• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Peter Parley tells about Europe...
 Peter Parley describes the people...
 Peter Parley goes on a voyage
 London
 Parley goes to see the castle at...
 Peter Parley tells about Engla...
 Peter Parley goes to Holland
 Parley visits Brussels, and tells...
 Parley goes to Copenhagen
 Parley leaves Copenhagen, and tells...
 Peter Parley tells about Russi...
 Parley tells about Prussia
 Parley goes to Vienna
 Parley tells about Vienna
 Peter Parley tells about Turke...
 Parley tells about Greece
 Parley goes to Italy
 Parley visits Switzerland
 Parley tells about France
 Parley tells about Spain
 Parley tells about Portugal
 Conclusion
 Table of Contents
 Tales about Asia and Africa
 Table of Contents
 Tales about America and Austra...






Title: Peter Parley's tales about the world
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00060103/00001
 Material Information
Title: Peter Parley's tales about the world
Series Title: Peter Parley's tales about the world
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Wilson, T. ( Editor )
Publisher: Darton and Co.
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: R. W. Martin, printer
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00060103
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ALH6159
alephbibnum - 002235696

Table of Contents
    Front Matter
        Page i
        Page i-a
    Frontispiece
        Page ii
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Title Page
        Page v
        Page vi
    Table of Contents
        Page vii
        Page viii
    Peter Parley tells about Europe and other matters
        A-9
        A-10
        A-11
        A-12
        A-13
        A-14
        A-15
    Peter Parley describes the people of Europe
        A-16
        A-17
        A-18
        A-19
        A-20
        A-21
        A-22
        A-23
        A-24
        A-25
        A-26
        A-27
        A-28
        A-29
        A-30
        A-31
        A-32
        A-33
        A-34
        A-35
        A-36
        A-37
        A-38
        A-39
        A-40
        A-41
        A-42
        A-43
    Peter Parley goes on a voyage
        A-44
        A-45
        A-46
        A-47
        A-48
    London
        A-49
        A-50
        A-51
        A-52
        A-53
        A-54
        A-55
    Parley goes to see the castle at Windsor
        A-56
        A-57
        A-58
        A-59
        A-60
        A-61
    Peter Parley tells about England
        A-62
        A-63
        A-64
        A-65
        A-66
    Peter Parley goes to Holland
        A-67
        A-68
        A-69
        A-70
        A-71
        A-72
        A-73
        A-74
        A-75
        A-76
        A-77
    Parley visits Brussels, and tells about Belgium
        A-78
        A-79
        A-80
    Parley goes to Copenhagen
        A-81
        A-82
        A-83
        A-84
    Parley leaves Copenhagen, and tells about Sweden
        A-85
        A-86
        A-87
        A-88
        A-89
        A-90
        A-91
        A-92
        A-93
    Peter Parley tells about Russia
        A-94
        A-95
        A-96
        A-97
        A-98
        A-99
        A-100
        A-101
        A-102
        A-103
        A-104
        A-105
        A-106
    Parley tells about Prussia
        A-107
        A-108
        A-109
        A-110
        A-111
    Parley goes to Vienna
        A-112
        A-113
        A-114
        A-115
    Parley tells about Vienna
        A-116
        A-117
        A-118
        A-119
        A-120
        A-121
        A-122
    Peter Parley tells about Turkey
        A-123
        A-124
        A-125
        A-126
        A-127
    Parley tells about Greece
        A-128
        A-129
        A-130
        A-131
        A-132
        A-133
        A-134
        A-135
    Parley goes to Italy
        A-136
        A-137
        A-138
        A-139
        A-140
        A-141
        A-142
        A-143
        A-144
        A-145
        A-146
    Parley visits Switzerland
        A-147
        A-148
        A-149
        A-150
        A-151
        A-152
        A-153
        A-154
        A-155
    Parley tells about France
        A-156
        A-157
        A-158
        A-159
        A-160
        A-161
        A-162
        A-163
        A-164
        A-165
        A-166
        A-167
        A-168
        A-169
    Parley tells about Spain
        A-170
        A-171
        A-172
        A-173
        A-174
        A-175
        A-176
        A-177
    Parley tells about Portugal
        A-178
    Conclusion
        A-179
        A-180
    Table of Contents
        B-iii
        B-iv
    Tales about Asia and Africa
        B-1
        B-2
        B-3
        B-4
        B-5
        B-6
        B-7
        B-8
        B-9
        B-10
        B-11
        B-12
        B-13
        B-14
        B-15
        B-16
        B-17
        B-18
        B-19
        B-20
        B-21
        B-22
        B-23
        B-24
        B-25
        B-26
        B-27
        B-28
        B-29
        B-30
        B-31
        B-32
        B-33
        B-34
        B-35
        B-36
        B-37
        B-38
        B-39
        B-40
        B-41
        B-42
        B-43
        B-44
        B-45
        B-46
        B-47
        B-48
        B-49
        B-50
        B-51
        B-52
        B-53
        B-54
        B-55
        B-56
        B-57
        B-58
        B-59
        B-60
        B-61
        B-62
        B-63
        B-64
        B-65
        B-66
        B-67
        B-68
        B-69
        B-70
        B-71
        B-72
        B-73
        B-74
        B-75
        B-76
        B-77
        B-78
        B-79
        B-80
        B-81
        B-82
        B-83
        B-84
        B-85
        B-86
        B-87
        B-88
        B-89
        B-90
        B-91
        B-92
        B-93
        B-94
        B-95
        B-96
        B-97
        B-98
        B-99
        B-100
        B-101
        B-102
        B-103
        B-104
        B-105
        B-106
        B-107
        B-108
        B-109
        B-110
        B-111
        B-112
        B-113
        B-114
        B-115
        B-116
        B-117
        B-118
        B-119
        B-120
        B-121
        B-122
        B-123
        B-124
        B-125
        B-126
        B-127
        B-128
        B-129
        B-130
        B-131
        B-132
        B-133
        B-134
        B-135
        B-136
        B-137
        B-138
        B-139
        B-140
        B-141
        B-142
        B-143
        B-144
        B-145
        B-146
        B-147
        B-148
        B-149
        B-150
        B-151
        B-152
        B-153
        B-154
        B-155
        B-156
        B-157
        B-158
        B-159
        B-160
        B-161
        B-162
        B-163
        B-164
        B-165
        B-166
        B-167
        B-168
        B-169
        B-170
        B-171
        B-172
        B-173
        B-174
        B-175
        B-176
        B-177
        B-178
        B-179
        B-180
    Table of Contents
        C-iii
        C-iv
    Tales about America and Australia
        C-1
        C-2
        C-3
        C-4
        C-5
        C-6
        C-7
        C-8
        C-9
        C-10
        C-11
        C-12
        C-13
        C-14
        C-15
        C-16
        C-17
        C-18
        C-19
        C-20
        C-21
        C-22
        C-23
        C-24
        C-25
        C-26
        C-27
        C-28
        C-29
        C-30
        C-31
        C-32
        C-33
        C-34
        C-35
        C-36
        C-37
        C-38
        C-39
        C-40
        C-41
        C-42
        C-43
        C-44
        C-45
        C-46
        C-47
        C-48
        C-49
        C-50
        C-51
        C-52
        C-53
        C-54
        C-55
        C-56
        C-57
        C-58
        C-59
        C-60
        C-61
        C-62
        C-63
        C-64
        C-65
        C-66
        C-67
        C-68
        C-69
        C-70
        C-71
        C-72
        C-73
        C-74
        C-75
        C-76
        C-77
        C-78
        C-79
        C-80
        C-81
        C-82
        C-83
        C-84
        C-85
        C-86
        C-87
        C-88
        C-89
        C-90
        C-91
        C-92
        C-93
        C-94
        C-95
        C-96
        C-97
        C-98
        C-99
        C-100
        C-101
        C-102
        C-103
        C-104
        C-105
        C-106
        C-107
        C-108
        C-109
        C-110
        C-111
        C-112
        C-113
        C-114
        C-115
        C-116
        C-117
        C-118
        C-119
        C-120
        C-121
        C-122
        C-123
        C-124
        C-125
        C-126
        C-127
        C-128
        C-129
        C-130
        C-131
        C-132
        C-133
        C-134
        C-135
        C-136
        C-137
        C-138
        C-139
        C-140
        C-141
        C-142
        C-143
        C-144
        C-145
        C-146
        C-147
        C-148
        C-149
        C-150
        C-151
        C-152
        C-153
        C-154
        C-155
        C-156
        C-157
        C-158
        C-159
        C-160
        C-161
        C-162
        C-163
        C-164
        C-165
        C-166
        C-167
        C-168
        C-169
        C-170
        C-171
        C-172
        C-173
        C-174
        C-175
        C-176
        C-177
        C-178
        C-179
        C-180
        C-181
        C-182
        C-183
        C-184
        C-185
        C-186
        C-187
        C-188
        C-189
        C-190
        C-191
        C-192
Full Text



























































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i



































p.

















COMTAIMING



EUROPE, ASIA, AFRICA, AMERICA,


AND


AUSTRALIA.






EDITED BT THE BEV. T. WILSON.






LONDON:

DARTON AND CO., HOLBORN HILL.































Parley gce to se the Castle at Windsr 66
Peter Parley tells about England 62
Peter Parley gooa to Holukh 67
Parley visits Brusels, and tells about Belgium 78
Parley goes to Copenhagen 61
Parley leaves Copenhagen, and tells about Sweden 88
Puley tells about Russia .









PAGN
Parley tells about Pruussia 107
Parley goe to Vienna 112
Parley tells about Vienna 116
Peter Parley tells about Turkey 123
Parley tells about Greece 128
Parley goes to Italy . ... 136
Parley visits Switzerland .147
Parley tells about France 156
Parley tells about Spain . 170
Parley tells about Portugal 78
Conclusunn .


















CHAPTER L
Prrrxat.Lyft tlUf AM> mnuors
A** EMtt 9MMtf.
I AM come ib I fit iL (said unele
Parley), to te 0* some interestal tales
about Europe, which is that part of the
world to which England belongs, in which
we all live, You may, perhaps, hw heard
about Europe; but I will show you Fictur
of it, by and bye. Over the leafis a picture
of the world, it is round, you me, and hangs
like a ball in the air. It looks in the picture





t_ _.-


as it would do, if you were to see it fromn.a
great distance. I suppose, if you could get
upon the moon, which is many thousands of
miles orf,.ou. vorld would appear to you as
it does in the plate which you me here.


















,If y were to approach the. world, an,
take a earer view of it, you would see the
a great part of the outside .or surface of it i
water, with vast portions of land.
... ".1^ -: ^ "t -...... *.. 1 -- ... 1 -





AVOUT mavOPW. 14
portion of land, extending nearly the whole
length, which is called the G(tn Western
Continent, or North and South America;
and on the other side you would see another
large portion of land in the midst of the
waters, called the Great Eastern Continent,
which contains the other divisions or parts
of the earth, and comprises Europe, Asia,
and Africa.
















To make you understand me better, I have
daumrn th;a nrdtrra n a m-;. n; ti, mi^wlA




IX PARLEYI TALMS
The light part, which runs from the top to
the bottom, represents the land, which I told
you is called America; and the dark portion
represents the water.
I have also drawn this picture of the other
side of the world. The black part represents



















Africa; I have made it black, because the
people, who are called Africans, are black






and also very ignorant The white part re-
presents Europe; and it is white, because
the people, called Europeans, are white, and
very clever, or well-informed. The portion
which has lines drawn across inr. the picture,
represents Asia; and that wlich has lines
drawn up and down, is called New Holland,
or Australia, and by some New Sor th Wales,
The places which I have thus shown yor
are land, and all the rest of the surface of
our world is water, except the small islands
which are situated in various parts of the
water.
To enable you to form an idea of the
roundness of the earth, I would advise you
to go to the top of some high hill, where you
will have a better opportunity of judging;
or, if you should eve: be on the sea, you will
observe that the tops of the masts of ships
at a great distance appear much sooner than'
the vessels themselves do. 0
But I mwt now tell you abbut Europe.
You will see,lby the white part, that Eu-
rope is mv th smaller than either Asia, Africa,
or Amer'.a; but though it is the smallest




14 PARLEY'& TALBE
division, yet it is much more populous, in
proportion, than any one of the other divi-
sions of the globe: and it contains many
different nations, kingdoms, and cities, and
the most splendid palaces, cathedrals, and
universities for learning, with other buildings
of every description, too grand to imagine.
As I said before, there are many nations
in Europe; I will tell you their names.
First of all we will begin with England,
which, you know, is your own nation, and
not the least important of them all. When
1 say England, I mean what is called Great
Britain, which includes Scotland, Ireland,
and Wales, each of which formerly had
kings of their own, but they are now all
governed by one king. The other nations of
Europe, are France, Spain, Portugal, Italy,
Germany, Holland, Belgium, Switzerland.
Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Lapland, Prus-
sia, Austria, and part of Turkey.
The people of these different nations not
only dress unlike each other, but they speak
*different languages, and live in houses of
various fashions. The language which is





ABOUT EUROPB. 15
spoken in England, which you know is
English, is also spoken in America, Aus-
tralia, and many other parts of the world.
If you were to go to any of the European
countries except England, you would not
understand the people, nor would they un-
derstand you, unless you should first learn
to speak their language. In France, for
instance, they call bread pain, and a horse
they call cheval, and a church eglie ; but in
Italy they call bread pane, a horse cavalko
and a church chiesa ; and so in each of thb
different nations they call things by difleren
names.





16 PARLEYtS TALUS






IITJr A "TPrl 1r


rhen known. They are likewise remarkable
)r silent curiosity, cool observation, and
patient perseverance, which make them suc-
essful in scientific pursuits. You must all
kse care to preserve this good character
rhnl hlamn m wnn ,n ,n, a 'a.. w.lth.,m,





ABOUT UROrI. 1"
The people of Frane are called French.
They arp remarkable for their politeness,
cheerfulness, and gaiety. Here is a picture
of some French men and women.














Some of the women, you ee, w.ar hand-
kerchiefs on their heads, instead of bonnets.
The French are very fond of novelty, which
is the reason why they are not domestic.
They are clever and ingenious, but not so
persevering as the English.
The inhabitants or people of Spain awe
called Spaniards. They are brave, sensible *





18 PARLEY'S TALIS
and patient; but proud, superstitious, and
very indolent. Their want of industry may
be attributed to the nature of the country,
which is very beautiful, and in which Nature
produces the necessaries of life so freely,
and without the need of labour.
They are very passionate, and it is said
that they often kill each other in a spirit of
revenge. The men wear short cloaks.














Here is a picture of a Spanish priest, sur-
cw.unded by Spanish men and women.
TIw people of Portugal are called Portu-





AWUUT KUUrE. RU
guese; their country, you will ee, if you
look at the map of Europe, is of a long


which they are still subject, and which have
depressed the energies of both commercial
and scientific men. You know, Columbus,
though a Genoese, was encouraged n his
thirst for discovery by the Queen a J.n,
and at a time when he could get nafV er
nation to forward his views.
In Portugal, a tailor sits like a shoemaker;
a hairdresser appears on Sundays with a





PARLEY'S TALKS


sword, a cockade, and two watches, or at least
with two watch-chains; a tavern is known by
a vine bush; and a house to let, by a large
blank piece of paper. The Portuguese use
oxen to tread out the corn from the ears, in-
stead of using a flail as we do; and their carts
or cars are drawn by the same animals. The
women, when they ride, sit with the left side
towards the hor 's head. You will see by
the map, that the capital city of Portugal is
Lisbon. If you were to go to Lisbon, you
would not, I am sure, like it as well as Lon-
don; for the streets are very badly paved,
andvery dirty indeed; and the only cleansers
of the filth which is thrown by every one
from the houses, are the dogs, which roam
about in great numbers, without any homes or
owners. There are also innumerable swarms
of flies, which are extremely annoying.
Lisbon still bears vestiges of the memora-
ble earthquake which took place in 1755.
The people of Italy are called Italians.
You will see by the map, that Italy is a long
neck of land, in the form of a boot, which
extends from the south of France into the





&IWVT ZRxorX


Mediterranea Sea. Its climate is delightful,
and produces excellent wines, fruits, oil, &C.
I remember some lines which so well de-
scribe the advantages of Italy, that I shall
here repeat them, that you may commit them
to memory:-
"Whatever fruits in different climes are foad,
That proudly rise, or humbly court the ground;
Whatever blooms in torrid tracts appear,
Whose bright suooession decks the varied year;
Whatever sweets salute the northern sky
With vernal leaves that blossom but to die-
These, here disporting, own the kindred soil,
Nor ask luxuriane from the planter's toil;
While sa-born gales their gelid wings expand,
To winnow fragrance round the smiling lad."
The Italians are well-proportioned and
active, with expressive countenances; they
are celebrated or extreme sobriety. In
their dispoeitio s they are considered more
revengeful thd brave, and more supersti-
tious than purely religious. They are very
fond of music.
The inhabitants of Germany are called
Germans. I must again refer you to the
map, and there you will see that Germany
is to the north-east of France and Italy.





22 PARLEY'S TALES
The Germans are very ingenious, particu-
larly in watch and clock making; and they
are distinguished above all other nations for
cool, just judgment, and great perseverance
in whatever they undertake; but their stu-
dies are directed more to speculative than to
useful subjects. Almost all Germans pos-
sess a knowledge of music, and the pro-
ductions of their composers rival, and not
unfrequently surpass, those of the Italian
School.
Their poets and dramatists likewise rank
high in literature; but the natural turn of
their minds seems to be for philosophy.
The late celebrated musical composer, Carl
Maria Von Weber, whose productions were
so rapturously received in London, was a
German.
The Germans have had many very ce-
lebrated generals; and when in the field,
their armies have long been noted for cool
and persevering courage, as well as a capa-
bility of enduring fatigue, and submitting to
the greatest privations.
The Germans are very far behind all other





aMu q au AUrj


oauons in puouc accommouaaons oi ever
description, as regards speed and comfort
conveyance in travelling, and attention an
fare at the inns.
The education of females seems to be g4
nerally disregarded. Even in the more n
spectable families, they are merely put under
the care of a servant, who bears the name (
a governess. They consequently want the
refinement which education always gives t
the character, especially of females.
The people of Holland are called Dutcl
Their country is not very large, to be sure
but I dare say you will be able to find it,
you look once more to the map. It lies b
tween Germany and the North Sea. Gol(
smith has so well described the character 4
the Dutch, in fourteen lines of his delightfi
poem, that I shall here seek his help to de
scribe it to you:
"Industrious habits in each bosom reign,
And industry begets a love of gain;
Hence all that's good, from opulence that springs,
With all those ills superfluous treasure brings,
Are here displayed. Their much-loved wealth impal
Convenience, plenty, elegance, and arts.







But vie hem closer, craft an fraud appeu
BRen liberty itself is bartered here
At gold's superior charms all freedom ie,
The needy sell it, and the rioh man buys;
A land of tyrants and a den of laves,
Here wraeL es seek dishonourable graves,
And, calmly bent on servitude, conform,
Dull as their lakes that sleep beneath the stor.n."

















The Dutch are the best skate in the
rorld. Here is a picture of a fat Dutchman
ad his wife, skating along to market. She
as got a basket of eggs and other things on
er head, which I think he would do much






better to carry for her, instead of puffing the
smoke of his pipe into her eyes. You wouh


-- -V* AW Vw" UWr ur UVA AIUUUjJ TJU W"U
see that lu itm sf nd ties between Fiane,
Germany, and Italy.
The Swiss are generally tall and well made,
and are very remarkable for their Lmesty
their firmness, and their courage; and their
love of liberty and independence is greater
than that of any other people. The cleanli
ness of their dwellings astonishes all travel
lers. They are very much attached to their





o PFARLEY 5 TALES
country, and would prefer a cottage and in-
dependence in Switzerland to a palace and
all its splendours elsewhere. The dress of
the Swiss is very peculiar. Here is a picture
of them. Observe nerr dresses and their
houses.















There are many very high mountains ir
Switzerland--one of the highest of which ii
called Mont Blanc, which means the whit
mountain, from its being generally covered
with snow. It is more than three miles above
the level of the sea.





ABOUT EUROPE. XI

The following lines of Goldsmith well ex.
press the attachment of the Swiss to their
country:-
Dear is that shed to which his soul conforms,
And dear that hill which lifts him to the storms
And as a child, when searing sounds molest,
Clings close and closer to the mother's breast;
So the loud torrent and the whirlwind's roar,
But bind him to his native mountains more."


happy, and very hospitable and generous. In
Holstein, which is in Denmark, there are
an amazing number of frogs, which make
such an incessant noise, that they may be
heard for miles. The noise, however, which





28 PARLEY'S TALKS
such a multitude of them make is really
harmonious, from which they are called, by
some persons, Holstein nightingales. The
noise sounds like the vibration produced by
musical glasses. Copenhagen is the capital
of Denmark.
The people of Sweden are called Swedes.
You must look again to the map, that you may
see where Sweden is situated. You will find
that Norway and Sweden extend a long way
up the map, between the Baltic Sea and the
Northern Ocean. You will see, also, that
Sweden is separated from Denmark by a
narrow channel of the sea, called a Sound.
Perhaps you don't know that most of the
iron that we use in England comes from
Sweden but it does; and, besides the
quantity of iron which Sweden produces, it
affords also abundant supplies of timber, for
the whole kingdom is one vast forest. The
people are remarkable for many good qua-
lities. Serious crimes are almost unknown
amongst them. They are active, intrepid,
and profound in their judgment; and acute
--!- !- TIL LN I






Tvy l1mpIe u, ULn, u1mE. .LVwV L f tuY
of some of them.


I --









Their villages are built chiefly of woow
but the exceeding neatness and cleanlinel
which distinguish the Swiss and Danes ai
njt so apparent. Stockholm, the capital cil
of Sweden, contains many very beautify
buildings. It has been described by a cel
brated traveller, as a gigantic heap of tl
most noble structures; palaces and church
all piled one above another, and floating,
c3


I





8, PARLEY'S TALES
it were, on the surface of the deep. This mag-
nificent scene is still further enlivened and
rendered more enchanting by the appearance
of vessels of all sizes; some sailing, others
riding at anchor amid the rocks and groves,
or beneath the very windows of the lofty build-
ings. Nor is the scene less interesting in win-
ter; for then the lakes and the sea are covered
with every description of sledges, and exhibit
one of the gayest scenes imaginable.
The inhabitants of Norway are called Nor-
wegians. Norway is a very cold country;
and, now I have told you that, I am sure you
can find it on the map, for you know the
coldest countries are most to the north; but
I will help you so far as to tell you, that it
is separated from a kingdom which I have
already described, by a long chain of mpun-
tains. The Norwegians are ever ready to
contribute to the comforts of strangers, even
at the expense of their own. They are in-
dustrious and economical, which it is very ne-
cessary they should be, as the procuring of a
subsistence in Norway is exceedingly difficult.
Everything is very dear. One of the great-





est objection to Norway, is toe continue
annoyance from a multitude of beggar
who are very importunate, violent, and eve
thievish in case of refusal. Shops are rei
scarce; and scarcely any books are sold bi
bibles, prayer-books, and almanacks. TI
Norwegians dreas not unlike the Dutch. Hei
is a picture of some Norwegians.





1




The mountains in Norway are peopled froi
bottom to top; and farm-houses are ever
where seen standing on sloping terraces, abol
precipices, without any marks of vegetatio





2 PARLEY'S TALES
upon them. Almost all parts of Norway are
intersected with water.
The inhabitants of Lapland are called Lap.
landers. If you were to go into their country
you would find that it joins Norway, and is
the most northern part of Europe. You would
see it almost always covered with snow, and
you would find the men and women not much
bigger than English boys and girls, with
large heads, long black hair, broad faces, and
flat noses, and large mouths, and thick lips.
But, though their appearance might be some-
what singular at first, you would find them
kind and hospitable to strangers, and united
and affectionate in their families. They hold
war in abhorrence, and would rather forsake
their homes than engage in it. Their only
vice is intemperance; but their acts, when
intoxicated, are those of folly, not wickedness
and cruelty. The voices of the Laplanders
correspond with the size of their bodies, being
harsh and squeaking.
In Lapland, though the whole country is
almost always covered with snow, there are
innumerable swarms of moquitoa, which in-





ABOUT EUROPE. 88
diet an incessant torment upon every one;
and such is the power of their bite, that
gloves of the thickest leather are no safeguard
against their attacks. We have no such tor-
ments as those in England.
Here is a picture of some Laplanders, with
a rein-deer and a sledge. Observe how they
are dressed: their dresses are made of skins.










ful to the Laplander; they furnish him with
food and clothing. With their skins he coven
his tent and forms his bed; of their milk he
makes his cheese, and uses the whey for hil
drink; of their sinews he makes bow-stringp
and threads for sewing. And all this valuable
animal requires for its food is moss, which is
very abundant in Lapland.
We will now leave Lapland, and travel
down the map, along the Baltic Sea, till we
come to Prussia. You see it joins Poland,
Russia, and Austria.
The inhabitants of Prussia are called Prus-
sians. They partake of the general character
of the Germans. Frederick the Great, whc
took a delight in soldiers to the hour of hi
death, was a Prussian.
The direction-posts are of a singular fashion
on the roads in Prussia; they generally repre
sent a negro's head with large white eyes, anc
a pig-tail; while two long stiff arms are
stretched out to ride the traveller-


-an -ra ma-0 -





ABOUT RUrfOP.


Here is a picture of some Prussians. Ob-
sere the manner in which they are dramd.


-












The capital of Prussia, you will find, is
Berlin, which is full of magnificent build-
ing.
The inhabitants of Russia are called Rus-
sians. They are very numerous, and almost
all of them are slaves, obedient to the most
arbitrary commands of their masters. The
condition of the peasantry is most degraded.
Every poor man is a serf; and his master, or
owner. an hb i ;a llal ian PntitlAA #n ilnim





PARLEY8' TALES
ee davs in each week of his labour. Ir


' they are allowed to keep shops, they are
obliged to give their masters the prihipal
art of their profit. These masters are wlled
Mlas, but I think the word is strangely mis-
?plied, for I do not think it noble to act
i they do. How happy we are to live in a
untry where su-h things are never thought
fI What would you say, for instance, if the
luke of Wellineton were to sell you for





ABOUT EUROPE. 87
slaves, and beat you, if you did not work for
him I You would think it very cruel, and 6
it would be.
Here is a picture of some Russians. You
see they are very grandly dressed; and from
this you may judge that they are not the
slaves of which we have been talking, but the
oaMs who oppress the poor.














The Russians are generally considered de-
ficient in original genius, but their talent for
imitation equals that of any nation. If you
I-1. *t.- ... vrnn wl ea that Russ






i an immense empire, occupying a large
portion of Europe, and a still greater extent
f Asia; so that, when we consider the whole,
t is larger than all the rest of Europe put
together. St. Petersburg is the capital of
lussia, and it is a very splendid city.
The people of Austria are called Austrians.
La we are not in their country, we must make.
ise of the map, to see where it lies. You see
t joins Prussia, Poland, Turkey, and Italy.
.ts capital city, you will also find, is Vienn,
rhich is on the river Danube. The Austrians
nd Prussians bear a very high character for
ivilization, which arises entirely from the
nflence of education, which is very much
cultivated in their country. The Austrians
iave fine features and animated countenances,
ad their cleanliness and general kindness are
universal. The higher classes are fond of
)omp and magnificence, which is strikingly
ontrasted with the sobriety and orderly con-
luct of the lower classes. Charitable institu-
ions are very numerous, and many buildings






ABOUT BUROP. "

Here you gee the picture of some Austrian
peasants.


ir in apnernllv of a liaht chestnut or aubmn




~,.,..(, ,,,,.


colour, and their eyes dark. They pretend
to be very passive and humble, but they are
easily provoked, and their passions are furious
and ungovernable, and they are suspicious
and extremely revengeful. They wear long
beards, they cover their heads with a white
turban, which they never take off, except
when they go to sleep; and none but Turks.
are permitted to wear turbans in Turkey.
Instead of shoes they wear slippers, which
they pull off when they enter a house or
temple. They wear shirts with wide sleeves,
over which they wear a sort of loose gown,
fastened round the waist by a sash. They
seldom travel, or use any exercise or rural
sports, and they have no curiosity to be in-
formed of the state of their own, or that of
any other country. They do not undress and
go to bed at any certain hour, as we do; but
they seat themselves on a mattress or large
cushion, and smoke till they find themselves
sleepy, and then some attendant comes and
covers them over. The richer class have
musicians, who lull them to sleep by the soft
sh-0;n C l~. f Mlk- -- -m~n C 1-sm





ABOUT SUROPI. 41

ing, to read to them light entertaining stories
till they go to sleep. They have always a
lamp burning, and if they wake in the night
they refresh themselves witn a fresh pipe or a
dish of coffee, till the inclination to sleep
returns.
When they sit down, it is always cross-
legged, after the custom of most eastern na-
tions.
Most of the people take rice for their food,
and coffee for their drink; if they were to eat
more solid food, it would make them ill.
They eat their food without either knife, fork,
or spoon. It would look very strange if we
were to pull our meat and vegetables to pieces
with our fingers.
Constantinople is the capital of European
Turkey. It is a most splendid city; every
luxury seems to abound there. It is fre-
quently called the Porte, or Sublime Porte,
when talking of the Turkish power generally.
It abounds with antiquities. The mosque of
St. Sophia, which was once one of the Chris-
tian churches, exceeds in grandeur the cathe-
dral of St. Paul's. The religion of the Turks
v3





5 rAAL.Jax a auJr
is Mahometan, which means the opinions of
man named Mahomet, who called himself tl


Dcriptures. zjven itome, winch was msa to
be the pride of cities, borrowed all her laws
and civilization from Greece. I think these
Romans must have been bad men, to have
destroyed and enslaved so much sovereignty
of mind, and such refinement of taste. All
the splendour of Greece is no more! Even
Athens, the capital, is distinguished only by
ruins of its ancient splendour and elegance.







[f you look on the map, you will see that
eece is the southern part of Turkey in
rope, next to the Mediterranean Sea.
[ have now told. you a little of all the dif-
ent nations of Europe, and I wish you to
ik over the map very carefully, to find out
ere each of the different nations is situated,
it you may always know when you are talk-
about them. You should always, when
i .ra ranDina hnnlr. ^f tP vwal. .mAl a.Braf-


counmres or wrmc
S. _-. ....__ .. -


TTTr *WT mni





PARLEY'S TAL


CHAPTER III.

PETER PARLEY GOES ON A VOYAGE.

SEVERAL years ago I became a sailor, anc
travelled to Europe. I sailed in the ship Bold
Hero, from Boston, in America, for England.
The vessel was commanded by Captain Phil.
lips. We sailed over the water in an easterly
direction for several days. The water we
sailed over is called the Atlantic Ocean. You
will see the direction we took, if you look al
the map of the world. Mind, we were sailing
from America to England, which is a distance
of about three thousand miles.
At length there came a storm. I assur
you it is not very pleasant to be out at sea ir
a storm. The water is thrown into great agi.
station; the waves rise and roll, and the ship ii
tossed about with the greatest violence. Al]
becomes confusion and uproar. The captain





ABOUT EUROPE. 45
s aloud to the sailors, the wind whistles
)ugh the rigging of the ship, the sails flap
ut, the timbers creak, and the ocean roars.
io it was with us. I was at first very
:h alarmed; and what increased my fears,
the sudden appearance of large masses of
called iceberg, which float about like
at lads in the northern seas. We were
-ful tat our ship would be driven upon
m, and thus be dashed to pieces.
Vhile in this situation night came on, and
expected never to see another day. But
rMng came, and we were safe. The storm
I ceased, and we had left the icebergs at a
at distance.
)ut what was our surprise to discover not
from us the wreck of a vessel We put
our long boat, and, amidst a good deal of
feting and tossing about in the waves, by
ich we were several times nearly upset, we
red towards it, and soon discovered that
re was one man on the wreck.
It is a dreadful situation to be left the only
rivor on a wrecked ship, with death threat-
ag you on all sides.





ramA o a .


nero yuu Wuill A ac jiLur m Ui UU a uW .V1












B


The man called to us, and lifted up I
hands and begged for assistance.
At length we got him on board our shi
He was an Italian, and his name was Leo.
had been the foremost in endeavouring to u
him, and he said he owed his life to me. ]
was captain of the vessel which had be
wrecked in the storm.
After we had rescued Leo, we sailed on (





T EUROPE.


which before had tossed so fearfully, were now
at rest; and the blue bosom of the ocean lay
spread out to a vast distance, as smooth as the
face of a mirror. Porpoises were playing on
the surface of the water on all sides, and mul-
titudes of whales were spouting up water at
a distance. Oh thought I, how peaceful is
the ocean when at rest, but how fearful in a
storm!
At length a favourable wind arose, and bore
us forward on our voyage. In thirty days
after we left Boston, having sailed 8000 miles,
we began to approach the coast .of England.
If you will look at a map of Europe, you wil
see a narrow strip of water, called-the English
Channel. We sailed through this channel,
and entered the mouth of the Thames, the
largest river in England. As we sailed up the
Thames, we were very much astonished to see
the vast multitude of ships which were sailing
UD and down thin river. At lenarth we reached





*IP FARLEY 8 TALZS
London, the largest city in England, and oi
of the most important in the world. At tl
place where our vessel stopped, there were I
many ships, that their masts looked like
great forest.
And now I have something to say to yo
As I intend that the next new book shall 1
given as a reward for the best attention
what I have been telling you, I shall ask yi
a few questions to try you. First, you knc
I sailed from Boston, in America.
How many miles is it from Boston ?
How long did it take us to perform tf
voyage ?
What is the great ocean called which e
tends between England and America?
What is the name of the narrow strip whi
I told you separates England from France 1
What is the name of the river, which
told you is the largest in England t
What large city did we stop at when
finished our voyage





*ABOUT EUROPE. 49



CHAPTER IV.

Ws left the ship, and got into a small boat,
which brought us up the river to a place
called Queenhithe.
Here you have a view of the place, with
St. Paul's Cathedral in the back-ground, and
part of the iron bridge, called Southwark
Bridge.















There are more houses and more people






in London than in Boston, New York, Phi-
ladelphia, Baltimore, and Charleston, five of
the largest cities in the United States of
America, all put together.
The people are so numerous in the streets
of London, that it is sometimes difficult to
pass through them.
Many years ago, an Indian came to Lon-
don. He wanted to find out how many
people there were in London; and how do
you think he set about to ascertain?-He
took a long stick, and determined to cut a
little notch in it with his knife for every per-
son he met. As you may suppose, his stick
was very soon entirely covered with notches,
and he threw it away in despair.
As soon as I could, I went about London
with Leo, whom we had aved from the
wreck. He was a great ttreller, and had
been in London before. The first places we
went to see were the palace of St. James, and
Buckingham Palace, where Queen Victoria
now resides. We then went to Westminster
Abbey, a very large church built many years
ago. In case you may not have seen this





flUNv A Unur% -*

building, I have made this representation of
it for you.















In this church many of the most celebrated
men that have r lived in England are buried.
We next went to the Tower of London, ua
it is called; a strong fortress and primo,
originally built by William the Conqueror, in
which many persons have been cruelly mur-
dered, and other acts of infamy committed.
At the Tower we saw a collection of wild
beasts, among which were some fierce lions





52 PARLEY'S TALES

and tigers. We also saw an amazing number
of fire-arms, sufficient to supply an army of
many thousands of men. All these fire-arms
are keDt polished in the most beautiful man-


FA











this, however, was but a nickname, for his
real name was Richard Plantagenet.
Now this Richard wished to be king him-
self, but this he could not be while his bro-
ther's children were alive: so he had little
King Edward shut up in the Tower, with his
younger brother, and there they were soon
afterwards killed. Richard was then made
king, and was called Richard the Third.
After we had been to the Tower, we went
into one of the public parks. These parks
are beautiful smooth grounds, with forest
trees planted in groups, and .arranged so as
to haveavey a ve i effect. Many persons
may be seen walking in them, and it is veiy
agreeable to stroll along the paths, and ob-
serve them pas to and fro.
SAfter we left the parks, we went to one of
the theatre. The Queen was there, and we
had a good opportunity of seeing her. She
.. .. T i'l _= __ 1 1 -1 __ .-___ Al.





PARLEY S TALE


jewels; but in other respects she looked like
any other woman. One thing amused me
very much: the Queen, though she did not
act, seemed the most attractive person in
the theatre, for every one looked at her more
than at the play itself. This, however, was
very excusable, for the hopes of Englishmen
are centred in their young and amiable Queen.
I had not sat long in the theatre, when I
chanced to feel for my pocket-book, in which
I had a small sum of money: it was gone. I
then felt for my watch; that was gone also
It was very clear that I had been robbed, but
by whom or how, I could not tell. It had
been done with so much skill, that I could
not guess who had done it. I, therefore, did
not say anything about my loss, but deter-
mined to be more cautious ip future. Let
me, however, advise you to benefit by my
misfortune, and, if you go to London, take
care of your watch and your pocket-book.
It was now past midnight, and Leo and
myself proceeded to our lodgings. As we
were passing through a dark narrow lane, he
heard a groan like that of a person in distress.
V. I I 11 1





ABOUT EUROPE. 55
stopped to listen. We ventured to knock
the door of a room on the around-floor.


then found some kind people, who took
e of the children; we helped them with as
ch money as we could spare, and in a few
rs the mother was decently buried.
[t seems she had died of hunger. Alas!
ught I, that any one should die of hunger
such a rich city as London. Yet I found.
It there is a great deal of want and mise
,re, partly owing to the improvidence of
People, and in many cases owing to mis-





6 PARLEY'S TALES




CHAPTER V.

PARLEY GOES TO SEE THE CASTLE AT
WINDSOR.

ABOUT twenty miles from London is a plea-
sent town called Windsor. It is situated
within a bend of the river Thames, and is
celebrated for a magnificent castle, called
Windsor Castle, one of the royal residences.
It was built by King William I., and re-
built by Edward III., who caused the old
building to be taken down, and began the
present structure, as well as St. George's
Chapel. Since then, so many important ad-
ditions have been made to it, and it has been
so greatly beautified, that this noble castle
has scarcely its equal in the world. It is a
great building, consisting of high stone walls,
within which is a palace, and many other
houses connected with it. It is situated on an





ABOUT EUROPE.

ill, from whence the prospect is delightful
'rom a part of it called the Round Tower,
here is an extensive view into twelve counties.
Here is a picture of Windsor Castle.














I had often head of Windsor Castle, and





00 PARLEY'S TALES
England is never very cold nor very hot, i'
is an agreeable mode of travelling.
England presents a delightful appearance,
to the eye of a traveller. The fields are
very green, and divided by hedges-rows o
shrubs, or small trees-and not by fences, a
in America. There are also a great man;
very splendid houses belonging to rich people
As I was going to Windsor, I passed a ver
beautiful house, surrounded with garden
and flowers, and blooming trees. Whoe
house is that ?" said I to a man who wa
sitting next to me on the stage.
"It is the seat of Lord Percy," he replied
We soon passed another very splendid
mansion. Who lives there said I.
The Duke of Sussex," said the strange
Whose seat is that?" I asked, pointing
to another similar house.
"That," said he, "is the residence of th
Earl of Harrowby."
"I am a stranger in this country," said
to the person of whom I asked these quei
tions. Will you do me the favour to te
me something about these Dukes, and Earl
--_ T --I. 91'O





BOUT EUROPE.


"I will tell you with pleasure," said the
gentleman.
"In England we have a class of persons,
:onsisting of Dukes, Marquises, Earls, Vis-
:ounts, and Barons; they are called lords,
and are sometimes denominated the nobility.
They live in great houses, and are generally
very rich. In America there are not any
lords, nor any distinguishing titles."
After a pleasant ride of two hours, I
reached Windsor Castle. The Queen was not,
there, and I was permitted to go through the
several apartments, and into St. George's
Chapel, where the members of the royal fa-
mily are now buried; and about the grounds,
which are very delightful.
When any one of the royal family is buried
in the chapel, the funeral takes place at mid-
night, by the light of torches. Perhaps you
do not know what I mean by the royal family,
so I will tell you. All persons related to the
sovereign, are called the royal family, and no
member of the royal family is permitted to
marry any other than a prince or princess.
Kings and Queens live in large houses







with six, and sometimes eight horses, and
they are always attended by a small body of
soldiers, called a guard of honour. *
You must read the history of the Kings
and Queens of England. You will find it
very interesting, but you will learn that most
of them have been unworthy to govern a
powerful nation, and very few have been
what we should call good men and women.
Do you know what a Queen is? A Queen
is generally a King's wife; but Queen
Victoria reigns because she is heir to the
throne.
I will tell you a story of a queen who lived
many years ago. She was the wife of King
Henry VI. and her name was Margaret. Her
husband was a weak king, and his enemies
rose against him, and put him in prison; they
thn. pursued Queen Margaret, but she fled
thrm them.into the woods, taking her little
son with her. She wandered about for a long
time, and at length was met by a robber.
Robbers are wicked men, you know, who
go about in woods and other places, to take
people's noney from them. Well, the robber
came up to Margaret, and told her to give him


. . .. . . -





ABOUT RUROPE. 61
all the money she had; but Margaret replied,
"I have no money: I am your queen, and
this boy is the son of your king."
Here is a picture of the scene.














The robber was very much surprised, so
he begged the Queen's pardon, and then led
her out of the woods, and conducted her to a
place of safety. You must read the History
of England to learn what became of Queen
Margaret after she left the woods.











CHAPTER VI.


PETER PARLEY TELLS ABOUT ENGLAND.


WREN I returned to London from Windsor,
I found that our vessel, the Bold Hero, was
about to sail for Holland. I wished to stay
and travel more in England, but I could not.
There are a great many large towns and
cities in England besides London. There
is Birmingham, where they make knives and
forks, lamps, guns, pistols, swords, and al-
most all the things which we call hardware;
Manchester, where they make muslins, cali-
coes, and printed cottons for gowns; Not-
tingham, where stockings and gloves are
made; Newcastle, from which place almost
all the coals that are used in London are
brought; besides many other famous places





ADUUI &v RUa M
which I wished very much to see. In Eng-
mrd, each of the towns is celebrated for the
manufacture of some.particular article.
I wished to go to Ireland too, where the
rish live. It is an island lying very near to
:ngland, and belongs to it. Its climate is
lild and temperate, but more damp than in
ingland. It is in general a level country,
rell watered with lakes and rivers, and the
oil is very good and fertile. The laws of
his island differ little from those of England,
nd the established religion is the same; but
he majority of the people are Roman Ca-
holies. Ireland is famous for the mana-
acture of linen. Dublin is the principal
ity, where the lord-lieutenant resides; he
ives in a fine castle, called Dublin Castle.
There is Scotland too, which joins England
n the north. Scotland is a romantic and
beautiful country, and the Scotch are an in-
eresting people. The most northern part of
Scotland is called the Highlands, and is cold,
barren, and mountainous: the southern part
s called the Lowlands, and is agreeably di-
rersfied with hills and fertile plains. In the





5* PARLEY 8 TALES

Highlands, the men wear dresses like ties
which you see in the picture here.


y, nWuy UAU BUIo 1CLU1UCU WU LLUIy.






I have now told you about England. It
is a beautiful country, full of towns ad
cities, and crowded with inhabitants. There
are more than twenty-four millions of inha-
bitants in Great Britain, which is more
people than you could count in a very long
time. There are almost twice as many
people in Great Britain as there are in the
whole of the United States of America.
The kingdom of Great Britain includes
England, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland.
Many of the people of England are very
rich, but many thousands are comparatively
poor. The very poor and miserable are
generally the very idle and abandoned.
The history of Great Britain is very inte-
resting; I should like you to read about it.
Many hundreds of years ago it was inhabited
by wild savages; but for about ten centuries
it has been gradually rising in civilization,
and may now be said to be the most en-
lightened nation on earth. It has had many
kings, and has produced many great men.
It may be said to be the richest and most
powerful nation in the world.
F3





DA T .WV rAT.VA


Now, since I have told you about England
and some of the most important places, you
must recollect what each of these places is
celebrated for. You must recollect, that
Birmingham is noted for guns, and pistols,
and hardware; Nottingham for stockings
and gloves; Manchester for printed cottons;





ABOUT EUROPE. 7





CHAPTER VII.

PETER PARLEY GOES TO HOLLAND.

AVING hoisted our sails, we now went
>wly down the Thames. I have already
Id you that there are multitudes of vessels
ing up and down this fine river. Night
d come on before we reached the mouth
the river.
There was a fresh breeze, and the darkness
the night was increased by a thick fog.
Ir vessel was sailing very fast, when we
-re suddenly alarmed by a great noise, ac-
mpanied by a shock, as if we had struck a
Ak.
We soon perceived that we had run against
other vessel, and with such force that she
s sinking. We had just time to get the
rsons who were in it on board our vessel,
ien she sunk in the waters and disappeared.





68 PARLEY'S TALES
The persons whom we had taken ou
the vessel, were the captain, his wife,
two children, and two sailors. The capti
name was Hatterick. He was a Dutchr
and came from Amsterdam, the largest t
in Holland. He had learned to speak I
lish, and he told me that his wife and fai
had lived for several years in his little vei
and that they were always with him du
his voyages.
I afterwards learned that this was not a





ABOUT EUROPE.


however, it is considered the most com-
mercial city in the world. It is larger than
New York, in America. I have drawn this
picture of Amsterdam that you may have














some notion of its appearance. You know
the people of Holland are called Dutch. I
have told you before, that the Dutch language
is different from ours. They have different
names for evervthina, thus. thev call a





DA D TVP flPA


As I did not understand the Dutch lan
guage, I could not tell what the people said
they only seemed to jabber like monkeys.
I wanted to go about Amsterdam, an
Captain Hatterick kindly offered to accon:
pany me. As we were passing along td
streets I observed a curious kind of carriage
much used at Amsterdam. It is formed b
putting the body of a coach on a sled4
drawn by one horse.
While I was going about Amsterdam wil
Captain Hatterick, he told me a good de
about Holland. He said that there were
great many other large cities in Hollar
besides Amsterdam.
There is Rotterdam, Haarlem, Leyde
Utrecht, Middleburgh, and Flushing; ai
many other towns. The number of inhabi
ants in Holland is about two millions and
half. The king resides at a place called t
Hague, thirty miles from Amsterdam; ai
where also the principal people reside.
Holland is generally very flat, and is cross
in every direction by canals, which are ve
numerous, and serve the same purpose





RnUIT EUlIRPn


I other countries, namely, for travelling and
me conveyance of goods. A great part of
he country was once overflowed by the sea;
ut the people built strong dykes, or dams,
U along the coast, the erection of which has
een justly considered one of the greatest
efforts of human industry, and thus the waters
re prevented from overflowing their land.
lut sometimes the sea breaks down the dam,
ad the waters overflow the country. Such
ecidents produce much distress, and often
estroy the lives of a great number of people.
'he great rivers are bordered by similar
ykes, and provided at convenient distances
ith sluces or outlets, by means of which
me country can be laid under water on the
approach of an enemy.
The Dutch (as I have already told you)
re a very industrious people, and have a
great number of ships, which trade to all
arts of the world. They have some thou-
nds of windmills for sawing timber,
grinding corn, &c., and a vast number of
manufactures.
The Dutch used to be distinguished for












them described as full of craft and deceil
bartering even liberty and freedom for gold
so that their country may be compared to
land of tyrants and a den of thieves. The
are now governed by a king, after the sam
manner as France and England. The Prc
testant religion is professed by the king an
most part of the people, but all sects hav
equal privileges.
A very singular story was told me abos
the Dutch people. There is a bird very con
mon in their country, called the stork. j
stork looks something like a turkey, but it hi
a longer neck, and is of a different colony
When a stork grows old and is too feeble t
fly, a young stork takes him on his back, an
carries him about in the air.
Well, the people of Holland are very fon
of these birds, and love to have them buil
their nests upon their houses. They thin
that no evil can happen to a house that has


_ m .








DL JLa vcrfy
or shoot them
is come about
I mlnnin tiAhe


The women hprp .- a in all ntflir Asrn ;n


1RnltT ITTIAIDW







Holland, work very hard. In the pictu
you see some of them bleaching linen in tl
river; a mode which looks very singular
those not accustomed to it.
Haarlem is a very fine town, and is famoi
for containing a church which has the large
organ in the world. The name of the chur
is St. Bavon. I went to see it with Capta
Hatterick. Its organ has eight thousai
pipes, one of which is thirty-two feet lonj
and one of the stops is called vox humana
from its imitation of the human voice. TI
church itself is a noble building, and is tl
largest in Holland.

A few miles from Amsterdam thdt is
little town called Saardam. Here rt utw
to build a great many ships. Wi o lrm
what more than a hundred years agf the
wee a gfM many carpenter at w*k it tl
ships hit gardam.
Among the rest wa one 5sled MNast
Peter. Now who do you think this Mast
Peter was? I will tell you. He was tl
Emneror of Ri~nin.






When the other carpenters found out that
aster Peter was an emperor, they were
ry much surprised, and wondered that he
uld be there at work as a carpenter. I
11 tell you the whole story," said Peter.
Here is a picture of Peter in the dock.
rd, telling the carpenters his history.














" I am emperor of the Russian empire.
lies many hundred miles to the north of
rope. My people are ignorant: they do










XLU5i1., miu LLaugL U LUC yjuJ o uun iUW w--
ships; he also taught them many oth,
things.
Peter built a splendid city in Russia, call
St. Petersburgh, and did so many good dee
that he became famous all over the world
and consequently he is now called by tl
name of Peter the Great. And when y<
come to read his history, you will say th
he deserves this title, for he made his peop
leave off a great many bad habits; taug
them useful trades, and engaged schoolmastu
to instruct their children.
Now, my young readers, if it should eg
be your lot to govern, which may be the caj
though not as a king, let all your action
like the Emperor Peter's, tend to the moi
improvement of those under you. Eve
master may be compared to a king reigni
over the little community whom he employ
and truly it may be said that, in proporti
as you enlighten and improve them by yc






,ood example, so much more will their ser-
ices be valuable to you.
Before I tell you any more, I should like
o ask you how long a time it would take you
o go to Amsterdam ?
Where do the Royal Family of Holland
reside ?
What are the names of the principal towns
n Holland ?
Where did Peter the Great work as a ship
carpenter ?















aS





78 PARLEY'S TALES




CHAPTER VIII.

PARLEY VISITS BRUSSELS, AND TELLS
ABOUT BELGIUM.

As Captain Philips was detained some time
at Amsterdam, I availed myself of the oppor-
tunity to visit Brussels, one of the largest
towns of Belgium, and the residence of the
king.
Brussels is a handsome city, and strongly
fortified.. I was very much pleased with its
squares, public buildings, walks, and foun-
tains, which are truly magnificent. This
place is celebrated for its manufacture of
lace, camlets, and tapestry, and the inhabit-
ants are an industrious and intelligent people.
Belgium is a new kingdom. It was at
one time under the dominion of the King of
Holland; but as this arrangement was forced
upon the Belgians without their consent,
and as the neonle were nuite liffirent from





ABOUT EUROPE. iU
s Dutch in their manners, language, and
ligion, the Belgian provinces revolted from
e crown of Holland, in the year 1830;
oclaimed their independence; and elected
rince Leopold of Saxe Coburg to be their
ng. This kingdom comprises the provinces
South Brabant, Liege, Namur, Hainault,
rest Flanders, East Flanders, Antwerp, part
Limbourg, and part of the Grand Duchy
Luxembourg. If you will look in the
ap of Europe for this country, you will see
a form resembles a triangle, the base of
which is the French frontier.
The general character of Belgium is that
f a low and level country, but it is highly
iltivated; this, however, has been effected
utirely by the industry of the inhabitants,
ie soil being naturally unproductive. It
produces wheat, rye, barley, oats, buck-
'heat, hemp, and flax. Tobacco is also
rown in some situations; and everywhere
ruits of the same kind as are grown in
England are objects of careful cultivation.
3elgium is not so well provided as Holland
vith canals, but has two good rivers, namely,





80 PARLEY'S TALES
the Maese and the Scheldt, besides other
streams. Its largest towns are Brussels,
Antwerp, Ghent, Liege, Louvain, Brughes,
Namur, and Tournay.
This country contains upwards of four
millions of inhabitants, who very much re-
semble the French in their general character,
and also speak the French language. The
greater part of them profess the Catholic re-
ligion, but all sects have the utmost liberty
of opinion and worship, and all their minis-
ters have salaries from the state. The king
of the Belgians is what is called a constitu-
tional monarch; that is, he rules according
to the laws of the country, like the King of
England. There are also two Houses of
Parliament, as in England, who make the
laws, and impose the taxes, but there are not
any nobles; nor can a female come to the
throne.
Having stayed two days at Brussels, and
acquired all the information I could about
the country and the people, I returned to
join Captain Philips at Amsterdam, very
much pleased with my journey.





ABOUT EUROPE.


always crowded with ships, and the streets
e crossed by canals, which bring the mer-
iandise close to the warehouses, which are
lilt on the quays. On the next page you
ill see a picture of Copenhagen.
The Danes have a language of their own.
could not understand it better than I could





8 PARLEY'S TALES














she language of the Dutch, but I obtain
what information I could respecting
Danes. I was much pleased with their I
pitality and general contentment, but I
very sorry to see a disposition to intempera
amongst them.
It is a great sin to get drunk, and a per
who is intoxicated is a very disgusting obji
I hope my little readers will have, as lonj
they live, the greatest dislike of drunken,
and let me advise them never to drink ard
spirits.





ABOUT EUROPE. 88
Denmark is a very flat country, and is
much subject to fogs. I hope you will re-
member that I told you it lies between the
North Sea and the Baltic Sea. It consists
of Zealand, Holstein, Lunenburgh, Jutland,
Iceland, and the Feroe Islands. The num-
ber of inhabitants is about three millions.
The name of the present king is Frederick
the Sixth.
While stopping at Copenhagen, I met
with an intelligent gentleman named Jen,
kins, who having lately been to ICELAN&D
gave me an interesting account of it. If youth
look in the map, you will see it is situated
in the Northern Sea, a long way to the west
of Norway. It contains very lofty moun-
tains, subterraneous fires, volcanoes, and hot
springs. Mount Hecla, a volcanic moun-
tain, is a mile high, and what will perhaps
appear strange to you, its top is always co-
vered with snow. The gentleman told me
that the largest hot spring in this niountain
has an opening in the middle, seventeen feet
wide, in which the water rises and falls; and





84 PARLEY'S TALES
lumn of boiling water is frequently shot
one hundred feet high. He also infon
me that the most dreadful eruption on rec
occurred at Mount Hecla in the year 1V
Three fire-spouts broke out at one ti
which, after rising a considerable height
the air, formed a torrent of red-hot lava,
flowed for six weeks, and ran a distance
sixty miles to the sea, in a broken brei
of about twelve miles; by which tw
rivers were dried up, twenty-one villi
totally overwhelmed by fire or water,
thirty-four very materially injured. Of
inhabitants, two hundred and twenty
rished by fire, and twenty-one by wa
numberless cattle were also destroyed,
the fish driven from the coast. The ii
bitants are called Icelanders; they are ral
tall, of a frank, open countenance, with
low flaxen hair. They are intelligent
contented, and possess a liveliness of dii
stion rarely to be met with in other part





LU K ZjIIiVW l &


CHAPTER X.

PARLEY LEAVES COPENHAGEN, AND
TELLS ABOUT SWEDEN.
VING been a month at Copenhagen, our
) left that place, and sailed for St. Peters-
gh, in Russia. I hope you will look at a
3 of Europe, and see the course we sailed,
ough the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Fin-
1. I persuaded Mr. Jenkins to go on
Ird our vessel, and so he went with us to
Petersburgh. While on board of the
p, he told me he had travelled in Sweden,
rway, and Lapland, and his account of
>se places I shall now communicate to you.
SWEDEN is an extensive country, covered
h rocks, woods, and mountains. By re-
ring again to the map of Europe, you will
it is bounded by the Baltic, the Gulf of
thnia, and the North Sea. It comprises
pland, Norway, Gothland, Finland, West







Nnrlanlr annr Rlnthn;a w4t annmi


tney go to cnurcn, and, atter asking tie pi
tection of Heaven, they again engage
their pleasures.
There was once a very remarkable Swe
ish king, who lived a good many years as
His name was Charles the Twelfth. He I
came king when he was but fifteen years o
The kings of Denmark, Poland, and Ri
sia, who lived near him, thought Char
was so young, that they should be able
take his kingdom from him. While tl


|





BOUT EUROPE.


lenly raised a small army of brave men, and
arched into Denmark.
Here he was met by an army of Danes,
nd a ferce battle was fought between the
iwedes and Danes, but the Swedes gained
he victory, and Charles made the Danish
ing promise to undertake no more mischief
against him.
Charles now marched his army into Po-
and, drove the king of Poland from his
hrone, and placed another in his stead.
'harles was so animated by this success, that
ie determined to march against the Russians.
At a town called Pultowa, the army of
1harles met the army of the Russian king,
nd here they fought a bloody battle. The
rmy of Charles was beaten, and nearly all
vere killed. Charles fled from the field with
Sfew followers, but he was closely pursued
by his enemies.
After a long and weary journey, he arrived
n Turkey, and sought the protection of the
rurkish ruler. To save himself from his
enemies, Charles now pretended to be sick,
utd lay ten months in bed.





86 PARLEY'S TALE
At length he determined 1
own country, if possible.


When you get to be a little older, yoi
should read the history of Charles. You wil
find it highly interesting: it will teach yoi
that he was a very brave man; it wil alsi
teach you that, like many other kings
Charles preferred his own fame to the goo<
of his people, and that to gratify his persona
ambition, he caused many thousands to b
killed in battle, and thousands more to suffe
the greatest distress. This, however, wa
the common fault of kings in his day; an




ABOUT BU5OWEM


even now umorunsmw y, Lauy unav .nam eg
come wise enough to refrain from seeing
and destroying one another's possessions;
that is what they call war, and boat about
as if they were doing good actions. Let us,
however, hope that they will become wiser
and better.

NORWAY, as you will remember from
what I have already told you, lies in the
north of jurope, and ik a very cold country.
For nearly a thousand yaIa it was a pro-
vince of Denmark, but by late treaties among
European sovereigns, it ws united to Swe-
den. Its chief towns are Christijan and
Bergen. It is the most mountainous country
in the world; and the rivers and cataracts
which intersect the mountains, render tra-
velling exceedingly dangerous. The inha-
bitants have few corn fields or gardens, but
subsist chiefly by hunting and fishing.
Horse-flesh is publicly sold in the markets
as the ordinary food of the people.
On the coast of Norway, as you will see
by looking to your map, are a great number







of small islands, which are occupied by bir;
and fishermen. And there is also a dange:
ous vortex of the sea called the Maelsron
Here is a picture of it.















The water in this whirlpool runs round
the most furious manner. It roars with
noise like thunder. If ships happen to
sailing near it, they are drawn into it a
dashed to pieces
Whales are sometimes forced into it a






wards it by the current, they become sensi-
e of their danger, and endeavour to escape
om it; but finding they cannot, they utter
ke most piteous moans as they are drawn
ong by the water.
There are a great many bears in Norway,
at they seldom do any injury to the inha-
,tants. A Norwegian was once about to
ross a river in a boat. While he was sitting
. one end of the boat, a bear very gravely
walked into the other end of it, and seated
mself. The boatman rowed across the
ver; the bear then jumped upon the land,
id ran into the wood without offering to
ay toll, or even saying so much to the
batman as Thank you."
Besides bears, the other wild animals are,
ie elk, lynx, wolf, glutton, fox, and hare;
at the most singular creature is the leming,
, Norwegian mouse, of a reddish colour,
id about five inches long. These animals
*oceed in vast numbers from the ridge of
olen towards the sea, devouring every pro-
ict of the soil in their course, and at last
ley devour each other.





Is PARLEY'S TALES
The people of Norway have some ver
curious customs. At a funeral, while carry
ing the body to the grave, a man goes before
the coffin, playing on a fiddle. In some part
of the country, the people speak to the dea
body and ask him why he died? whether hi
wife and neighbours were kind to him ? an
many other questions.
There are about one million of people i:
Norway, who speak the Danish language
with a mixture of Swedish words. They ar
a very rude and ignorant people. In winter
the weather is exceedingly cold, and th
inhabitants wrap themselves up in furs. I
summer the weather is very hot.

LAPLAND is the most northern portion c
Europe; and by looking to the map you wi]
see it joins Norway. There are no larg
towns in Lapland. The country is desolat
and barren, and the people wander about
living in huts in winter, and in tents, made a
deer skin, in summer.
In the northern parts of Lapland, the su
is absent about seven weeks in winter. Th





ABOUT EUROPE. 93
rs are visible at noon, and the moon shines
hJout intermission. In the summer, on
! contrary, the sun never sets for seven
eks together.
rhe cold in Lipland is excessive. About
a hundred years ago, an army of Swedes,
visiting of seven thousand men, were
zen to death while crossing one of the
untains of Lapland. When they were
nd, some of them were sitting up, some
re lying down, and others were kneeling;
were stiff and dead!
The people of Lapland have a high opi-
in of black cats-almost every family has
Lack cat, which they talk to, and ask advice
as if it could really understand them.
whenever the people go on fishing or hunt-
parties, they always take a black cat with
am.
The people of Lapland ride about on
dges drawn by reindeer. The reindeer is
'ery swift animal, and will convey a person
rty or forty miles without stopping.





94 PARLEY'S TALUS



CHAPTER XI.
PETER PARLEY TELLS ABOUT RUSSIA.
IN a few weeks after we sailed from Copel
hagen, we arrived at St. Petersburgh.
St. Petersburgh is one of the largest citi(
in Russia. The emperor, or king of Russi
resides here. If you look on the map, ye
will see it is situated on the river Neva, nea
the Gulf of Finland. It was founded 1
Peter the Great, a little more than a hu]
dred years ago ; and in one of the squares
a very fine bronze statue of that great ma
mounted on a beautiful Arabian horse, whi4
is trampling the serpent or envy under i
feet. The streets are straight and general
broad and level; some have a walk along 4(
middle, shaded by poplars, and canals pa
through many of them, by which the inhat
tants are supplied with water. The pub]
buildings are very magnificent, and the ma
sions of the nobility are on a very large seal





ABOUT EUROPE. 95

[ere is a picture of St. Petersburgh.













Russia is one of the largest countries in
Irope, but not a third of the country is
efficiently peopled or properly cultivated.
contains about fifty millions of people-
e greater part of whom are poor and unci-
ised, and in a state of slavery to the nobles,
I have told you in another part of my book.
hough often treated with great cruelty, they
e cheerful in their disposition.
In some parts of Russia, the climate is so
vere, that icicles frequently hane to the





Ub rAUl.&I b a TAJLU
eye-lashes, and the drivers of carriages
often found frozen to death on their sea
Among the natural curiosities of Russia,
bergy, or rocks of ice, found in the Froi
Ocean, of many miles in extent, and of
astonishing height, which are adorned I
cathedrals with pinnacles, and reflect ev
variety of colour.
The principal rivers are the Dnie]
Volga, Don, Dwina, and Oby, which abol
with fish.
I staid at St. Petersburgh about
months. While there, I one day met i
an English trader who had been to Mosc
and he told me a good deal about it. I
cow is the largest city in Russia. Peter
Great was born there.
Twenty-five years ago, Buonaparte,
peror of France, came with an immense a
against Russia. He entered Moscow witl
soldiers, and expected to spend the wi
there and to march to St. Petersburgh it
spring. But the Russians set fire to the
and the flames spread from house to h<
and from street to street.





ABOUT EUROPE. 97

Here is a pictureof the scene.





rAiJab aj AALJ.


I must tell you about the manner of trave
ling in winter, in Russia, for it is singula
They have very large sledges covered wil
furs, drawn by four or six horses, and on lor
journeys, the travellers eat and sleep in the
sledges. In this way they get along ve:
comfortably, even when the weather is e
ceedingly cold.




AfL UU& 01.* 7U
While I was in St. Petersburgh, I heard a
ry interesting story about a young woman
Filed Prascovia. I think you will be pleased
:th this story, so I will tell it to you.


There once lived in Russia a man by the
mne of Loupoloff. In some way or other,
offended the emperor, or king of Russia.
he king was very angry, and so he sent
Dupoloff and his wife and little daughter
r away into Siberia.
Siberia is a desolate country, and is many
mdred miles from St. Petersburgh. They
are very unhappy in Siberia. The country
as covered with woods, and these woods
-re filled with wild beasts. Besides, they
Id no pleasant friends there, and nobody
n be happy without friends around them,
Prascovia, the little daughter of Loupoloff,
me at length to be fifteen years old; she
is a very good girl, and loved her parents
aarly. One day, she discovered that her
their was very sad, and that her mother was
seping. "Oh! my dear parents," said




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