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Group Title: Anna Ross
Title: Anna Ross, a story for children
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00061385/00001
 Material Information
Title: Anna Ross, a story for children
Series Title: Anna Ross, a story for children
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Kennedy, Grace
Publisher: Robert Carter & Brothers
Place of Publication: New York
Manufacturer: R. Craighead, printer
Publication Date: 1853
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Bibliographic ID: UF00061385
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Resource Identifier: ltuf - ALH2865
alephbibnum - 002232471

Table of Contents
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Preface
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
        Page vi
    Main
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Full Text








KH
IX !A


THE OLD SERGEANT AND ANNA.


Pae.20








ANNA


ROSS:


STORY FOR CHILDREN.



BT
GRACE KENNEDY,
AUNOio 01
*aJsU um N "l~omonS aor NpslhIEsw asM


I lUsttatel.




NzW YTOK:
ROBERT CARTER & BROTHERS,
105 1S*ADWAT.
1858.

















































3. 03A1ab. fmrlr
a raw awd4 m. r
















IN the following Story an attempt is
made to assist religious parents in im-
pressing the important truth onu -
minds of their children, that this lif i
only a portion of time, short and rapid
in its progress, in which the "one thing
needful," is to prepare for the eternity
which shall follow.

All religious parents, s tomse mo-
mats when tir views are claru,
and their resolatioun mot sijldki dnj


Itrrgti.






PREFACE.


to impress the minds of their children
with this truth, and also to preserve
them from those pursuits which fasci-
nate and ensnare the unrenewed heart,
and make it turn with indifference or
disgust from that religious training
which is uncongenial with its nature,
but which God has appointed as the
means to bring the soul to Himself;
but how few steadily and perseveringly
act up to their convictions on this point!
How do they waver and hesitate!
How inconsistent are their calmer
views and their practice How little
can they endure the thought that their
children shall forego on account of re-
ligion any advantage esteemed by the
world! and how often do they risk
their eternal interests, by setting them







PREFACE.


the example of professing to give up
the world, while still, in many things,
they conform to it, and set a high value
on its approbation! What can be ex-
pected from such an education, but
that young people should grow up with
their heads full of religious knowledge,
and their hearts full of the love of
things, which, though perhaps not the
most glaringly so, are yet altogether
worldly t Were religious parents more
single-hearted in obeying the precept,
"Train up a child in the way he
should go,"-they might more confi-
dently trust to the fulfilment of the
promise, and when he is old he will
not depart from it."


1*













ANNA ROSS.


Sona there is no British boy ol -i
who has not heard of the battle of Ware.
loo! It was early in the morning wbe
the accounts of it arrived a d h;
and many people were awsipd i* the
firing of the great guns from Castle, to
announce the joyful news. aur seen
servants hurrying to the post-do to get
their masters' newspapers-gentlemen has-
tening to the same place to lear what had
happened-and every face eqpmmin int,-
est and anxiety; for many had
and fathers, and son, sant&
relate, in that battle
loud thunder of the caauM it wV

r ^







ANNA RO88.


echoed by the towering buildings of the
old town and the neighboring hills, car-
ried joy to the hearts of many, while they
thought only of the victory that had been
gained, others felt only alarm and appre-
hension, lest thre they most dearly loved
might be amongst the number who must
have suffered in the battle. Such were the
feelings of Mrs. Ross, the mother of the
little girl whose story will be told in the fol-
lowing pages. On that morning Mrs. Ross
and Anna had risen at their usual early
hour, and were beginning the day as they
did every day. Anna had read a portion
of the Bible to her Mamma, who had ex-
plained it to her as she proceeded, and lis-
tened to all her questions and remarks with
her usual gentle kindness; and answered
her so as to make Anna feel that God was
present everywhere, and saw her heart
every moment, and loved those who loved
Him, but was angry with the wicked every
day. After this reading and conversation
with her Mamma, Anna had sat down on
footstool beside her, to commit to memory








ANNA ROSS.


some verses, as she did every morning,
while Mrs. Ross read to herself. When
the first gun fired from the Castle, little
Anna started up and hastened to the win-
dow. Mrs. Rosa's house was in a street
from whence the Castle was seen, and, just
as Anna reached the window she saw the
flash and smoke of a second cannon.
"Oh, Mamma, the Castle is firing I" ex-
claimed she. There must be a victory I
Papa will get home!" On turning round,
Anna perceived that her Mamma had be-
come very pale, and was leaning back in
her chair. Anna ran to her. "Dear Mam-
ma, are you ill 7 You tremble all over
What shall I get for you? Der MNau-,
speak to me!"
Mrs. Ross put her arm round Aw little
girl, and said, I want nothing, my love."
But she seemed unable to say any mre;
and little Anna, forgetting the guns and
everything else, stood looking anxiously at
her Mamma, who started and ometims
shuddered at their loud reports. Jtauil,
ring -ed, Mary, Mrs. Ro's maid, eMs







ANNA R088.


into the room to say, that Mr. Grey, a kind
friend of Anna's Papa, had just called on
his way to the post-office, to beg Mrs. Roe
not to be alarmed, and to say he would
bring the newspaper himself, and let her
know whatever had happened.
Mrs. Ros and Anna immediately went
down stais, and Anna placed herself at the
window to watch for Mr. Grey's return.
The time seemed very long; at last she ex.
claimed, There he is! there is Mr Grey !"
and herself ran out to open the door for
him; but Mary too had been on the watch,
and on Mrs. BRo coming into the lobby she
met him. Mr. Grey turned away a little
a seeing her, and looked so grave, that
Mrs. Boss could only say, "I se, Sir, you
have bad news forme;" and she then stood
as motionless as a statue.
"No, no, not bad news I hope," replied
Mr. Grey; only an honorable wound, my
dear Madam."
Wounded repeated Mn. IBas ishi
smme among the wounded "
"Yes my dear Madam, you shll e it







ANNA ROSS.


yourself" Mr. Grey supported Mrs. Ros
to a chair, and then showed her the list of
the wounded in the newspaper. Of some
it was said they were wounded slightly,
of others severely, and of others danger-
ously. "Major Rem severely," was read
by Anna's Mamma. She repeated the word
"severely." "Yes," said Mr. Grey, "but
not dangerously." "God grant it may be
mol" ejaculated Mrs. Ros fervently. Then
added, "I must go to him, Mr. Grey."
Mr. Grey tried to dissuade Mrs. Ror
from this plan. She had been very un-
well during the winter and spring, and had
a oough, and at tim pain in her side, and
Mr. Grey thought her quite unable for
fatigue she proposed. But Mrs. B woum M
aot be dissuaded; and Mr. Grey at last oam-
seated to make inquiries whether ay v-
s was to sail from Leith in which she
would be accommodated. He then left her;
ud Mr. Ross, after kissing litthAms aa.
Ierly, desired her to remain for a aIIm w1
Mary, sad then went into her own nmo
and looked the door. Anna thd ght th








ANNA ROSS.


time very long while her Mamma staid
away; but she knew she would be dis-
pleased if she disturbed her while locked
into her own room. Mary entreated Anna
to eat as it was past her breakfast-time; but
when Anna tried to do so she could not,
for her heart was full, and she could only
think of her Mamma. At last she ven-
tured to take some tea and toast to her
Mamma's room door. She knocked very
gently, and Mrs. Ross opened it.
Dear Mamma, it is very late, and you
hkve eaten nothing." She looked up anzi-
ously in her face.
Mrs. Ross stooped and kissed her, and
took what she had brought from her; but f
when she said, "I thank you, my dear,"
Anna scarcely heard her, she spoke so low;
and she saw that her eyes were swollen
with weeping. Mrs. Ross, however, did
not invite Anna into her room; but, after
putting down the tea, gently closed the
door, and again locked it. Poor Anna did
not not turn to Mary, but sat down on a







ANNA ROW8S.


step of the stairs near her Mamma's dbor,
and wept in silence.
After a long time, as Ammu thought, she
heard her Mamma's footstep iw her room,
and instantly hastened softly down stairs to
conceal her weeping face. Mary had left
the room, supposing Anam had remained
with her Mam= and she- had time to dry
up her tears, before Mrs. Ros came dd*#h
stairs and entered'the room.
"Come hither, my love," said she t6
Anna, who had turned away to hide hWi
face. She immediately came to her Mam-
ma, who drew her into her bosom. ", '
you go with me, Anna, and assist mi t6
nurse your Papa "
"Oh yes, dear Mamma, do let ui'go."
"But, my love, you do not know what
you may hare to suffer. We must go by
sei probably with very bad socommoda-
tibn,l-no gdod bed to sleep on,-dio goodd
food to eat,---no maid to attend you."
"Will Mary not go, Mamma interrupt
ebk*-'







ANNA ROSS.


No, my love, I must have no expense I
can avoid."
"Well, Mamma, I can do quite well with-
out Mary, if you will tie my things that
fasten behind."
"Yes, my love, but what I mean to pre-
pare you for is this; you must try to enable
me to trust that you will do every thing for
yourself that you can, and neither be a
trouble to any one, nor give me cause to be
anxious about you; for when I get to where
your Papa is, I must devote my whole cares
to him; and, it I did not think I might trust
to'your being rather a comfort than a cause
of anxiety to your Papa and me, it would
be wrong to take you; yet I know no one
here with whom I should wish to leave
youY"
"Oh, Mamma, do not, do not think of
leaving me Indeed, indeed, Mamma, you
may trust me. I shall not be a trouble to
you."
"Well, my dear Anna, I hope I may.
Iut, rnember, my love, I warn you before








ANNA ROSS.


we go, that you will have many, many in-
conveniences and hardships to meet with;
you wil be sick at sea; you will be crowded
into the same cabin with a number of peo-
ple; and no quiet or comfort night or day;
and I may be sick at the same time, and
no one to be sorry for, or take care of you."
"Or of you, Mamma'l" asked Anna,
anxiously.
"I trust God will support me, my love."
"And God will take care of me also,
Mamma."
"Oh, my dear Anna," said her Mamma,
pressing her closely to her heart, "if I
thought you really loved God, and really
Trusted yourself to his love and care, I
should have no anxieties about you; but,
Anna, there is a great, great difference be-
tween reading and learning about God, to
please me, and because I wish you to do
so, and loving Him really, and really trait-
ing Him; and I fear, as yet, my Anflrly
reads and learns the character and wil of
God, because I wish her to do so."
Anna hung down her head and m ilb t


, *^ !







ANNA R088.


answer, because she knew that what hei
Mamma said was true; and while she stood
thus, for an instant, she said in her heart,
"0 Loid, teach me to love and to trust in
Thee I" And though Anna, ever since she
could speak, had knelt, morning and even-
ing, at her Mamma's lap, and repeated her
prayers; yet perhaps, in the sight of that
God who looks on the heart, Anna had
never before really prayed. Mrs. Rose
kissed Anna, and then rung for Mary, and
desired her to pack up some things, while
she also occupied herself in the same way.
Anna immediately thought with herself,
"Now, how can I be useful to Mamma?"
and then very soon found out many ways
that she could be so, and anxiously avoided
asking a question, or doing a thing that
coul .e the least troublesome.
JRB re Mrs. Ross had finished t er neces-
sary arrangements, Mr. Grey4jturned to
sayjit a vessel was to sail hat evening
for ottrdam; that it would be crowded
with passengers; but that another vessel
would sail in a few days, for which he








ANNA R088.


urged Mrs. Ross to wait; but she determined
to go that evening.
Every preparation was soon made, and
about six in the evening good Mr. Grey
saw Mrs. Ross and Anna safely on board,
and soon after the vessel moved out of the *
harbor, the sails were spread; and when
Anna looked back to the shore and the pier,
where the numbers of people, and noise,
and bustle, and voices, had so confused her
that she scarcely knew where she was, nor
what she -did, it seemed as if they were re-
ceding from the ship, and she no longer
heard'their noise. It was a beautiful eve-
ning in June, and most of the passengers'
remained on deck. Mrs. Ross and Anna
did so also, and all around her was so new
to Anna, and occupied and amused her so
much, that she could scarcely believe it
possible, when her Mamma told her it was
he usual time of going to bed. Mrs. Bos,
tde, began to feel the air chill, and she and
Anna went below. It was as Mrs. Ros
had said; the cabin was crowded to exoss,
and the beds as small and los as poiW. .
a*







ANNA ROSS.


Anna for a time shrunk from creeping into
the one destined for her Mamma; but recol-
lecting her promise not to give any trouble,
she begged her Mamma to allow her to un-
dress herself; and while she tried to do so,
Sand laughed at her own awkwardness in
undoing those fastenings she could not see;
she also occasionally stole a look at her
bed, which seemed to her no larer than a
shelf in her Mamma's wardrobe at home.
Me, however, with her Mamma's assist
ance, crept into it, and getting as far back
as she could, to leave room for her Mamma,
was soon fast asleep.
Next morning poor Anna waked more
sick than she had ever been in her life; so
were most of the other passengers; and for
that day, and the following day and night,
there was nothing but complaints and sick-
ase, and crying children, and running to
and fro of the two old sailors who attended
on the passengers. Mrs. Roes.sfered less
from sickness than the others, bat the cloe-
ams of the cabin made her cough ims-
natly; ad At the cio of the third day,
*







ANNA R08S. ,
when the other passengers were begianiu
to feel well, she seemed won out and ji.
When Anna was able to go on deck, ow,.
ever, her Mamma went also, and the a
revived her strength. Among the pasrs-
gers was another oicer's lady. Her bh
band had not been wounded, but she wa
going to join him. 'his lady's name was
Mrs. Mason. When she was sck, *M.
Bor nursed her as well as Amut; and whb
she ws again well, she was anxious to
prove her gratitude to Anna's Mamma, by
showing her every attention in her power.
When the veel arrived at Rotterdam,
Colonel Mason, Mrs. Mason's husband,
was waiting there to seive her. Colonel
Mason knew that Majr BRos, Anna's
Papa, was among the wounded, but had
not heard of him ance the day after a
battle. He could, however, diet Mr.
Ross to the place where he and other
wounded office of the same regiment had
ben carried. It was a village a fewi il
fom the field Waterloo.
Mrs. Bor imn &diately left resb e,







ANNA ROSS.


and travelled the same day till within a
few miles of this village. Mrs. Ross then
became so very much fatigued, that she
could travel no farther, and had to stop and
rest till the following day, when she and
Anna set out from the village. As they
drove rapidly along, Anna observed that
her Mamma frequently clasped her hands
together, and raised her eyes to heaven, and
wept; but Anna did not say any thing,
lest she should trouble her; she only pray-
ed in her heart that God would comfort her
Mamma. At last she ventured to say soft-
ly, "You love God, Mamma; He will
support you."
"I have no other support, my own
Anna," replied her Mamma. "He does
support me, or I should not have strength
for this moment. Perhaps, Anna, your
Papa may be very ill,-perhaps you no
longer have any Papa."
Anna had never thought of this; and
just then the post-boy turned round to point
out the village to which they were going,
and which Anna now saw at no great












T- A
d


IT WAS AN OFFICERS FUNERAL


PFe 21







ANWNA PROS. A
distance. Mrs. Ros again clasped ber
hands, and raised her eyes to heaven. She
leant back in the carriage, but Anna kept
her eyes fixed on the village.
"I see a great many soldiers, Mamma,"
said she at last. "They are all standa*,,
before a white house at the end of the
village nearest us. And now I see they
are Highlanders. Perhaps they are Papa's
own soldiers. Now they begin to .~m
slowly; they are coming quibe near, MaN-
ma, I hear music; how sloy and menK-
choly it is I"
The carriage moved on till the soldiers
came up. The post-boy then stopt .at op
side of the road to let them pass. It was
officer's funeral. The soldiers, as theypW
ed the carriage at a slow and solemn marc
looked so grave and sad, and the music was
so mournfully solemn, that Awpn felt part
sad, and partly frightened. flp be IMF
amma's hand firm in both of hsaw
*be cqutinu silently to watUm .
procuion. There were pmaiy
gqi~ior' l^pr^Tef,-.4bqI U~e uul a .10







I ANNA R088.

more soldiers,-then, carried by soldiers,
came the coffin, and on it lay the officer's
military cap, his sash, his sword and belt.
Just as this passed, Anna exclaimed,
" Dugald! There is Papa's servant, Du-
gald!" The soldier heard Anna's voice,
and looked up. "My master's child!"
exclaimed he; and then the other soldiers
wo were near also looked into the carriage
a sopt for an instant. Dugald, how-
ever gave them some directions, and they
moved on, while he himself left the ranks,
and came near the carriage, but not so near
as to listen to Mrs. Ross, who made a sign
to him to approach. He took no notice of
Sher sign, but waited till the soldiers had
passed, then hastened back to the vil-
lage.
"I see how it is, Anna," said Mrs. Ross,
quickly; and when Anna looked round,
her Mamma had sunk back in the carriage;
her eyes were closed, and she was quite
pale. Anna had seen her Mamma faint
before; and though she was very fighter.
i4 di remembered what should Pdoe,







ANNA R088. I
and supported her, as well as she could, in
her arms, till the carriage stopt at the white
house in the village. Dugald was waiting
to open the carriage-door, and though he
was a brave, rough soldier, when he saw
Mrs. Ross in a faint, and poor little Anna,
almost as pale as she was, attempting to
support her, tears gushed into his eyes.
He, however, hastily wiped them away,
and then gently lifted, Aft Anna, nd a
her Mamma from the criage.
woman of the house was waiting to
and Mrs. Ross was carried into a room
laid on a bed, and every thing proper done
to recover her. In a little time she opened
her eyes; and when she saw Dugald, who
just then entered the room with something
he had been in search of to hasten her re-
covery, she said to him, "Your master is
gone then, Dugald?"
Dugald seemed as if he could not answer;
at last he said, "He l gone, bAdsm folm
a world of care, and sow, and ~ui
to one of everlasting happMss."
Mrs. Bos thin asked su srs I






t AlN1 A WOss.
specting her husband; and when she had
heard all she wished, and that it was his
funeral she and Ania had met on the road,
she sent Dugald and e'bry one away but
Anna, and then desired her to draw the cur-
tains of the bed close afbund her. "And
now, Anna, come and' lie down beside me,
for you are now all that God s left me on
earth;"
Anna did as' her Mamma desired, and
when she puither arms around her neck,
and put her little face close to hers, Mrs
Ron wept very much, and Anna wept and
sobbed with her.
For three days Mrs. Ros was very little
out of bed; for when she attempted to rise,
she became so faint that she was obliged to
lie down again. During these three days,
Anna watched constantly by her Mamma's
bed, and when she could listen, read por-
tios of the Bible to her. Mrs. Ross never
Jas ed wenl except when Anna was thus
employed; but her cough had become so
nceasing, that it was only at short indtLr
Vi r& could lite.i' Thed' V wi mi y








ANNA o088.


officers lodging in the same house, who had
been wounded in the battle, and they re-
quired much attendance from the people, so
that.Mrs. Ros was left almost entirely to
the care of Anna and Dugald. Dugald,
however, was anaUlent assistant to Anna.
He stationed himself during the day near
her Maai ts room door, and never left his
post except when obliged by his military
duties. At night he wrapped himself in his
plaid, and laid down just behind her door,
so that whenever Mrs. Ross wanted any-
thing, Anna had just to open her door gen-
tly, and there was Dugald ready to get it, or
to find some one who could. Poor Dugald,
from the first day he had seen his lady on
her arrival at the village, had thought her
looking very ill, and had entreated her to al-
low him to bring the surgeon of the regiment
to visit her. Mrs. Ross would not conmt at
first; but after a few days, when she fetolji
self becoming worse and worse, she afibt"
him to do as he wished. When the bD
oame, Mr. Ron sent Anna out to td'M
8







ANNA RS0.


short walk, attended by Dugald, for she
wished to see the Doctor alone.
As Anna passed out of the house, and
along the road near it, many soldiers were
standing about, who, when they saw her
accompanied by Dugald, gueed who she
was: and she heard many of them say,
"God blesherfor her father's sake." Anna
did not stay oat long, for she wished to re-
turn to her MMma; and on coming back
there were more soldiers near the house
itha there had been before. They stood
back mespetfully to let her pase, and many
of them again prayed God to bless her; and
one, an old sergeant, stepped forward, hold-
ing in his hand a basket filled with nice
fruit and flowers, and said he hoped she
would not refuse to accept of a little mark
of respect from her Papa's own men. Lit-
tle Anna thanked the old soldier, and said
she would take the fruit to her Mamma.
He then gave the basket to Dugald; and
when Anna, who felt that she loved her
Pp'sa old soldier, held out her hand to







ANNA RO88.


take leave of him, he stooped down and
kissed it two or three times, and then turned
away to wipe the tear from his eyes, as
many of the other soldiers did also.
When Anna returned to her Mamma, she
pressed her to eat of the older's fruit, and
she picked out the most beautiful of the
rose to put in her bosom, and told her bow
the soldier's had blessed her ar bhe Papa's
sake. Mrs. Ros let her mdms Al wqld
for a time, and listene&to brlw-- of
what she had seen and heard; ir H
said, "There are many, Anna, who ill be
disposed to love you for your Plap kt,
for he was a kind frimd to many; but
there is one, Anna, who has promised to be
the Father of the fatherless. Do you love
him, my child "
"I think I do, Mammu."
"If you love him, Anna, then youm a
be sue He lores you far more; and if r, s
you will believe that whatever i bt for
you, though it may cause grief a fin at
the time, is what ha wil do."
"I think I believe so Mamma."







ANNA ROSS.


Do you think God loved you when he
took away your Papa l"
I think God loved Papa, and took him
away from this world to make him quite
happy,-happier than he could be here;
and I love God for loving Papa."
"And if God should show his love to
your Mamma, Anna, by taking her away
to be happy with your Papa in heaven,
should you then love God still more?"
Anna looked up in alarm, "Mamma,
what do you mean 1"
"I have asked you a simple question,
my love. I believe firmly, Anna, that I
should be far happier in heaven than here.
Do you think you would love God more if
he took me to heaven "'
Poor little Anna became as pale as one
of the lilies she had brought to her Mamma,
and could not keep from crying, while she
answered, "No, no, indeed, Mamma. I
oanaut say I could love God if he took you
away from me."
"'Then, my dear Anna, you love me







ANNA ROS8.


more than God; and you remember who it
was who said, He who loveth father or
mother more than me, is not worthy of
me.' "
But, Mamma, how can I help it?'
"God is going to teach you how you
may, my love. He is going to teach you
by your own experience, that your.Father
in heaven can do a thousand times more for
you than any earthly parents He i going
to take away your mother as well as your
father, that you may have none to trust ,
or to love more than himself He is on-
stantly near you, Anna. At this moment
he is present with us, and looking on your
little heart, which he sees ready to break,
because I am telling you that you are to
have no parent but him. Yet though you
love him so little, He still loves you. He
sent his only beloved Son into the world, to
assure us that He loved us. Jess invited
children to come unto him, and took 6(1
in his anns, and blessed them. He AM
changes He les Wl ui as much new
as he did when he was m wrth, si sdt
83






ANNA ROS8.


invites them to come to him, and promise
that he will 'gather them with his arms,
and carry them in his bosom.' Why, my
dear Anna, do you suppose that God sent his
Son into the world tobecome a little child ?"
"I do not know, Mamma."
"It was for this reason among others,
my love, that He might himself feel as
children feel. Jesus was once a child of
your age, Anna, and remembers and knows
what the feelings of children are, and suits
his love and grace to them. God has given
his Son to us, that he might lay down his
life for our sins; that he might be our
friend, and guide, and teacher. He is in
God, and God is in Him; and if you, my
dear Anna, will give yourself to him, he
will be all these to you, and far more than
any earthly parent could be; for all things
are his, and all hearts are in his hands, and
he can make all things, and all hearts work
together for your good and happiness; and
above all, he can give you, yourself, my
SAnna, a new heart, and prepare you to live
for ever in heaven."







ANNA ROS.


Mrs. Ross spoke to Anna with so much
solemnity and earnestness, that she soon be-
came exhausted, and was obliged to lie
down. Anna watched beside her, ad
thought of what she had said, and then she
prayed in her heart that God would not
take away her Mamma.
From day to day Mrs. Ross continued
to grow worse. At last she was quite con-
fined to bed, and spoke so low that Anna
could scarcely hear. A nurse had been
procured by Dugald to be constantly with
her, while he continued to keep watch at
her door.
One morning very early, Anna was awak.
ened by the nurse, who said her Mamma
wished to speak to her. Little Anna imme-
diately got up, and hastened to obey the
summons. She found her Mamma sitting
up, supported by pillows in bed. Se
looked very ill indeed, and breathed very
quick, and she could only say two or than
words at a time.
"My dear Anna," said she, "I have mnt
for you nce more before I leave yot LMst







ANNA R08S.


en to me, I am scarcely able to speak, but
must say three things, which I hope, my
dear love, you will never forget Anna,
when the last day comes, the Lord, the
Great Judge, will make a separation be-
tween his own people who have loved and
served him, and those who have loved the
things of this world more than him. He will
place his own people at his right hand, and
those who ase not his at his left. Anna,
will you seek to meet me at his right hand
that day ?"
Mrs. Ross spoke with great difficulty,
but also with great solemnity; and when
ae asked the last question, Anna trembled,
and answered, I will seek to do so, Mam-
ma."
"Then, my love," resumed Mrs. Ross,
"you will begin seriously to seek Christ;
fr there is no name given under heaven, or
among men, whereby you can be saved but
his I charge you, Anna, never to suppose
that you are safe, or that you will meet
yur Papa and me in heaven, till you can
tnly say that you know Christ, and that







ANNA ROSS.


he is all your salvation. You do not fully
understand what I say, therefore I charge
you, my dear Anna, never, on any account,
or wherever you are, to let one morning
or evening pass without praying to God;
and, if possible, reading, as you have
done with me, a portion of His holy
word."
Mrs. Rmos could say no more, but she
made signs to the nurse to take Anna away,
and she was again put to bed in a little room
off her Mamma's; and when the nurse
came again to her, it was to tell her that her
Mamma was in heaven.
Two days after this, Mrs. Ros was bu-
ried in the same grave with her husband;
and on the following day, little Anna, under
the care of the nurse, who was a soldier's
wife, and who had promised to Mrs. Ross,
before her death, not to leave Anna till she
had placed her safely with her own friends,
set out on their return to their own country.
Dugald also accompanied them, and saw
his master's child safe on board the vessel
which was to convey her to a new home







ANNA R088.


among strangers. He was then obliged to
return to his regiment.
The home to which Anna was now to go
was the house of her uncle, her Papa's bro-
ther. This gentleman had just been ex-
pected home from the West Indies, at the
time Mrs. Ross and Anna had left Edin-
burgh to join Major Ross, and with whom,
if he had been arrived, Mrs. Ross would
have left Anna. He was Major Ros's only
brother, and had been appointed by him, in
the event of the death of her parents, one
of Anna's guardians. The other guardian
was her Mamma's brother, Mr. Murray;
' and Mrs. Ros had left directions in her
will, that Anna should first go to her uncle
Rbss's and remain with his family six
months, and then to her uncle Murray's to
remain the same time; at the end of which
she was to be allowed to choose in which
family she would reside as her future
home.
Poor Anna was again very sick for two
days on her passage home. The nure
watched by her, and when she got better,







ANNA ROBS.


took her on deck, and did all she could
to comfort and amuse her; but Anna could
not be amused. Her heart was sad, for she
could only think of her own dear, kind.
Mamma: and when she looked up to tl
pure blue sky above the ship, dhe wished
that she could die too, and go toher; sad
then the thought would come into her mind,
perhaps if I did die, I should not get to
where Mamma is; and then she would weep,
and try to remember what her Mamma had
said to her was the only way to get to
heaven. She had not once forgotten to
pray, morning and evening, since her Mam-
ma had so solemnly enjoined her to do a;
and, indeed, she had prayed far oftm#r
for she remembered that God was now, u
her Mamma had told her, her only Father;
and her heart began to feel confident in
God. She remembered that her Mamma
had aid, that all hearts were in his hand;
S as every one was good and kind to th
Ial orphan, she knew that it wa God
who made them so, and thamht hia i
her heart and in her paye W s d







ANNA ROSS.


went on deck, she would take her Bible
with her; and the sailors were so sorry for
her, that they had placed an awning over
a corer of the deck, that she might have
a place to retire to, where the other passen-
gers would not disturb her; and Anna
thanked her Father in heaven for all their
kindness, and asked nurse to tell the sailors
that she did so.
Anna had never see the uncle to whose
house she was going; but she supposed he
would be like her Papa. She had often
heard that her aunt was particularly anxious
about the education of her children. She
had one son and three daughters, for whom
Anna had heard of tutors and governesses
* being sent from both France and England
to instruct them; and she felt rather afraid,
she scarcely knew why, to meet this aunt
At last the vessel arrived at Leith, and
just on its entering the harbor, a person
came on board to inquire whether Miss Ros
was among the pasengers; and then Anna
was informed that her aunt was waiting for
her in her carage on the shore; and her







ANNA BROWS.


little trunk was got, and nurse was directed
to follow with the other things she had
charge of; and before Anna, had time- to'
think, she found herself on shore, then in
her aunt's carriage, in which were her ant;
a little girl about her own age, and a bey
a good deal older, who had come down
from the coachox,, where he had been
seated beside the coachman, and jumped
into the carriage after Anna, with no other
intention, appmmntly, than to stare at her.
Anna's aunt kissed her, and desired her
little girl, Lmina, to do so also, and George
to ihake hands with his cousin. "VYon
must love each other as brother and sister,
my dearm" sid she, "for I hope Ann&a wl
chose to remain always with us."
Louis~ and George made no answer, but
cauinnet to stare at poor Anna, who thought
it vryunkm in them to do so, as ghe felt
my strange, and could scarcely keep fom
crying
"UWen you sick at se, my dear?' asked
her Ai:Bo s.
"YeMa' m very sick" answered Ann







ANNA ROSS.


"You will soon be well and happy, my
dear, with your young cousins. Though
they look so shy, and do not speak, it was
their wish that our airing should be on the
sands to-day, just in the hopes that we
should hear something about you; and when
we saw a sail making for the harbor, we
aet immediately to discover from whence
it came; and when we heard from Rotter-
dam, we hoped you might be on board.
But, my dear," continued Aunt Ross, "you
are not in mourning. That will look very
odd. You must not be seen till you get
mourning."
Poor Anna could no longer keep from
crying, for this remark reminded her of her
Mamma. She attempted to say that there
had been no time to procure mourning, but
she could not speak, and just turned away
her head and wept. Her aunt did not
attempt to comfort her, but she heard her
whisper to her cousins, Do not mind her,
my dears, it will soon go off;" and then
they began to speak of other things, as if
she had not been present; and George told







ANNA ROSS.


his Mamma that Sam, the coachman, had
allowed him to drive for most of the time
he had been on the coach-box; and his
Mamma said, that if she had known it, he
should have been terrified out of her senses;
and George laughed, and insisted on again
getting out of the carriage, that he might
show his Mamma at what a rate he shold
make the horses go on Leith Walk; and his
Mamma entreated, and Louisa held by his
jacket, and George only laughed the more;
and getting his head out of the window,
called to Sam to stop, which he immediately
did. The servant from behind came to
know what was wanted, and was ordered
by George to let him out; and while he was
doing so, he was desired by Aunt Ross to
charge Sam on no account to allow Master
George to drive. During this scene, Anna
was so astonished that she forgot ew-
thing else.
"He is a sad boy, my dear," id
aunt to her, on observing her looks of rMe
prise; "but his Papa and Tutor know how
to manage him. You, Anna, will be under







ANNA .R06s.


my care, and I hope you will be very good
and obedient"
Anna said she hoped she always should
be so, and then the carriage was again
stopt to direct Sam to drive to the dress-
maker's; and when they arrived there, so
much was said by Aunt Rose about how
everything was to be made, and Let every
thing be as deep as possible, for the child
has just lost both her parents," and so on,
that poor Anna was soon again in tears,
and in her heart longed for her quiet little
corner under the awning on the deck of the
little vessel, where the rough sailors had
felt so much more for her than her aunt
seemed to do. At last Aunt Rose had
given as many directions as she thought
necessary respecting Anna's dress; the car-
riage was ordered home. and in a few mi-
nates stopt at the door of a large house m
Carlotte Square.
."Now, my dear," said Anna's aunt to
her, as they entered the house, "you will
just go up stairs, and remain with Miss
Palmer out of sight for a day, till you get







ANNA ROSS..


your mourning dres. Oh, you do not
know the way, and I feel so fatigued, I
really cannot mount the stairs to the school-
room: John," addressing a footman, do
you show Miss Ross the way to the school-
room, Louisa must remain with me, as Lady
Alderston may perhaps call this forenoon,
and she expressed a wish to see my
children; and Anna, my dear, tell Miss
Palmer to have the other children nicely
dressed, for if Lady Alderston should ask
for them, I should send to bring them
down."
Anna promised to do as her aunt desired,
and then followed John, who proceeded up
stairs before her to the door of the school-
room, which he threw open, and announc-
ed, "Miss Ross, Ma'am, the young lady
who was expected."
Anna timidly entered, and was received
with kindness by Miss Palmer. There
were two little girls in the room with Miss
Palmer, whom.she introduced to Anna as
her two cousins. They were two pale,
sickly-looking little creatures; but they
4*







4a ANNA 8O.


seemed very happy to see Anna, and im-
mediately entreated Miss Palmer to give
them a holiday because their cousin was
come. "Oh, no, no, my dear," replied Miss
Palmer, you have had two holidays this
week, and your Mamma said you could
have no more, on any account whatever,
and you know your cousin is to remain
with you."
"But do, Miss Palmer, give us at least
two hours," said the eldest, whose name
was Jane. "Oh, pray do, if you please,
just this once, Miss Palmer," said little
Marianne, tears starting into her eyes, for
I am so tired sitting in this stiff chair with
my feet in the stocks!"
"No, no, children, it cannot be," replied
Miss Palmer, and you must not tease me.
I dare say your cousin is a good little girl,
and tired of being idle."
Tired of being idle! I wonder who
ever tired of being idle," said Marianne,
putting her arms coaxingly round Anna.
"Are you tired of being idle?" asked she,
looking up in her face.







ANNA OS8.


"Perhaps I could assist you. What wm
you doing?" asked Anna, while she warmly
returned her little cousin's caresses.
"Now, you see what a good, kind little
girl your cousin is," aid Miss Palmer,
" and how much better bred than you, Miss
Marianne; for you repeated my words very
rudely, and Min Anna has shown that aer
knows how to be both kind and polite."
"But will you ally assist me?" asked
Marianne, still clinging to Anna.
"Indeed I will, if you will tell me how
I can."
Oh, come, come then," exclaimed Manzi
nnme, joyfully.
But I must first deliver my message m
Miss Palmer," said Anna; and then she
told her aunt's wish that the children should
be dressed, and ready to be sent for, if
Lady Alderston called; and then, though
the little cousins could not have a moment
to get acquainted with Ama, every .thing
must be stopt, and they sent off to the nur-
sery, though already quite neatly dressed,
to be decked out, that a stranger might fpe.







ANNA ROSS.


haps say to their Mamma, "What nice
children,-what pretty children!" and for-
get the next moment that they were in
existence.
Little Marianne was very anxious that
Anna should go with her when she went to
be dressed, but Miss Palmer said, No, no,
my dear; Miss Anna shall remain with me,
and that will make you return the sooner;"
and poor little Marianne ran off to get
dressed as fast as Kitty, one of the nursery-
maids, could be prevailed on to assist her.
In her absence, Miss Palmer asked Anna
many questions.
"May I ask how old you are, Miss
Anna?"
"I was nine about two months ago,
Ma'am."
Nine? You are very tall of your age.
Miss Louisa is ten, and she is no taller, I am
sure. Have you begun music "
"Yes, Ma'am. Mamma had been teach-
ing me two years."
"Indeed I and Frenchl can you speak it
at all'"








A~NN* RSAS4.


Anna answered Miss Palmer in French,
that her Mamma had been teaching her
that language also.
"Indeed repeated Min Palmer, "and
you seem to have got the pronunciation
very correctly. But that is not in my de-
partment. Poor Mademoiselle, the French
governess of your cousins, got into such
bad health as to be obliged to return to her
own country. Mrs R oss is in search of
another; and in the mean time the children
have a master. You have learnt dancing.
I supposed'
"No, Ma'am, I never have."
"What No dancing That is very ex-
traordinary."
Miss Palmer asked a great many more
questions, and concluded, after Anna had
answered them all, by saying, "Well, my
dear, I hope to find it pleasure to carry
on your education. You seem to have
been accustomed to regularity and obedi-
ence, which I too have always been accus-
tomed to exact" She then kised Anna
affectionately; and 1he lite orphan remem-








ANNA ROSS.


bered that God was her father, and she
thanked Him for making Miss Palmer love
her.
When Jane and Marianne returned, Miss
Palmer immediately set them to their les-
sons. Jane sat down to the pianoforte to
practice, while Miss Palmer sat by to in-
struct her, and also to remind her how she
ought to sit and use her fingers, and how
to place her feet, and her elbows, &c. As
for poor Marianne, she was set in a high
chair, the back of which was so made as to
oblige her to hold her head and shoulders
properly; and her poor little feet were
placed in stocks, because her Mamma said
she turned her toes in when she walked;
and in this stiff attitude she was getting a
lesson for her French master. Anna sat
down by Marianne, and assisted her so
much, that her little cousin two or three
times forgot, and threw her arms round her
"dear cousin Anna's" neck to thank her;
but every time she moved from the posture
in which she had been placed, Miss Palmer
added to her task, so that poor Marianne at


40S







ANNA ROSS.


last remembered Miss Palmer's instructions,
to express whit she felt by words. "You
have a silly childish way, Miss Marianne,"
continued her governess, "of always put-
ting your arms round one, crumpling one's
ruff, and almost strangling those you love.
You know your Mamma has often forbid
your doing so."
Poor little Marianne seemed to think she
had been guilty of a seris fault, and a
blush spread over her pai, sickly little
countenance, while Anna felt bewildered
on hearing blame attached to those proofs
of affection which her own Mamma had
always received from her, and returned
with the most tender kindness.
Dinner followed the lessons; and an
hour's walk followed dinner, during which
the children were directed how to sit, and
how to eat, and how to be graceful, and
how to be polite; and Louisa looked tired
and croes,-and Jane looked stupid,-and
little Marianne cried two or three times,-
and Anna did all she was desired as well
a she could, and was praised by Mi







ANNA ROSLS.


Palmer, but wished very much that it was
bed-time, when she hoped that nurse would
be allowed to attend her. Bed-time came,
but when Anna modestly asked Miss Palm,
er if she might be allowed to see nuse,
she was told that her Aunt Ross had
thought it best that they should not meet
again, because a parting scene would have
done no good to either; but that nurse had
been well rewadedfor the trouble she had
taken.
Poor Anna could not stand this, and
burst into tears. "Oh, fie, ie!" exclaimed
Miss Palmer, "what a baby I Come, Mis
Louisa, you shall say your prayers firat
and I shall give Miss Anna that time to
recover herself."
SLouisa knelt at Miss Palmer's lap, and
repeated a short prayer without seeming to
attend to a word she said; and though she
concluded by a long yawn, Misa Palmer
found no fault. When. Louisa rose from.
her knes, Mins Palmer motioned to Anna
to take her place. Anna drw back. Whea
as wasra litt.lehild sha eould have said







ANNA 2O0S.


her prayers at any one's lap, but now she
knew better what it was to pray, and dhe
felt that Miss Palmer was a stranger.
"Come along, child," said Mis Palmr,
impatiently.
"If you will be so good as to allow se,
Miss Palmer, I will say my prayers in my
room, before I go to bed."
"Nonsense," said Mir Plahme, don'tt
keep me waiting;" and poor Anna knelt
down. She remembered, however, dut it
was God himself, that she, a little ignorsat,
sinful girl was addressing, and she repeated
a prayer her Mamma had taught her whue
she was two years younger, (for latterly
she had been instructed to pray to God
from her heart,) with awe and reverence in
her tone of voice, and in her manner; a;
when she rose from her knees, she though
that when she got into her own room ai
would read a portion of the Scrium, aad
pray to God for those blessings he bad we
missed to give in answer to praym of ti
heart Anna was sadly diappola hit
ever, when, on Miss PalMna sigg I







ANNA ROSS.


bell twice, the maid who had, about an
hour earlier, come to take Jane and Ma-
rianne to bed, again appeared, to whom
Miss Palmer said, Take the young ladies
to the little room off mine, which was pre-
pared for them, Hannah, and do not allow
them to trifle while you are undressing
them, for I shall be in my room in half an
hour; and remember, Miss Louisa, if you
are not in bed, I shall just take away the
candle, and leave you to get into it as you
best can."
Hannah had prepared every thing in the
girl's little room. She had opened Anna's
trunk, and got all that was necessary, and
now offered her assistance to undress her.
"If you please, Hannah, give me my
Bible, out of my trunk; I always have been
used to read at least a few verses before I
lie down to sleep," asked Anna, modestly.
"Certainly, Miss Anna; but you will
have very little time, for Miss Palmer is
very exact in always doing as she says,
and she will take away the candle, whether
you are in bed or not."







ANNA ROSS.


"Well, Hannah, I do not mind. Pray,
give me my Bible." Hannah did as she
wished, and Anna began to read; but
Louisa talked so much, and so often ad-
dressed what she said to her,that she found
she could not attend to a word she read,-
and then Hannah every moment reminded
her that Miss Palmer would be coming,-
so that, at last, poor Anna was obliged to
shut her Bible, and allow Hannah to un-
dress her, and she was scarcely in bed
when Miss Palmer entered the room.
Louisa, who had disregarded all Hannah's
exhortations to make haste, and who seem-
ed quite a new creature when no longer in
her Mamma's or Miss Palmer's presence,
was chatting and laughing, and declaring
that it could not be above a quarter of an
hour since they had left the schoolroom,
and only about half undressed.
"Very well, Miss Louisa," said Misa
Palmer, "I suppose you like being in the
dark. Come away, Hannah;" and she
took the candle, and desiring Hannah t
leave the room before her, immediate~ ,






ANNA ROSS.


followed, closing the door after her, and
leaving Louisa in the middle of the floor
half undressed, and in total darkness.
Of Miss Palmer,-if you please, Miss
Palmer," excaimed Louisa; but Miss
Palmer said not a word in answer. They
heard her moving about in her own room,
through which was the only entrance to
that in which the girls were; but she re-
turned not, and poor Louisa had to get into
bed, as Miss Palmer had threatened, the
best way she could. Anna heard her
muttering, "How cross II shall never get
these knots untied,-what shall I do "
"Come near, and I shall try to assist
you," said Anna in a whisper. Louisa
groped about in the dark till she found
Anna's bed, and then they, together, at last
succeeded in getting off Louisa's things,
during which she said to Anna,--"Did
you ever see any one so cross as Miss
Palmer is "
"She told you what she would do," re-
plied Anna. "You know she could not
help doing it after she had said she would;







ANNA ROSS.


add it was somebody else who was to
blame when you were left in the dark."
"But she might have staid just a few
minutes !"
"Then she would have broken her word,"
said Anna, "and that would have been
much more sinful than leaving us in the
dark."
Louisa was silent for an instant, then
said, "I hope you like early rising, Anna,
for you will see Miss Palmer will send
Hannah to us at six o'olock in the morn-
ing."
"And what is the first thing you do in
the morning" asked Anna, in the hope
that she might hear that the day was at
least begun as she had been accustomed to
see it.
"Lessons, lessons, lessons," replied Lou-
isa, "from morning to night nothing but
lessons, and sit this way, and sit that way,
and walk so and so, and how awkward
you are, and how ungraceful, and you will
never be like Miss somebody, or Min t'other
body. Oh, how I wish that 1 was .po







ANNA, Ross.


up, and then no more Miss Palmer for ever
at my elbow 1"
"But do you not read God's Word the
first thing you do in the morning"' asked
Anna. "How can you know how to please
Him, unless you learn what His will is
from the Bible?"
Miss Palmer reads a prayer, and one of
the lesson every morning," replied Louisa;
"but I never listen, nor know what they
are about."
And does Mis Palmer not question you
whether you have understood what she has
readV"
"No, never. She is in a hurry to finish
that we may get to our lesson-s-grammar,
geography, French, scribbling, arithmetic,
long division, and compound multiplication,
and parsing and spelling, and jingle, jingle,
on the piano,-you ase out of time and you
ae out of tinm, from the time you rise till
yes go to bed."
Anna could not help laughing.
"Do not laugh; she will hear you," said
Louis, "Ian that will bring a lesson on







.A3Nh. ROMs


laughing,-about load lanuhiag, and val-
gar laughi,-nd the polished smil, sad
the genteel laugh h I if you hend how
George could mimic Mia Palmer, but good-
nea, them she i coming;" and Louim
quickly goped her way into bed, where
sh was scarcely laid, vhen Mss Palmer,
with a candle in her hand, opened the door,
and looked in
"Just got into bed, I perei," said she,
"and your clothes left scattered o the ecar
pet; pray Mi Louisa, just get up, and put
them in their proper place." Louim was
obliged to obey; but did so with so bid a
grace-o slowly, ad with such a strong
expression on her counmtenae, that Miss
Palmer, as a punishment, told her that the
first thing hae should do next morning,
should be to get a portion of the Bible by
heart, to teach her to be of a better temper.
When Mis Palmer left the room, all ro-
mained perfectly quiet, and Amoa rmemm-
bered her wish to pray, bet sh did not fel
such confdece in God when dhe thought
f Him as she had itherto done mine her







ANNA R'088.


Mamma's death; and when she began to
ask Him to forgive her for what she had
done that was wrong, she felt that during
the last short time in which Louisa had
been speaking to her, she had been led into
what was very sinful, in joining in her
laugh at the pains and trouble her gover-
ness was taking with her; and she prayed
God, for Christ's sake, to forgive her, and
then again she felt confidence in God as her
father in heaven; and she thought of her
Mamma, and remembered how she used to
teach her every thing in such a way that
she loved to be taught. She remembered,
too, how often her Mamma had told her,
that the only return she could make to those
who took the trouble to instruct her, was
to love them, and make it as easy as pos-
sible for them to teach her, by being atten-
tive and obedient; and while she thought
thus, she felt so peaceful and happy, that
she believed what her Mamma had often
told her, that it was the Holy Spirit, God's
own Spirit, who put every good thought
into our hearts, and who was the "One-








ANNA ROBS.


former, and gave us peace;" and she prayed
God to give her his Holy Spirit, to lead her
every moment to think and desire, and love
what was right; and then she repeated to
herself her nursery lines:
Now, wbm I l ae down to deep,
I give ly wd to Qris to kep;
Wae I td r a or wake I aInu
I e ta audl to C t r ort
and then she fell into a sweet alm sleep.
Next morning all was pretty much as
Louisa said it would be. The girls wer
called at half-past six o'olock; and, on going
into the school-room at seven, found Mis
Palmer ready to revive them. Louisa again
knelt at her lap, ad carelessly repeated a
prayer. Anna was directed to follow her;
and when repeating her morning prayer in
a slow and reverent manner, attempting to
enter into the meaning of what she aid, Mis
Palmer whispered to her, "Speak a little
quicker, my dear." Miss Palmer afterward
read a lesson, and one or two prayers, in a
rapid manner; then closing the Prayeraok,
sad patti it away in its plac witAot








ANNA ROSS.


attempting to explain anything she had
read, and as if the first duty of the day had
been fulfilled, she said, "Now, my dears,
let us to work; and while she was looking
for the proper book for Anna to get a lesson
in grammar, Anna could not help recollect-
ing how often her Mamma had said to her,
that the form of repeating prayers, and the
task of reading a portion of God's Word,
while the heart was not praying, and while
the heart was not seeking to understand
and obey, was a daring mocking of God
instead of pleasing him; for that God look-
ed only on the heart. When Miss Palmer
gave Anna the lesson she was to get, poor
Anna was so occupied with thinking how
little she had begun this morning as her
own Mamma had charged her to do, and in
trying to find something to say which might
induce Miss Palmer to allow her to return
to her little room for half an hour, that she
might really pray and read, that she quite
forgot her lesson, and was roused from her
thoughts by Miss Palmer saying, with
much displeasure, "Miss Anna, what am







ANNA ROSS.


you about ? When do you expect to have
your lesson, if you sit dreaming in that
manner ?"
Anna dared not venture to say anything
when Miss Palmer seemed so much displeas-
ed, but her thoughts were so much taken
up with the idea that she had disobeyed her
Mamma's last wishes, that she got her les-
son very ill, and then Miss Palmer was still
more displeased, and the next lesson was no
better-or the next, and poor Anna was in
disgrace most part of the day. Next day
was spent much in the same way, and
Anna began to feel very unhappy. She had
not yet got her mourning dress, and, as
there was company constantly with her
aunt, she had not been allowed to come
down-stairs. Her uncle had, on the first
day of her arrival, and each day since, come
to the school-room several times to pay her
visits, and had been so kind to her that she
already began to love him, and she now
thought of a plan that she determined to
ask his permission to put into execution.
Anna had observed that there was next to







ANNA ROSS.


the school-room, a large bed-room, in which
no one slept; and she thought, that if she
could get her uncle's permission, she would
ask Hannah to wake and dres her half an
hour earlier than Louisa, and then she
would go into that empty bed-room and
pray to God alone, and read her Bible, as
her Mamma had charged her to do, aad
be ready to join Miss Palmer and Louisa
at the usual time. Full of this plan,
Anna, the next time her uned came into
the school-room, ran joyfully to receive
h&n.
"Well, my little Anna, how are you
Well, and happy, I hope," said her uncle,
sitting down, and taking her on his
knee. "You are till a primer up here,
I find. That dressmaker is a nauhty
woman."
"I have a great favor to ak of you,
anoe," whispered Anna into his ear.
"What is it, my love ask anything
you choose. Is it a sert Pray, Min
Palmer, take away Jae and Mamiam% sad
Bave us for a ule."








ANNA RO88.


Miss Palmer did not look quite pleased,
but did as she was directed; and when she
was gone, Anna told her uncle about her
Mamma's last illness, and how she had
sent for her just before she died, and the
three things she had charged her to remem-
ber; and, indeed, uncle," continued Anna,
"I cannot obey my own dear Mamma if I
never am one moment alone, and sever
even.allowed to read the Bible, and then
when the last day comes, and Mamma i
on the right hand, and looks for me, where
shall I be?" and then poor Anna could not
keep from crying and sobbing.
Her uncle kissed her, and pressed her to
his bosom. "You are your father's own
child, Anna," said he. "He used, from a
boy, always to be talking in that way; and
though I think it all nonsense, at yoW ag
to be making yourself melaneshly with
such things, still, for his sa. aai- hi
father, who was far better thd h r ia lt
him do as he chose, you too, Anam s abd
have your own way;. so tell ie, my larW.
what you wish."
6
** .








ANNA ROSS.


Anna clasped her arms round her uncle's
neck. "Dear, dear uncle, how good you
are! This is what I wish; you know there
is nobody sleeps in the bedroom next the
schoolroom, and if you would allow me to
go in there alone every morning, and put
my Bible in one of the drawers, and lock it
and keep the key, and Hannah to wake
and dress me half an hour earlier than
Louisa, and tell Miss Palmernot to be
angry,.for you allowed me."
"Yes, yes, my love, I shall settle it all;
call Miss Palmer, and I shall tell her about
it" Anna ran joyfully to tell Miss Palmer
to come, and her uncle directed all to be as
she wished, and left Anna quite happy.
Next morning Hannah came at the time
she had been desired, and Anna moved
about quite softly, that she might not wake
Louisa; then, taking her Bible, went into
the empty bedroom, and bolted the door;
and then she remembered that she was
ale with God; and she loved to think that
'1 wa so; and she prayed to Him as to a
ather, and tried to recollect and caonfm


,16#4







ANNA ROSS.


what she had done wrong, that she might
ask God to wash away all her sins in the
blood of Christ. And then she believed
that they were all washed away; and she
prayed for God's Holy Spirit to guide her
every moment, and to teach her to under-
stand God's word; and then she read and
understood some, though not much; but
what she understood, she read over two or
three times, that she might remember it.
And she also chose a chapter, that she
might begin to commit it to memory, as she
used to do with her own Mamma; and she
had got two verses, and was just getting. j
a third, when Hannah came to the door to
.say Miss Louisa was dressed; and then
Anna hastened, with a heart as happy and
peaceful as possible, to go to her lessons.
And though Miss Palmer read the Scrip-
tures and prayers so fast, she still beard
something she could understand. Anna's
lessons this day were so well got, that Mis
Palmer was again quite pleased with he; *.
and she had some time alo to asst tr
little Marianne. Louisa t a p1M







ANNA glas.


every forenoon with her Mamma, wieh
Anna would also have done, as Aunt Rom
thought she could herself best teach little
girls how to be polite, and what to say,
when any one who called spoke to them;
and so on; but as Anna had not got her
mourning dress, Aunt Roes said she was
unfit to be seen. On this day, however,
Anna's dress at last arrived; and Aunt
Ross herself came up-stairs to see how it
fitted, and said so much about every part
of it, that poor Anna could not keep from
crying; for the dark dress only reminded
her that her own Mamma was gone to
another world.
Aunt Ross chid Anna for being such
a baby as toory at every thing, and thie
desired that she would dry up her tearu
and accompany her to the drawing-room.
There was nothing in the world Aunt
BeRs desired more than what she consider
ed he good of her children; and she felt
quit disposed to adopt the little Opha
Ama into her family, and betow a portion
f Wr cares mn her. Indeed, as apel *







ANNA ROSS.


tending the education of children was what
she supposed herself peculiarly capable of
performing, it was rather agreeable to her
to have one more added to the number of
those who she hoped would, on a future
day, prove the superiority of her mode of
education. With this end in view, Aunt
Ross spared herself no trouble which she
thought could promote it Her great aim
was, that her young people should be gen-
teel, fashionable, and accomplished. Noth-
ing, however, is more difficult than to de-
fine what it is to be genteel and fashionable.
Aunt Ross thought she was a perfect judge
on these important subjects; but many
other fashionable ladies would have laughed
at Aunt Ross's notions, and considered her
a vulgar under-bred woman; while, per-
haps, these very ladies themselves weld,
in their turn, be held in scorn by otms.
One of Aunt Ross's methods of form as
she said, the manners of her young pesae,
was to make them pass two hours in the
drawing-room on those forenoomn whm
she remained at home, to reanive
6*







ANNtA ROBB.


visitors as might happen to call. It was
for this purpose that Anna was now
desired to follow her aunt to the drawing-
room. On arriving there, Anna and her
cousin were desired to seat themselves in
a window, and occupy their time in get-
ting a lesson for their Italian master; but
when any person called to whom Aunt
Ross introduced them, to be attentive in
remarking their manners, their style of ad-
dress, and so on. "If I do not introduce
you to any visitor, Anna," said Aunt Ross,
"you may suppose that I do not wish you
to imitate the manners of that person, and
you may just go on with your lesson."
Such were Aunt oass's instructions; and
Anna was thinking them over, that she
might be ready to obey them, when a ser-
vant opened the drawing-room door, and
announced Mrs. Elford," and a pleasing-
looking elderly lady entered.
"1Ms. Elford I How do you do?" said
Amit Ross, but without seeming very hap-
py to see her. "How is Mr. Elford, and
yor' yo"ug people?"







ANNA R08S.


"All well, thank God," replied Mr. El-
ford; and then looking smilingly to Anna
and Louisa, "I hope you are both well,
my dears'"
Anna, who had been taught by her
Mamma, that the only way to be truly
polite was to obey God's command, to love
every one, and to feel gratified for every
mark of kindness from others, immediately
rose and hastened to give her hand to Mrs.
Elford, and looked pleased and grateful for
her notice, while Louisa did not venture
to leave her seat, till her Mamma said
coldly, "Come and speak to Mrs. Elford,
my dear." She then approached, but Mrs.
Elford did not seem now to observe her,
being wholly occupied with Anna. She
had drawn the grateful looking, smiling
little orphan, into her kind bosom, and was
now caressing her as she talked to her,
while a tear sometimes stood in her eye.
"Will you come and see me, my love?
I have many young people at home, and
I am sure they will all be most happy to
see you."







ANNA RO88.


"I shall like very much to come, I am
sure," replied Anna, drawing the kind Mrs.
Elford's hand closer round her waist, "if
aunt will allow me."
"I allow of very little visiting," said
Aunt Ross, dryly, "but we shall think
about it; and now you may return to your
lessons."
Anna was again kissed by Mrs. Elford,
and then obeyed her aunt.
When the two little girls had resumed
their seats, Mrs. Elford asked Mrs. Ross
in what church she had decided to take a
pew.
"Not in the one you advised, Mrs. El-
ford," replied Mrs. Ross. I found, on in-
quiry, that scarcely any genteel people sat
there."
"I did not say genteel people sat there,"
replied Mrs. Elford; "I said the Gospel
was purely preached there; and the clergy-
man so plain in his style, and at the same
time so attractive and persuasive in his man-
ner, that I thought your young people would







ANNA ROB8.


love him, and listen with attention to him,
as I find mine do."
"Oh, I hope my young people are too
well instructed not to listen to any clergy-
man their parents take them to hear,"
replied Aunt Ross, "but I do not choose
them to go where so few genteel people
think of going. I have decided on taking
a pew either in St. George's Church, or in
one of the Church of England Chapels;
but I think the latter, because, though I
understand St. George's is crowded with the
genteelest people, I am told the clergyman
is very uncharitable in his style of preach-
ing, always addressing even his congrega-
tion as if they were irreligious people,.
which I think is quite contrary to the mild-
ness and charity inculcated by the Ohris-
tian religion."
Mrs. Elford was beginning to answer
Aunt Ross, when the door was agak
thrown open, and the servant announced
"Lady Alderston," and Mrs. Bom wis
immediately in such a bustle to receive ths,
as she thought, fashionable visits, that she








ANNA OSS0.


seemed quite to forget Mrs. Elford. That
good lady, however, quietly rose to take
leave, and, before going, went to the window
where the little girls were sitting, again
kindly invited Anna to visit her; and then,
taking a pretty little book from her pocket,
gave it to her, saying, "ask your aunt's
leave, my love, and then read this little
book. I am sure you will like it."
Anna thanked Mrs. Elford very grate-
fully, and then, though she longed very
much to look at the kind lady's gift, she put
it aside till she should ask her aunt's leave.
It had taken all this time for Lady Alder-
ston to come up stairs. At last she entered,
-a lady so fat, she seemed scarcely able to
walk, dressed out in the most fantastic
style, and accompanied by a little dog quite
as fat, which came into the room puffing
and wheezing, and immediately squatted
itself down on the rug. Lady Alderston
smuk down on a sofa; and Mrs. Ross called
to Louisa to bring a footstool, and herself
placed a cushion; and at last the borlady
seemed tolerably comfortable.












i/Il


i/w
LAO


THE FASHIONABLE VISITOYL
Page?7








ANNA ROSS.


Allow me to introduce my niece to you,
my dear Lady Alderston," said Aunt Ross,
looking towards Anna, who immediately
approached. Lady Alderston looked care-
lessly at her for a moment.
"A fine child, Mrs. Ross. Pray, have
you got the French governess you were in
quest of?--and she took no more notice of
Anna, who returned to her seat in the win-
dow rather mortified, but recollecting her
aunt's injunction to pay particular attention
to the manners of those to whom she was
introduced. Lady Alderston spoke of the
theatre, and of parties, and of balls, and of
young ladies who had come out, and of
Lord this, and Lord that, and Sir John and
Sir Thomas, and Lady M--and Lady
S--, the one's carriage, and the other's
beautiful set of rooms. And Mr. Ros
seemed delighted, and poor Aaa listened
as she desired, while her liUQ 'I became
colorless, and she yawned Vry minute,
and was at last quite happy to hear another
visitor announced, and then r wr, and
another; but Lady Alde ton at a, aad







ANNA ROSS.


she still was obliged to listen. She was
introduced by her aunt to several other visit-
ors; but the two hours in the drawing-room
seemed to Anna the longest she had ever
spent in her life, and she felt quite rejoiced
when her aunt permitted her and Louisa to
return to the school-room. As they went
Louisa whispered to her, "You know,
Anna, we are to imitate Lady Alderston;
now see how well I can obey Mamma ;" and
then she walked exactly like her, imitating
every motion, till she reached the school-
room door. She threw it open, and called
out Lady Alderston," and then waddled
into the room, and sunk down on a chair,
pretending to pant for breath, as she had
done. Anna could not help laughing, yet
she felt that she was wrong in doing so, for
her Mamma had often told her that those
who ridiculed others for personal defects,
which they could not help, mocked not at
tham but at thei Creator. Anna, too, had
oisrvOd that Mis Palmer herself had
turned aw.p her head to conceal the laugh
she could not press; yet Anna continued







ANNA ROSS.


to laugh, while something within was
checking her all the while.
Miss Palmer, however, soon recovered
her self-command, and told Louisa she
would have no more such fooling; but
this was all she said. And when Aima
was at last quietly again set to her lemons,
instead of attending to them, she began (o
think how differently her own Mamm
would have viewed such conduct; mad she
said within her heart, "How shall I eam
to be good now Nobody here is like
Mamma." Then she remembered that
God's word would teach br how to be'l
good; and that God himself would asit
her if she asked him, for he had prenmied
to give his Spirit to those who asked him;
and as she sat with her head leaning over
her grammar, she in her heart prayed to
God to forgive her, and give her hi Spirit
to lead her to do and think what we
right; and then she felt quite Ihappy,
began to get her leonM with a ligt a
cheerful heart.
Anaa had not forgot her little book; i
7







ANNA ROSS.


the first time she again saw her aunt, she
asked her permission to read it.
What is it, child?" asked Aunt Ross.
"I have not looked at it without your
leave, aunt," replied Anna, putting the book
into her hand.
"Very right, my dear." And her aunt
opened the book and looked at the title-
page, A Help for the Young and Ignorant
to understand the Scriptures." Mrs. Ross
smiled contemptuously. "Poor Mrs. El-
ford!" said she, "does she really think
children will read such books then giving
it back to Anna, "read as much as you
can of it, my dear. I give you free leave.
It will not be much." Anna thought very %
differently. She just wished for some help
to understand the word of God, and she
carried up her little book, and as she put it
into the drawer beside her Bible in the
empty bed-room, she thanked God for
having put it into Mrs. Elford's heart to
give her such a precious little book; and
next morning when she went alone to read
apd pray, dhe found that it assisted he







ANNA ROSS.


very much to understand what she had
never understood before.
One day of Anna's life at her aunt's was
very much like every day. Lessons, les-
sons, as Louisa had said, from morning to
night-or sitting in the drawing-room-or
a formal walk with Miss Palmer. No
person in her uncle's house seemed, from
one end of the day to the other, to recollect
that there was another world, two other
worlds rather, to one of which every man,
woman, or child, is on the way. One
world where God is, and where good
angels, and the spirits of holy people are.
Another world to which those who forget
God are on their way, where Satan is,
and wretched spirits, and unholy souls of
men, and women, and children; where .,
there is no hope! where there is nothing
but pain, and horror, and misery, and
darkness, for ever and ever! but Uncle
Ross, nor Aunt Rose, nor Miss Palmer, nor
her cousins,-no one seemed to recollect
these two worlds. Her uncle lood old,
and had grey hairs; but he never sesld t








ANNA ROS.


to think of any other world than this,
which he must leave so soon. He scarcely
ever went to church. He never taught his
children or his servants anything about
God. He often, when he spoke, took God's
name in vain. And Aunt Ross, whatever
she did, it was always to do as other
people did. Every one does so and so,
was a sufficient reason for her doing any-
thing she wished to do. She never seemed
to recollect that God has given us his Word
to tell us what we ought to do, and that, at
last, every one shall be judged according to
it. In educating her children, she seemed
to think they were to live for ever in this
world; for she only aimed at preparing
them to take a part in those things which
belong only to this life. iiss Palmer also,
after the quarter of an hour she spent in
reading a lesson and one or two prayers in
the morning, seemed to forget that God
saw her and her pupils every moment;
and that, while she was, hour after hour,
urging them on in their acquirements of
such things as were of no value in His







ANNA ROSS.


sight, she was neglecting his command, to
train up children in the nurture and ad-
monition of the Lord," to teach them to
"remember their Creator in the days of
their youth," and to tell them that those
who sought God early shall find him. If
Anna tried to talk to her cousin Louisa
about God, or Jesus her Saviour, or heaven,
Louisa would get away from such subjects,
as soon as she could, and try to do or say
something to make Anna laugh, for nobody,
she said, spoke of such things except they
were melancholy. Poor little Marianne
was the only person in the family who
seemed to love such subjects. She was
very sickly, and often confined for most of
the day to her little crib, to avoid catching
cold; which, from having been born in a
warm climate, and spending her infancy
there, she did very easily. When she was
so confined, Anna went to her whenever
she was permitted, and the poor Pittle thing
soon loved Anna better than all the world
Besides, and would listen to anything she
told her, and loved to hear of that Saviour
6*







ANNA ROSS.


who came into the world to save lost
sinners, and who loved children, and took
them in his arms, and blessed them. She
also was taught by Anna to pray to this
Saviour, and to repeat some hymns which
mentioned his love and goodness to chil-
dren; and little Marianne would sometimes
say, "I am so often sick, Anna, that per-
haps I may die soon, and go to Jesus, and
to your Mamma." And then Anna and
she would talk about what Jesus had done
for them that they might get to heaven,
how he had shed his own blood, and died
a death so painful, that they might never be
punished for the sins they had committed;
and how he had promised to send his Holy
Spirit into their hearts to make them holy,
and fit to live in heaven with him for ever.
And little Marianne would say, "I love
God for making me sick, for I never should
have known about Jesus my Saviour un-
less I had been confined to bed, and you,
Anna, had come to watch me and teach
me." After these times of sickness, Miss
Palmer and every one remarked what







ANNA ROSS. 7

a good, industrious little girl Marians
was.
Month after month passed away in i '
same manner at Uncle Ross's. Anna had
become a favorite with every one, as 1
as with Marianne. Uncle Ros said be
loved her, because she was always in good
humor, and because she was so kind to his
poor little Marianne. Aunt Ross loved her,
because all her masters praised her for hoe
docility and attention; and because si
danced gracefully, and played well for her
age on the piano-forte, and came into the
drawing-room quite with the air of a fash-
ionable little girl; and she was never rude
or ungenteel; and she had improved so
astonishingly in all these important things
since she had been under her care. Mis
Palmer loved her, because she gave her
little trouble. Louisa loved her, because
she was good-natured, and always assisted
in getting her out of the scrapes her love
for ridicule, and idleness, and giddiness
were continually bringing her into. Jam
loved her because de never laughed at ho.







'ANNA OSS0.


stupidity, which all the others did: and
George loved her for all the reasons the
others loved her; and poor Anna's heart
began to be puffed up with pride, for it is
much easier for the human heart to con-
tinue soft and humble when in sadness and
misfortune, than when all things are pros-
perous and happy. Poor Anna began to
like to hear herself called graceful, and
clever, and good-natured. She tried to be
more graceful, and exerted herself to excel
all the other little girls who were attended
by the same masters: not that she might
please God,-not that she might prepare to
meet her Mamma at the last day, but that
she might hear it said that she was the
cleverest of all Mr. B--'s scholars, or the
most graceful dancer at Mr. R- 's school,
or the first in her class somewhere else;
and all this, instead of being pleasing to
God, only made her proud; and pride is the
most hateful of all things in his sight
When Anna began to be proud, however,
and to think highly of herself, she began
also to think less of God, and of heaven







ANNA ROSS.


and of her Mamma. She still continued
to pray morning and evening, and to go
alone to read the Bible, and good Mrs.
Elford's little book; but she both read and
prayed carelessly. Anna now looked upon
herself as good and clever, and trusted to
herself; and she had forgotten that it was
God who had given her any powers she
had, and who had given her health, and
friends, and all things.
Anna was in this state of mind, when
poor little Marianne caught the measles.
It was not certain that Anna had ever had
the complaint, and she was therefore com-
pletely separated fromher little cousin, as
Aunt Ross said it would be quite a pity to
stop all her lessons, and every thing, when
she was improving so rapidly, by exposing
her to the infection; Anna, however, was
grieved not to see Marianne, and she now
felt that she loved her more dearly than all
the others; but Aunt Ross, or Uncle Ross
would not be prevailed on to suffer her to
go to the poor little girL Marianne was
very ill, and many doctor were called ia,








ANNA ROSS.


and Anna saw that her uncle was very
uneasy, for she observed him one time,
when he came out of Marianne's room,
wiping his eyes as he went down stairs; but
still she could not gt permission to see her.
Anna prayed to God that Marianne might
recover, but she now found that she could
not pray as she used to do. She remem-
bered that for many mornings and evenings
she had prayed to God with her lips, while
her heart was far from Him; and now
when she wished to pray to Him from her
heart, she could only remember how sinful
and ungrateful she had been, and she could
not believe that God would listen to her,
or regard her, except with displeasure.
She was very unhappy, and wished that
she could be alone for a long time, that she
might think over the past, and confess her
sins to God, and remember what her dear
Mamma used to say to her, and to read
those passages in the Bible which she now
remembered to have noticed when she was
reading, in which it was said, Return, ye
backsliding children, and I will receive you,







ANNA ROS.


sith the Lord," or some such words; but
Anna could not get alone, for Aunt Ross
had desired that the lessons should go on
as usual; and while Anna was thinking on
these things, she was at the same time
attempting, at intervals, to note down a
task of music. She was also listening to
every footstep which passed to Marianne's
room; and, on Miss Palmer's leaving the
apartment in which they were, Anna, for-
getting every thing but her anxiety to hear
of her little cousin, slipped to the door, in
the hope that she might see see some one
who could tell her about her. Just on
ripening the door, she saw a maid-servant
come out of Marianne's room at the other
end of the passage, and on going softly
toward her, observed that she was weeping.
"What is the matter, Hannah?" asked
Anna, fearfully; "why do you cry so
much "
Oh, Miss Anna, who could help crying
that saw that sweet child and Hannah
burst again into tears, and covered her face
with her apron.







ANNA ROS.


"Is Marianne so ill, Hannah?' asked
Anna, beginning to cry also.
Yes, Miss Anna, she is very ill, very
ill, but it is not that; I have often seen ill-
ness before; but to see that young, young
thing, with its little thin white hands
clasped together, and praying with such
a solemn heavenly look in its innocent
face! Oh, I could not stay,-it made me
seem to myself,-I cannot tell what,-eo
sinful,"-and Hannah cried and sobbed
again.
"Was Marianne praying to be well, Han-
nah T' asked Anna.
"No, Miss Anna, she was praying to
Jesus to wash away her sins, and take her
to heaven to be with himself; and to come
quickly and take her: and she prayed for
you, too, Miss Anna, and called you her
dear, dear teacher; and for her Mamma,
and every one; and she said to me that
she was going to where your Mamma was."
At this moment Mi Palmer appeared, on
her return to the sobool-rom. ise W -







ANNA ROSS.


proved Anna for having left it, and as a
punishment, increased her task.
In the evening, the children were in-
formed by their Mamma, that their little
sister Marianne was an angel in heaven.
That they must be good children, and that
they, too, would go there when they died.
Aunt Roes could not speak without cry.
ing, and then she kissed them all kindly,
and left them.
Next day the whole family left town,
and went to a house a few miles in the
country. Uncle Ross looked very ad;
but a number of his friends'came to see
him, and they took him out, and they staid
with'him, and talked with him, and did ll
they could to make him forget his psor
little Marianne, and be comforted. Aunt
Ross's friends also came to see her, and
the children were allowed to be constantly
out in the pretty pleasue-grounds, and to
forget every thing in the novelty of the
scene. George received a beautiful little
Pi a a present fim a gentioara a
8







ANNA ROSS.


friend of his Papa's, and before a fortnight
had passed, poor little Marianne seemed for-
gotten, except by Anna; but Anna had
spent this fortnight very differently from
the others. When she found that she might
spend her time pretty much as she chose,
she had found a quiet pretty bower in the
garden, to which she had retired every
day; and while George and Louisa were
going to every part of the grounds in search
of novelty or amusement, or disputing
which should ride on George's pony, Anna
was trying to recollect the instructions her
own Mamma used to give her, and remem-
bering how sinful she had been, and pray-
ing to God to forgive her, and thinking of
little Marianne, and repeating to herself
those passages of Scripture she had learned.
When she had oeoupied herself in this way
till she found her eart again loving God
and Jesm, and trusting in Him, then she
would join her cousins.
At the end of the fortnight the family
ain returned to town. The children wa
told never to mention Marianne's nuamat.







ANNA ROSS.


fore their Papa or Mamma. Lessons and
masters were all again as before; and every
thing was done to make every one forget
that there had been death or sorrow in the
house. When God sends affiction, how-
ever, it is in. mercy, to make people consi-
der, and remember that they must die, and
prepare for it; and when people do not
attend to what God does, but turn away
from Him and forget Him, then he turau
away from them, and ceases to send Hi
Holy Spirit to put good thoughts or good
desires into their hearts; and then Satan,
and their own sinful natures, make them
worse, and more forgetful of God, and more
disobedient to Him than ever. So it was
at Uncle Ross's. Uncle Ross himself now
never went to church at all, and was some-
times so cross that nQB y could please
him, and then he wop:t rak God's name
in vain when he found fault with every
one, and would curse his servants. George,
too, imitated his father, and never would
enter church, but spend the Lord's day in
,iding on his pony, or walking with other
4 .


,' U '







ANNA ROSS.


thoughtless, sinful boys, or reading any
foolish story-bbok, or tormenting Anna;
for though he was always kind and affec-
tionate to her on other days, he could not
bear to see her slip away from the drawing-
room, that she might be alone on the Sab-
bath evenings; and he would take up a
hunting-whip he had, with a loud whistle
at the handle, and he would keep whistling
at the back of her door, till the whole house
rung. His Mamma reproved him for mak-
ing such an intolerable noise, but his Papa
only laughed, and said it was just what he
used to dohimself to Anna's father. Poor
Anna could not read or pray in such a
noise, and she would be often weeping
inside the room while George was amusing
himself without; and she would say in her
heart, "Oh, God, how can I be good?"
and she would even sometimes wish that
she might die like Marianne, and go where
every one was good; but then she would
be afraid; for Anna's heart was by nature
#tlW like all other hearts, and she was
'oftem led to do what she knew to be

L







ANNA ROS.


wrong, that she sometimes feared that she
was not really a child of God. She still
was often proud of the praises she received,
and often eager to excel her companions,
and felt elated when she did so, and de-
spised others, and she knew all this to be
very sinful; but she so constantly heard
her aunt, and Miss Palmer, and every one
talk, as if goodness consisted in learning
lessons most perfectly, and in dacing
gracefully, and in being fashionable in
manner, and playing well, and as if noth-
ing was so wrong as being the most stupid
girl in the class, or dancing ill, or being
awkward, or shy, or vulgar, that poor
Anna scarcely could distinguish now what
was right and wrong, at least what her
own Mamma would have considered right
and wrong, as the Bible taught.
Poor Anna was in this dangerous state
when, one day while she was in the draw-
ing-room, her Aunt Ross recei a letter,
which seemed to displease her Much.
After reading it more than
it on the table, saying, "How
8*







ANNA ROSS.


I had quite forgotten that tiresome, vulgar
uncle !" Then turning to Anna, she said,
" Here is a letter from your Uncle Murray,
my dear, to remind me, as he says, that
the six months you were to spend with us
is now elapsed, and that he will be here
himself in two days to take you home
with him for the next six months. I am
quite vexed at this," continued Aunt Ross,
looking very much displeased. You will
lose everything you have got. I have
done all I could to improve you. Your
uncle has determined to add to your for-
tune, so as to make it equal to Louisa's.
You are two of the most elegant little girls
to be seen, every one says so; and to take
you away to live at a Scotch minister's!
Vulgar people, without fortune, or any
advantage; and to associate with their
rude hobbish boys. How could your pa-
rents make such a will !"
"Mamma loved Uncle Murray," said
Aan, who never could bear to hear any
reaction thrown upon her own Mamma.
"Wall, well," replied Aunt Bos, "your







ANNA R085.


Mamma had some strange notions; but
what is to be done now 1 I would not for
the world you should lose all the advan-
tages you have got with me; and six
months is such a time at your age. All the
other little girls will get before you, and
Louisa never attended to anything half so
well till you came. What shall I do?"
Aunt Boss thought for a little, then said,
joyfully, Ah I that will do! Miw Palmer
shall go with you; and I can get another
governess for Louisa, whom I can myself
superintend; and her French governes is
to be with us immediately. That will do
delightfully, and as much as possible coun-
teract the evil you would acquire at your
uncle's. Poor Miss Palmer, to be sure, will
not like to bury herself in such a place;
but your uncle will increase her salary for
the time. You may go to the school-room,
my dears, for I must settle all this imme-
diately." So Aunt Ross rung bAll,
and desired the servant to tell Zj,
say she was not at home, though wa;







ANNA ROS.


and the children went off to the school-
room.
Every one was angry at Anna's uncle
for coming to take her away. Uncle Ross
vowed she should not go, for he could not
live without his pretty, good-natured, cheer-
ful, little Anna; and then he said, "I have
adopted her in the place of my poor Mari-
anne. I will give her the fortune I meant
for my own child. What can that preach-
ing minister do for her? She shall not
go." Aunt Ross knew, however, that
Anna's uncle could not be prevented from .
taking her away; she therefore tried to
reconcile her husband to the idea of part-
ing with her, and mentioned her plan of
sending Miss Palmer with her. Uncle
Ross could not, however, be reconciled to
the thought of parting with Anna, "his
only brother's only child." And though he
was at last obliged to acknowledge that he
hIld not prevent her going, he never saw
hr for the two following days without
saying something against er Uacle Mur-
ay, and lamenting over being aliged
.I
0







A-NNA R080.


to go to such people. George and Louisa,
too, lamented over Anna, and for them-
selves. What shall we do without you,
Anna said George. "Louisa must al-
ways have her own way, or she is as cross
and ill-natured as,-I cannot say who;
and Jane is such a clod, it makes me yawn
to look at her. And what on earth will
you do at the manse? Mt ,butter and
cheese 7"
"Hold your tongue, George," said his
father, who had overheard him, Do you
not know that my father, your own grand-
father, was a minister? Many a happy
day have I spent in a manse, though it
might not suit me now; and is not a fit
place for Anna; at least I can provide a
better for her. But do not you be such a
blockhead as to speak with contempt of
the profession of your own grandfather.",...
"Dear me, Papa now thinks you i
be so happy at the manse said L u -S
"I dae say yew will choose to remain
there."
Go ft schoolarom, you implrt-








ANNA RO88:


nence!" exclaimed Uncle Ross, .looking
quite in a passion at Louisa.
"Oh, no, dear uncle!" said Anna, coax-
ingly. Louisa did not mean any thing,
but is sorry that you like me to go to the
manse."
"I do not like you to go to the manse,
my own Anna."
Ah, then, do not be displeased with
Louisa."
"Very well, I forgive her, since you ask
it," said Uncle Ross, allowing Louisa to
eat herself on his knee, as a proof of re
conciliation.
So much was said against Anna's umcle,
and so much did George and Louisa ridi-
b cule every thing she should meet with at
the manse, when out of her father's hear-
ing, and so much did Miss Palmer lament
Over her fate in being obliged to go to such
a place, that Anna felt quite afraid of her
uncle's rival; and on being told, on re-
ining 6om her walk with Miss Palmr,
on the day he was expected, that he had
arrived, and was in the drawing-room with







ANNA ROSS.


her aunt, her heart beat so quick she could
scarcely get breath to walk up stairs. Her
walking things were taken ofl and her
dress arranged, though Miss Palmer re-
marked that it was waste of trouble, for
what could Mr. Murray know about dress
Anna then waited, listening eagerly for.
some one's approach to desire her to come
to the drawing-room. At last she was sent
for, and, with a feeling for her uncle of
mingled fear and dislike, she went down
stairs, her heart beating quick as she went.
The servant who had been sent for her
opened the drawing-room door, and the
moment Anna entered, her uncle rose to
meet her; but when he saw her cold and
constrained looks, he stopt, and looked dis.
appointed.
"Come and speak to your uncle, my
love," said Aunt Ross; and Anna slowly .
and timidly approached, not venturing to
look up in his face. He held out bie hmnd,
aud she gave him hern.
"I perceive you are very sary to me '.
me," said hr uncle, in a vy gentle
9*
24.




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