• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Advertising
 Chapter I: Frankie going to...
 Chapter II: Mamma's school
 Chapter III: Study and play
 Chapter IV: Frankie and the pumpkin...
 Chapter V: Song of the birds
 Chapter VI: Nelly's old nurse
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Mrs. Leslie's books for little children. Little Frankie series ;, 4
Title: Little Frankie and his father
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00064497/00001
 Material Information
Title: Little Frankie and his father
Series Title: Mrs. Leslie's books for little children. Little Frankie series
Physical Description: 104 p., 1 leaf of plates : ill. ; 16 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Leslie, Madeline, 1815-1893 ( Author, Primary )
Nichols, Henry, b. ca. 1816
Billings, Hammatt, 1818-1874
Woolworth, Ainsworth & Company ( Publisher )
Boston Stereotype Foundry
Publisher: Woolworth, Ainsworth, & Co.
Place of Publication: Boston
Chicago
Manufacturer: Electrotyped at the Boston Stereotype Foundry
Publication Date: 1870
Copyright Date: 1860
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Early works to 1900 -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Parent and child -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Cousins -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Home schooling -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Truthfulness and falsehood -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Family stories -- 1870   ( local )
Bldn -- 1870
Genre: Family stories   ( local )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Mrs. Madeline Leslie.
General Note: Frontispiece engraved by Nichols after Billings.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00064497
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002221548
notis - ALG1772
oclc - 57314189

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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Advertising
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Chapter I: Frankie going to church
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Chapter II: Mamma's school
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Chapter III: Study and play
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
    Chapter IV: Frankie and the pumpkin seeds
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
    Chapter V: Song of the birds
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
    Chapter VI: Nelly's old nurse
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
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LITTLE





FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.




Lf

MRS. MADELINE LESLIE,
AUTHOR OF "THE HOME LIFE SERIES;" "MRS. LESLIE'S
JUVENILE SERIES," ETC.







BOSTON AND CHICAGO:
WOOLWORTH, AINSWORTH, & CO.
1870.
































Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1860, by

A. R. &AKER,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the District of Massachusetts.
















ELECTROTYPED AT THE
BOSTON STEREOTYPE FOUNDRr.











MRS. LESLIE'S BOOKS

FOR


LITTLE CHILDREN.




THE LITTLE FRANKIE SERIES.








THE ROBIN REDBREAST SERIES.


THE ROBINS' NEST.

LITTLE ROBINS IN THE NEST.

LITTLE ROBINS LEARNING TO FLY.

LITTLE ROBINS IN TROUBLE.

LITTLE ROBINS' FRIENDS.

LITTLE ROBINS' LOVE ONE TO ANOTHER




THE LITTLE FRANKIE SERIES.


LITTLE FRANKIE AND HIS MOTHER.

LITTLE FRANKIE AT HIS PLAYS.

LITTLE FRANKIE AND HIS COUSIN.

LITTLE FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.

LITTLE FRANKIE ON A JOURNEY.

LITTLE FRANKIE AT SCHOOL.







LITTLE

FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.

CHAPTER I.
FRANKIE GOING TO CHURCH.

LITTLE Frankie began to go to
church with his mother when he
was three years old. He was very
much pleased when she told him
he might go, and promised that
he would sit very still, and not
talk. His brother Willie was
(7)





8 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
quite excited too, and wondered
what Frankie would say to the
music. "I am afraid he will
talk when the organ begins to
play," he said.
"No, no," said Frankie, "I
shall be vely till."
When they entered the pew,
and his mother lifted him upon
the seat, the little boy looked
around with astonishment. First
he gazed at the pulpit where the
minister sat in his black gown.





FRANKIE GOING TO CHURCH. 9
Then he caught a glimpse of a
pair of roguish blue eyes in the
slip opposite. But he did not
smile. He looked surprised, and
that was all. Presently the or-
ganist began to play the volun-
tary while the people were com-
ing in, and Mrs. Gray lifted him
up so that he could kneel upon
the seat and see where the music
came from. He had not been
kneeling there more than a min-
ute, before she heard him sob.





10 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
What is the matter, dear ?"
she asked, taking him into her
lap. But he sobbed so much
he could not speak. Mrs. Gray
could think of nothing to make
him cry, unless he had smiled,
and caused some lady of the
congregation to shake her head
at him. She began to be afraid
she should be obliged to take
him out before the service com-
menced. She whispered again,
" What ails mother's darling ?"





FRANKIE GOING TO CHURCH. 11
Frankie wiped his eyes with
his fat hand, and whispered, "I
can't see the monkey to it any
where, mamma."
The little boy had often seen
men going about with a hand
organ; but it so happened that
they had always been accompa-
nied by a monkey; and this he
thought by far the best part of
the exhibition. Now, when he
heard the organ, he thought of
course there must be a monkey





12 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
somewhere behind the curtain,
and was so disappointed when
he could not find it, that he be-
gan to cry.
His answer was so different
from what she had expected,
that his mother could not help
smiling, though she tried very
hard to control her mirth. She
soothed the little fellow, and
pre Senitly the minister arose for
prayer.
As soon as the service was





FRANKIE GOING TO CHURCH. 13
through, and the people began
to leave the church, Frankie
spoke aloud: "I been vely good
boy, mamma, and not talk at
all."
When Nelly came to live with
her aunt, she had never been to
church but a few times ; and
then her mother had allowed
her to carry her doll, to keep
her quiet. She now went reg-
ularly every Sabbath with her
cousins ; and though she was





14 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
rather inclined to look around
the church and laugh with little
girls or boys, whose eyes she
could just see over the tops of
the pews, yet she was learning
to be a good girl.
She had begun to make a
patchwork bed-quilt for her dol-
ly, and her aunt had promised,
when it was finished, to quilt
it for her, so that she could
spread it on her little bedstead.
She had learned to thread her





FRANKIE GOING TO CHURCH. 15
needle, and to put the thimble
on the right finger. Her aunt
had made her a pretty apron,
which she put on when she
sewed, and which she called her
sewing apron. It had pockets,
where she kept her thread, and
the little squares not yet sewed.
Sometimes NIelly got out of
patience with her work, because
the thread knotted or broke; and
then she wanted to throw it down
and run out to play. But her





16 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
kind aunt encouraged her to per-
severe ; and Frankie said, "I
wouldn't give up, Nelly, cause I
belong to the Try Company.'"
The little girl was much amused
the first time she saw the boys
marching in their uniform, with
Willie drumming at their head.
" I want a cap too, aunty," she
said; why can't girls train ? "
"You don't tie up your shoes,
or get the knots out," said Frankie,
earnestly.





FRANKIE GOING TO CHURCH. 17
A few days before this, Nelly's
shoe string was hanging about
her heels, and her aunt told her
to tie it up. She stooped down
to do so, but found it was in a
hard knot. She gave up at once,
and said, "I can't do it; it's in
an ugly knot."
"I will! I can!" said Frankie,
sitting down on the floor beside
her. He worked patiently at it
for several minutes, his face grow-
ing quite red from his exer-
voL. Iv. 2





18 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
tions, when his mother offered
to help him.
"No, mamma!" he said, in
great excitement; "pretty soon
I shall be captain of the Try
Company; and they will say,
'Can't you untie knots ?' Then
his mother gave him a large pin,
and he soon jumped up gayly to
say that his work was done.
This was what Frankie meant
when Nelly wanted to join the
Try Company.





FRANKIE GOING TO CHURCH. 19
One evening, Mrs. Gray went
up to her room, and found her
little boy kneeling by his low
chair, and repeating his prayers.
Presently he jumped up, saying,
" I have said my prayers four
times, mamma, cause when I go
to bed I'm so -sleepy. Now I
sha'n't have to say them for a
good many nights."
The lady could scarcely keep
from smiling, this was so strange
an idea.





20 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
How should you like it," she
asked, "if God were to say, 'I
am tired of giving little Frankie
so many breakfasts, and dinners,
and suppers; I'll let him eat all
the time to-day, and then he
won't need any thing more for
a week ? '"
"I should be vely hungry,
mamma," said Frankie, looking
very sober.
Yes, dear, of course you
would. Well, if God is so kind





FRANKIE GOING TO CHURCH. 21
as to give you a breakfast every
morning, a dinner every noon,
and a supper every night, ought
you not to be glad to thank him
for his kindness ? "
Yes, mamma, I will ;" and a
happy smile made the little fel-
low's face look very pretty. At
least his mother thought so, and
she drew him up to her side,
and kissed him. .





22 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.

CHAPTER II.
MAMMA'S SCHOOL.

WHEN Frankie was five years
old, he heard his father explain-
ing to Willie about the earth
turning round and round, which
made day and night.
The gentleman took an apple
for the sun, and then a small
potato for the earth. He stuck
a smooth stick through the po-
tato, and turned it slowly, to show





MAMMA'S SCHOOL. 23
the boy that when one side was
next the sun it would be light,
or daytime; but when it was
turned the other way it would
be dark, or night. The next
day Willie went with his father
to the High School, where he
saw all the planets in their order,
in what was called an orrery.
Here were Jupiter, Venus, the
Earth, and all the other planets,
arranged by wires to perform
their revolutions around the sun.





24 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
Early next morning Willie was
up as soon as he could see, and
went down to ask cook for some
raw potatoes and turnips. Then
he went to the barn, and found a
piece of wire; and when his fa-
ther and mother came down to
breakfast, he showed them his
orrery.
His father pointed out to him
quite a number of improvements
which he could make, and so
he concluded to give this to





MAMMA'S SCHOOL. 25
Frankie, and make a better one
for himself.
The little fellow was delighted,
and persuaded nurse to go at
once and hang it up in the play
room. Mamma pointed out to
him the names of the different
planets, so that he knew Jupiter
was represented by the larg6 blue
potato, Herschel by the red one,
and Saturn by the flat turnip.
Several weeks after this, it so
happened that for some days





26 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
Frankie was out of doors so
much that he had not time to
go up to his play house. When
he did so, he burst into so loud
a cry, that his father, mother,
and nurse ran quickly to see
what was the matter.
The little fellow was standing,
wringing his hands, gazing at
the orrery, from which a number
of the planets had entirely dis-
appeared. As soon as he saw
his father, he exclaimed, "O,papa,





MAMMA'S SCHOOL. 27
my Saturn! my Saturn! 0, my
Saturn!" All at once he checked
himself, and said, "It seems like,
'0 Absalom, my son! my son!
O, my son!' "
When he was somewhat quiet-
ed, his father told him he had
no doubt but the mice, or his
little lamb, thought the turnip
and potatoes were hung there for
their breakfast, and this so amused
the little boy that he began to
laugh most heartily.





28 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
Nelly had never been taught
her letters, but now that she
was seven, her aunt thought it
was quite time for her to learn
them. So she put Nelly and
Frankie in a class, and told them
she would be the teacher.
Frankie had a beautiful set of
blocks with letters on one side,
which had been one of his
Christmas presents. She took a
book containing a large alphabet,
and showed them great A; then





MAMMA'S SCHOOL. 29
she sent them to the blocks to
see which could find one like it.
After they had tried a few times,
they began to be very much ex-
cited to see which could find it
first. In a few weeks they had
thoroughly learned all the let-
ters. Then she gave them words
to spelt She began with the
word boy, and told them to find
the letters b-o-y, and lay them
in a row. This was their first
lesson in reading, and they were





30 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
very proud of it. They went
over it again and again. First
they shuffled all the blocks to-
gether; then, when she said boy,
they made their little fingers fly.
"I've found 0," cried Nelly.
"And I have found B here
it is," said Frankie.
Then Nelly soon found Y, and
thus the word was spelt.
When mamma was busy, they
often played school by them-
selves ; sometimes Nelly and





MAMMA'S SCHOOL. 31
sometimes Frankie acted as the
teacher.
From words they went to sen-
tences ; and it made mamma
laugh to see how pleased they
were when they had spelt out
Ponto is a good dog, though
some of the letters had to be
cut from a newspaper to make
the sentence.
After this, mamma thought
they might begin to read from
a book.





32 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
Early one afternoon she told
nurse to dress the children in
clean clothes, for she wished to
take them to walk. She went
first to the bookstore, but could
not find a book simple enough
for her purpose. Then she went
to a toy shop; here she found
pictured alphabets in great vari-
ety. She wished one in which
the letters, both large and small,
were perfectly plain, like those
on their blocks, but with pic-





MAMMA'S SCHOOL. 33
tures underneath them; and this
was what she obtained. On the
first leaf there was large A, and
an ape. On the opposite was
small a, and an apple. Down at
the bottom of the page were a
few lines in very large print,
saying, "An ape looks like a
monkey. Apples are very nice
fruit. When they are ripe, they
are red, yellow, or green. The
seeds are black."
On the next page was large
VOL. IV. 3





34 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
B, and a picture of a ball; then
on the other side small b, and
a baby. Underneath were the
words, "A ball is used to play
with. I have a little baby sis-
ter; she is a dear little girl."
Mamma bought two of these
books, one for each of her little
class. Then she followed the
shop girl to the other end of
the .counter, and began to look
over a great box of marbles.
"Are you going to let us





MAMMA'S SCHOOL. 35
play marbles, mamma ?" asked
Frankie, pulling her dress.
The lady laughed.
I don't know how," said
Nelly.
I should like twelve of these
large, green ones," said mamma
to the shop girl, and one hun-
dred of the gray ones."
"0 mamma, how many!" cried
Frankie, in surprise.
"What shall you carry them
in ? asked the girl. I am





36 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
afraid they would break through
paper."
I see a little wooden box on
the shelf behind you. What
does it cost ?" inquired Mrs.
Gray.
"Only ten cents, ma'am," said
the girl.
"I'll take it then, to keep my
marbles in," said mamma.
These are for my little school,"
she said to the children, as they
were walking home.





STUDY AND PLAY. 37

CHAPTER III.
STUDY AND PLAY.
BOTH Nelly and her cousin were
very curious to know how mam-
ma could keep school with mar-
bles; but the lady only smiled,
and said they would see when
they came to school the next
day. Willie was very curious
too, and said he guessed mam-
ma couldn't play marbles as well
as he could.





38 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
The next morning, Frankie
said, "Mamma, why can't Pon-
to come to school ? He would
be good, Im sure."
'm willing," replied mamma.
"But I'm afraid he won't learn
much."
Nelly and Frankie then car-
ried their new books and the
box of marbles up into the
nursery, where the lady was
cutting out some work. They
were impatient for school to





STUDY AND PLAY 39
begin. Mamma always had her
sewing all ready, and so worked
while she taught her little class.
She said she would be ready
in ten minutes, and that they
might play with Ponto until that
time. So Frankie took a book,
and began to teach Ponto his
letters.
"That's O-say 0; began the
little boy. Ponto opened his
mouth, and said, "Bow, wow."
Nelly laughed, but Frankie





40 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
said, "That is very well indeed
- say it again."
But Ponto was sleepy, and
thought once was enough. He lay
down on the rug and shut his eyes.
Come," said the lady, im
ready now. Here, F~I. '-_k',1 take
these marbles and count them ;"
and she gave him a handful out
of the box.
He-re are seven, mamma," he
said. I can count ten; may I
have ten ? "





STUDY AND PLAY. 41
Yes," and she passed him
three more. Then -she gave
Nelly ten, and told them to lay
the marbles out upon the floor.
"Frankie," she said, if I give
you one marble, and Nelly gives
you one, how l-:,ny will you
have ? "
The little scholar looked right
straight into his mother's eyes,
but did not answer.
Here, dear," she began, tak-
ing one from his pile, "I give





42 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
you this one. Now, Nelly, give
him one of yours for a minute;
how many have you in your
hand ? "
Only two, mamma. You said
I might have ten."
The lady smiled, as she said,
"Yes, but we are playing with
them. Now, Nelly, suppose I
give you two marbles," put-
ting two into her hand, -"and
Frankie gives you one, how many
will you have ? "





STUDY AND PLAY. 43
Nelly looked very sober a mo-
ment, when her aunt said, "Count
them, my dear."
0, I know," said Nelly "I
have three."
"How many are two marbles
and one marble, then ? "
"Three marbles," said Frankie,
beginning to understand the new
game.
"Now Ponto shall have some
marbles," said iiull-illu. Here,
Nelly, count out ten for him."'





44 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
The little girl did so, and put
them in a pile close beside the
dog. Ponto jumped up, put his
nose down to the marbles, and
then took one in his mouth.
Frankie laughed, a~nd said,
" Ponto thinks it is something
good to eat."
Ponto soon dropped the hard
stone, shook his head as if he
thought it was a very bad joke,
or a poor dinner, and lay down
to sleep again.





STUDY AND PLAY. 45
"Now," said mamma, I will
give you, Frankie, two marbles,
Nelly will give you one, and
Ponto will give you two; or, if
he- is too sleepy, you may take
two from his pile; how many
marbles will you have ? "
Frankie and his cousin eagerly
put their heads together to count,
and at length answered correctly,
" Two and one are three, and two
more make five."
"I love to play marbles," cried





46 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
Frankie, after they had been
counting thus for nearly an
hour.
"You have recited very well
indeed, for the first time," said
mamma; "now you may put
them all back in the box."
Can't we play a little long-
er ?" asked Nelly.
"Not to-day, my dear. It is
time for recess, and after that
is the reading lesson."
"Come, then," said the little





STUDY AND PLAY. 47
girl, we will go and swing un-
der the tree."
As the sun was very warm,
they were soon tired of this, and
came into the dining hall, where
mamma allowed Frankie to keep
his rocking horse.
I'll be the papa, and take my
children to wide," said Frankie ;
"and you be the lady, and live
over there in the corner."
"Yes," said Nelly, "as soon as
I get my dolly. Now I'm ready,"





48 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
she said, returning almost out of
breath. "This is my little girl,
Fanny; and this is my house be-
hind the chair."
Frankie untied the reins from
the chair, which he called the
stable, took Dinah and Lily Gray,
who were already seated in the
carriage, into his lap, and began
rocking with all his might. He
took the whip and shouted, Go
long, pony! we must get to the
lady's house quick."





STUDY AND PLAY. 49
Presently he said, Whoa !
whoa! now we have got there."
He stepped out, and tied the
horse again, and then took his
babies in his arms, and walked
to the corner where Nelly sat.
"How do you do, sir ? asked
Nelly, jumping up and shaking
hands with him. "How is your
wife ?"?
Pretty well," said Frankie.
"I have been winding a long
journey."
VOL. IV. 4





50 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
"This is my daughter Fanny,"
said Nelly, holding up the doll.
How do you do, Fanny "
said the little boy, taking hold
of dolly's hand.
SAre your children pretty
well ?" asked the little lady of
the house.
"No, they are vely sick in-
deed."
"I should think you would
leave them at home, then," said
Nelly, laughing.





STUDY AND PLAY. 51
no, I take Dinah to wide
to make her better. Lily's got
the hooking cough."
Go right away, then. I am
afraid my little girl will catch
it;" and Nelly jumped up and
gave her young visitor his hat;
and then they both laughed very
heartily.
Now I will be the lady," said
Frankie.
"And I will be Squire Brown,
come to buy your cow," said





52 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
Nelly. "I will leave Fanny in
the chair, and you can have
three little girls." She ran out
in the entry, and soon came
back with Willie's jacket and
cap on. After riding in the car-
riage a few minutes, she walked
across the floor, and knocked at
Frankie's house.
Frankie tried to look very so-
ber, when she said, in a loud
voice, "I want to buy a cow
to-day."





STUDY AND PLAY. 53
"Well, I have got one," said
Frankie.
"How much does it cost ?"
asked Squire Brown.
Two dollars," said Frankie.
Here's the money, then,"
said the Squire, putting two
small pieces of paper into the
little boy's hand. "I mast go
now. Good by."
Good by. Come again said
Frankie.






54 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.

CHAPTER IV.
FRANKIE AND THE PUMPKIN SEEDS.

ONE Sabbath evening, papa sat
with Frankie on his knee, while
Willie, Nelly, and Margie stood
pressing up to his side, looking
at the pictures in the great Bi-
ble. Papa had explained them
often, and Frankie began to be
sleepy, when Willie said, "I wish,
father, you would tell us a story
about when you were a boy."





PUMPKIN SEEDS. 55
O, do, papa cried Frankie,
waking up quickly; tell 'bout
squirrels, papa."
"Not about squirrels to-night,
my son. Thiis s the Sabbath;
but I will tell you about some-
thing I did when a boy, which
was very wrong indeed."
Did Satan use to whisper to
you, ptpa ? asked Frankie, ear-
nestly.
"Yes, he did. But 'll tell
you about it. When I was a





56 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
little boy as old as you are, I
lived on a farm with my father
and mother. In the spring there
is a great deal to do on a
farm. First, the ground must
be ploughed, so that the seeds
can be put in; and then the far-
mer, with his men and all the
boys he can get, must plant
potatoes, and corn, and beets,
and turnips, and squashes, and
pumpkins. One morning my
mother brought out from the





PUMPKIN SEEDS. 57
closet a great bag of pumpkin
seeds, and laid them on the ta-
ble. Father said, 'Now these
must all be planted to-day. I
wonder whether you couldn't
plant some, sonny.' He always
called me sonny."
"What a funny name! said
Frankie.
"I was six years old then, and
thought I could do almost any
thing; so I said, 'O, yes, I can
plant pumpkin seeds.'





58 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
Then my father patted me
on the head, and told mother I
must have something nice for
my dinner, if I worked with the
men.
I wore an apron, and mother
basted on a small pocket, so that
I could take some seeds out of
the bag into it, and get at them
easily. I remember I went with
father, feeling very smart that I
was thought old enough to work
with the men. I was to follow





PUMPKIN SEEDS. 59
them through the long rows, take
a little stick to make a hole,
and then put one seed into each
hole. I began very bravely, and
went on back and forth, back
and forth, until the sun grew so
hot that I had to keep stopping
to wipe the perspiration from
my forehead. After this I did
not walk quite so fast, and soon
was far behind the men. Every
time I took a handful of seeds
into my pocket from the bag, I





60 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
stopped to see how many there
were left. I began to be dis-
couraged, and to think it was too
hard work for a little boy like me.
Just then I heard my father's
voice calling, Sonny, sonny, come
and get some luncheon.'
"I forgot in a minute how
tired I was, and ran as fast as I
could to the spot where the men
were sitting down on the grass
under the shade of a large oak
tree. I can well remember how





PUMPKIN SEEDS. 61
cool and pleasant they looked
sitting there, while father was
pouring out some cold coffee
from a jug, and passing it around.
Then he opened a large tin pail,
and took out tarts and cakes,
gingerl.-,i:lad and cheese. 0, how
good the food tasted!"
"I like cheese," said Frankie.
SDid you go to work again ? "
asked Nelly.
"O, yes, my father praised me
very much; and the men said





62 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
they never knew such a smart
little chap; and so I was quite
ashamed to say I was tired.
Beside, rest under the shade had
refreshed me very much. For
a little while I worked quite fast
again, and planted four times the
pocket full before dinner.
"The men were allowed an hour
at noon, and so I had some time
to rest; and I wanted to say that
I could not plant any more. But
when I heard father telling moth-





PUMPKIN SEEDS. 63
er how much I had helped him,
I did not like to say so. I lay
down on the mat in the dining
room, and soon fell asleep. I
thought I had not lain there
but a minute, when father said,
SCone, sonny! you've had a
good nap. We're going out into
the field again now and we
want all our men.'
"I rubbed my eyes, and v-t.
out with him ; but the sun was
very hot, and it seemed such a





64 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
long walk from one end of the
field to the other!
The men were hurrying with
all their might, for they thought
a shower was coming up, and
father wanted the seed to be in
the ground before it rained. I
was a great way behind now;
but I walked slowly back and
forth, making the little holes and
putting in the seed.
"At last I had only two or
three handfuls left; but by this





PUMPKIN SEEDS. 65
time my back ached so hard
that I began to cry. Just then
I came to a great flat stone right
in the middle of the path, and
between the furrows where I
walked. I sat down on it a
minute to rest. Then I put my
hand in the bag to see how long
it would take me to plant the
rest."
"Did you belong to the Try
Company then, papa ? inquired
Frankie.
VOL. IV.





66 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
No dear; mamma hadn't got
it up then, as Willie says;" and
papa laughed.
"What did you do then ?"
asked Willie.
I began to think it was of no
use to plant so many seeds, and
said, aloud, 'I know there will be
enough, if I don't plant the rest.'
"~But what will you do,' whis-
pered a small voice, when your
father asks you whether you have
finished the work ?





PUMPKIN SEEDS. 67
"'I don't know,' I said; but
just then I thought, I'll lift up
the stone, and plant the rest of
the seeds under it.' This was a
thought of my wicked heart.
"You know I have told you
about the conscience God has
placed in our breast, to tell us
when we do wrong. As soon
as I began to think about the
stone, conscience said, 'No, no!
that would be wicked. It would
be acting a lie.'





68 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
"' I don't know what you
mean,' I said.
Why,' answered conscience,
'your father expects you to plant
the seeds where they will come
up and grow. If you don't mean
to plant them, you had better
carry them home, and let some-
body else do it.'
"' But then father won't say
I'm smart, and the men won't
praise me,' I said; and I tried
to stop my ears, for I meant to





PUMPKIN SEEDS. 69
put the seeds under the stone;
and I didn't want to hear any
more that conscience had to say
about it.
"I got up as quick as I could,
and lifted the stone with all my
strength, and poured out all the
seeds from the bag; and then I
ran home as fast as I could go."
"O0 how vely naughty said
Frankie, earnestly.





70 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.

CHAPTER V.
SONG OF THE BIRDS.

"As soon as I reached home,
I gave mother the bag.
"'Why, sonny,' she said, 'have
you done your work so quick ?'
"I nodded my head.
I Well,~ you're a very good
boy,' she said; you have helped
your father a great deal.'
I felt very happy when my
mother praised me in the morn-





SONG OF THE BIRDS. 71
ing; but now I did not feel
happy, because conscience was
whispering to me all the time,
'You're a naughty boy. You
hid the pumpkin seeds under
the stone.'
"I sat down and leaned my
head on my hands. I was so
unhappy that I began to cry.
"'Why, sonny,' said mother,
you're all tired out working so
hard. I thought 'twas a great
day's work for such a little boy;





72 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
and you've hurried yourself al-
most to death. Here, lie on my
bed, and perhaps you will fall
asleep. Don't you feel well ?'
she asked, as I continued to cry.
"' I ache in here,' I said; and
so I did, but it was only where
conscience was whispering so
loud. 'Your dear mother thinks
you've been good,' said con-
science. 'You know you have not.
You know you're acting a lie.'
I didn't tell her I had planted





SONG OF THE BIRDS. 73
all the seeds,' I said, 'and so I
didn't tell a lie.'
"'No,' answered conscience;
cbut it is as easy to act a lie, as
to tell one. You gave her the
bag, and then nodded your head
when she asked if you had done.
It was just the s..inl; as if you
had said, "Yes, ma'am, I have
pLn1i%(d them all."
"' I don't believe it,' said I.
While I was lying on moth-
er's bed, and talking with con-





74 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
science, father came in. Where's
sonny ?' he asked.
"'On the bed,' said mother.
'He is all tired out, and has a
pain in his stomach.'
"' I'm sorry,' answered father.
' He has worked like a little Tro-
jan, and I meant to let him go
fishing with me. Fm going
down to the brook now. It is
cloudy, and I think I shall get
a good string of fish for supper.'
"I jumped off from the bed





SONG OF THE BIRDS. 75
in a minute. There was nothing
I liked so well as to go fishing
with father. I told conscience
not to speak another word, for I
was going to the brook to have
a good time any how.
SFather took the line, and I
carried the little box with the
bait. Then I sat on the bank,
while father put the hook, with
the little worm, into the water,
and drew up in quick succession,
one, two, three large fish, next





76 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
four smaller ones. Then he said
it was time to go home. Mother
had the spider all ready to cook
them as soon as they were well
cleaned; and then we sat down
to supper.
"I had a nice piece on my
plate, and a hot potato to eat
with it, and was just cutting a
mouthful, when one of the men
said, You worked smarter than
any of us, sonny, and got your
work done in the middle of the





SONG OF THE BIRDS. 77
afternoon. When I have plant-
ing to do, I shall want to hire
you.'
"I began to choke, and then
burst out crying, for while he
was speaking I heard conscience
again saying, 0, what a wicked
boy! you put the pumpkin seeds
under the stone. Your father
thinks you planted them all; but
you put them under the stone.'
"'What is the matter now ?
asked father.





78 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
"' Something hurts me,' I
sobbed out. I got up and went
into the other room. I was so
tired of hearing conscience talk,
that I went up stairs to bed.
SI'll go to sleep,' I said to my-
self, 'and then I can't hear it.'
"But as soon as I was alone,
I could hear its voice plainer
than ever; and what was very
strange, the little robins came
and sat on the tree near my
window, and, instead of singing





SONG OF THE BIRDS. 79
their pretty good-night song,
they only sang, Pumpkin seeds
under the stone pumpkin seeds
under the stone !'
"It was still quite early, and
they kept singing it over and
over again, until I was so tired
of it that I thought I would get
up and dress myself. But when
I sat up in bed, I saw it was
beginning to be twilight, and so
the birds would soon cease their
song, and go to their nests.





80 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
When it grew darker I turned
over in bed. 'Now,' said I, I'll
go to sleep.' But just then I
heard a loud noise from the
brook. It was a bull-frog that
used to sing me to sleep every
night. I liked to hear it very
much; but I grew very angry
when I heard the ugly tune again,
'Pumpkin seeds under the stone!
pumpkin seeds under the stone !
I pulled the clothes up over
my ears, for I knew if it had





SONG OF THE BIRDS. 81
once learned that tune, it would
sing the same all night. It was
warm, and I was almost suffo-
cated; but I thought it was bet-
ter to lie still, than to be so trou-
bled; and after a while I fell
asleep.
"The next morning it rained
very fast, and the men had to
work in doors all day. I kept
as busy as I could, for the mo-
ment I stopped to sit down, I
heard conscience begin to talk
VOL. IV. 6





82 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
again. Father was very glad it
rained; it was the best thing
for the planting, he said. Rain
would soak the seed, and make
it come up very quick.
"For three days and three
nights I tried very hard to quiet
conscience. 'It can't be helped
now,' I said, 'and what is the use
of talking any more about it?
One night I went to drive the
cows home, and all the way the
birds kept telling one another,





SONG OF THE BIRDS. 83
SHe put the pumpkin seeds un-
der the stone! he did! he put
them under the stone.'
C I went in and sat down by
my mother. 'I wish the birds
would stop singing,' I cried.
"' Why, my dear ?
"' Because I don't like to hear
them,' I answered.
"A few days after this, father
went out to the field to see how
the seeds were coming up. When
he came back he looked very





84 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
sober indeed. I thought in a
minute, 'he knows about the
pumpkin seeds under the stone.'
'Come here, sonny,' he said.
SI went to him, but before he
began to speak, I burst into a
loud cry.
"' My little boy,' he said, I
know now why you have been
so unhappy. You did not plant
all the seeds; you put them un-
der the stone., and they have
come up all around it.'






SONG OF THE BIRDS. 85
"' There, now,' said conscience,
'I told you he wouldn't like it.'
I cried so that I couldn't speak.
Are you sorry ?' asked fa-
ther.
I've been sorry all the time,
sir.'
"'What made you do it, my
child ?'
"' I was so tired of putting
only one in a hole.'
"'Well,' said father, 'it was
very wrong indeed. It was de-





86 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
ceiving, my dear; but if you are
really sorry, I will forgive you.
I hope you have asked God to
forgive you.'
"' To, sir, I have not; but I
will now; and so I went up to
my little chamber, and told God
bow wicked I had been, and
asked him to forgive me; and
that night, when I went to bed,
the robins came and sat on the
tree, and sung their old song,
and never said a word about





SONG OF THE BIRDS. 87
pumpkin seeds under the stone.
The bull-frogs forgot it too, for
they commenced telling a story
which I could not well under-
stand; but as it was nothing
about the pumpkin seeds, I did
not care; so I soon fell quietly
asleep."
_'.. i'1 '-:- ^


.i -
C -' ..-, ", i-
".. .. _.. . ,. '. ; .. -- -,.





88 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.

CHAPTER VI.
NELLY'S OLD NURSE.

ONE pleasant morning, Mrs.
Gray said she wished to send
to the store for some thread.
She told Nelly and Frankie that
they might go with Margie, if
they wished. They were very
happy to go, and soon set off with
Ponto following closely behind.
While Margie was in the store
buying the thread, Nelly and her





NELLY'S OLD NURSE. 89
cousin stood at the door to watch
the people as they passed along.
Presently a black woman
turned the corner of the street,
and came toward them. Nelly
gazed at her very steadily for a
moment, and then, with a scream
of joy, rani along the sidewalk,
and sprang into her Wnns.
"0, the sweet darling !" said
M: iia. She knew her old
nurse, didn't she ? and the
tears ran down her cheeks.





90 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
Then Maria took Nelly in her
arms, and kissed her over and
over again.
By this time Margie had come
ont of the store, and found Frankie
standing with Ponto, and looking
very solemn indeed. Quite a
number of persons were stand-
ing to see with what pleasure
the little, delicate child was wel-
coming her old nurse. But
Frankie did not smile at all.
He had never seen a black wo-





NELLY'S OLD NURSE. 91
man before; and he did not
know what to think of it. In-
deed he was afraid of her, and
wanted to get Nelly away as
soon as he could.
But Nelly had no idea of leav-
ing her nurse, now that she had
once found her. She kept fast
hold of her hand, leading her
along toward her aunt's house.
" There's my cousin Frankie," she
said; ".and that is Margie, the
girl who lives there." Then she





92 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
tried to get Frankie to come
nearer, so that Maria could see
him; but he clung to Margie, and
would not go.
When they had nearly reached
the gate, he called Ponto, and
ran as fast as he could up the
avenue to the house to tell his
mother that Nelly was walking
with a great woman, who had a
very dirty face.
The lady smiled, for she knew
at once who it was ; and she





NELLY'S OLD NURSE. 93
went down to see Maria, and
tell her that they had heard
from her mistress.
Maria was in the kitchen wip-
ing her eyes, and telling Jane
how glad her darling was to see
her, and that it paid her for all
the care she had taken of the
dear child, to think she had not
forgotten her in so many long
months.
I couldn't bar it any longer,
missis," she said, as the lady





94 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
came in. I wanted to see the
pretty creature once more; and
so I walked all the way from
home, only to get a glimpse of
my darling."
Mrs. Gray smiled, and told her
Nelly often talked of her.
And when will mistress be
coming home ? asked Maria.
"She has gone farther than
she expected, and won't be back
for several months yet," said the
lady.





NELLY'S OLD NURSE. 95
"0, deary me! what will I
do? exclaimed the poor woman,
beginning to cry again.
Nelly put up her hand to wipe
away the tears; and the nurse
caught her to her bosom, and
sobbed over her, saying, "c y
sweet pet, I can't give you up
again."
The lady was really sorry for
the faithful nurse. She told her
to take off her bonnet, and Jane
would give her something to eat





96 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
after her long walk; and then
she went up stairs, that Maria
might have an opportunity to
talk with Nelly.
The little girl was improving
now very fast; and while her
aunt was much pleased to see
the love she felt for one who
had done so much for her, she
hoped that this visit would not
make Nelly discontented, or wish
to return home with nurse.
Jane set a large piece of pie,





NELLY'S OLD NURSE. 97
with some cold meat and bread,
upon the table, and then went
into the yard to hang out her
clothes.
As soon as they were alone,
Maria drew from under her shawl
a small box of guava jelly.
" Here, darling! she said, "I
have brought this for you. Do
you like to stay here, or do you
want to go home with Maria ? "
"I like to stay here best," an-
swered Nelly. "I am learning
VOL. IV. 7





98 FRANKIE AND HIS FATHER.
to be a good girl, and I never
suck my finger at all. I used to
be real naughty when I came;
and then I have my cousins to
play with."
Nurse gazed at her in surprise.
There was a change in the child
which she could not quite un-
derstand. She was affectionate,
more so than she had ever known
her, but she had grown more
obedient and amiable.
When Mrs. Gray left Maria




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