cheerfully," said Sukey. "One can but be
employed; and you, when you are sputter-
ing over your pudding or potatoes, and the
frying-pan, when he is spitting with his
cakes, are on no harder service, really, than I
am; but everything depends on the way you
take work. I sing over mine / "




















MAKE THE BEST OF IT,
A HEDGEHOG and a tortoise lived together
on amicable terms in a garden. One
day the tortoise found the hedgehog very
disconsolate under a hedge.
What's the matter ? he cried; every-
thing is lively and bright; it is warm enough
even for me; I've taken the trouble to walk
all across the path, on purpose to know why
you sit sluggishly here in the shade, instead
of rejoicing in this glorious sunshine."
The hedgehog was for some time ashamed
to tell; at last he confessed that he was
jealous. There is not a creature," he said,
"that is without friends but myself. The
cat, who kills the birds and destroys the
game, is petted and caressed. The dog, who,






MAKE THE BEST OF IT. 59

while he guards the sheep, often kills the
lambs, is made one of the family. There's
not a bird or a beast that I see around that
doesn't receive some kind of affection or
admiration, however useless or even mis-
chievous it may be; but I, who am perfectly
harmless, and most diligent in discharging
the duties for which I am placed here-I,
against whom no single charge can be laid
-am looked on with disgust, or avoided."
"And you don't know why?" said the
tortoise.
No; do you ?" said the hedgehog.
"Yes, I do," said the tortoise. "All that
you say with regard to your moral character
is true; but, if you are aware of it, you have
at least forgotten that you are covered with
prickles, which, though they don't interfere
with your respectability, make you dis-
agreeable company to all but such as I, who,
being thick-skinned, feel no inconvenience
from them. Be content, my friend, to live
quietly and do your work unnoticed, remem-
bering that if your prickles keep you from
the caresses received by pets, they also save
you from the caprices which they often suffer.
Dogs are hanged, and cats are drowned; but
who ever heard of any but a hungry gipsy
killing a hedgehog?"






60 ORIGINAL FABLES.

THE MILL-HORSE AND THE RACER,

" W'AT a dull life yours is said a racer
'to a mill-horse.
Dull enough," said the mill-horse.
"You must feel uncommonly stupid!"
"Stupid enough," said the mill-horse.














"Round and round-round and round, and
that, day after day! No wonder your head
hangs down-why, you're just a piece of
machinery, and no better."
The mill-horse didn't answer, but continued
going his round; while the racer, who was
tethered near, repeated his remarks every
time he came within hearing.






THE MILL-HORSE AND THE RACER. 61

I'm afraid I've offended you," said the
racer.
Oh no," answered the mill-horse; "but
my quiet life has this advantage in it-it
gives me time to think before I speak."
"And have you been thinking while I
have been talking?"
"Yes," answered the mill-horse; "and I'll






IN






tell you what I've been thinking. You're a
very fine fellow, and I am contemptible in
your sight; but I know which of us would be
the most missed. Depend on this, if I and
my breed were to take our departure, and no
other substitutes could be found, folks would
do without racing, and take you and your
breed into our places."






62 ORIGINAL FABLES.


WHERE TO BEG AND PROSPER,
Swo beggars met one day, and thus
they talked as they rested on
the roadside:-
Ours is but a poor trade; I
am getting very tired of it," said one.
Are you ? Well, it is not so with me. I
find it a prosperous business, and like it better
every day," said the other.
Strange enough, that !" was the answer:
" there are so very many things against us.
First of all, one dares not go to the same
person too often."
"That's not my experience," said the other.
"I find that the oftener I go, the more
readily I am heard."
"You don't say so!" exclaimed his com-
panion. I get turned away with 'Saucy
fellow!' or some such name, and am told
to take my tale elsewhere. As to money or
bread, I may knock pretty often before I get
a sight of it."
Now I can truly say," said his companion,
" that if I don't get what I ask for, I have
something better instead of it."
"A lucky fellow you are; and in these
times, too, when people shake their heads






WHERE TO BEG AND PROSPER. 63

and declare they have need to go begging
themselves."
"Ah, that I am never told. I go where
riches abound, and where there is enough,
and more than enough, for all that ask."
"If I put on a doleful face, they call me
hypocrite;, if I put on a merry air, they say
I am not in want; there is no knowing how
to succeed with them."
When I am in trouble, I get pity; when
I am full of praise and joy, I get a more
abundant blessing."
Wonderful wonderful! They grow
tired of my story, I find, before they have
half heard it, and suspect it is false, without
caring much for me even if it were true."
How contrary my case! I cannot tell
my sorrows and wants too often: I am told
to come with every one of them; and strange
to say, so deep is the interest in my behalf,
that what I have to tell is better known
where I beg than I know it myself."
Why, what house do you beg at?"
asked the astonished beggar.
"At the gate of heaven," said his com-
panion. "Where do you beg ? "
Oh, Ibeg of the world," said he.
"Then no wonder you are tired of your
trade. Come and try my gate. If you make






64 ORIGINAL FABLES.

your stand at that, you will never be dis-
appointed, never get an angry or unkind
word, and never never be turned empty
away."


THE COUNCIL OF IGNORANCE,
HAT are you staring at the fence
for ? asked a conceited pullet
of a hedgehog, who was minutely
inspecting the boundary fence of
the poultry yard.
"I was trying to see, miss, if there was
any way through it," the hedgehog humbly
replied.
"What for ? demanded the pullet, pertly.
"I should like to see what's to be seen on
the other side, if I could get there," said the
hedgehog.
"Oh, there's nothing worth seeing, take
my word for it," said the pullet, with great
assurance.
"Yes, miss, certainly; no doubt, then, you
know all about it," said the hedgehog,
deferentially.
"Oh yes, you may be sure my opinion is
worth having," said the pullet, evading the
hedgehog's inquiry, and turning away.






THE COUNCIL OF IGNORANCE. 6-5

"Your opinion, miss it is based on know-
ledge, of course?" asked the hedgehog,
anxious to learn her real value as an
authority.
"I don't know what you mean, exactly;
but I can't waste time in talking now, while
my friends yonder are eating up the barley,"
said the pullet, moving off.
I mean, miss, you've been on the top of
the fence and seen all over it? inquired the
hedgehog, earnestly.
"Not I; I wouldn't take the trouble,"
said the pullet, much confused.
"Ah! then you have scratched your way
inder it, and have seen it from below," cried
the hedgehog, determined to know the truth.
"Not I; I wouldn't take so much trouble;
but I know very good judges who have,
and they have told me all about it," said
the pullet, running away from any more
questions.
"Well, well," cried the hedgehog; "was
there ever such conceit ? Her wings are not
long enough, I see now, to fly over the fence,
nor her feet strong enough to scratch under it,
and yet she talks as confidently about the
other side as if she knew it all by heart.
How true it is that ignorance and conceit go
together "







66 ORIGINAL FABLES.















THE REFLECTIONS OF A PEACOCK,
SWHAT can the vicar be thinking of ?" said
a peacock that paraded the churchyard
in melancholy mood. "He certainly is a man
of bad taste, or he would consider me as the
ornament of his parish."
Here he took as good a survey as he could
of his tail, which he then spread out, and
strutted up and down the middle path before
the vicarage windows.
There isn't a figure in the parish equal to
mine. As to dress, let them show any of their
fashions that come up to my plumes; and yet,
directly I go into his garden, or even into the
orchard, he sends the boy to hunt me out-







THE REFLECTIONS OF A PEACOCK. 67

nay, he raced after me himself, whip in
hand. Very undignified indeed! He must
be jealous; that's it, perhaps. He has only
a few scanty white hairs for feathers on his
head, while I have an exquisitely beautiful
coronet. Poor man Or perhaps he thinks
his family will get a love of dress by looking
at me; that may be it. -It cannot be my
voice that offends him; for I never let him
hear it, as I know he is not fond of music-
except when I am flying away from his whip.
Why does he persecute me thus? And,
turning his head in every direction to show
his colours, and carrying his tail with much
pomp, the peacock stalked again up and down
the middle path.
Now it happened that Drover, the shep-
herd dog, had heard him soliloquising as he
was lying on the churchyard wall, and, just
raising his head, he said, "Do you really
want to know ?"
The peacock turned, and, half offended at
being so unceremoniously questioned, answered,
" Yes."
"Well, then," said Drover, "it's neither
more nor less than because you eat his goose-
berries." Then he put his head down and
went to sleep again, or rather into a waking
doze.






68 ORIGINAL FABLES.

The peacock was much mortified by this
humbling solution to the mystery. In his
heart he was well aware that it was the
truth; but while he knew it, he wished to
cover it to the world with reasons more
honourable to himself. He took care, when
next he meditated aloud, to go where Drover
could not hear him.



THE COCK CORRECTED,

S 'YVE a great mind!" said the old
cock, fiercely, to the white
hen, as she ventured too near
the barley.
"I've a great mind!" he cried again, flying
round on the speckled hen, who was stepping
up to it on the other side.
I've a great mind !" he cried a third time,
to the brown hen, whom he found pecking
fast when he turned.
You a great mind! exclaimed Drover,
contemptuously, as he arose, disturbed by
the sputtering away of the discomfited hens;
"you're very much mistaken: you are a
bully; and who ever heard of a bully with
a '.great mind ?'"






ORIGINAL FABLES. 69
















THE SQUIRREL AND THE MASTIFF,
" HAT an idle vagabond you are said a
surly-looking mastiff to a squirrel that
was frolicking about in the trees above him.
The squirrel threw a nutshell at him. I've
been watching you these two hours," said
the mastiff again, "and you've done nothing
but dance, and swing, and skip, and whisk
that tail of yours about all the time."
"What an idle dog you must be!" said
the squirrel, "to sit for two hours watching
me play."
"None of your pertness! I had done all
my work before I came here."






70 ORIGINAL FABLES.

Oh, oh !" said the squirrel; "well, my
work's never done. I've business up in this
tree that you know nothing about."
"Business, indeed! I know of no business
that you have but kicking up your heels,
and eating nuts, and pelting honest folk with
the shells."
"Fie!" said the squirrel, "don't be ill-
tempered;" and he dropped another nutshell
at him.
To see the difference there is! said the
mastiff: nothing -but play and pleasure for
you, up in the green trees amusing yourself
from morning to night."
"Don't envy me my lot, friend," said the
squirrel; for although I rejoice in the happi-
ness of it, I must remind you it isn't all joy.
Summer doesn't last for ever; and what
becomes of me, do you think, when the trees
are bare, and the wind howls through the
forest, and the fruit's gone? Remember that
then you have a warm hearth and a comfort-
able meal to look to."
"You wouldn't change with me, however,'
said the mastiff.
No ; nor you with me, if you knew all,"
said the squirrel. "Be content, like me, to
take together the rough and the smooth of
your proper lot. When I am starving with






'*HOW NED SHOWED HIMSELF A DONKEY. 71

cold in the winter, I shall be glad to think
of you by your pleasant fire. Can't you find
it in your heart to be glad now of my sun-
shine? Our lots are more equal than they
seem."


HOW NED SHOWED HIMSELF A DONKEY,

B RAY, Ned!" said the colts that.
were feeding in the same field,.
where the pasture was short.
Ned looked pleased, pricked up
his ears, and brayed tremendously.
"Bray again, Ned !" said the colts, with
mischievous glee.
Ned made a succession of brays till he was
fairly tired.
"You like my braying? he said, coyly.
"Vastly," said the colts, who saw the
master coming to turn him out.
Oh dear said Ned, why did I bray?
If I had kept quiet he'd never have known
I was here."
"Because you were a donkey, to be sure,"
said the colts, "otherwise you would have
known that nobody would bear your braying
without a good reason for it. We knew it
was the only way to get rid of you."







72 ORIGINAL TABLES.














THE THRUSH AND THE CATERPILLAR,
RUEL bird! barbarous abuser of superior
strength! What is there not enough
to gratify thee on earth-its precious fruits,
so sweet, so abundant-are they not suffi-
cient, but thou must destroy life to appease
thine appetite ? Ah I rejoice-the lark has
risen beyond thy flight. He is hidden in
yonder fleecy cloud, and thou returnest baffled
-defeated. It is well "
And the thrush, who had indignantly
watched the hawk on its pursuit, nestled
more closely over her young brood, comparing
herself, greatly to her own advantage, with
the bird of prey.
"Madam," whispered a caterpillar from






TEST OF FRIENDSHIP. 73

behind a leaf, I beg to apologise; but allow
me to say that I am rejoiced to hear your new
view of things. You breakfasted this morning
on an intimate friend of mine, and I have
been -keeping close ever since, for fear you
should lunch on me; but after what you have
said, my apprehensions must be groundless.
You will, I am sure, henceforth confine your-
self to vegetable diet."
Humph muttered. the thrush, "awk-
ward that; it never struck me that 'people
who live in glass houses should not throw
stones.'"
We often learn the true character of our
own deeds in observing what is done by
others.


TEST, OF FRIENDSHIP.
iH is a friend like me?" said the
shadow to the body. "Do I not
follow you wherever you go ?
Sunlight or moonlight, I never
forsake you."
It is true," said the body; "you are with
me in sunlight and moonlight; but where are
you when neither sun nor moon shines upon
me? The true friend abides with us in
darkness."






74 ORIGINAL FABLES.

A NEW LIGHT ON THINGS,

" HOLLOA young fellow," said the cock to
Sthe shepherd's dog, eyeing him very
fiercely as he ran by, "I have a word to say
to you."
"Let us have it," said Shag; "I'm in a
hurry."














I wish to remark," said the cock, "that
there has been a great mistake made in the
stackyard, and you can tell your master that
he and the other men, instead of turning the
corn end of the sheaves into the stack, and
leaving the stubbles outside, should have done
it the other way. How are my hens and I,






A NEW LIGHT ON -THINGS. 75

do you think, to get at the grain under the
circumstances ?"
"Anything else ?" asked Shag.
The cock was offended, -and shook his
wattles, but answered, Yes-I have also
to remark--"
"Never mind, never mind," said Shag,
interrupting him; "you're under a general














mistake, I see, and one answer will do for all
your objections. You fancy that farmyards
were made for fowls, but the truth is that
fowls were made for farmyards. Get that
into your head, and you won't meddle with
arrangements you can't understand, and in
which you and your affairs are not taken
into account."






76 ORIGINAL FABLES.





















NOT QUITE SO BAD AS REPORTED,

" CUxoo Cuckoo said the grey bird,
as she rested from her weary flight
on a budding elm one soft, showery April
day.
"Would you have believed it?" said a
staid-looking thrush, lifting her head from
her nest, where she was feeding her young
ones.






NOT QUITE SO BAD AS REPORTED. 77

Believe anything of her," said the black-
bird.
Cuckoo Cuckoo cried the grey bird,
flapping her wings and tail among the boughs
of the tree as she hunted for her prey.
"Oh, what times these are, when such
audacious impudence is to insult the public
with impunity!" said a bluetit.
Take care of your nests," chirped a
hedge-sparrow; she was so civil as to leave
an egg in mine last year, and I had as much
work to do to feed that young one as my own
brood of six gave me."
Cuckoo! Cuckoo! cried the grey bird,
as she flew hurriedly and heavily from tree
to tree, with curious small birds in her
train.
Whereupon there arose a universal twitter
among the feathered tribes, and cock-robin,
who was much offended by her inelegant
flight and appearance, voted asking the owl
his judgment as to how she was to be got
rid of, and prevented from ever again obtrud-
ing herself into their company.
The owl was fast asleep; but the chattering
of the sparrows and chirping of the tits,
loudest in the outcry, awoke him. He half
opened one eye.
"One at. a time, friends," he said, nearly







78 ORIGINAL FABIiES.

closing it again as the din increased. "I
really cannot pretend to understand more than
one at a time."
So the thrush, the blackbird, the tit, the
sparrow, and various others, laid their com-
plaints before him in succession. He blinked
solemnly as he listened, and when they had
finished, said:
"Friends-having been somewhat inde-
corously disturbed in my meditations at this
my usual hour of rest, I am hardly in a
capacity to adjudge your cause; but you shall
have the best decision I can give.
"As I make out from the evidence, the
cuckoo is accused of neglect of home duties;
of thieving, in taking house-room to herself
without paying for it; of uselessness and idle-
ness; of thrusting her young on the care of
others for support; and of impudence in the
midst of all her misdemeanours. In regard
to home duties, Mrs. Thrush," you are a
pattern of mothers, and, respecting you as
such, let me remind you that, although she
does not take care of her young in person,
she puts them out to good nurses. As to
thieving, I must say that Mr. Tit, who was
first witness on this head, had his mouth so
full of peas that he could hardly give- evidence.
For her uselessness I have this much to say






NOT QUITE SO BAD AS REPORTED. 79

to you all: I heard the farmer tell his bailiff
that he was. welcome to shoot all and any of
you (excepting the thrush, who lives upon
snails and such things), but not to touch a
feather of a cuckoo; for she clears the trees
of caterpillars and their eggs, so as to save
half the young things that are coming up
from being devoured. As to thrusting her
young on the public for support, I appeal to
you all, if, while she is working for the
public, she hasn't a right to that public's
assistance.
"And now as to beauty and elegance, there
are so many opinions upon that subject, that
I must decline answering to the objection;
and as to impudence"-and here he opened
both his eyes, and looked at the sparrows-
" I confess that I shall cease to -be surprised
at anything, when I hear a charge like that
brought by such proverbial offenders."
The exertion of delivering this harangue
sent the owl fast asleep again; and as the
birds, looking very foolish at one another,
were dispersing to their several quarters,
they heard the grey bird crying, Cuckoo !
Cuckoo They all felt a little ashamed of
the bitterness of their previous hatred of one
for whom some good could be said.






80 ORIGINAL FABLES.

LOOK AT HOME,

" TED, I'm ashamed of you," said Silver, the
S white cow. "Really, with that clog
on your leg, I wonder you attempt to mix
with respectable people."
Your servant, ma'am," answered the












\ \ -.\. \. \.'" %..-


donkey. "I don't see that I am to be
blamed for it, seeing that I did not put
it on myself."
No, no, you were not likely to do that;
but if you hadn't taken to open the gates with
your nose, and wander off nobody knows
where, so that you could never be found






LOOK AT HOME. 81

when you were wanted, the master wouldn't
have fettered you. You needn't look at me
so boldly; it's a disgrace, and you know it,
and you ought to be ashamed of it."
"I ask your pardon, ma'am," said Neddy,
looking stedfastly at the knobs on the ends of
Silver's horns, "but I was so taken up with
















looking at those things which the master
put on your horns the day you broke down
the hedge, and tried to toss the dog, that
I did not quite hear you. Please to say
it again."
But Silver walked another way, and Neddy
grazed without further interruption.
F







82 ORIGINAL FABLES.















CIRCUMSTANCES ALTER CASES,

F ISK, my lady's dog, had a way of stand-
ing on his hind legs and looking out of
the stable window to see what was going
on in the farmyard. One fine winter morn-
ing, having finished an excellent break-
fast of bread-and-milk, and warmed himself
thoroughly on the hearth-rug, he ran to his
old place, the shutters having been left open
a little. He had just settled himself when
Growler and Drover, two shepherd dogs, met
underneath the window, their-coats looking
dingy against the white snow, and rough
and shabby with hard running, while their







CTRCUMfSTANCES ALTER CASES. 83

breath floated in thick curling clouds on the
clear air.
"Good day, Drover-it's terribly sharp,"
said Growler.
"Ay, pretty well for that," said Drover.
"I have seldom known it to set in so bad
as this so early," said Growler.
"1No, it is trying," said Drover; "espe-
cially in the mornings, I can hardly feel
my legs."
Our sheep are just frozen," said Growler;
and as to the cows, their teeth pretty well
freeze to the turnips."
"Poor brutes! no wonder I heard old
Dobbin cry out that his shed was so cold he
was as stiff as. the old barn-door that won't
go on its hinges. What in the world do all
those poor creatures do that lie out on the
common-the stray donkeys and the gipsy
horses ? "
"What indeed! It makes one's teeth
chatter to think of them."
Fie! fie !" said Frisk, looking down on
them; "I'm sure this is most seasonable
weather--what would you have? A fine
fresh sparkling air, a bright blue sky, and a
healthy crisp frost-charming weather if you
would only be sensible of it: you should try
for a contented mind, friends, and recommend







84 ORIGINAL FABLES.

the same to the sheep, the cows, Dobbin, and
the stray donkeys; for reflect, I pray you, it
is, all of it, what they are used to, and what
they may always expect."
Frisk said all this with much vivacity, his
eyes dancing with animation, and a smirk of
satisfaction on his face.
i"Ah! said Drover, looking up, "have
you had breakfast?"
"Yes," said Frisk.
"Pray where did you have it ?" asked
Drover.
"By the fireside," said Frisk.
"So I thought," said Drover; "perhaps
if you knew the meaning of hard quarters
and short commons, you wouldn't be quite so
philosophical. Change places with us for a
few days, and then let us see what sort of a
sentiment you would send to Dobbin and his
fellow-sufferers."







...... ..






ORIGINAL FABLES. 85














MORE WINTER BEFORE SPRING.
"SPRING is coming," said a celandine,
peeping from under a hedge.
"Is it really ?" said a thrush; then I
must look after my nest. But who told
you so ?"
"The sun. When he came this morning,
he looked so lovingly on me, that I opened
at once to see him, and a soft breath of air
was playing all around; besides, the violet
is quite ready to show her pretty face, and
I can smell her perfume even here."
The thrush shook his head. "Is spring
coming?" he said to the violet.
Yes," said the violet.
"How do you know ? asked the thrush,






8.6 ORIGINAL FABLES.

"By the soft dew that hung on me this
morning, which the sun kissed away. Wait
till to-morrow, and you shall see all my
buds open."
"Is spring coming?" said the thrush to
a daisy, that showed her bright round face
on the turf.
"No, I think not," said the daisy; "not
yet."
"How so?" said the thrush; celandinee
and violet assure me it is."
Celandine and violet are young and
inexperienced," said the daisy. "I have
weathered the winter, and know well that
it is not over. The sun kissed me, and the
south wind blew at Christmas, but I knew
full well it was not to be depended upon;
and although he was kind this morning
as he was then, and a breeze just as.
gentle blew, winter is not past-take my
word for it."
The thrush told the celandine and violet
what the daisy said.
"Mere croaking," said the celandine.
"Some people are given to forebode," said
the violet.
The thrush hopped about; he wished to
believe them, but couldn't help thinking the
daisy was right.






TI-E SWALLOWS. 87

That night a sharp frost set in, and killed
the celandine and the violet, and a deep snow
soon buried them. The thrush could hardly
find a hip or a haw for his dinner. When
the snow melted, the daisy was there on the
turf. The sun was shining and the south
wind blowing; the thrush, half-starved, was
pecking about for worms.
You'll believe me, now, won't you ? said
the daisy. Take my advice, and don't begin
to build yet; there will be more winter
before spring comes."
The thrush hopped over the graves of
celandine and violet, and sang a little twit-
tering requiem, and then flew back to his
hole to wait for building time.



THE SWALLOWS,

ow provoking!" said Betty, as
she stood with her long broom
in her hand under the parlour
window.
"What's the matter?" said the vicar,
looking out of it.
Why, sir, these swallows !" said Betty:
"four times this summer I have knocked






88 ORIGINAL FABLES.

down their nests; they will build under the
slates just above, and they make me such
work, I've no patience with them."
"Four times! Are you sure they have
begun again four times?" said the vicar,
with interest.
"Sure enough, sir; they got the start of
me, and finished their nests the first time
before I noticed them; then I knocked them
down with the long rake, by help of the
ladder; but in two days John came to tell me
they had got a good way on with new ones.
I soon finished them; but if they didn't begin
again that very evening! and the next morning
I had a good piece to clear away. I thought
that would tire them out, and didn't look for
a time; but right in the very same place,
when I did look, were the two nests built up
to the top. This shall be the last time, I
said; and I smashed 'em to atoms, and
away flew all the birds, pretty well scared.
But the obstinate, perverse things won't be
conquered. Here they are again, the nests
more than half made. Please, sir, might
John have the gun to shoot them?"
"Oh no, Betty," said the vicar, "by no
means."
Then, sir, I can never get rid of them."
"Don't attempt it, Betty," said the vicar,






THE SWALLOWS. 89

who had listened with much attention to her
complaints. "Let them dwell in peace, where
they have had such trial of patience in build-
ing. I wish I may preach as useful a sermon
next Sunday as their example has preached to
me to-day."
Betty looked amazed. "Not knock them
down, sir?" she asked, in a tone of vexed
surprise.
"No; don't touch them. Every time they
twitter, they will remind me of the injunction,
' Faint not.' They have gained their parish,
and are under my protection; so take away
your broom, Betty," said the vicar, with a
smile, as he closed the window.
"Ah!" said Betty, as she watched his
white head' disappearing : "it's all very
good, but master hasn't got to clean the
windows."
No, master had not; but he had trying
lessons of patience with a refractory parish
full of perverse hearts, and had often been
tempted to cry out in despair, It is enough;
I will no longer work here: it is not my
place." Joyfully, therefore, did he take the
hint from the swallows, and determine to
build on, saying to himself, "Perhaps one
more season of patient labour, and, like them,
I may gain my parish."






90 ORIGINAL FABLES.


VAIN-GLORIOUS BOASTS END IN SHAME,

ID you hear how the fox ran into
Farmer Brown's yard and fright-
ened every one to death?" said
the speckled hen to the rest; and
they gathered round her to listen to the story.
"Don't be nervous, ladies," said a grand-
looking cock, strutting up and down before
them. "Remember you are under my pro-
tection "
The fox the fox screamed the hens;
and in he actually ran, the hounds after him.
The valiant cock flew up to the top of the
wall, while the hens scattered off as fast as
they could into the roosting-place.
"He is gone!" cried one, peeping out.
" Oh yes, he is gone!" said the rest; and
they came, one by one, very cautiously down
the roost ladder, and landed in the yard.
"Is he gone?" cried the cock from the
wall.
Yes, quite gone," they all cried.
"Then I may come down too," he said;
and strutted about as before.
I wouldn't leave my post, you see, ladies,
while there was any danger," he said, majes-
tically.






A HINT TO TEACHERS. 91

Who doubts that?" said Shock, who had
heard him promise to protect them. "You
are a brave defender, indeed If your ladies
had not had the roost to fly to, you would
have helped them much from the top of yon
wall!"
"Pray, sir, what was I to do?" said the
cock, much disconcerted and offended.
Oh, of course," said Shock, "you
couldn't do anything but take care of your-
self; and I don't blame you for doing that,
but for blustering about what you knew you
couldn't do. False pretences always make
people contemptible."



A HINT TO TEACHERS,

RANNY, granny! the air is full
of canaries; it is, granny Just
like Miss Lily's, in the cage-
the cage, granny, that she rubbed
my nose against because I just looked at it."
And the kitten stood with her back arched,
her tail straight up, and her eyes as bright
as stars and as round as beads.
Nonsense !" cried the old cat.
"Well, then they are butterflies. Yes;






92 ORIGINAL FABLES.

they are butterflies!" said Kitty, lifting up
one little paw for a start.
"Butterflies in December said the old
cat, contemptuously.
"Then-then-then-they are- ," cried
Kitty; and off she scampered without wait-
ing to finish, and, jumping up to catch one,
fell backwards and over and over.
They are nothing but dead leaves,
granny !" she exclaimed, returning with an
air of disappointment.
"Of course they are dead leaves; I knew
that," said the old cat.
Did you ? Then why didn't you tell me
so?" asked Kitty, half affronted.
"Because, my dear," replied the old cat,.
" young people are apt to set a higher value
on what they have some trouble in learning
than on what they get for nothing."



TRIFLES TRIFLES 11 TRIFLES!!1
N'rT! said the pony to the flies;
and he shook his head and lashed
his tail about, and away they all
flew.
Don't, I say he cried again, moving to
another place, where he hoped he should lose






TRIPLES TRIFLES TRIFLES 93

them. And so he did for a minute or two,
but no longer. There they were-in his eyes,
on his nose, at his ears, and all over him.
If he could have eaten them all he would,
or kicked them into the next county he would,
or galloped them out of the world he would;
but there was no doing anything with them.
As he moved, they moved; and every time
he attempted to graze, they settled themselves









on him, or buzzed in a cloud round his head
as regularly as if they had come by invita-
tion.
Oh dear !" he sighed at last, "what is
to be done? I can bear my master's whip
and spur; I can stand being half worked to
death over the country, and with the heavy
cart-those are evils I make up my mind to;
and if that yelping cur comes behind me, I
can give him a reception that sends him
flying; but as to these torments, contemptible







94 ORIGINAL FABLES.

as they are-too small to be met effectually
-I verily believe they'll be the death of
me !"
Ah so it is in human life as in pony life.
Great trials can often be bravely borne, when
petty annoyances, by their number and perti-
nacity, vex and wear the soul.




TWO SIDES TO A TALE,

SHAT's the matter?" said Growler
to the black cat, as she sat
mumping on the step, of the
kitchen door.
"Matter enough," said the cat, turning
her head another way. "Our cook is very
fond of talking of hanging me. With all
my heart I wish some one would hang
her."
"Why, what is the matter?" repeated
Growler.
"Hasn't she beaten me, and called me a
thief, and threatened to be the death of
me? "
"Dear, dear !" said Growler; "pray what
has brought it about?"







TWO SIDES TO A TALE. 95

"Oh, the merest trifle absolutely
nothing; it is her temper. All the servants
complain of it. I wonder they haven't hanged
her long ago."
"Well, you see," said Growler, "cooks
are awkward things to hang; you and I
might be managed much more easily."
"Not a drop of milk have I had this day,"
said the black cat; "and such a pain in my
side !"
"But what," said Growler, "what imme-
diate cause ?"
"HIaven't I told you? said the black cat,
pettishly. "It's her temper-what I have
had to suffer from it! Everything she
breaks she lays to me; everything that is
stolen she lays to me-such injustice! it is
unbearable "
Growler was quite indignant; but, being
of a reflective turn, after the first gust of
wrath had passed he asked, "But was there
no particular cause this morning?"
"She chose to be very angry because I-I
offended her," said the cat.
"How? may I ask," gently inquired
Growler.
"Oh, nothing worth telling a mere
mistake of mine."
Growler looked at her with such a question-






96 ORIGINAL FABLES.

ing expression, that she was compelled to
say, I took the wrong thing for my break-
fast."
Oh! said Growler, much enlightened.
"Why, the fact was," said the black cat,
"I was springing at a mouse, and I knocked
down a dish, and not knowing exactly what
it was, I just tasted it, and it was rather
nice, and- "
"You finished it," suggested Growler.
"Well, I should, I believe, if that cook
hadn't come in. As it was, I left the
head."
"The head of what ?" said Growler.
"How inquisitive you are!" said the
black cat.
"Nay, but I should like to know," said
Growler.
"Well, then, of some grand fish that was
meant for dinner."
"Then," said Growler, "say what you
please; but now I've heard both sides of
the story, I only wonder she didn't hang
you."




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