• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 Part I
 Part II
 Part III
 Part IV
 Part V
 Advertising














Title: Hetty Hornet, the hasty girl.
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Title: Hetty Hornet, the hasty girl.
Series Title: Hetty Hornet, the hasty girl.
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Publisher: Carlton & Porter
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Table of Contents
    Front Matter
        Page 1
        Page 1a
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Preface
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Table of Contents
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Part I
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Part II
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Part III
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Part IV
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Part V
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Advertising
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
Full Text













CI-~I.





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11


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Mar VTp Mn tVwtrA Sd*.























Later, according to Act of Congpss, In the ywr IMO,vy
LANE & SCOTT,
In th Clrk's Oice of the Ditrict Court of the Southern
Ditrit of New-Yk.









PREFACE.


No little child who reads this book
need suppose that the author has








WUULMu IUUa LUC wrUKIu UcILC, UUle
do a great deal by beginning with
little children; because we believe
that most children want to do right;
or, they would want to do right, if
they knew how much better right is
than wrong.

















PART L

WarrNTm TO Tan-nDIAII TrM-T-wrorT ZCUT--
MAT MOO R-LT ALONt--O-WIC--VATIB A DAO
Page 9

PART II.

WHAT MAIK DOGO BRBZ AnlD RI--CHAEX AND MO-AD
TRAINING or A LITLR Do- AUNT nASm-WrAT CMnW
Taun wArr tool Uac wu . . .. 17

PART II.

DrILInJ--ZAD MN--DTWM--- WA3. .

PART IV.

THI WALIK-T COLLAB--'T LIIULI rs 1- R- 1 .
co a . . . . . . . . 31

PART V.

cNaWrTIA's w-- K urn L--r erT- m or amuas a
mx--wIOSx TO U MUD-Ya . . . . 4-










HETTY HORNET.


PART I.
WASTING TO STING-INDIAN TBMPKR-WIT*-
OUT EXCUBS-MARY MOORB-L3FT ALO.S
-PIC-NIC-WANTING A DOG.
I KNEW Hetty Hornet very welL HB
father's name was not Mr. Hornet,
for he had not the disposition to aing,
which was manifested by his daugh.
ter, and from which she obtained her
singular name. Hetty was very p
sionate, but this was not alL In one
respect she was different from Petuq
the passionate boy. You have mee
sbme animals and insecta w id,
becoming angry with ech elbm,






vould separate as quick as possible.
rhis was something like Peter, the
)assionate boy. His playfellows said
hat he was always going away.
That was very bad, very ill-tempered
indeed ; but it was not so bad as
what Hetty Hornet was in the habit
of doing. Instead of going away
when she was angry, she stayed, and
waited for a chance to sting; hence,
we are sorry to say, Hetty Hornet,
instead of Hetty Hillman, was the
name by which she was generally
known. We often say that there is
not much in a name; but there is
more in a name like that than we
are willing to think of. Every little
child who has such a name applied
to him, should search his heart, and
examine his conduct, and see if it is
merited.


lmqW I~'




HITTr HOUNrT.


We have before said that Mr. Hill-
man, Hetty's father, had not such a
disposition; he was a very kind, for
giving man. But we must consider
the little girl unfortunate, in having
a mother who boasted that Hetty
was just like her; that she had a real
Indian temper, and never forgave an
injury. This woman should have
reflected that the poor Indians, who
have not the light of the gospel to
show them the great wickedness of
revenge, might have some excuse
for this sin; but she and her daughter
were without excuse. In the same
village where Hetty lived was a wi-
dow lady, who was a distat slative
of Mr. Hillman Her name wa
Mr. Moore, and she had a daughter"
whose name was Mary. Now MNy
Moore was very different froth Hetty;




1 HLTTIT HUIoNT.
and though they were relatives, and
both lived in white cottages, very
near to each other, yet they were
seldom seen together. When at
school, they sat widely apart; and at
church, I am sorry to say, Mrs. Hill-
man and her daughter were seldom
seen. Mary Moore had lived in
Oakdale but a short time. Their
former home was in a large city,
where they were greatly beloved;
but it happened to Mary, as it often
happens to children in this world of
sorrow, she was left fatherless; and
her mother, thinking that she should
enjoy a quiet country place like Oak-
dale, where she could commune
with her own heart, and be still,
moved there with her little daughter.
Mary had promised herself great
pleasure in being so near Hefty.




IUrrTTY flOp. 18
She called her cousin, though they
were only second cousins; and.
she had no brother nor sister, was
prepared to love Hetty very much
indeed. Little Mary found, to her
great disappointment, that Hetty
cared nothing about being beloved.
She would put herself into a passion
at nothing at all, and then, instead
of walking away, and staying until
she had time to cool off, she would
follow Mary with unkind and abu.-
sive words The little girls at school
told Mary that she had better not
make herself unhappy about a girl
like Hetty Hornet, and after a time
Mary thought so too. She would
have borne her ill temper, with the
hope of doing her good, but she
thought it best to have a little ts
do with her as possible. Theremae




t1 mmr aoI L 'o *
not wanting in kiihool kind little
s, who could -Of t
stinging their play 'to Mary
soon found those whom she could
love, and who loved her.
But what did Hetty find? Iwill tell
you. She found, what all such chil-
Sdren will sooner or later find, that she
Swas alone. There is such a thing as
being alone in a crowd, and Hetty
found herself alone, even at school
There were merry little boys there,
and bright-eyed, happy little girls,
but who wants to play with a Hor-
not?
One evening-it was a bright,
beautiful evening-God had been
sending his refreshing rain upon the
earth, and baptizing the young flow-
elo; but now the sun was ahinin
Uoftly upon the blue hlls, andwst




ouowy. It

lily though its wateb
were of eman and gold. Hetty
was itin at the tea-table, with her
father and mother. "To-morrow
will be the fourth of July," maid Mr.
Hillman
"Yes," replied Hetty; "and our
school is to have a pic-nic over in
South Fields, but I am not invited."
You not invited?" said her mo-
ther; that is pretty well. What ex-
cuse have they now for slighting
you?"
"0, the old one," replied Hetty;
"I shall get provoked at something,






Hetty, that you are not be
loved? Last night, when I cam
home, and the children were pla3
ing together so pleasantly upon th
green, you stood by the fence, an,
had no part with them. Yesterday3
at recess, I saw the little girls walI
ing arm in arm, or lovingly clinging
to each other's necks; bat it grieve
me tosee my little daughter all alom
^ Why is it, Hetty-are you not lone
some, child?"
"Yes, father, said Hetty, "I aw
lonesome; I wish that you wouln
bay me a little dog."





Brlow WihmWWF.


PART II.
WHAT MAKI8 DOOG BARKE AND BITS-OA-9LO
AND PEDRO-BAD TRAINING OF A LITTLEM
DOG--AUNT PINDAR-WRAT OBEITI MA
WANT-POOR RICH WOMAN.
Let dogs delight to bark d bite
For God hath made them so."
WE cannot beheve that God made
il dogs to bite. Carlo, the little dog
)ought by Mr. Hillman for his daugh-
ter, had never been known to bite.
Ee was one of four black and white
nuppies, that were left without a mo-
her at a very early age. Charley, a
compassionatee boy, had taken ea of
hem for some time; and, knowing
something of the character of Btty
Iornet, the hasty girl, he feh aiL to
elloneto herfather. ButMr.Hiliftm
iered a high price, and ChUrle
wtLmn wvilg nrnr on 16t &hsaMened




1S HuTT HORIT.
to part with Carlo, but could not help
saying to Mr. Hillman that he hoped
Hetty would not hurt the good dis-
position of this little dog.
On the same day Charley made a
present to Mary Moore of Carlo's
brother, Pedro; and as they were
just of a size, and both black and
white, it would have been difficult
to have known one from the other,
had not Mr. Hillman put a brass col-
lar upon Carlo's neck.
It may seem strange that a little
girl should choose a dog for compa-
ny ;-not that we think meanly of a
good dog, by any means. We have
seen dogs whose society we should
prefer greatly above that of wicked
persons. But it was not from any
good motive that Hetty wanted a dog.
It was not because she was lme-




HWTTT HOUIiT


some; for she might have had com-
pany if she greatly desired it. She
thought that a dog would help het
pay folks for not loving her. Shc
knew some children in the neigh-
borhood who were much afraid of a
barking dog; and as these children
refused to play with her, and she
had not often an opportunity to
quarrel with them, as she would have
liked to, she thought of this way to
revenge herself
The Bible says, that evil comm-
nications corrupt good manner; and
this is as true of animal as of ldb
dren. It was not many weeks be
fore Camo began to show what com-
pany he kept Charley kept an eye
upon him, and was grieved to s
that he was growing day by day hiB
Betty Hornet She had taut hin




HETTY HORNET.


to run after the children, and bark,
and even bite, so there was not in
all that village a person so much
dreaded as was Hetty Hornet and her
dog Carlo. A shocking, good-for-
nothing fellow was Carlo, seeking
occasion to fight even with his own
brother Pedro, whom Mary, for this
very reason, was obliged to keep
mostly in the house.
Things were in this state when a
lady from the city visited Oakdale.
She was aunt to Mrs. Hillman and
Mr. Moore, a very wealthy woman,
but sickly, and without children.
Hetty had several times visited aunt
Pindar, and she took care at such
times to appear amiable. She was
quite a favorite with the old lady.
Mary Moore was rather too serious to
suit herfancy; for Mrs. Pindar, though






she was an old lady, still loved the
world, and the things that are in
the world. Nearly the whole of her
long life had been spent in vain and
foolish pursuits; and now that she
had become old, and was pressing
nearer and nearer the eternal world,
she tried by every means to turn her
thoughts from the endless future.
For this purpose she spent most of
her time in going from city to city,
and from country to country. She
liked to visit Mrs. Hillman, because
she took such unwearied pains to
amuse her, and never made any s-
rious reflections; and as Hetty ex-
pected fine presents at such times,
she appeared more like a lady-bid
than a hornet.
Mr. Moore loved her aunt Pindar,
not for her gold, but for her mother's


PI l YVIII





n HrTTT HOIENr.
sake; and she felt grieved that she
had somewhat offended the old lady,
by seeking to do her good. Mrs.
Moore was a Christian. She be-
lieved that her aunt was not prepared
to die, and felt sorry to see her spend-
ing the few remaining days of her
life in a restless striving to forget that
she was passing away. Poor old
lady! thought Mrs. Moore; poor in
the midst of wealth: for, alas! what
is fold without a treasure in heaven?




UWAWy UnlmWWW


Pindar, and she seldom visited her,
coming often and spending weeks
at Mrs. Hillman's, and leaving her
with only a formal call
Such treatment is hard from those
we love; but we should not shrink
from our duty, in order to gain or
retain friends. God will take care
of those who do right, and they will
not want for friends.




WUWPT AOlWT.


PART III.
DIBLIKS-BAD SIGNO-DZOKPTIONX--~W X
COHANG.
"Yoth is the seed-time of the soul;
If thi he wasted thus,
The harvest ye will onwrd ron,
A famine and a curse."
THE evening after Mrs. Pindar's ar-
rival she was sitting in the portico,
with Mrs. Hillman and Hetty. The
easy-chair had been brought from the
parlor for her accommodation, and
Hetty was on the alert to bring her
everything that she might seem to
want. "HIow is Harriet (meaning
Mrs. Moore) getting along here in
Oakdale ?" inquired Mrs. Pindar.
"0," replied Mrs. Hillman, art-
fully, "good people like her must get
along well in any place."




LM'rIz UVUAMS .


lhen ose is as regligous a ever,"
said Mr Pindar.
quite, and more so, I think;"
(here Mrs Hillman curled her lip
disdainfully;) "and do you know,
dear aunt, she is bringing Mary to
be as great a Pharisee as herself
The little hypocrite is already too
good to play or in any way associate
with Hetty."
The old lady felt indignant when
she heard this She considered
Hetty a very amiable child, and she
pettishly remarked, that it was the
way with most religious people;
they were always setting themselves
above their betters
SIf Mrs. Pindar could have read the
heart on that evening, how quickly
would her harsh judgment have boai
changed. If she could have see




lTl3T HOlRUT


Mrs. Hillman and her daughter as
God saw them. What an alarming
sight! Pride, hatred, variance, and,
above all, revenge! What dreadful
stains are these! But Mrs. Pindar
could not see the heart; she saw no-
thing but the very good-looking out-
side, and felt more and more dis-
pleased with Mrs. Moore, and her
gentle daughter Mary.
When Hetty went to bed that
night she thought to herself How
much better aunt Pindar likes mo
their than she does Mrs. Moore, and
me than Mary. Now they will gel
their pay for setting themselves u\
to be better than we are. They are
poor, and some of aunt Pindar'i
money would be a great help ta
them, but they will not have it Pool
Hetty! she had never been taught of




NHTTY HOORTM.


how much greater value is a good
conscience than gold, that the fear
of the Lord is wisdom, and that wis-
dom is of price far beyond rubies.
The Psalmist, speaking of a revenge-
ful person, says, that he made a pit,
and digged it, and had fallen into the
ditch that he had made; and this
is often the case with such persons.
We shall see how it thus happened
to Hetty Hornet, the hasty girl.
Carlo had come to be of so bad a
temper, that barking was his chief
amusement. When he could find
no little children to bark at, and
Pedro had gone quietly to sleep,
he would content himself with bark-
ing and howling all night at the
moon.
Now, aunt Pindar was, as we have
before said, old and sickly. She be.




uwnen- I 9 VnWur


lived in igns, and, above all things
hated to hear a dog howl. She said
that it was a certain sign of death,
and considered it much surer thaE
old age, or ill health, or even the sen
tence passed upon all,-" Dust thoi
art, and unto dust shalt thou return.'
Gen. iii, 19. It cannot be doubted
then, that the first night of her sta3
at Oakdale was a sleepless one. She
had seen Mary Moore leading a
black and white dog around the gar
den, and had no doubt but that i
was the same. The poor old lad]
felt more vexed than ever. Mrs
Moore, thought she, cannot have a
chance to whine to me about dying
herself, so she allows that vile cur t
howl of death all night And whei
Mrs. Hillman came to her room is
the morning, she declared that now




ITTY BOBRNT.


it the worst-tempered people in
ie world would keep such a dog
)out the house.
Mrs. Hillman allowed her to think
iat the dog belonged to their neigh.
or, and going down stairs told Hetty
iat they must contrive to keep up
ie deception.
Hetty had not spoken to Mary
loore for some weeks; but that day,
s she was walking in the garden,
ae carried Carlo to the gate, and said
iat his noise disturbed aunt Pindar
ery much, and begged to know if
lary would exchange while the old
idy stayed at Oakdale.
0 yes," said Mary, I should be
appy to oblige you, and especially
unt Pindar: but one thing you muat
PImise me, Hetty; you will not




90 HITrr HONIRT.
kind tricks. I would rather he
would die, than behave in such a
way."
Hetty did not like this very much;
but, she thought to herself I can pay
Mary for this saucy language at some
other time, So she promised, and
the little girls exchanged dogs.
Now it so happened that Pedro
won greatly upon aunt Pindar's af-
fection. The old lady said that he
showed his bringing up, and com-
plimented Hetty greatly on her skill
in training. "Affectionate people,"
said aunt Pindar, "make affectionate
animals; and whenever I see a howl-
ing dog, I know that he belongs to
some snarling family, which claims
to be orthodox."
At this Mrs. Hillman laughed, WtW
mid that Pedro. like the family to






which he belonged, chose to show
his piety by his temper.
This was very true; but it must
be remembered that she was all
along allowing aunt Pindar to think
that the dog belonged to Hetty.


PART IV.
THE WALK-THE COLLAR-THE LITTLE BOY
STUNG--THE DISCOVERY.
"God s in heaven; can he see
When I am doing wrong I
YT, that he can; he loob at dr
All day and all night log."
ONE fine morning the old lady was
walking with Hetty and Pedro, who
considered his company as indispen-
sable. "Do you know that little
boy ?" said aunt Pindar.
"Yes," replied Hetty, I know him
very well; it is Charles Irving."




82 RETTT HOBIUT.
Just at that moment Charley, called
the compassionate boy, met them. He
took off his hat, and bowed respect-
fully to aunt Pindar, and said, Good
morning, Hetty; is that your dog ?"
"Yes," replied Hetty, coloring a
little; to be sure it is. Why should
you ask?"
"Because," said Charley, "your
dog always barks at folks, you
know."
It is no such thing;" and, iying
into a passion, Hetty forgot aunt
*Pindar. You are a real story-teller,
Charles Irving; and your mother is
too poor to keep you from looking
like a scarecrow."
Aunt Pindar was very much sur-
prised to see her lady-bird so sud.
denly changed to a hornet, and was
arieved to see that the Dleasant, kind.




HBTTY BORNBT.


looking little boy really felt her sting.
His cheek crimsoned, and he looked
as if ashamed of his mended clothes.
But this was only for a moment
He took a beautiful brass collar from
his hat, with a name marked upon
it, and, looking up into aunt Pindar's
face, said, You see, ma'am, I meant
no hurt by asking about the dog.
Mary Moore has been very kind to
us, and took good care of mother
while she was sick, so I bought
this collar for her Pedro. I thought,
ma'am, that this dog looked and
acted like Mary's; but if it is
Hetty's Carlo, I beg her pardon. I
meant no hurt." Saying this, Char-
ley bowed again, and walked away.
Hetty felt alarmed at aunt Plmdar'
altered manner, as they pummed
their walk, for she had become qujt




HiTir HORlrT.


silent; and so the naughty girl
thought best to vindicate herself. "I
suppose," said she, looking up into
aunt Pindar's face, with a sweet
smile, "that it was very foolish in me
to be so angry; I don't know when
I have been in such a passion be-
fore: but I am sure that if you knew
all, dear aunt, you wouldn't blame
me. Since Mary Moore came here
I have no peace of my life. She is
so sly, and tells such stories about
folks. She has set all the children
against me, and Charles Irving said
that this morning, just to be saucy."
Now this may look like a very in-
genious story; but I hope my little
readers have learned that honesty is
the best policy. It is true that ithad
some effect upon aunt Pindar for a
time, but people's sins will find them




=Ias&& UVIAU -


out. A nie wiU nunt me lar mrougn
a thousand windings, turning as he
turns, dodging as he dodges, till at
last it will come upon him, bringing
its dreadful retribution. So of all
other sins. There is no refuge for
the sinner, but in repentance and
amendment: "He that confesseth
and forsaketh his sins shall find
mercy."
Aunt Pindar thought that if wfat
Hetty said was true, it was some ex-
cuse for her hasty conduct; and,
though she was sorry to have aen
such an exhibition of ill temper, she
was pleased at Hetty's seeming
frankness. The child is sincere,
thought she, and sincerity is a jewel
She spoke kindly again, went with
Hetty to the grove, and came baek
across the fields, where they gathesd




16 HETTY HOUNKT.
some flowers. But just as they
stepped from the field to the main
-oad Charley Irving met them again.
'Hetty," said he, "I didn't leave
his collar with Mary, because I want
:o see myself how it fits. I thought
that this was Pedro, and am sorry
that you told me a wrong story about
it"
"Why, my little boy," said aunt
Pindar, "you should not trouble
Hetty about her dog."
"I don't wish to trouble. her," said
Charley; "I only want to put this
collar on Pedro's neck."
Did Mary Moore send you here?"
asked the old lady.
"No," said Charley; "I went to
Mrs. Moore's, and told Mary that I
had a new collar for Pedro, and
wanted to put it on myself. She





netTY InoRKErT 87
said that Pedro was not at home;
she had changed with Hetty for a
time, because her dog howled and
barked so. I told Mary," continued
Charley, "that I shouldn't want t0
swap for a long time. But she
said that she would rather swap for
good, than to have aunt Pindar dis-
turbed."
Charley now called Pedro,
put the collar upon his neck. Hef
began to abuse him with her ill lan-
guage again, but aunt Pindar desired
her to stop.
Mrs. Hillman, who knew nothing
of this matter, was greatly surprised,
on the following morning, to hear
the old lady say that she was going
to spend a day or two with Ur.
Moore. "Dear aunt," said she, "I
hope they will not kill you with their






piety; but I am sur& that you will
come back low-spirited."
Mrs. Pindar made but little reply
to this. She was beginning to think
that people who could deceive in
small things, were not to be trusted
in anything.
Hetty walked with aunt Pindar
over to Mrs. Moore's gate, very po-
lily carrying her basket; but as she
bade her good morning, and turned
away, aunt Pindar told her that she
had better leave Pedro, who had fol-
lowed them, and take Carlo home.
Mrs. Hillman was greatly mortified
when she found that the old lady had
found out the deception, and blamed
Hetty severely for her poor manage-
enot She and her daughter had
long been trying to sting their good
atlahl"r.a hnt unw thav wamm 4- .


.._. ._.._>*>




Jmzjz IUMmKzL


selves stung with disappontment
and shame. Thus will it ever be.
The word of God declares, that with
what measure we mete it shall be
measured to us again.
After spending a few days with
Mrs. Moore and her good little daugh-
ter, aunt Pindar became convinced
that none but those who love God
can sincerely love their neighbor.
She saw what spirit, working in the
heart, made people wish to bite and
devour one another; and so, in her
old age, God opened her eyes to see
the things which belonged to her
peace. So the poor old lady, who
had wandered from city to city, and
from country to country, seeking
rest, and finding none, now found
rest in coming, weary and heavy la.
dea, to Christ. She determined am







spending the remainder of her days
with her pious niece in Oakdale.
"Christian, when your altar burns,
0 receive me into rest.

Lonely, I no longer roam
Like the wind, the cloud, the wave;
Where you live shall he my home,
Where you die shall be my grave."



PART V.
OCHBITIAS' REST-SICK LITTLE GIRL-THE
STING OF DEATH IN I-FORGIVE THE
DEAD-LINES.
The let us heed the warning voice,
That whispers from the sky;
That at the last we may rejoice,
And like the righteous die."
HErT, though young, and bidding
fair for long life, was laid in her
grave before old aunt Pindar. She
took a violent cold by standing in
the cranberry meadow one night, for
a Inner timp' RhiRiner (hnrlpv Trvina


U ~IfJ1 F a l la'r m




HnTTr HOna T.


calling him names, and stinging him
to the very heart, by saying cruel
things about his dear mother.
She went home quite exhausted
with her angry work; and without
feeling sorry, or asking God to for-
give her, she went to bed. Before
morning the poor girl was in a raging
fever; and she, who had stung her
little school-fellow with cruel words,
was now stung herself with the keen-
est pain. Day after day, and night
after night, she tossed upon her bed,
and found no rest Her father aad
mother, aunt Pindar, Mrs. Moore, and
Mary, watched beside her, but they
could afford no relief. Once duringher
sickness she had a frightful dream.
She saw in her sleep the beautiful
city of the righteous; its gate. of
pearl were open, and she ventured




HITTT .BORNET


in. There were countless multitudes
of little children, who always beheld
the face of their Father in heaven;
but, as Hetty approached them, they
spread wide their snowy wings, and
flew away. She tried to follow, but
was thrust back; and then she saw,
that instead of being a beautiful an-
gel, like them, she was only a sinful,
fretful girl, like a hornet with an
ugly sting.
"Mary, Mary," said Hetty, "I am
afraid to die."
The sting of death is sin," said
Mary; but she told the poor trem-
bling girl who it was that robbed the
tyrant of his sting, and how faith in
Jesus Christ gives victory over death.
We cannot tell whether this vic-
tory was given to Hetty or not She
died suddenly; and when the little





BETTY HOBRNT.


ren saw the cold turf laid up<
coffin, they forgave her wh
past, and never spoke of her ;
y Hornet any more, but alwa,
d her poor Hetty Hiuman. H
ier, ever after Hetty's deal
led deeply stung with remon
died at last, warning all to shi
path which she had trod.
unt Pindar went down pea<
Sto her grave, leaving M
,re the guardian of her weal
charging her to use it for t
I of the world. Charley Irvi
L._. _.L .. .. .... .^A ,


n .





44 BETTT HORNET.

Our peace with him cannot be made ,
Until we love our brother.

Enough of woe and sorrow here,
And all must share their part:
But stern unkindness is a spear
Of keen and cruel dart.

And those who bear this venom'd sting
Should walk life's paths alone;
For such will thorns and briers bring,
Where flowers might else have grown.
"And to the land of fadeless flowers
Unkindness cannot come;
It enters not the lovely bowers
Where Jesus Christ has gone.

U Then softly may we seek to tread
The path of peace below,
Till by one Shepherd we ae led
Where purer water flow."




THE END.





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