• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Historic note
 Main














Group Title: Bradenton GCREC research report - University of Florida Gulf Coast Research and Education Center ; BRA1994-4
Title: Yield response of 'jupiter' bell pepper to foliar biostimulant spray
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00065270/00001
 Material Information
Title: Yield response of 'jupiter' bell pepper to foliar biostimulant spray
Series Title: Bradenton GCREC research report
Physical Description: 9 p. : ; 28 cm
Language: English
Creator: Csizinszky, Alexander Anthony, 1933-
Gulf Coast Research and Education Center (Bradenton, Fla.)
Publisher: Gulf Coast Research and Education Center
Place of Publication: Bradenton FL
Publication Date: 1994
 Subjects
Subject: Peppers -- Varieties -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. 3).
Statement of Responsibility: A.A. Cszinszky.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "March 1994."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00065270
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 68641731

Table of Contents
    Historic note
        Historic note
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida








UNIVERSITY OF
Gulf Coast Research and Education Center
SLO RIDA L5007 60th Street East, Bradenton,FL 34203
Bradenton GCREC Research Report BRA-1994-4
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences March 1994 Mar ston Sc ence
Library
YIELD RESPONSE OF 'JUPITER' BELL PEPPER TO MAY 2 0 1994
FOLIAR BIOSTIMULANT SPRAY

A. A. Csizinszky' University of Florida
Replicated trials were conducted at the Gulf Coast Research and Education Center,
Bradenton in the fall-winter 1992-93 to evaluate the response of 'Jupiter' bell
pepper to 'Atonik' foliar biostimulant spray. The effects of biostimulant on
earliness and fruit size were of special interest.

Materials and Methods

Plots, 17-ft long and 5 ft wide with 3 ft between plots, were established on 32-
inch wide and 8 inch high beds formed on 5-ft centers of Eau Gallie fine sand.
Prior to land preparation, soil samples were taken and analyzed at the Analytical
Research Laboratory at Gainesville (3,4). Nutrient concentrations in the soil
solution were (in ppm): 0.5 NH4-N; 1.0 NO3-N; 27.8 P; 25.0 K; 875 Ca, and 151 Mg,
and the pH was 6.98. Nutrients, applied in lb per acre (acre=8712 linear bed ft)
were 261N, 46P and 289K. Nitrogen and K source was an 18-0-20.75-1.2 (N-P-K-Mg)
fertilizer and P source a 0-8.74-0 (N-P-K) superphosphate. The superphosphate
also contained the micronutrients (F503) at 80 Ib/ton (21 Ib/acre F503).
Superphosphate with the micronutrients was placed in a 6-inch wide band in the
bed center on the false bed. The N and K were placed in a 2-inch deep, narrow
furrow in the bed center. Soil was fumigated with Terr-O-Gas (66.6%
methylbromide and 33.3% chloropicrin) at 213 Ib/acre. Beds were covered with 1.4
mil thick white on black polyethylene film.
On 8 September, 5-week old 'Jupiter' bell pepper seedlings were planted in double
rows at 14 inches between- and 14 inches within-row spacing (14,930 plants per
acre). In the biostimulant-treated plots, the 'Atonik' compound (Asahi Chemical
Co., Japan) containing sodium mono-nitrophenolates, was applied three times
during the season: at the beginning of flower bud formation (8 Oct.); at first
bloom (20 Oct.) and when small fruit were present (3 Nov.). The biostimulant was
applied at 8 fl oz/acre at the 1st and 6 fl oz/acre at the second and third
applications in 50 gal of water plus 1 oz of a non-ionic surfactant (Sunspray
11E). Plants in the control plots were sprayed with water only. Sprays were
applied with a fan-nozzle equipped backpack sprayer at 40 psi. Biostimulant-
treated and control plots were arranged in a randomized complete block and
replicated four times.

Soil samples for pH and total soluble salt (TSS) determination and macro and
micronutrient analyses were taken immediately after transplanting and at the end
of the harvest season. Leaf samples for dry matter determination and for macro
and micronutrient analyses were taken after each biostimulant spray application
and at the end of the harvest. Chemical analyses were carried out at the
Analytical Research Laboratory in Gainesville.


'Associate Horticulturist.









Pesticides, labelled for peppers, were applied weekly. Fruit were harvested on
17, 24 and 30 November, 8 December, 1992, and 5 January 1993. Fruit were
separated into marketable and cull, then marketable fruit were graded into U.S.
Fancy, U.S. No. 1 and U.S. No. 2, according to U.S. Grade Standards (5).

Data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA).

Results and Discussion

Yields, in 28-lb cartons/acre and the number of fruit (in 1000's) harvested per
acre, are in Tables 1 to 4. In the first two harvests, there was no significant
difference in yield (weight or number of fruit per acre) between 'Atonik' or
water-treated control. From the third harvest, there was a non-significant trend
towards larger fruit size and marketable yields with the 'Atonik' than with the
water spray. In the last harvest (harvest 5) the 'Atonik' treated plants yielded
significantly more of U.S. Fancy grade, but fewer U.S. No. 1 grade fruit than
water treated controls (Table 3). The 'Atonik' treatments also reduced both
weight and number of cull fruit (Tables 2 and 4). For the season, U.S. Fancy
grade yields were about 18% higher with the 'Atonik' biostimulant than with water
spray, while U.S. No. 1 and U.S. No. 2 yields were slightly higher with water
than with 'Atonik' sprays.

Dry matter (dm) content and concentrations of macro and micro elements in shoots
on selected dates and in fruit at harvest are in Table 5 and 6.

In general, there were very small differences due to spray treatment in dm and
elemental concentrations in shoots and in fruits. Only K was consistently lower
at each of the three sampling dates with 'Atonik' than with water control sprays
(Table 5). However, shoot K concentrations with both 'Atonik' and water sprays
were in the sufficiency range. In the soil solution, TSS, pH and macronutrient
concentrations were similar in the 'Atonik' and water treated plots (Table 7).

The results of this study are similar to earlier studies on the effect of several
biostimulant products on peppers: plants treated with foliar biostimulant sprays
had slightly higher yields of U.S. Fancy or marketable grade fruit, than plants
sprayed with water only (1,2). Therefore, the beneficial effect of biostimulant
sprays on pepper yields has to be weighed against the cost of biostimulant
applications.

The effect of biostimulants in previous studies also depended on the pepper
cultivar (1). It is advisable for the growers, therefore, to test the effect of
biostimulant sprays on a small area and preferably on several cultivars before
treating a large acreage of peppers with biostimulants.

Note: The use of trade names in this publication does not imply either
endorsement or criticism of these products by the author or the University
of Florida.









Relevant Publications

1. Csizinszky, A. A. 1990. Response of two bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L.)
cultivars to foliar and soil-applied biostimulants. Soil and Crop Sci.
Soc. Fla. Proc. 49:199-203.

2. Csizinszky, A. A., C. D. Stanley and G. A. Clark. 1990. Foliar and soil-
applied biostimulant studies with microirrigated pepper and tomato. Proc.
Fla. State Hort. Soc. 103:113-117.

3. Hanlon, E. A. and J. M. deVore. 1989. Chemical procedures and training
material. Fla. Coop. Ext. Ser. Circ. 812. Gainesville, FL.


4. Hanlon, E. A.,
water testing.


G. Kidder,
Fla. Coop.


and B. L. McNeal. 1990. Soil, container and
Ext. Circ. 817. Gainesville, FL.


5. United States Department of Agriculture.
for Grades of Green Peppers. USDA Agric.
D.C.


1977. United States Standards
Marketing Service, Washington,


Table 1. Yield (ctn/A) of 'Atonik' biostimulant treated Jupiter peppers by
harvest.

Harvest Treatment US Fancy US #1 US #2 Marketable Culls Total
------------------- 28-lb cartons/acre ----------------

1 Control 131Y 64 6 201 0 201
Atonik 121 44 0 165 6 171

2 Control 121 195 31 347 7 354
Atonik 123 208 14 345 2 347

3 Control 11 373 55 439 31 470
Atonik 16 455 52 523 18 541

4 Control 0 130 27 157 17 174
Atonik 0 161 32 193 8 201

5 Control 88 396 143 627 78 705
Atonik 154 267 142 563 49 612


at P < 0.1.


zAcre = 8712 linear bed feet; 14,930 plants per acre.
YYield differences between treatments were non-significant









Table 2. Cumulative yield (ctn/A) 'Atonik' biostimulant treated Jupiter
peppers.

Harvest Treatment US Fancy US #1 US #2 Marketable Culls Total
----------------- 28-lb cartons/acrez -----------------

1 Control 131 64 6 201 0 201
Atonik 121 44 0 165 6 171

1+2 Control 254 259 36 549 7 556
Atonik 244 252 14 510 8 518

1+2+3 Control 265 633 91 989 39 1028
Atonik 262 707 66 1035 26 1061

1+2+3+4 Control 265 763 119 1147 56 1203
Atonik 262 869 98 1229 34 1263
**Y

1+2+3+4+5 Control 352 1159 262 1773 132 1905
Atonik 416 1136 240 1792 82 1874
**Y


ZAcre = 8712 linear bed feet; 14,930 plants per acre.
YYield differences were significant at P < 0.05 (**) as indicated.


Table 3. Yield (numbers x 1000/A) of 'Atonik' biostimulant treated Jupiter
peppers by harvest.


Harvest Treatment US Fancy US #1 US #2 Marketable Culls Total
-----------------------. x 1000/Az ----------------------

1 Control 7.3 4.3 0.4 12.0 0.0 12.0
Atonik 6.9 3.3 0.0 10.2 0.7 10.9

2 Control 7.3 14.2 2.5 24.0 1.4 25.4
Atonik 7.3 14.9 1.1 23.3 0.4 23.7

3 Control 0.7 26.9 5.1 32.7 4.0 36.7
Atonik 1.1 32.7 5.1 38.9 2.5 41.4

4 Control 0.0 10.9 3.3 14.2 2.5 16.7
Atonik 0.0 13.1 3.3 16.4 0.7 17.1

5 Control 4.7 28.7 12.0 45.4 9.4 54.8
Atonik 8.3 19.2 12.3 39.8 5.4 45.2
*Y **Y **Y


at P < 0.1 (*) and


ZAcre = 8712 linear bed feet; 14,930 plants per acre.
YYield differences between treatments were significant
P < 0.05 (**) as indicated.









Table 4. Cumulative yield (number x 1000/A) of 'Atonik' biostimulant treated
Jupiter peppers.


Harvest Treatment US Fancy US #1 US #2 Marketable Culls Total
---------------------- x 1000/Az ----------

1 Control 7.3 4.3 0.4 12.0 0.0 12.0
Atonik 6.9 3.3 0.0 10.2 0.7 10.9

1+2 Control 14.5 18.5 2.9 35.9 1.4 37.3
Atonik 14.2 18.2 1.1 33.5 1.1 34.6
1+2+3 Control 15.2 45.4 8.0 68.6 5.4 74.0
Atonik 15.2 50.8 6.2 72.2 3.6 75.8

1+2+3+4 Control 15.2 56.3 11.2 82.7 8.0 90.7
Atonik 15.2 63.9 9.4 88.5 4.4 92.9
**Y
1+2+3+4+5 Control 20.0 84.9 23.2 128.1 17.4 145.5
Atonik 23.6 83.1 21.8 128.5 9.8 138.3
**Y


at P < 0.05 (**) as


zAcre = 8712 linear bed feet; 14,930 plants per acre.
YYield differences between treatments were significant
indicated.









Table 5. Dry matter content and macro element concentrations in 'Atonik'
treated 'Jupiter' pepper shoots and fruit on selected dates.


Shoots Fruit
DAPZ
Treatment 41 64 92


Dry matter


12.86Y
12.94
ns


6.65
6.39
*



0.66
0.63
ns



5.12
4.87
**


Control
Atonik
Signif.y



Control
Atonik
Signif.y



Control
Atonik
Signif.y



Control
Atonik
Signif.y



Control
Atonik
Signif.y



Control
Atonik
Signif.y


0.62
0.60
ns


(% dry. weight)

16.04
16.34
ns


4.82
5.13
*



0.35
0.34
ns



4.45
4.26
**


1.41
1.46
*


0.62
0.63
ns


16.91
17.60
ns


5.77
5.67
ns


4.86
4.89
ns



0.32
0.30
ns



4.32
3.85
*


2.14
2.20
ns



0.35
0.34
ns



2.70
2.75
ns


1.92
2.02
ns


0.11
0.11
ns


0.76
0.80
ns


0.17
0.16
ns


ZDAP = days after planting.
YDifference between means is
non-significant (ns).


significant at P < 0.1 (*) and P < 0.05 (**) or


1.14
1.11
ns









Table 6. Microelement concentrations in 'Atonik' treated 'Jupiter'
shoots and fruit on selected dates.


pepper


Shoots Fruit
DAPz
Treatment 41 64 92
Dry matter (ppm dry weight)


Control
Atonik
Signif.


Control
Atonik
Signif.


Control
Atonik
Signif.y


Control
Atonik
Signif.


282
307
ns


zDAP = days after planting.
YDifference between means is significant at P < 0.1 (*); P < 0.05 (**)
or non-significant (ns).









Table 7. Total soluble salts (TSS),
soil solution.


pH and macronutrient concentrations in


DAPy
Treatment 1 34 70 93 1 34 70 93


TSS, ppm


pH


6.20
6.20
ns



1.3
1.9
ns



766.0
499.0
ns


6.10
5.90
ns


6.70
6.30
ns


NO3, ppm


52.9 21.7 26.4
50.0 43.8 44.4
ns ns ns

K, ppm


411.0
406.0
ns


142.0
137.0
ns


Mg, ppm


975.0 1066.0 1096.0
999.0 949.0 1030.0
ns ns ns


127.0
127.0
ns


121.0
130.0
ns


144.0
125.0
ns


ZMean difference is significant at P <
YDAP = days after planting.


0.05 (**), or non-significant (ns).


13,020
10,400
ns


74.2
82.2
ns


53.0
61.9
ns


Control
Atonik
Signif.z


Control
Atonik
Signif.z



Control
Atonik
Signif.z



Control
Atonik
Signif.z


6.70
6.40
ns


10,060
11,620
ns

NH4, ppm


24.4
20.2
ns


P, ppm


78.8
57.0
ns


5760
5480
ns



5.9
20.6
ns



48.9
52.5
ns


4580
6060
ns



4.1
11.9
ns



47.4
55.3
ns


Ca, ppm


971.0
1023.0
ns


137.0
150.0
ns


143.0
142.0
ns








The Gulf Coast Research and Education

The Gulf Coast Research and Education Center is
a unit of the Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences, University of Florida. The Research
Center originated in the fall of 1925 as the Tomato
Disease Laboratory with the primary objective of
developing control procedures for an epidemic
outbreak of naithead spot of tomato. Research was
expanded in subsequent years to include study of
several other tomato diseases.

In 1937, new research facilities were
established in the town of Manatee, and the Center
scope was enlarged to include horticultural,
entomological, and soil science studies of several
vegetable crops. The ornamental program was a
natural addition to the Center's responsibilities
because of the emerging industry in the area in the
early 1940's.

The Center's current location was established
in 1965 where a comprehensive research and
extension program on vegetable crops and ornamental
plants is conducted. Three state extension
specialists positions, 16 state research
scientists, and two grant supported scientists from
various disciplines of training participate in all
phases of vegetable and ornamental horticultural
programs. This interdisciplinary team approach,
combining several research disciplines and a wide
range of industry and faculty contacts, often is
more productive than could be accomplished with
limited investments in independent programs.


9

Center


The Center's primary mission is to develop new
and expand existing knowledge and technology, and
to disseminate new scientific knowledge in Florida,
so that agriculture remains efficient and
economically sound.

The second mission of the Center is to assist
the Cooperative Extension Service, IFAS campus
departments, in which Center faculty hold
appropriate liaison appointments, and other
research centers in extension, educational
training, and cooperative research programs for the
benefit of Florida's producers, students, and
citizens.

Program areas of emphasis include: (1) genetics,
breeding, and variety development and evaluation;
(2) biological, chemical, and mechanical pest
management in entomology, plant pathology,
nematology, bacteriology, virology, and weed
science; (3) production efficiency, culture,
management, and counteracting environmental stress;
(4) water management and natural resource
protection; (5) post-harvest physiology,
harvesting, handling and food quality of
horticultural crops; (6) technical support and
assistance to the Florida Cooperative Extension
Service; and (7) advancement of fundamental
knowledge of disciplines represented by faculty and
(8) directing graduate student training and
teaching special undergraduate classes.


Location of
GCREC Bradenton


IFAS IS:
a The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences,
University of Florida.
Q A statewide organization dedicated to teaching,
research and extension.
Q Faculty located in Gainesville and at 13 research
and education centers, 67 county extension
offices and four demonstration units throughout
the state.
D A partnership in food and agriculture, and natural
and renewable resource research and education,
funded by state, federal and local government,
and by gifts and grants from individuals, founda-
tions, government and industry.
3 An organization whose mission is:
Educating students in the food, agricultural,
and related sciences and natural resources.
Strengthening Florida's diverse food and
agricultural industry and its environment
through research.
Enhancing for all Floridians, the application
of research and knowledge to improve the
quality of life statewide through IFAS exten-
sion programs.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs