• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Contents
 Back Cover






Title: The child's pictures
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00063630/00001
 Material Information
Title: The child's pictures
Physical Description: 64 p. : ill. ; 16 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Tract Society ( Publisher )
Publisher: American Tract Society
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: c1870
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Treatment of animals -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Poverty -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Prayer -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Primers (Instructional books) -- 1870   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1870
Genre: Primers (Instructional books)   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00063630
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224088
notis - ALG4348
oclc - 15735276
lccn - 13005783

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page i
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Contents
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
Full Text














































..........






. . . .








Als.










+. ++,.. it, ..


i~...... ,.+.:. ; .. .. .
N..







.M.


q in
v9










..... ... ..
x























I+i.+'' .........U a st
..,. < ..












iof
.-W.
.." ". ......
.. r:-t






- ':"
*1 <. .. . .-. ..

4'r ,4ai .4.- ..











'4..!:+, ".~,I"'"+'

The Baldwin Library
." I ISn~ n








~3~)~tCc~/
6~t~Z
"T~







THE



CHILD'S PICTURES.




















PUBLISHED BY THE
AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY,
150 NASSAU-STREET, NEW YORK.

































ENTERED, according to Act of f :.. in the year 1870, by the
AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY, in the '.'tn.. i the Librarian of Congress
at Washington.






THE

CHILD'S PICTURES.



Ir








FEEDING GOD'S SPARROWS.
YES, that is right. Be kind to the
hungry little li-.. "Your Heav-
enly Father feedeth them." And is
it not a very pleasant thought that
he has given you some spare crumbs
to throw out for them ?





4 THE CHILD'S PICTURES.















THE GOOD BOOK.
WELL may they read it, and study
it together. It is the only book
that can make her the best of moth-
ers, and her pet the best of daugh-

THE GOOD BOOK.
WELL may they read it, and study
it together. It is the only book
that can make her the best of moth-
ers, and her pet the best of daugh-
ters. God's word, if they love and
obey it, will bring them both at last
to God's house above.





THE CHILD'S PICTURES. 5














HARDY AND FEARLESS,
THE tough little fellow has fairly
earned success, venturing over the
lofty cliff in search of eggs or young
birds. Only I hope he has God's
warrant to take the eggs, and is
earning an honest livelihood by it,
and not committing a needless and
cruel robbery.





6 THE CHILD'S PICTURES.












THE SLEIGH-RIDE.
A BRIGcIT clear day, a smooth road,
horses that love to go, pleasant com-
pany, a good conscience, and a heart
to bless God for all these good
things, make a pleasant sleigh-ride.
Don't forget the Giver, while you
enjoy his gifts; and let some of your
happiness overflow to cheer the poor
and the iifirm.





THE CHILD'S PICTURES. 7












THE ICE-BOUND SHIP.
FROZEN in till next summer! far up
in the regions of polar bears, where
for many days the sun hardly shows
itself at all above the ice, and where
hot coffee will freeze in the open
air while dropping to the ground!
How many a brave fellow has died
there of hunger, and cold, and dreary
home-sickness!





8 THE CHILD'S PICTURES.














ROLL AWAY, BOYSI
ROLL away! Roll up all the fun
you can, only have it snow-white and
pure. Roll up good habits, roll up
learning, and skill, and self-control,
and a good name, and works of love
to God and to man. Roll up things
that will last when snow-balls and
worlds are no more.






THE CHILD'S PICTURES. 9






*~-a -







LITTLE FINGERS.
OH how busy little fingers are!
fat little fingers, mischievous, touch-
ing, t.c;iliii'. 1pttiiiu. good, naugh-
ty, dear little fingers! They vex
mamma, and worry her, and caress
her. She wonders what they will
do next. She loves them, and begs
God to make them good, kind, useful.





10 THE CHILD'S PICTURES.












WINTRY WEATHER.
WINTER is cold, but cheery. It
nips our fingers and toes, to hint
to us to keep them warn with good
works, to remember the poor, to
make home happy, and send as
much sunshine and warmth as we
can to the homes around us. He
that giveth to the poor lendeth unto
the Lord.





THE CHILD'S PICTURES. 11





f-










WHmcii do you think is to blame-
the boy or the horse? It is sad,
but true, that the dulnb beasts are
usually more likely to do right than
men are, and the Bible often sends
us to them for lessons of wisdom.
"Ask now the beasts, and they shall
teach thee."





12 THE CHILD'S PICTURES.





--- _

l^ ,^ .^^_-





PRAY, mother, pray
For the little one so dear,
Oft reposing on your breast;
Never in the coming years,
Though he seek for it with tears,
Will he find so sweet a rest.
Feet like those may go astray,
Bruised and. bleeding by the way,
Ere they reach the mansion blest!
Pray, mother, pray!





THE CHILD'S PICTURES. 13




';-' ) i ,"*. f ',

J I I -I








THE GIRL'S PETS.
SOMETHING to love, to feed, to call
your own, to care for and play with;
something that will come at your
call, and play with you, and love
you back, and be happier for your
owning it. If you have any pets,
take good care of them.





14 THE CHILD'S PICTURES.












SCHOOL IN A BARN.
THESE poor r.c --oed boys seem very
glad to be taught. And who would
not gladly help a boy who may be
saved from a life of sin, and become
a blessing to his friends, an honor
to his country, yes, and a son of
God! All of them are in danger of
being thieves and drunkards; can
you help save them ?





THE CHILD'S PICTURES, 15





-4
'--- -











A SISTER'S THOUGHTS.

How sweetly baby has slept! and
howv fresh and bright he has waked
up this morning! I wonder if an-
gels did really come and see to him
in the night. If they did not, I
know One that did, who "never
slumbers nor sleeps." And he gives
his angels charge over us too.





16 THE CHILD'S PICTURES.





~1-


..







THE FIGHTING COCKS.
THEY are very fierce and earnest,
and with their bloody combs and
torn feathers will soon be a sorry
sight-a warning to boys and girls
not to let their angry p1,ains rise.
Anger is a short madness.





THE CHILD'S PICTURES. 17













THE YOUNG CHAMPION.
STAND your ground, my boy! Look
him in the eye, and hit him hard
if you can. You are right and he
is wrong; and man is master of the
brutes. Defend your little sister at
all risks; only be sure, before you
begin, that you must and ought to
do it.
2





18 THE CHILD'S PICTURES.














ST. BERNARD DOG.
TIRED out, faint and cold, this
poor traveller over the Alps would
sleep his last sleep but for this
brave, hardy, and sagacious dog.
He licks his face and hands, and
barks to rouse him up, that he may
take more food and clothing, and
follow his kind guide to the house.





THE CHILD'S PICTURES. 19














DRUMS and rocking-horses become
tiresome after a while, and then, or
at almost any other time, one of
grandfather's good -tii'..; is very
welcome. How many wonderful
things he has seen! and he can tell
of thirty different times when he
has come very near dying, by sick-
ness or accidents.





20 THE CHILD'S PICTURES.












KIT AND THE BALL OF YARN.
KITTY is highly delighted with this
round, well shaped, easy rolling ball,
and loves to tap it and see it roll.
She half believes there is some live
thing in it, but looks and listens
and smells in vain. Then she gives
it another toss, little caring what
trouble she makes for her little mis-
tress. Oh what fun!





THE CHILD'S PICTURES. 21






r- -








"- -RURAL LIFE.
: W .HAT n apl-,' ,-,ant ,,tory
-.- thi,- piiicture tells, (.l' f iid-
Iln'. a.l.l" 11' l (' (ill mll_' .ide,
and of love and trust on
the other. Happy the boy who can
have these pure and simple pleas-
ures of country life, and who so acts
towards all as to secure their love.





22 THE CHILD'S PICTURES.





















what a charm the trees would lose,
if there were no bright and gay
birds to flit through them, and to
siere no trees to build their branchenests
in, and Nfrnish them food? And
what a charm the trees would lose,
if there were no bright and gay
birds to flit through them, and to
sing among their branches !

U





THE CHILD'S PICTURES. 23












THE TWO GUIDES.
GOD has given him a faithful dog,
to lead him to those who will give
him food, shelter, and clothing. This
is a guide for his body. But better
still, He has also sent him a guide
for his poor blind soul, to lead it to
Christ for sight, pardon, peace, holi-
ness, and eternal life. How many
blind men has He made to see!





24 THE CHILD'S PICTURES.






L.





THE RUINED FLOWER.
AFTER so much care and pains in
making the ground rich and mellow,
setting out the plant, watering it
often, and watching the bud grow
and slowly open, how cruel to knock
it over on purpose! No more flow-
ers for mother's parlor, nor for poor
Mary's sick-room! It is too bad!
0 John, how could you do it?





THE CHILD'S PICTURES. 25
















THESE little South-sea girls gladly
bring their heaps of bread-fruit to
buy the words of Christ-the real
bread of life that came down from
heaven. If we love our Testaments,
we shall meet in heaven many from
those ocean islands.





26 THE CHILD'S PICTURES.
















THESE poor savages have never
seen or heard of a talking bird till
now; they think it is witch-craft
that helps the .parrot talk with the
captain of the ship, and they run
from the cabin in terror. The bird
has seen more of the world than they.





THE CHILD'S PICTURES. 27





.










THE thistle and the butterfly are
near together, and the hand too eager
to catch the one may be torn by
the other. Let us hope that some
thorn may always be at hand to
keep us away from any rose we
ought not to pluck.






28 THE CHILD'S PICTURES.


r--

S ,i -l _ ....: ,, --



4 I I







THE little boy looking on, means
to be a rider himself by-and-by.
And so, I hope, does every boy that
reads this, as soon as he can find
the horse to ride and the safe friend
to teach him how. E\-.:ri boy should
learn to ride and to swim: it may
be useful to him in many ways.





THE CHILD'S PICTURES. 29












-.;*=": ^ ^-*- ^ ..--


"WHO's afraid of cold weather?"
says the snow-bird, with his warm
coat of feathers, hovering round our
houses for seeds and crumbs. "Be-
hold the fowls of the air: for they
sow not, neither do they reap, nor
gather into barns; yet your heaven-
ly Father feedeth them."
*






30 THE CHILD'S PICTURES.















THE BUSY LITTLE FLY has life and
motion. Babe is c(.h:i-.,ii with the
merry buzzing of its wings and its
eager air, and he wants to take the
little wonder in his own hands,
and look at it more closely. But
I fear he would soon pull it in
pieces.






THE CHILD'S PICTURES. 31















THE THREE PLAYMATES.
NEDDY is very patient, and is
more than willing to lend his back
to the boys for a ride. But he likes
a little fun too; and the boys do n't
always find it easy to get on his
back, nor to stay on when once
fairly mounted.





32 THE CHILD'S PICTURES.















POOR BIRDIE
Pussy with her sharp claws can
climb the trees, and catch the young
birds if they have not learned to
fly. After that, they can keep out
of her way. If there were too many
birds, our strawberries and cherries
might fall short.





THE CHILD'S PICTURES. 33








i .



FIREI FIRE FIRE"
IT is rather late to cry "Fire!"
when the house is all in flames.
Just so it is with 1i ,a habits and
bad pa-;.-i,-; conquer them in the
outset, or it will very soon be too
late! And oh! where does that fire
come from? See James 3:6. The
tongue "is set on fire of hell!"'
3






34 THE CHILD'S PICTURES.





















glad he must be that he can talk
to his countrymen in their own lan-
guage, about the way to Jesus and
to heaven.





TH-E CHILD'S PICTURES. 35












HOME PLEASURES.
BIDDY AND BUNNY are on very,
friendly terms with each other, and
are likely to be well fed and cared
for, if we can judge from honest
Harry's looks. Evidently love rules
in the house, and I think it rules
in the barnyard. Even the dumb
beasts ought to know that their
master is a Christian.






36 THE CHILD'S PICTURES.




.. i. V ,


V Il





POOR SAILOR BOYI

THEY are all dead and gone. The
house is closed, and you have no
home! But be comforted; your
heavenly Father has made arrange-
ments for you; kind neighbors are
on their way to help you. There is
a home for you, both here and in
heaven, if you love and serve Christ.





THE CHILD'S PICTURES. 37



:--
.' I








THE BUSY BEE.
How doth the little busy bee
Improve each shining hour,
And gather honey all the day
From every opening flower.

In works of duty or of skill
I would be busy too;
For Satan finds some mischief still
For idle hands to do.





38 THE CHILD'S PICTURES.





"
work hard, live fruglly, and ma







w isely. .Lt no careless foot, still .
/less a wilfl crus t







ANTS.
THESE little people in glossy black
work hard, live frugally, and manage
wisely-. Let no careless foot, still

"Go to the ant, thou .i]-I.1,
consider her ways and be wise."





THE CHILD'S PICTURES. 39
















ONE WAY TO KISS.
GIRLS who have had a quarrel,
sometimes pretend to "make up,"
when after all they have the same
angry feelings as before. They are
told to "kiss and be friends" again;
but we can all see, and God too,
how little love they have.





40 THE CHILD'S PICTURES.















REAL RECONCILIATION.
KISSES of forgiveness and real love
are above price. We all do wrong
sometimes, and suffer wrong; and
we must forgive, just as heartily as
we want God and men to forgive
us-rubbing it all out, and forget-
ting it as soon as possible.





THE CHILD'S PICTURES. 41












NETTIE is sorry to see the rain,
for it keeps her close shut up at
home. But she will say to herself,
' Well, I know that my flowers, and
all the trees and all the farmers are
glad of it, and everybody else that
wants fruit, and corn to eat. And
then it comes from above, just as if
God's hand was sprinkling it down
on us pure and sweet. Dear rain !"





42 THE CHILD'S PICTURES.












"CONSENT THOU NOT."
WIIo does not love good ripe cher-
ries? But stolen cherries are sure
to make you sick, with a kind of
sickness very hard to cure. A good
conscience is better than a tickled
palate; and all wrong-doing leaves
bitter pains, when its short pleas-
ures are fled. What good did Adam
and Eve get from their stolen fruit?





THE CHILD'S PICTURES. 43
















How beautiful and grand! "It
walks the water like a thing of life,"
a wonderful work of man's skill and
power. But if we could stand where
we could see the great round world
roll by before us, whose skill and
power should we think of?





44 THE CHILD'S PICTURES.







.:- -;








BEAUTIFUL views are found all over
the world. But what if there were
no sunlight, to show us the clouds,
the hills, the water and the land, in
so many different forms and colors!
And what good would they all do
if there were no millions of eyes to
enjoy them ?





THE CHILD'S PICTURES. 45















How happy and free the birds
are! How many different kinds
there are, with different sizes and
forms and colors and notes and hab-
its Who but God would have
thought to make them, and the air
for them to fly in, and to bring us
their gay little songs ?





46 THE CHILD'S PICTURES.
















How much good sense, fidelity,
and honesty are shown in this fine
face. One would think that many
of our boys would be ashamed to
look him in the eye. Do you be-
lieve he would steal from that bas-
ket, even if it was full of meat ?





THE CHILD'S PICTURES. 47














THE CHILDREN'S FRIEND.
NEXT to mother herself, the little
folks can hardly have a better and
more needful friend than the good,
patient, motherly cow, whose whole-
some milk is so necessary for the
growing boy or girl. What a bless-
ing she is to us all, and how good
and wise is He that gave her to us.
moeneflf'edta h od
patient,3~ mohrycw hs hoe





48 THE CHILD'S PICTURES.














HOME FLOWERS.
EVERY home ought to have flow-
ers, even the brick house in the
city, with its few feet of border.
Yes, have some pet flowers if you
can, summer and winter too. Home
will be the happier for them, and
its living flowers more blooming and
amiable.





THE CHILD'S PICTURES. 49





^ ~-V









LITTLE children, can you tell,
Do you know the story well,
Every girl and every boy,
Why the angels sang for joy.

Yes, a little babe that day
Christ the Lord of angels lay,
Born on earth our Lord to be.
This the wondering angels see.
4





50 THE CHILD'S PICTURES.



-. ,- a '''^- 3 -




,., ..:.-.. ; -..-
-j -'^'1 '
-t

THE SPILT BERRIES.
A WHOLE basketful spilt, and the
vines all stripped! And now the
head and feet must go without the
new hat and shoes, and poor Jenny
cannot go to church for want of
them. Happy the girl who has a
little money to spare, and who is
glad to deny herself for Jenny's sake.





THE CHILD'S PICTURES. 51


















"You can't tell her anything naugh-
ty of me, that I don't tell her myself."
That is right. Let every boy and
girl tell mother when they do wrong,
and they will not keep on doing it,
I am sure.





52 THE CHILD'S PICTURES.












ONLY A FLOWER TO GIVE.
SHE has no money to buy a costly
present for her dear teacher, but she
loves her none the less, and her lit-
tle handful of flowers is all bright
and sweet and dewy with real love
and gratitude; and I 'm sure her
teacher will value it very highly.
Many such a little gift has been
cherished for year-.





THE CHILD'S PICTURES. 53






'. .; -"." _






DRUNK IN THE SNOW.
Do you think he said his "Now I
lay me before he went to sleep in
the snow ? If lie should really die
before lie wakes, what would become
of his soul? Is it God, or the evil
one, that wants you to learn to use
any drink that leads to such results
as this? "Touch not, taste not,
handle not," and you are safe.





54 THE CHILD'S PICTURES.

,-, W "i









ROBBIE IN A PET.
FEELING ugly is about the worst
feeling one can have. It begins in
tne heart, but soon shows itself in
the face, and in the actions. Rlob-
bie ought to have a l:oking-glass
held up where he can see just how
he looks and acts, when he is cross
and angry. What a hateful passion
it must be, that makes a dear boy
look so!





THE CHILD'S PICTURES. 55











". -.T *


THE TURTLE-DOVE.
TIERE is a holy Dove that sings
To every Christian child,
That whispers to his little heart
A song so sweet and mild.

It is the blessed Holy Ghost
That speaks his soul within,
That leads him on to all things good,
And holds him back from sin.





56 THE CHILD'S PICTURES.



















But he is a little afraid of her, and
lie knows she is now one of the famn-
ily, and haas as much right there as
he has. So they will both think it
best to become good friends.





THE CHILD'S PICTURES. 57

^. K














IT seems to a young boy, as
though he would never be an old
man. That te is so far off as to
be wholly out of sight. But to the
old man, the time seems very short,
and like a dream in the night, or a
tale that is told.





58 THE CHILD'S PICTURES.














How many a happy hour passes
in the quiet safety of our Christian
homes-in mother's company, with
a good book to read and talk with
her about. We may think little of
these pure pleasures while they are
p,;--iii., but in after years many a
sad and broken heart looks back to
them with longing.






THE CHILD'S PICTURES. 59





.- .. ..











FLOWER VOICES.
BUTTERCUPS and daisies,
And the violets sweet-
Flowers of field and garden-
All their voices meet,
And their Maker's praises
To our souls repeat.






60 THE CHILD'S PICTURES.






I





--.- .- -. ___ ,


A BIRTHDAY WISH.
On, for my boy a humble seat
On Calvary's mount at Jesus' feet;
And a home at last on the happy
plains
Where the glorious Saviour ever
reigns:
God grant thee this.





THE CHILD'S PICTURES. 61



-.--._ -






THE LONELY GRAVE.
SoMic poor sailor grew sick and
died, far up in the icy north. His
shipmates have buried him with
tears, out of the reach of foxes and
bears; but wife and children will
never even see his grave. Yet God
will not forget him. By-and-by he
will be raised up again; and then
the question will be, not where he
died, but where he will live for ever,





62 THE CHILD'S PICTURES.









'i








How pleasant the old-fashicned
kitchen was, with the hmn1 of the
kettle lid, the quiet purr of the cat,
tile snapping of the great wood fire,
the bright flames, and love's warm
glow over all.





THE CHILD'S PICTURES. 63











A LESSON FOR US.
BIRDIE Sinmgs away cheerily, and
does not mind the storm. Perhaps
he knows that sunshine is sure to
follow a storm, and spring to follow
winter; but he means to sing, any
way. God has made him so that
lih loves to -i,-. to cheer himself
and us in stormy times. Let us
keep a contented mind, and "rejoice
in the Lord always."





64 THE CHILD'S PICTURES.














CHILDREN'S HOSANNAS.
WE lo0e to singo
Around our King,
And hail him "Blessed Jesus!
For there 's no word
Ear ever heard,
So dear, :so sweet as JESUS.




I







University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs