• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Chapter I: Don in full dress
 Chapter II: Mamma's visitor
 Chapter III: Bertie's walk with...
 Chapter IV: Mamma's school
 Chapter V: The sick dog
 Chapter VI: Sunday school...
 Chapter VII: Bertie's sick...
 Chapter VIII: Bertie at school
 Chapter IX: The letters
 Chapter X: Bertie's compositio...
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Happy home stories for boys ;, 6
Title: Bertie & his sisters
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00064475/00001
 Material Information
Title: Bertie & his sisters
Series Title: Happy home stories for boys
Alternate Title: Bertie and his sisters
Physical Description: 104, 8 p., 4 leaves of plates : ill. ; 16 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Leslie, Madeline, 1815-1893
Rudd, Nathaniel ( Engraver )
Henry A. Young & Co ( Publisher )
Russell & Richardson ( Engraver )
Publisher: Henry A. Young & Co.
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: c1871
 Subjects
Subject: Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Family -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Home schooling -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Dogs -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Sick -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Family stories -- 1871   ( local )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1871   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1871
Genre: Family stories   ( local )
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Aunt Hattie.
General Note: Added series title page and some illustrations engraved by Russell & Richardson and Rudd.
General Note: Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00064475
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002221576
notis - ALG1800
oclc - 57624154

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
        Cover 3
    Frontispiece
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Advertising
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Table of Contents
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Chapter I: Don in full dress
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Chapter II: Mamma's visitor
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Chapter III: Bertie's walk with mamma
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Plate
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Chapter IV: Mamma's school
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Chapter V: The sick dog
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Chapter VI: Sunday school lesson
        Page 56
        Plate
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Chapter VII: Bertie's sick mamma
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
    Chapter VIII: Bertie at school
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
    Chapter IX: The letters
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
    Chapter X: Bertie's composition
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
    Advertising
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text
































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BY AUNT HATTIE.





' Train up a child in the way he should go. and when he is
old he will not depart from it."-- Solomon.
















BOSTON:

HENRY A. YOUNG & CO.,

24 CORNIIILL.






























Entered according to Act of Congress. in the year 1871, by
HENRY A. YOUNG & CO.,
in the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.














LIST


OF VOLUMES IN


TIIE IAPPY HOME STORIES.


FO BOYS.






I. DILIGENT DICK.

II. COUSIN WILLIE.

III. LAZY ROBERT.

IV. LITTLE FRITZ.

V. THE NEW BUGGY.

VI. BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.















LIST


OF VOLUMES IN


THE HAPPY 10HME STORIES.


FOR GIRLS.





VOL. I. LITTLE FLYAWAY.

VOL. II. THE SPOILED PICTURE.

VOL. III. FLEDA'S CHILDHOOD.

VOL. IV. THE SINGING GIRL.

VOL. V. MOLLY AND TIE WINE GLASS.

VOL. VI. THE TWINS.














CONTENTS.




CHAPTER I.
Page.
DON IN FULL DRESS, .

CIIAPTER II.
MAMMA's VISITOR, 17

CHAPTER III.
BERTIE'S WALK WITH MAMMA, 27

CHAPTER 1V.
MAMMA's SCHOOL, ...... 35

CHAPTER V.
THE SICx DOG, 45

CHAPTER VI.
SUNDAy SCHOOL LESSONS, 56







8 CONTENTS.

CHAPTER VII.
BERTIE'S SICK MAMMA, 65


CHAPTER VIII.
BERTIE AT SCHOOL, 75


CHAPTER IX.
THE LETTERS, .


CHAPTER' X.
BERTIE'B COMPOSITION,. 9









BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.



CHAPTER I.

DON IN FULL DRESS.

MRS. LESLIE was going by the nur-
sery when she heard a smothered
laugh and the murmur of several
voices talking together. She opened
the door softly, and peeped in.
What do you think she saw ?
In the middle of the floor, little
Rosamond sat, her long, golden hair
floating like a veil about her face,
her mouth open as she laughed, her
hands engaged in tying grandma's
cap around the head of old Don,





10 BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.

who stood, with edifying sobriety,
gazing into her face.
Close by was Daisy; or as her kind
papa called her, Daisy Dell, showing
all her white teeth, holding out a fur
tippet which was to be put on next,
while Herbert, a rollicking boy of
nine, was seated on a rocking-horse,
like an army general giving his or-
ders in state.
"You ought to put on the pants
first, and then the jacket to button
them to. Pshaw! girls don't know
how to dress anybody. Ha! ha! ha!
See how he kicks !"
Coiled up in a chair with her feet
under her, sat Maud aged ten, hold-
ing a book in her hand, but with her
eyes on the busy actors in the centre
of the room.





DON IN FULL DRESS. 11

Rosamond was using her best ef-
forts to quiet Don while she inserted
one of his hind legs into an old pair
of Herbert's pants; but as fast as she
slipped it in, saying:
Good fellow! Poor fellow!" he
gave a gentle shake which threw
them off
"It's too bad he acts so," she said
with some indignation.
Maud threw down her book and
rushed to the rescue. Putting her
arms round Don's neck she patted
his head, calling him caressing names,
while Rosamond, with Daisy's help,
succeeded in dressing him as she
wished.
A perfect shout of merriment arose
when Don, rising on his hind legs,
tried to lick Maud's face. In the





12 BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.

midst of the fun mamma walked into
the room, with a smile.
Oh, mamma, see Don! Doesn't
he look like a boy? Isn't he too
funny?" cried one and another with
bursts of laughter.
Boys don't wear ruffled caps,"
said Herbert, rocking away as though
nothing had happened.
Let's take Don into grandma's
room," said the mischief-loving Rosa-
mond.
"So we will," echoed Herbert,
alighting with one bound from his
horse.
Maud, and even mamma, followed
laughing as heartily as the children,
at Don's comical shakes of the head,
and twitching of his legs to rid him-
self of his unusual dress.






DON IN FULL DRESS. 13

"A gentleman has come to see
you, grandma," began Herbert.
"No; a boy," lisped Daisy Dell,
crowding close to grandma's side.
Oh, that's my new cap!" ex-
claimed grandma clutching at the
strings. "I thought it was safe in my
box."
Maud threw back her head, and
laughed till she cried, and Don think-
ing her in trouble, jumped up on her,
and tried to lick her face again.
The effect of his position, with his
loose jacket, his short pants buttoned
around his legs, and the muslin cap
with its wide frill falling over his
face was so irresistibly ludicrous that
the old lady forgot the liberty which
had been taken with her wardrobe
and joined heartily in the mirth.






14 BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.

Don looked seriously in the laugh.
ing faces, and then shook himself all
over, as if trying to escape from
what encumbered the freedom of his
limbs.
"You can't do it, old fellow," ex-
claimed Maud, "so you may as well
submit with a good grace."
Grandma took off her glasses,
wiped her eyes, and seated Daisy
Dell on her lap.
Isn't Don funny?" asked the lit-
tle pet, holding up her cherry lips for
a kiss. "I guess he don't know
what it means."
The great dog evidently thought
the fun had lasted long enough at
his expense. IIe walked off deliber-
ately into the nursery, and laid him-
self down on the mat in front of the






DON IN FULL DRESS. 15

grate, but keeping his eyes open to
watch what the children would do
next.
"Let him rest a little while," sug-
gested Maud, returning to her chair.
" He feels tired, poor fellow "
Don rapped with his tail on the
floor. He quite approved this re-
mark.
Mrs. Leslie stopped a few moments
to talk with grandma, and then came
into the nursery with her bonnet in
her hand.
"Maud, can't you exchange that
cap for Herbert's school hat? I'm
afraid Don will soil that on6."
"We shall take off all his clothes
presently," answered Maud laughing,
"only I do wish papa could see him."
We'll dress him up again," shout-






16 BERTIE ANTD HIS SISTERS.

ed Herbert,' "to-night when papa
comes home."
A sharp bow!-wow!-wow! from
the dog made Daisy dance with de-
light.
Come now," said mamma, "who
will read to me while I sew ?"
"I will," quickly answered Maud.
"I will," said Herbert.
"I'll tell you the stories in my
new picture book," said Rosamond
jumping in a chair to take it from
the shelf.
"What will you do, Daisy Dell?"
"I'll get Prudy to sleep, mamma."
She caught up a large doll, seated
herself in a little rocking chair, and
with her favorite finger in her mouth
looked like the dear little lamb that
she was.






MAMMA'S VISITOR. 17




CHAPTER II.

MAMMA'S VISITOR.

MAUD and Herbert attended a pri-
vate school only two squares beyond
their father's house. At home mam-
ma had a play-school, as papa called
it, for Rose, Daisy, and a dozen or
two of dolls who were made to sit
upright with their hands before
them, and their eyes staring straight
against the wall.
Don was a member.of the school,
too, but an irregular one. He had a
habit of sitting on the outer door
step and watching the people pass
along. If hle saw one of his acquain-
2






18 BERTIE AND HIS SISTER;.

tances, either a large or a small dog,
he ran down the sidewalk to have a
little talk, and then returned quietly
to his place on the upper step.
Rosamond could read and spell in
words of two syllables, though she
greatly preferred listening to mam-
ma, who often read them a story at
the close of the school hour.
Daisy was learning her letters,
which was rather a discouraging pro-
cess, both for her and her patient
instructor. By the time she had
learned the names of the last half of
the alphabet, the first had slipped
out of her mind. There were in
fact only three, round O, crooked S,
and straight I, upon which she could
really depend in case she wished to
exhibit her progress to papa.






MAMMA'S VISITOR. 19

"Daisy is monitor, mamma," said
Maud laughing heartily one morning
as she watched her little sister's ma-
noeuvres.
What is monitor?" lisped Daisy
Dell letting her book fall out of her
lap.
Why, at school we have one girl
or boy who watches the others to see
whether they obey the rules. You
have so much trouble with your dol-
lies, you can't attend to your lessons.
If I were mamma I wouldn't let such
naughty dollies stay in my school."
*"Prudy's good. She sits very still.
See, Maud!"
This was a holiday with Maud
and Herbert. The young girl had
a composition to write; and she
couldn't decide what subject would






20 BERTIE AND IIIS SISTERS.

be the easiest. With her pencil
nicely sharpened, her porcelain slate
in her lap, and her forehead all in a
pucker with anxiety, she commenced
in large letters.
Visit to the glass blowers," but
after saying, 'The house was large
and a great many barrels of clay
all about,' she thought of an anecdote
about a dog, and concluded to rub out
her heading and commence again.
"Oh what horrid work it is!" she
complained at last, catching a curious
glance mamma threw in her direc-
tion. Did you have to write com-
positions when you were a little girl,
manmma ? "
Certainly, my dear."
"How did you do it? please tell
ie !"






311MAMA'S VISITOR. 21

About the same as a young lady
of my acquaintance, only that I
hadn't a large chair to coil myself up
in."
SOh, mamma! did you hate to do
it?" Maud was wide awake now,
" and did you keep changing from
one subject to another until your
time was all gone? and did you have
misdemeanors for not having it
ready ?"
Mrs. Leslie laughed heartily, as
she answered, "I suppose all those
things happened."
"But how did you learn, then?
You write such nice letters, now.
I'm afraid I never shall."
"Were you a little girl once,
maiiiilna, just as little a3 I am?"
q-.c'lioned D,isy, cage rly.





22 BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.

"Yes, dear, and had to learn my
letters. But,.Maud, I'll tell you how
I did. I persevered. I had a sister,
your aunt Alice, you know; and we
had a beautiful baby house. We
used to play visit each other with
our dolls ; but we could not do this
until all our school tasks were coin
plated. So after dallying awhile and
playing with our work, we settled-
down to business in earnest."
Just as I mean to, mamma. It's
no use to be all day about it, so I'm
going -into my room, and I wont
change the subject once more."
That's right, Maud."
Herbert had started off soon after
breakfihst to spend the forenoon with
his cousin Osgood. They were all
surprised therefore to hear his voice





MAMMA'S VISITOR., 23

in the back hall, and presently he
opened the nursery door.
His face was crimson, and there
was a flash in his eye which was
quite unusual.
"Why, Berty," exclaimed his moth-
er, has anything happened ?"
Before he had answered there was
a ring at the door bell, and presently
aunt Alice ran up the broad stairs.
"Good morning," she said gaily.
"I have come to take you out for a
walk. You needn't make a single
objection, Miriam, for go you must.
Haven't you read the papers? Why
everybody is crazy over Stewart's
advertisements of new and rich silks
and shawls."
Mamma smiled as she shook her
head. "' What would become of my





24 BERTIE AND IIIS SISTERS.

scholars ?" she asked with an arch
glance at the little ones.
"Leave them with the nursery
girl, as I do. Why, Herbert, how
came you here? I thought you
were playing with Osgood. I hope
you haven't quarrelled; but there's
never any comfort where two boys
get together. Where's Jane? Isn't
she capable of managing while you're
out? I do think it's a shame for you
to stay here mewed up day after
day, acting the part of a nursery
maid."
Herbert sat swelling with indigna-
tion at this address to his mother.
Iie came forward and stood proudly
at her side, to show her that he was
ready to act in her defence.
Mamma took his hand, and held it





MAMMA'S VISITOR. 25

in her's to show him that she under-
stood him.
"I'm not in need of silks, Alice,"
she began, and you know my
Christmas present was a handsome
shawl fi-om grandma."
You always have some excuse
when I want you particularly," re-
sponded the lady in a vexed tone.
" It's sheer nonsense for you to shut
yourself up day after day and week
after week. If I were Edward I'd
put a stop to it and drive you out."
Papa never drives mamma any-
where," burst out Herbert, unable
longer to hold his peace.
Aunt Alice laughed, though she
was provoked. You'd better go to
your play," she said, "'tisn't polite for
little boys to interrupt." Come,





26 BEETIE AND IIS SISTERS.

Miriam, ring for Jane, and put on
youi bonnet."
"Jane is ironing, Alice; and if she
were not, I am much better and
more happily employed at home. I
don't like shopping as well as you
do, you remember."
"But I wanted your taste in the
selection of a dress."
Are you intending to buy,
Allce?"
Well, I don't really need another,
and I suppose there'll be a row
when the bill goes to my husband.
But they are so splendid, and cheap
too; besides they are so rich, and
will doubtless be so fashionable, I'm
afraid I can't resist."
Take my advice then, and don't
go in the way of temptation."





BERTIE'S WALK WITH MAMMA. 27




CHAPTER III.

BERTIE'S WALK WITH MAMMA.

IERBERT was very quiet. He sat
down near his mamma, and read for
awhile, occasionally stopping to laugh
at Daisy's numerous mistakes; then
he stood for a minute with his arm
on mamma's shoulder, and finally
walked off into grandma's room.
When the clock struck twelve, the
school broke up. Daisy danced and
clapped her hands, and Don gave a
joyful bark, while Rosamond busied
herself in trying on a new sack which
mamma had been engaged in trim.
ming for her.






28 BERITIE AND IIIS SISTERS.

Presently a young girl entered
with her bonnet on.
Shall I dress the children now,
ma'am ? she asked.
"Yes, Annie, and take them for a
long walk. It's a fine day. I'm go-
ing out myself and shall not be back
till dinner time."
"Is Herbert going, Mrs. Leslie ?"
Yes, I suppose he would like it,
unless I take him with me."
She walked into grandma's room,
and found him holding a skein of
worsted for the old lady.
Would you like to walk with
me ?" she asked.
Oh yes, mamma! that's just
what I would like," he answered
\, 1l a ; .! b;:".,,i' .... ul -hisl
Leu.






BERTIE'S WALK WITH MAMIMA. 29

"I shall not be ready for ten min-
utes, dear; so you will have time to
finish the worsted."
Mrs. Leslie was one of the mana-
gers of an orphan asylum, which she
visited once or twice a week. She
had now heard of a poor family of
children, whose mother had died,
and who had no one to take care of
them. The father was living, but he
was a drunkard, whose neglect of his
family had broken his wife's heart.
As she and Herbert walked toward
the narrow court where the poor
mother had just died, Mrs. Leslie
told her boy the sad story. She
noticed that he looked very sober,
and she suspected that he had some-
thing to tell her. It was very sweet
for her to feel sure that if he had






30 BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.

done wrong his conscience would not
let him rest until he had confessed it.
She did not wish to urge him, though
when she heard his repeated sighs,
she longed. to give him comfort.
Mamma," he began at last, "Why
don't Aunt Alice take care of her
children, as you do? If she staid at
home they wouldn't act so."
How do they act, my dear ?"
Oh, they fight awfully all but
Belle ; and she's such a little tot she
gets abused every day. I don't hke
Osgood; I sha'n't go there any more
if he teases me ever so much. He's
a real wicked boy; and I hate him."
Stop stop my son. You're
excited, and you don't know what
you say."
"I do hate him, mamma; and it






BERTIE'S WALK WITH IMAMMA. 31

would be deceiving to say I don't.
He's just as ugly as can be."
"I'm sorry to hear you talk so,
Herbert. You used to like your
cousin."
"Not for a good while, mamma. I
always grow bad and angry when
I'm with him."
He glanced shyly in her face, hop-
ing she would help him out with his
confession; but she looked grieved
and did not speak.
I'm real sorry, mamma," he said
presently, winking very hard. "I
got angry with Osgood and kicked
him."
"What did he do, my dear?"
Must I tell, mamma ?"
"Yes, tell me everything."
"I wouldn't tell anybody in the






32 BERTIE AND IIIS SISTERS.

world but you," he said energetically.
" We were playing cars, and Osgood
wanted to be the conductor all the
time. I said it was mean. We used
to put Belle and Emma into the cars
for passengers; and one time when
we stopped at a station Belle played
she must get out with her child.
She had a dolly you know; and she
was crawling out of the chairs that
were piled up, when Osgood pushed
her over. There was a great bump
on her head. When I saw it I told
Osgood I wouldn't play any more.
Oh, mamma lie said very wicked
words; and besides he called me a
girl-boy 'cause I tried to make Bell
forget her headache, and played ball
with her; and then I forgot and
kicked him, and ran right away."










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BERTIE'S WALK WITH MAMMA. 33

"Did you feel happier after that?"
"Oh, no, mamma! I was ashamed.
I thought once I'd go right back,
and tell him I was sorry; but I -I
didn't."
"That would have been right, my
son. I wish for your own sake as
well as for his, you had done so."
But, mamma," urged Herbert, his
face growing very red, You don't
know what a fellow he is. I did once
tell him I was sorry when I'd been
angry; and he called me a whining
Methodist. What does that mean,
mamma ? '
"I don't think he knew what he
meant. He had probably heard
some one use the words in ridicule.
Methodists are a denomination of
Christians."
3






34 BERTIE AND IIIS SISTERS.

"Is aunt Alice a Christian, mam-
ma? I don't think she is, or else she
would make Osgood stop using such
words."
Mrs. Leslie was prevented from
the necessity of answering by their
arrival at the house where the poor
orphans lived.


















'.*






MAMMA'S SCHOOL. 35




CHAPTER IV.

MAMMA'S SCHOOL.

"WASN'T I good, mamma," asked
Daisy one day when they arose from
family prayer. I shut my eyes
tight, just so." She squeezed her
eyelids together till nothing could be
seen of her blue eyes.
What makes people shut their
eyes," inquired Rosamond coming
forward, holding her doll by one leg.
Because when we are thinking
of our Father who lives in heaven, it
is easier not to see what is going on
about us."
I can't keep my eyes shut every






36 BEETIE AND HIS SISTERS.

minute, mamma. They will fly right
open. When I grow up to be a big
lady I shall."
W "What is praying, Rose ?"
"It's asking God for things."
"Do you think he will grant our
request if he sees that we are not in
earnest ? "
"I don't know what you mean,
mamma."
"Why suppose you were to go to
your papa and say ; Will you please
take me to ride to the beach, and let
me pick up shells and pretty mosses,
and sail. on the water, and catch fish,
and have a nice chowder ?'"
Oh, I'd like that dearly?" said
Rosamond, hopping up and down on
her toes.
': I too," echoed Daisy Dell.






MAMMA'S SCHOOL. 37

"Yes," said mamma smiling, "but
suppose all the time you were asking
him he should see you gazing round
the room, or playing with your dolls,
or looking at pictures, do you think
he would imagine you were very
earnest in your request ? "
"Oh, no indeed! I wouldn't do
so. I would look right in his face
and say, 'dear papa, please do, it
would be so nice.'"
"Well, my dear, when we kneel
down, papa speaks for us all; he
asks God to give us bread and
clothes. He begs that our sins may
be forgiven for the sake of Jesus
Christ."
I'm going to ask God to give us
raspberry jam too," said Daisy, "'cause
I like it so much."






38 BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.

When papa asks for these bless-
ings we ought to be asking too."
"I never hear you speak, mamma!"
No, dear; but God sees into my
heart, and he knows I'm following
papa's words, and saying; 'Yes, I do
want to have my sins forgiven. I do
want bread for my children, or else
they'd starve. I do want clothes for
them to keep them warm. I do
thank thee for a pleasant home and
all other blessings.'"
"I'm glad I know that," said Maud,
putting her arm about mamma's
neck, and speaking in her ear. "I've
wondered a great many times what I
ought to be doing while papa prayed.
Now I know."
Dear child," whispered mamma,
" every day I ask God to draw your





MAMMA'S SCHOOL. 39

heart in love to him; then you will
know by your own experience what
it is to pray."
Just as Mrs. Leslie rang the bell
for her little scholars, a woman came
into the nursery accompanied by two
children.
Oh, there's Belle !" screamed
Rosamond, running to meet her
cousin in such haste that she fell
over a cricket. She tried hard not
to cry; but she had hit her head and
her lip quivered.
Belle has come to spend the
day," said Jane, trying to turn the
thoughts of her pet away from the
bruises.
"Yes," said Osgood, I brought
her. Mamma says she may stay if
it's convenient. Mamma is in bed






40 BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.

with headache. Where's Herbert,
aunt Miriam?"
He and Maud have gone to
school."
The boy ran off without another
word; but the children were too
busy in getting off Belle's sack, hat,
and tiny kid gloves to notice his ab-
sence.
Belle was a few months older than
Rosamond. She was a lovely child,
the favorite of her father, who was
fond of home and of his family. It
was Belle who entreated her father
to forgive Osgood, when, as often
happened, he was in disgrace.
"Mamma, may Belle take my
book? cried Rosamond. May she
be in my class ?"
Yes indeed," said mamma.





MAMIMA'S SCHOOL. 41

Daisy Dell was very quiet this
morning. She sat rocking Prudy
with her finger in her mouth, her
eyes slowly following Belle, as with a
happy face she walked about the
room.
Mrs. Leslie sat down with her
work-basket by her side, and the
little girls stood up before her hold-
ing the book between them.
Very well, Rose," said mamma,
"You are getting on finely. Now
will you read, Belle?"
"I can't tell the words without
spelling," faltered Belle with a blush.
" Mamma never has time to hear me
read." She began where Rosamond's
finger pointed.
"T-w-o, two ; g-i-r-1-s, girls; w-e-n-t,
went;" repeating every letter aloud.






42 BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.

"Wait a minute," said her aunt;
" spell the words softly as Rosamond
does."
Belle tried again, and was so de-
lighted with her success that she
wanted to repeat the paragraph over
and over. Her blue eyes sparkled,
and her voice sounded very happy.
Now for my next class," said
mamma.
Oh! oh Daisy is asleep," said
Rosamond, laughing merrily.
Hush! hush! don't wake her,"
whispered mamma. Go and call
aunt Jane to take her to her crib."
Aunt Jane was a woman who had
lived with Mrs. Leslie as a house-
keeper and upper servant for many
years. She was really no relation to
the family; but she had helped the





MAMA'S SCfOOL 43

mistress nurse the children through
measles, whooping cough, and many
other sicknesses, and they all loved
her dearly.
She lifted the little head upon her
arm ; Daisy, even in her sleep, hold-
ing Prudy fast; and laid her on the
crib in the adjoining room. Mamma
followed and took Daisy's hand.
"Why she said starting back,
"how hot she is! "
She wouldn't be asleep at this
time of the day if she were well,"
urged aunt Jane. "Dear little lamb,
what comfort she takes with her fin-
ger to be sure !"
Daisy sucked away; but at the
same time an expression of pain
passed over her face.
"I'll sit close by," said mamma.






44 BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.

"If she is not better when she wakes,
I shall send for the doctor."
Jane stood a moment gazing anx-
iously at the sleeping child and then
turned to go below, saying:
"If I were you, I'd keep Rosamond
away. There's no harm in being
carefuL"






THE SICK DOG. 45




CHAPTER V.

THE SICK DOG.

"IT'S a pity Belle is here to-day,"
said Mrs. Leslie to Annie, who came
into the nursery bringing a basket of
clean clothes.
I'm cleaning silver, ma'am; and
I'll take them both down with me,"
suggested the girl. "I hope the lit-
tle dear isn't going to be sick."
Is Daisy ill ? asked grandfia,
coming in from her daily walk.
" Let me see her."
She put on her glasses, stooped
over the crib, laying'her hand gently
on the child's forehead.






46 BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.

"Pretty hot, and her pulse is too
quick Has she ever had the chick-
en pox?"
No, mother! answered Mrs. Les-
lie with a sigh of relief. The rest
have had it. I was afraid of scarlet
fever."
Keep her quiet, a few hours will
decide, Miriam; I don't think she is
very ill. I'll sit here if you have
anything to do."
"Thank you. I'll be back pres-
ently."
She found Annie, and asked her to
go out with the children at once.
"May we have some bread for the
swans in the lake, mamma ?" asked
Rosamond.
"Yes, dear. Annie, you may leave
the silver, and keep them all out till






THE SICK DOG. 47

one. When you come back, Rosa,
you may play with your new set of
teacups."
"Oh, goody! goody! May Her-
bert make some ice cream for us?
He knows how. It's splendid," plead
Rosamond.
It's milk and sugar with a little
pounded ice," explained Annie laugh-
ing.
"Yes, and you may invite Maud
too; only be as quiet as you can, so
as not to disturb your little sister."
When Daisy woke she moaned
with pain. Her cheeks were very
red; but her eyes were heavy; and
she turned her face from the light as
though it pained her.
Where does my darling feel
sick?" asked mamma.






48 BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.

"In my tummic." She moaned
again, growing very pale about her
mouth.
"Oh, how sick she looks!" cried
mamma. We must send for the
doctor at once." But at that mo-
ment Daisy sprang up from the crib,
and began to vomit; the perspira-
tion starting from every pore.
Why why !" screamed mamma,
"no wonder she is sick," as large
pieces of orange peel made their ap-
pearance in the basin. "Where did
she get such stuff?"
Give her plenty of warm water,"
urged grandma, bringing a tumbler
fill from her chamber. We must
get rid of this indigestible matter as
soon as possible."
In a few minutes dear little Daisy






THE SICK DOG. 49

was quite relieved from her pain,
though she was weak and languid.
I don't ache any more," she said
softly. Where's Belle ? "
Gone to walk with Rosamond."
"I don't like orange now, mamma."
Where did you get orange peel ?"
"In the street. I thought it would
taste nice; but I don't want any
more."
"Shall I sing for you, darling 2"
"Yes, mamma, only I'd rather hear
a story about when Don first came
here to live."
The lady laughed. She had told
this story many times; but her little
ones always liked to hear it. Indeed
they knew it so well that they cor-
rected her if she changed or omitted
a word.
4






50 BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.

"It was a cold night," she began ;
"and I was returning with papa from
lecture, when' I heard a noise in the
back yard. The gate was fastened;
but we went through the house and
out by the back door. The moon
was shining very brightly; and we
could see a funny little dog lying on
the bricks in the corner of the yard.
Close by the small dog there was
a large one."
"That was Don," said Daisy, catch-
ing her finger from her mouth.
SYes, that was Don; and he was
trying to find out what made the lit-
tle one moan so dreadfully. He took
his large paw and turned the little
spaniel over, and smelt of him; but
it did no good. Don was very glad
to see us. He came whining to my






THE SICK DOG. 51

feet, took my dress in his teeth and
pulled me toward the sick dog. I
went into the kitchen and brought
out some milk and meat. Don tried
to show his joy by barking and wag-
ging his tail. He pushed the little
dog and at last made him stand on
his feet to drink the milk; but the
little creature was so weak he fell
over. Then Don began to look wist-
fully in my face and whine. IIe was
trying to tell me about his poor
friend.
Papa carried the little creature
into the coal-house ; and Don followed.
In the morning the little dog was
able to crawl about, and when the
gate was open dragged himself away,
though not until he had eaten a good
breakfast.






52 BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.

"The next day Don came back
and seemed as glad to see me as
though he had known me for years.
I told cook to give him some meat,
but he did not eat it; he took it in
his mouth and ran ,away as fast as he
could go. This he did for four or
five days; and then I got a boy to
follow him. Don trotted off down to
a pile of lumber lying near the
wharf; and there hidden between
some great piles of boards where he
was shielded from the wind, lay the
little dog waiting for his protector.
"The boy I sent saw Don lay
down the meat and stand by to see
the sick one eat. I don't .know
where he got his own food, for he
did not come back till the next
morning."





THE SICK DOG. 53

By this time Daisy's eyes were
shut, and mamma, thinking she was
asleep, stopped talking. But the
moment her voice ceased the little
girl exclaimed:
"You didn't tell about hiding Don's
plate."
Well," continued mamma laugh-
ing, I was curious to see what Don
would do if there was no meat ready
for him to carry away. So I hid the
plate behind a barrel. Just at his
usual hour, Don came trotting into
the yard, and went to the back steps
smelling about for the food. lie
seemed astonished that it was not
there.
"I was watching him from the
window, and as soon as he heard my
voice he came bounding up the stairs,





54 BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.

and stood looking earnestly in my
face.
"' Good fellow!' I said patting him,
'good, faithful fellow!' "
"He wagged his tail and was much
pleased. Then I said:
"' Do you want some meat for the
sick dog ?'
"Bow !-wow !-wow!' he barked. It
sounded exactly as if he had said:
"'Yes, I do! I do!' So I went
down and gave him the plate; and
he ran off with the big bone.
"One day when I was standing
near the window with Herbert in my
arms, he was a baby then, I saw the
little dog and the large dog come
walking into the yard together. I
went down stairs; and they came up
to lick my hand. Bertie was de-





THE SICK DOG. 55

lighted to see them, and put his lit-
tle fist right into Don's great mouth.
But Don didn't bite; he loved the
dear boy, and now that his sick friend
did not need his care, he resolved to
stay with those who had treated him
so kindly. When the little dog went
trotting out of the yard, Don followed
and kissed him good bye. I suppose
he told him he was going to take
care of baby Bertie. One day, Ber-
tie tried to say dog, but instead he
said 'Don,' and ever since we have
called him Don. When Bertie grew
older they had merry times together.
There comes Don to see what's the
matter with you."





56 BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.




CHAPTER VI.

SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON.

I DON'T know how Osgood per-
suaded Herbert to make up their
quarrel and be good friends again.
They went to school together, and
they both liked to play ball and to
collect stamps, and to skate in the
rink, so it was natural they should be
rather intimate. They were in the
same class in Sunday school too; and
Herbert always called for his cousin
to go with him.
At Mr. Mitchell's they had a late
breakfast on Sunday; and when Mrs.
Leslie begged her sister to allow Os-












I // 1 -

--l ".11 t .... '1: 11 '!! 1 -,. -









ji -* ~III* p''iI'-


.._ ii










BERTIE AND MAUD PLAYING WITH DON.-- Page 57.






SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON. 57

good to go to school with her boy,
the lady objected.
"I'd like to know," she said laugh-
ing, that he was safe for one hour
ift church, or Sunday school, or any-
where, for he is so noisy, and teases
the little ones till Nancy loses all
patience, and threatens to leave; but
it would be a great bother to get him
ready."
Are you talking about our young
hopeful ?" inquired Mr. Mitchell, ad-
vancing from the adjoining room.
"Yes, I want him to go to Sunday
School with Herbert. The class have
an excellent teacher; and I feel sure
Osgood would be interested."
"He shall go," answered Mr. Mitch-
ell, "if Herbert will call for him.
He is a wild fellow; but they tell me





58 BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.

he is just what I was at his age."
The father smiled; but it was not a
glad smile.
It was now more than three
months since Osgood's first appeal-
ance in the Sunday school, and not
once had he been absent. ;Though
nearly a year older than Herbert, he
had failed to commit the lessons, and
had been removed to a lower class.
Here his conduct was so rude, and
his influence over his companions so
bad, that his teacher feared she
should be obliged to expel him.
He always had some excuse for
not learning the lesson; either that
he had forgotten where it was, or he
had lost his book, or he had no time.
When the others were reciting, he
spent the hour in slyly pinching





SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON. 59

them, or snapping seeds into their
ears, or making faces to attract their
attention.
As their seats were on different
aisles in the large chapel, the cousins
did not see anything of each other
during the school hour; and after-
wards Herbert joined his parents in
the church, while Osgood sauntered
about the streets, or went home as
he pleased.
Mrs. Leslie sometimes used to fear
that Herbert would be injured by
association with his cousin. On the
other hand, she hoped he might do
Osgood some good. She had little
idea how often her boy was led into
temptation or urged to do that which
his conscience told him was wrong.
On Saturday evening, it was her





60 BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.

habit to go over the Bible lesson
with Matd and Herbert, hearing the
verses they had committed and an-
swering questions on the part they
did not understand.
On one occasion she found Bertie
unwilling to apply his mind. "It's
no use," he said yawning. "Ever so
manly of the boys read the verses
instead of repeating them. Osgood
says he wouldn't go if he had the
bother of learning them by heart."
Who does lie expect will be in-
jured by his idleness, Bertie ? his
teacher or himself? "
"I don't believe he thinks any-
thing about it, mamma."
What do you suppose induces
the teachers to take so much pains
to study the lesson and make it






SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON. 61

interesting and useful to their
classes ?"
I don't know, mamma."
You certainly understand a little
how your father feels about his
scholars."
"Yes, I know he buys new books
and gives prizes to the good ones,
and takes them to picnics."
"Because they commit more verses
than any other class in school, and
they seem to understand them too.
Studying the Bible is not like study-
ing any other book. You know Da-
vid says, 'Thy word is a lamp to my
feet and a light to my path.' The
Bible shows us the road to heaven;
and it points out too, the crooked
paths that lead off to sin and misery."
Like the drunkard's fast route






62 BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.

from Sippington to the Black Valley,
mamma," suggested Maud, "in papa's
great picture, with all those dreadful
stopping places; Topersville, Rowde-
ville, Beggarstown, Fightington, Pris-
onton, and ever so many more."
Herbert laughed, and his mamma
saw with pain that he had lost much
of his interest in the lesson. She
gazed anxiously in his face as he sat
with his eyes on his bobk; but evi-
dently not applying himself, and said
to herself, Perhaps he does not feel
well to-night. I must not urge him
too much. I must pray that he may
grow to love the teachings of God's
holy book."
"Now, mamma, I have twelve
verses," said Maud in a triumphant
tone. Will you hear me ?"






SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON. 63

"Very well repeated, my dear, and
I think you understand them too.
Now I suppose aunt Jane is ready to
give you a bath. Good-night."
"I almost wish I was a girl," said
Herbert, following his sister from the
room.
This astonishing declaration made
Maud open her eyes to their widest
extent; for Bertie repeated many
times every day the assertion:
"Oh, I'm glad I'm a boy! I
wouldn't be a girl for all the world."
"What makes you say so ?" asked
Maud laughing.
"It isn't half so hard for girls to be
good. Boys have to be bad or else
they're called cowards."
What do you mean, Bertie ? It's
awful to talk so. Has Osgood been






64 BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.

calling you a coward? What would
mamma say if she heard you ?"
"Perhaps I shall tell her sometime;
hut I don't want anybody else to tell
her."






BERTIE'S SICK MAMIMA. 65




CHAPTER VII.

BERTIE'S SICK MAMMA.

IT was spring when I wrote about
Bertie's neglecting his lessons; now
the weeks and months have flown
away until the fields are golden with
the ripening grain. Mrs. Leslie has
been very ill; and the children for
the first time in their lives have been
away from her watchful care. For a
few weeks she remained near the
White Mountains, gaining health dai-
ly by the strengthening breezes; but
she soon began to yearn for home
and children, wondering every hour
in the day what they were doing,
5






66 BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.

and how they were progressing with-
out her.
They returned to the city, where
Maud received them with tears of
joy, while Rosamond and Daisy Dell
danced and clapped their hands, and
made Don stand erect for his best
bow.
Bertie came in from his play, and
received his mamma's caresses more
quietly than usual. For one instant
he laid his head on her shoulder,
then with a sigh drew himself away.
I have a great deal to ask," whis-
pered mamma, kissing him again.
"It is a hard thing to be away from
my darlings so long. I was glad to
hear from grandma that you helped
her with your little sisters."
Bertie's chin quivered. His heart






BERTIE'S SICK MAMMA. 67

was full. Oh, how he longed to lay
his head on her lap as he used to do
before he began to think it was too
much like a girl, and confess how
sadly he had missed her! Perhaps if
no one had been present he might
have done so, and then what sorrow
he would have saved himself and her.
But mamma had travelled many
miles since morning, and papa was
anxious to have her retire to her
rest; so with another kiss he bade
her good-night, and hid away in his
breast once more the heavy load he
had carried so many weeks. Poor
little Bertie!
A few days later Mr. Leslie re-
ceived an answer to a letter for
which he had been anxiously wait-
ing. It contained these words:






68 BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.

" DEAR SIR:
I have just reached home after
our vacation. Our term commences
on the twentieth of this month. We
have three boys in our family whom
we mean to treat, in all respects, as
though they were our own. Our
number is limited absolutely to four.
If your son is what he ought to be,
with such a mother, he can fill our
only vacancy. Our terms are six
hundred dollars a year; no extras.
Respectfully yours,
STEPIIEN AUSTIN."
September 10, 8 -

This gentleman had formerly lived
in the city, and been superintendent
of the Sunday school with which
Mr. Leslie's family were connected.





BERTIE'S SICK MAMMA. 69

On account of his health, he had
removed fifty miles into the country,
and opened a small school for boys,
taking no more than he could him-
self teach.
Finding his wife's health far from
confirmed, Mr. Leslie had written to
engage a place for Herbert; but now
the answer had arrived, he scarcely
knew how to convey the intelligence
to her.
"Must it be so ?" she asked gaz-
ing tearfully in her husband's face.
"This is the greatest trial of all.
Just at his age too, when he needs a
mother every hour in the day."
l" He shall return the moment
you are well." The father spoke
hopefully. We have tried to teach
our boy his duty to God and to him-





70 BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.

self. Now we must leave him to act
out these principles. I believe that
-when he finds he must depend on
himself, he will give us reason for
gratitude."
"I know Osgood is going to a
boarding school."
Yes, Mitchell told me they could
not endure his boisterous conduct
any longer. I'm afraid he might
have said his disobedience, with truth.
Nothing would tempt me to allow
Herbert to be with him. We both
feel confidence in Mr. Austin; and
we will try to be happy in having
our son in his care."
"Let me tell Bertie," urged mamma.
The -next morning Mrs. Leslie lay
on the sofa in her chamber. Rosa-
mond was standing on a cricket at





BERTIE'S SICK MAMMA. 71

the end, and trying to comb the long
silky locks of hair Maud with a
mysterious air was seated near t-he
window, busily engaged looking over
some pieces of bright colored silks.
Daisy, little rogue, had pulled open
mamma's bureau drawer and was de-
lighting herself, while no one noticed
her, in ornamenting Don with lace-
bordered handkerchiefs, delicate rib-
bons, et cetera.
Presently Herbert walked in just
.as aunt Jane deposited a large arm-
ful of his clothes on the bed.
"~ Did you wan-t me, mamma ? he
inquired looking round with some
astonishment.
"Yes, my dear. Come and sit close
by my side."
I know something," began Rosa-





72 BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.

mond who never could keep her
mouth shut.
"Hush," said mamma. What do
you say, Bertie, to leaving home for
a few months ?"
"Me!" repeated the boy, the blood
rushing violently to'his face.
"Yes, dear." She then informed
him of his father's letter, and the
answer which had just arrived.
"Is Osgood going there, mamma?"
"Oh, no; certainly not to the same
school! Why, my son?"
Bertie hesitated, blushed again,
and then said:
"IHe told me he was going away.
I didn't know where. I'm rather
glad he isn't going with me. Is that
what aunt Jane has got all my
clothes about for?"





BERTIE'S SICK MAMMA. 73

Yes, Herbert."
Mrs. Leslie was surprised and
grieved at the coolness with which
her only son received the intelligence
which had cost her such a pang. He
walked toward the bed and taking
one last year's jacket exclaimed:
This is too small. I want lots of
new clothes. I mean to ask father
to buy me a watch."
"A watch, indeed!" repeated aunt
Jane. "There are a good many
things you'll have to learn first."
You have nothing to do with it,"
he said angrily. "My papa, is rich;
and I don't see why I can't wear a
watch as well as Osgood."
Has he got a watch ? inquired
Maud in surprise.
Yes, he showed it to me, and a






74 BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.

gold chain and a beautiful key. He
said it cost ever so many hundred
dollars."
I doubt the whole story, Bertie,"
began Jane with a toss of her head.
"I guess 'twas a brass one, and you
had on your glory glasses."
The children all knew very well
what kind of glasses these were, for
whenever they told a story which she
considered extravagant, she looked
sharply in their faces to see the glory
glasses, as she called them.






BERTIE AT SCHOOL. 75




CHAPTER VIII.

BERTIE AT SCHOOL.

A SMOTHERED laugh from Daisy
Dell made all in the room turn
round. Oh, what a sight! The draw-
er was empty; Don, stretched at fll
length on the carpet, was covered
with collars, under sleeves, gloves,
handkerchiefs, and ribbons. A bright
blue bow on his forehead gave the
finishing touch to his wardrobe, and
made the little creature dance with
delight.
"O-o-h! o-o-h-!" screamed Rosa-
mond letting fall the comb and run-
ning to the rescue. "Isn't she real






76 BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.

naughty, mamma ?" Then seeing
that mamma smiled, she began to
hop up and down shouting :
"Doesn't Don look funny? How
still he lies. He doesn't even move
his tail. Mamma, he is looking to
see what you will say. Good fellow !
He isn't to blame. Oh! the bow
makes him looks so funny."
In the meantime Jane and Maud
were depriving the dog of some of
his ornamental trappings. When the
last one was removed lie rose, shook
himself and walked over to the sofa
where his mistress still lay. Ie
stood there looking earnestly in her
face till she put her hand on him
saying:
"Good Don, you behaved well
under the circumstances." Then he






BERTIE AT SCHOOL. 77

gave a little bark and went down
stairs.
"Come here, Daisy," called mam-
ma softly. "Was .it pretty to open
the drawer and take out mamma's
nice things ? "
"Don didn't hurt'em any," earnest-
ly pleaded Daisy. He lay still just
so," throwing herself at full length
on the floor.
"Look at me, darling. If mamma
gets well and strong, she will want to
wear those pretty things. She will
not want them to be soiled and tum-
bled. You may dress Don in your
every day clothes; but you must
never open mamma's drawers. Will
you remember ? "
"Yes, I will. I'm going to be a
real good girl. I love you dearly,






78 BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.

dearly. Now may I go out to walk
with Prudy ?"
The twentieth of September came
all too soon, or rather the nineteenth,
for on that day papa started with
Herbert for the school. The watch
was still in the store; but papa had
promised a handsome gold watch as
a reward for one year of good be-
havior, and diligence in study.
O.rgood Mitchell left home at near-
ly the same time, carrying his moth-
er's watch, which he had secretly
taken from her drawer, and shown at
various times to his companions.
A few days after Bertie joined the
school, Mrs. Leslie received a note
from Mr. Austin which greatly pleased
her. It was this:
'f Herbert is rather behind the





BERTIE AT SCHOOL. 79

other boys; and I have put him in a
class by himself; but he is very am-
bitious of overtaking them. IIe has
conducted so far in a manner that
convinces me your instructions have
not been wasted."
Scarcely a week later there came
another letter from the teacher, en-
closing one- from Bertie. The first
read as follows :
"I informed your husband that it
was my rule to allow the boys to
correspond with their parents with-
out any oversight of the letters; but
outside of the family-circle all are in-
spected. A letter came yesterday to
Herbert which I read, but did not
deliver, and now enclose it to you.
I am sorry to say that your son has
not seemed as happy as we hoped he






80 BERTIE AND IMS SISTERS.

would be. On Sunday night Mrs.
Austin heard him crying in his cham-
ber; but when she went in, could not
persuade him to confess the cause of
his grief. He only said, as well as
his sobs would allow:
"I want mamma I must see
mamma!"
Herbert's letter was badly written,
worse spelled, and blotted with tears;
but his mother kissed it, wept and
prayed over it. He began:
Oh, I do wish I had never come
here! I want papa to write and tell
Mr. Austin to let me go home. I
found mamma's letter in my trunk
when I took out my clothes to go to
church. But I couldn't read it then.
I can't read writing very well, and so
it took me a good while; and oh, it






BERTIE AT SCHOOL. 81

made me feel so bad!' I cried till
my head ached. Mamma, I want
you to read this when you are all
alone. If I did not know you loved
me, I could not write what I am go.
ing to. I have been a very wicked
boy. Till I read your letter about
God seeing all we do, and about giv-
ing him an account of ourselves, I
didn't think so much about it. I
thought, as Osgood said, that it was
a joke. Dear darling mamma, if you
can't forgive me, I shall run away
and never see anybody again; I
thought of it in the night. I began
by spending my Sunday school pen-
nies for candy. Osgood laughed at
me when I said it was wicked to buy
candy on Sunday; but I ought not
to do it, because my papa and mam-
6






82 BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.

ma teach me better than his parents
do him. I used to want to tell you
so bad; but you were away, and I
couldn't. I am very home-sick, and
I can't study. Please mamma, let
me go home. I must see whether
you will forgive me. I said my pray-
ers when I first came here as I used
to at home; but I can't say 'em now,
'cause when I begin I cry so, and
.then I know God is looking right in-
to my heart; and he knows how bad
I am, so I feel ashamed to pray. I
can't write any more, my head aches
so. I know I've lost the watch; but
I don't care for watches as I did.
Osgood isn't happy, though he has
got one.
IERBERT LESLIE."






THE LETTERS. 83




CHAPTER IX.

THE LETTERS.

MRS. LESLIE went to her desk and
wrote at once, while her husband sat
down to answer Mr. Austin's letter.
This was what she said:

" MY DARLING BO :
If I had wings I would fly to you.
Never have I longed more to hold
you in my arms, and tell you how
truly I forgive you all, everything.
You do not tell me what you have
done; but, Herbert, dear, you can
tell Jesus, your loving friend. You
say you are ashamed to pray because






84 BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.

God knows how wicked you are. If
you were not ashamed and penitent,
it would be no use to pray to him.
Jesus is watching you with arms out-
stretched to receive you, and give
your poor heart peace.
"Your father thinks it not best for
you to come home yet; but you may
ask Mr. Austin from me, to give you
time to write every day if you wish;
and I will promise to answer every^
letter. If it will comfort you to tell
me how you have been naughty, you
may do so; but I assure you before-
hand that I forgive you, and shall
love you still, though my heart may
ache with yours. Dear Herbert, will
there ever be a better time for you
to make Jesus your Saviour ?. He
"came from heaven, you know, to save






THE LETTERS. 85

little children who feel themselves to
be sinners. He loves you with a
love greater even than your moth-
er's; and you know how tenderly I
love my only son.
Maud, Rose, and Daisy are well,
and send many kisses to dear Bertie,
as also does grandma.
LOVINGLY, YOUR MOTHER."

A few days passed and then papa
brought from the post-office another
letter from Herbert.

" DEAR MAMMA :
Will you care much if this letter
is not spelled right? I want to say
a great deal; and it takes me so long
to look out words in the dictionary.
1 meant to tell you what I did; but






86 BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.

I forgot, and my eyes ached crying
so hard. You know papa gave Mr.
Austin some money for me to spend.
I haven't used one cent. I am sav-
ing it all in one of my stockings.
Now I will tell you what I did.
There is a boy in the city who sells
molasses candy. He has it on a tray.
Osgood and I used to pass him on
our way to school. I bought some of
him once, and the next day I wanted
more; but I hadn't any penny. Os-
good asked him to trust us; but he
said he was too poor. I am afraid
you will never love me any more if
you know how bad I was. Osgood
knocked the tray out of his hand,
and I picked up a good deal of candy
and ran away. The boy cried dread-
fully. Oh, how sorry I am! I didn't





THE LETTERS. 87

think it tasted good after that, and I
gave it to Osgood. He laughed very
hard, and called it a good joke. The
next time I saw the boy I was so
ashamed, I went another street. The
reason I am saving my money is that
I want to give it to him. If you
haven't given away my last year's
jacket that was too small, will you
please give it. to the boy. Maud
knows him. He's the boy Osgood
used to make fun of.
"Dear Mamma, I want papa to
know that I have been bad, and how
sorry I am; but I darsn't tell him.
It's easier to tell mothers than 'tis
anybody else, though if aunt Alice
wag my mamma, I couldn't tell her
anything. Until I came here I for-
got what a darling mamma I have.





88 BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.

Last night I kept awake a long time,
and I prayed to God real hard. I
told him all about the candy boy,
though of course he knew it before.
I felt better after praying; and I
didn't cry any more. Oh, mamma,
I do hope I shall be good after this !
It doesn't pay to be so naughty.
Osgood used to call me a coward
when I wouldn't do things; and he
said only girls and babies tell their
mothers every thing; but I don't
care. I like girls a great deal better
than I used to; and I do think Maud
and Rosamond and Daisy are the
very dearest and nicest and funniest
I ever saw.
HERBERT LESLIE."
Mamma, I want to tell you and
papa that I am very sorry I have





THE LETTERS. 89

given you so much trouble. I hope
I never shall act so again. I've
prayed to God to make me a good
boy."
The next mail carried mamma's
answer to this.

"My DEAR SON:
Do you remember a story I told
you about a boy who stole one row
of pins, and from that went on grow-
ing worse and worse, until he became
a hardened thief. God has been
very gracious to you that he has in
the beginning shown you your sins;
and led you to repent of them. It
was stealing, my dear boy, I can call
it by no other name, to take from a
poor child his only-means of support.
My heart ached for him, for you, and






90 BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.

for your poor, erring cousin. IIe
wrote you a letter which Mr. Austin
opened. As it was not a pretty let-
ter he enclosed it to us. I could not
understand it till your's came. lHe
refers continually to the good joke
played on the candy boy. I am
glad you are saving your spending
money for him. I know you will feel
happier to deny yourself every luxu-
ry until this debt is paid in full. My
darling child, when I read in your
letter that you prayed in earnest to
your heavenly Father for forgiveness,
I wept tears of joy. Ever since yol,
were a baby I have longed for the
time when you would feel your need
of help from above to do what is
right. If you seek help from God,
IIe will certainly give it.





THE LETTERS. 91

"Now I am going to tell you what
a fright we had last Sunday. Papa
and Maud had gone to Sunday
school, Rosamond was in grandma's
room, hearing the story of Joseph;
and I was lying on the sofi reading.
Daisy had been singing her new
hymn:

Twinkle, twinkle, little star !'

in a tune of her own composing,
while Don lay sleeping on the rug.
I did not miss her for some time and
then supposed her with Jane. I was
much interested in my book, and I
did not notice the unusual quiet
until Rosamond came in and asked :
"' Mamma, where's Daisy gone ?'
"' With aunt Jane,' I answered.
"'No, mamma, aunt Jane has gone






92 BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.

to church. I guess she's in the kitch-
en.' She ran down, but returned in-
stantly, saying the little one was no
where to be found. You can imagine
how our hearts beat with terror.
Grandma went up and down, search-
ing in every room; and cook came
up from the kitchen to say that Don
had gone too. I tried to rise from
the sofa to help in the search, but
fell back almost fainting. Grandma
had stayed from church on account
of a cold; but she put on her bonnet
and went into the street to call a
policeman. She had to walk some
distance, and who do you think she
met? Why papa, and Maud, and
Daisy Dell, with Don walking soberly
at her side. Grandma sent Maud
home in a hurry to relieve us; and





THE LETTERS. 93

then we heard the story. In the
midst of it Daisy walked in with
sparkling eyes and such blooming
cheeks and came tiptoeing up to me
exclaiming:
"I went to church, mamma, and
sat on a sofa, and saw a man stand
in a box. He talked just so," and
she spread out her arms and made
strange gestures.
"Yes, mamma," added Maud. I
was sitting in the pew with papa;
and I saw people laughing, and then
Daisy came running up the aisle
with her oldest hat on, and Don
right after her. Papa caught her in
pretty quick, and shut the door. He
couldn't help laughing though, I saw
him behind the hymn book. Oh,
how Daisy did look!-Her hair, tum.






94 BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.

bled; and she, without her best
dress. When the minister preached
she looked at him so funny; but
when she had heard him a little
while she put her finger in her
mouth, and sucked it ever so loud.
Don behaved better than she did."
"Oh, Daisy!" I said, how could
you frighten mamma so? "
"'I go to church with Don. I hear
great loud moosic. I find papa in
church.'
This was all the explanation we
could get from the darling. She was
too delighted with the strange sights
she had witnessed. Papa took her in
his lap, and began to explain to her
that it was very naughty to run
away and frighten poor sick mamma;
but his mouth looked so roguish that






THE LETTERS. 95

it did not make much impression
upon her. He told me afterwards it
was the most comical 'sight he had
seen for many a day. She recog-
nized him among a crowd of stran-
gers, and came running up the aisle
as though she and Don were in the
midst of a frolic. Her hair was fly-
ing in every direction, the old hat
she wears in the yard perched on the
side of her head, her arms just slipped
into an old sack; but laughing till
she showed all her white teeth.
"Poor grandma has scarcely re-
covered from her fright. She quite
confuses Daisy by her actions, some-
times trying to scold her, and then
catching her up, and almost smother-
ing her with kisses. Write again soon.
YOUr AFFECTIONATE MOT-HER.




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