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Group Title: Bradenton GCREC research report - University of Florida Gulf Coast Research and Education Center ; BRA1988-24
Title: Harvest date and duration of storage of caladium tubers influence subsequent sprouting
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00065231/00001
 Material Information
Title: Harvest date and duration of storage of caladium tubers influence subsequent sprouting
Series Title: Bradenton GCREC research report
Physical Description: 3 leaves : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Harbaugh, B. K ( Brent Kalen )
Gulf Coast Research and Education Center (Bradenton, Fla.)
Publisher: Gulf Coast Research and Education Center, IFAS, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Bradenton FL
Publication Date: 1988
 Subjects
Subject: Caladium -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (leaf 5).
Statement of Responsibility: Brent K. Harbaugh.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "October, 1988"
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00065231
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 63682288

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HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida






S


GULF COAST RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTER
3 IFAS, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
5007 60th Street East
S. f :' iBradenton, Fl 34203


Bradenton GCREC Research Report BRA1988-24 October 1988


HARVEST DATE AND DURATION OF STORAGE OF CALADIUM TUBERS INFLUENCE
SUBSEQUENT SPROUTING

Brent K. Harbaughl

Caladium tubers are typically harvested from November through March
depending on weather conditions, machinery availability or capacity,
personnel available for harvest, and storage space. Tubers are generally
cured for several days, cleaned, graded and then stored until sold.
Tubers may be sold immediately after curing or after several months in
storage. Duration of storage influences subsequent sprouting of tubers
when they are forced in pots. Poole and Conover (3) reported that
'Candidum' and 'Red Flare' tubers had a "least responsive" stage from
three to six weeks after harvest. Tubers stored for shorter (0-2 weeks)
or longer (8-12 weeks) periods took less time to sprout. Marousky and
Raulston (2) reported that the longer the storage period, the more rapid
the emergence of leaves for 'Caroline Whorton' tubers stored 0, 3, 6 or 12
weeks. The purpose of this research was to determine if the date tubers
were harvested would influence the effects of duration of storage and/or
subsequent sprouting of tubers forced in pots.

Caladium tubers used in this study were produced on an EauGallie fine sand
soil using the full bed mulch management system with seep irrigation (1).
'Candidum' and 'Rosebud' tubers were cut into 1 inch propagules and
planted May 10, 1984. Spacing was 3 inches ('Rosebud') or 4 inches
('Candidum') within the row and 9 inches between the three rows on a 30
inch wide bed. Osmocote 11-11-18 9-month controlled release fertilizer
was incorporated in the top 2 inches of the bed at a rate of 300 pounds of
nitrogen per planted (row) acre. Tubers were harvested randomly from 3
foot sections of the row throughout the field on November 1, November 29,
December 27 or January 24, 1984-85. Tubers were washed, leaves and roots
removed, and placed in trays to dry and cure. Tubers were cured, stored
and forced in a room maintained at 70-750 F. One number one grade tuber
was planted per 4 inch pot after storage for 1 to 12 weeks for each of the
harvest dates. Tubers had the central eye removed (de-eyed) at time of
planting. The number of days to emergence of three leaves was recorded
for each plant. There were 7 replications of each harvest and storage
period combination, with a single plant as the experimental unit. Trend
analyses were performed for data for each harvest date to determine the
influence of duration of storage on subsequent sprouting.


1Professor of Floriculture.









Results

Harvest date and duration of tuber storage affected sprouting of
'Candidum' and 'Rosebud' differently. For November 1 and November 29
harvests (Fig. 1), storage duration of'Candidum' tubers affected sprouting
in a manner consistent with that reported by Poole and Conover(3). That
is, a least responsive stage was evident, with the longest period to
sprout occurring after 7 weeks and 4 weeks storage for November 1 and 29
harvest dates, respectively. For harvests on December 27 and January 24,
an increase in storage duration resulted in a decrease in the length of
time for tubers to sprout. The least responsive period for these later
harvest dates was after one week of storage. These trends indicated that
'Candidum' tubers left in the ground until December 27 or January 24 had
undergone the least responsive stage before harvest.

'Rosebud' tubers harvested from November 1 through January 24 all
responded similarly to storage duration with an increase in length of
tuber storage resulting in a decrease in the length of time for tubers to
sprout, Fig. 2. This cultivar responded in a manner consistent to that
reported for 'Carolyn Whorton' (2). Thus, these cultivars did not have a
least responsive stage resulting from storage. If a least responsive
stage was involved with these cultivars, this stage would have occurred
while tubers were in the ground.

The length of time to sprout after 1 week of storage decreased for each
harvest date from November 1 to January 24 with 'Rosebud'. This was
similar to the trend caused by storage of tubers after any harvest. Thus,
with 'Rosebud', leaving tubers in the ground was similar to digging tubers
and storing them. It should be noted, however, these results are from one
year and early cool weather caused foliage to collapse and die-back in
late October. In other seasons, cold fronts may not cause this to happen
until late November or December and growth may continue. Research to date
has not defined whether cool temperatures or the process of digging,
curing and drying tubers, or interactions of these and other factors cause
tubers to initiate the least responsive stage. These data indicate that
both cold weather and drying tubers could cause a least responsive stage,
and cultivars will respond to these factors differentially.
Summary

In summary, these data illustrate the importance of knowing the date of
harvest as well as duration of storage of caladium tubers. Commercial
greenhouse managers forcing caladiums can more readily predict time from
planting caladium tubers to expected date of marketing if they are aware
of harvest and storage dates. Unfortunately, data from this experiment
and similar data from other research (2, 3) indicate cultivars differ
widely in length of time tubers take to sprout, and also differ in their
response to harvest date and storage duration. More research will be
necessary to classify cultivars into groups that respond similarly so that
forcing time can be predictable. Also, continued research on factors
initiating the least responsive stage of tubers in the field or during
storage will provide information to better estimate production time for
potted caladiums.







3

Literature Cited

1. Harbaugh, B. K. and A. J. Overman. 1983. Evaluation of fertilizer
rates on Caladium X hortulanum Birdsey 'Cendidum' tuber production in
muck and sandy soil management systems. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc.
96:250-254.

2. Marousky, F. J. and J. C. Raulston. 1973. Influence of temperature
and duration of curing, storage, shipping and forcing periods on
caladium growth. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 86:362-368.

3. Poole, R. T. and C. A. Conover. 1977. Sprouting of caladiums as
influenced by planting date. The Florida Nurseryman. Septomber:25.










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Number of Weeks in Storage


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27 or Jan. 24)
'Rosebud'
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