Group Title: CFREC-Apopka research report
Title: Propagation of Dracaena fragrans 'Massangeana' affected by cane position on stock plants
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00065291/00001
 Material Information
Title: Propagation of Dracaena fragrans 'Massangeana' affected by cane position on stock plants
Series Title: CFREC-Apopka research report
Physical Description: 5 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Conover, Charles Albert, 1934-
Poole, R. T ( Richard Turk )
Central Florida Research and Education Center--Apopka
Publisher: University of Florida, Central Florida Research and Education Center-Apopka
Place of Publication: Apopka FL
Publication Date: 1992
 Subjects
Subject: Dracaena -- Propagation -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Foliage plants -- Transportation   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. 3).
Statement of Responsibility: C.A. Conover and R.T. Poole.
General Note: Caption title.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00065291
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 70004262

Full Text

q92 -/1
Propagation of Drcaena fragrans 'Massangeana' Affected by Cane Position on Stock
Plants

C.A. Conover and R.T. Poole1 nc

University of Florida, IFAS,o 30 <4
Central Florida Research and Education Center-Apopka '
CFREC-Apopka Research Report RH-92-17
iUniversity of Florida


Dracaenafragrans (L.) Ker-Gawl. 'Massangeana', (corn plant) is propagated by
semi-hardwood stem cuttings referred to as cane. Cane are obtained from the long stems of
stock plants grown primarily in the Caribbean region, where plants are grown as field crops,
much like woody ornamental field production in temperate climates. Stems harvested from
stock plants are stripped of leaves, then sectioned into desired lengths, usually ranging from
1 to 5 ft.

Cane propagation performance is variable, not only among cane within individual
shipments, but also among cane from different shipments. For some plant species, root
production on cuttings obtained in this manner varies according to the cutting's original
position on the mother shoot (1, 2, 3). Cutting position is not usually important in easily
rooted species but may influence availability, cost and quality for harder to root plants such
as corn plant.

As with many other hard to root plants, IBA (indolebutyric acid), dissolved in the
alcohol portion of a water/alcohol solution is used to enhance rooting. Alcohol concentration
in the propagation dip varies according to individual grower preference. The following
research was conducted to determine effects of position on the stem of stock plants and
alcohol concentration in IBA propagation dip on corn plant root and shoot growth.

Materials and Methods

Cane utilized in these experiments were harvested from stock plants field grown in a
nursery located near Siquirres, Costa Rica (Matas, De Costa Rica S.A., Siquirres, Costa
Rica). Healthy stock plants were produced outdoors in the native clay. Irrigation was
provided by natural rainfall and plants received 100 lbs N/A/yr from a 1-1-1 (N-P20O-K20)
fertilizer. Cane sections harvested from stock plants were pre-measured, starting from the
apex, so that each section consisted of 5 ft of semi-hardwood propagation material. Cane
sections were stacked horizontally on pallets and moved into the processing building. The


'Professor of Environmental Horticulture and Center Director,
and Professor of Plant Physiology, respectively, Central Florida
Research and Education Center, 2807 Binion Road, Apopka, FL 32703.






which prevented drying and splitting during shipment. Cane were placed vertically in crates
with 1 inch of moss covering bottoms to maintain high humidity during shipping.

Cane were shipped from Puerto Limon to Miami, Florida in shipping containers
loaded on cargo vessels. In Miami cane were transferred to refrigerated trucks for the
journey to the University of Florida, IFAS, Central Florida Research and Education Center
located at 2807 Binion Road in Apopka, Florida. Air temperatures in containers and trucks
were maintained at 620F. Time elapsed from cane harvest until initiation of experiments was
approximately 10 days.

Experiment 1 was initiated on 15 October 1990, the day after cane arrived from
Miami. A circular saw was used to remove 0.5 inches from both the top and bottom of each
5 ft section. Sections were then cut into 5 equal lengths approximately 1 ft long. The
section containing the youngest growth, and therefore, originally closest to the apex was
assigned position 1. Position 2 cane was situated directly below section 1 cane on uncut
sections, followed by positions 3, 4 and 5 cane, respectively.

Three to 4 inches of the basal ends of all 1 ft sections were held for approximately 2
seconds in 20/80, 40/60, 60/40 or 80/20% alcohol/water solutions containing 10,000 ppm
IBA. Cane were potted in 6 inch containers using mix of 6:3:1 v/v Florida peat:pine
bark:builder's sand, amended with 7 lbs dolomite and 1 lb Micromax per yd3, respectively.
Cane were rooted on a greenhouse propagation bench where temperatures ranged from 65 to
90F and maximum light intensity at bench level was 1500 ft-c. Cane were misted
manually, 4 times daily, during weekdays only. Containers were top dressed with 5 g/6 inch
pot 19-6-12 Osmocote 3 month release rate fertilizer (Grace/Sierra Co., Milpitas, CA 95035)
on 14 November 1990.

Number of roots greater than 1 inch, number of shoots and total shoot length of all
shoots greater than 1 inch were recorded on 12 March 1991, after cane were maintained in
the propagation area for 21 weeks.

Experiment 2 was a repeat of experiment 1 except for time of year cane were
propagated and number of fertilizer applications. Containers were top dressed with 5 g 19-6-
12/6 inch pot on 31 July 1991, the day the experiment was initiated, and again on 1
November 1991. Growth was determined on 28 December 1991, after cane were maintained
in the propagation area for approximately 21 weeks.

Results and Discussion

Number of roots was affected by cutting position in experiment 1 where propagation
was initiated in the fall (Table 1). Position 1 cane, sections nearest to terminal ends of
stems, rooted easiest, followed by position 5 cane from the basal end of stems. Cane from
middle portions of stems rooted more slowly.






Position 1 cane grown in experiment 2 also had more roots, than cane from other
positions tested (Table 2). In addition, position 1 cane also had more shoots that grew longer
than shoots on cane from positions 2, 3, 4 or 5. As in experiment 1, position 5 cane were
next best in overall propagation performance. Cane used in experiment 2, initially placed in
propagation area in July, developed roots and shoots faster than cane from experiment 1,
which began in October. Results of alcohol treatments were not consistent, but the higher
alcohol concentrations in the IBA dip solutions did not affect plant growth.

The root/shoot generation process is initiated in propagation material when cuttings
are made. Since about 10 days elapsed from the time cane was cut into 5 foot sections until
the time 5 ft cane were cut into 1 foot sections, the growth regulators required for root
initiation would already have formed in the basal ends (position 5 cane after 1 ft sections
were made). New bud formation would also be well underway in the terminal ends (position
1 cane after 1 ft sections were made). Faster root initiation aids shoot growth and new
leaves promote root growth, so that the time lapse during shipment from Puerto Rico may be
the cause of best results with the top and bottom sections.

Literature Cited

1. Hansen, J. and E.E. Andersen. 1987. Propagation of Schefflera arboricola by
single-node cuttings. Position of cuttings on the mother plant. Gartner Tidende
103(17):491-493.

2. Hartmann, H.T. and R.M. Brooks. 1958. Propagation of Stockton Morello cherry
rootstock by softwood cuttings under mist sprays. Proc. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci.
71:127-134.

3. Loreti, F., and H.T. Hartmann. 1964. Propagation of olive trees by rooting leafy
cuttings under mist. Proc. Amer Soc. Hort. Sci. 85:257-264.







Table 1.


Number of roots formed on Dracaenafragrans 'Massangeana' during
propagation affected by position of cane on stock plant. Cane grown from 15
October 1990 until 12 March 1991. Experiment 1.


Positions


Number of roots > 1 inch


Significance'
quadratic ***

zCane sections originally closest to the apex when still attached to stock plants were
assigned position 1. Position 2 cane were directly below section 1 cane on stock plants,
followed by positions 3, 4 and 5 cane, respectively.
Y***Results significant at P = 0.001.






Table 2.


Shoot length, number of shoots and number of roots formed on Dracaena
fragrans 'Massangeana' during propagation affected by position of cane on
stock plant. Cane grown from 31 July until 28 December 1991. Experiment


No. shoots > 1 inch No. roots > 1 inch
Positions Shoot length
1 39.8 2.4 6.6
2 26.2 2.3 2.4
3 21.2 1.8 1.2
4 23.8 2.1 1.7
5 35.6 2.2 3.3
SignificanceY
quadratic *** ***

zCane sections originally closest to the apex when still attached to stock plants were
assigned position 1. Position 2 cane were directly below section 1 cane on stock plants,
followed by positions 3, 4 and 5 cane, respectively.
Y*, ***Results significant at P = 0.05 and P = 0.001, respectively.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs