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Title: Travels and extraordinary adventures of Bob the squirrel
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Table of Contents
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
    Half Title
        Page i
    Frontispiece
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Preface
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
        Page viii
    Voyages and adventures of Bob the squirrel
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Unnumbered ( 27 )
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        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Unnumbered ( 34 )
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 34a
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Unnumbered ( 44 )
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 40a
        Page 41
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        Unnumbered ( 56 )
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        Page 52a
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        Unnumbered ( 68 )
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        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 62a
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        Unnumbered ( 80 )
        Page 69
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        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 72a
        Page 73
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        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
    Advertising
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
    Back Matter
        Page 89
Full Text















BOB THE SQUIRREL.















1'








THE


TRAVELS

AND

EXTRAORDINARY ADVENTURES

or


BOB THE SQUIRREL,


ILLUSTRATED WITH TWELVE ENGRAVINGS

BY

3fstingu x p Iartsrt



PHILADELP HIA:
GEO. S. APPLETON, 164 CHESTNUT STREET.
NEW YORK:
D. APPLETON & CO., 900 BROADWAY.
1850.



















Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1846,
BY GEO. S. APPLETON,
in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States, in and
for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.











PREFACE.


THE following little story has been put in the
present shape by a Father; and he takes the pri-
vilege of a Preface to say a word in behalf of
children, as REASONABLE BEINGS. Whoever will
take pains to talk to them, and to listen to and
understand what they say, and what they ask,
will find in the first much that will be worth re-
membering, and in the second much gat will
challenge the mature reason to answer. It is
only those who are ignorant of the capacity of i-






vi PREFACE.

fancy, who pronounce children uninteresting, or
who imagine it beneath the intellect of the adult
to converse with the child.

In whatever household it is made a daily prac-
tice to hold a conversation in which the children
can participate, for an hour on each day, it will
be found that the time thus spent is more fruitful
in good influences than all the time which is de-
voted to set and formal instructions can be; in-
deed, such twilight conversations, if properly di-
rected, develop what the child daily learns, by
enabling him to apply it. Give a boy a knife,
and a girl a box of colours, and each will at once
put the present to use, and affix a value to it.
But give them a task in certain things which you





PRBIAOB.


tell them to commit to memory to apply when
they grow up," and they will, in spite of them.
selves, forget nearly as fast as they learn, and find
the acquisition of knowledge an irksome and ap-
parently profitless occupation-disheartening and
disagreeable.

Converse with them daily, and you put what
they acquire to instant profit, They discover the
advantage of education, by being enabled to make
it instantly available in their conversation with.
their elders. And, on the other hand, those elders
will not fail to perceive that there are aspects of
almost every subject to which children are the first
to call their attention. The little fellow in frock






VI1 PIBFAGE.

and trowsers looks under the table,whie his so-
niors see only the cover.

Stories" are always interesting to children -
and are much better told than read. A very little
fancy will enable a parent, before such kind and
respectful critics as his children, to introduce
passage bearing on the conduct and character
of members of his auditory; and reproof or en-
couragement, playfully conveyed in this manner,
is sure to be remembered.








VOYAGES AND ADVENTURES


OF

BOB THE SQUIRREL.



"Now, father! a story--a sto-
ry!" said Mr. Goodman's children,
as their father and mother drew up
to the fire one winter evening, after
the tea-service was removed-" A
story! a story !"





ADVENTURES OF


There were two children; one a
fine little girl, whose name was
Mary, the other a little boy, whose
name was Frank. He looked a
little pale, as if he had been sick,
and one of his arms was hung in a
handkerchief, which was fastened
round his neck. Why this was
done, the little reader will find
out, before the end of the book.
"Well," said the kind father,
willing to oblige his children,





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


" what shall the story be ? About
a good boy ?"
No, father," said little Mary,
"we have heard quite enough
about good boys." *
About a bad one, then ?"
"No, sir, if you please," said
Frank. He was very much afraid
if his father began a story about
bad boys, that. it might come a
great deal too near home. Histo-
ries of bad girls and good girb





ADVENTURES OF


were also objected to, and Mr.
Goodman cut the dispute short by
commencing:
Once upon a time-"
"That's the way you always
begin," said Mary.
Well, you wouldn't have him
say 'twice upon a time,' would
you ?" asked Frank, who tried to
be thought smart, like a great many
other boys that we see. Now if
these little folks could only hear





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


with other people's ears, how very
little wit there is in some of these
attempts to be satirical, we think
they would not be so fond of ta-
king up" their brothers and sis-
ters; and trying to be amusing
at the expense of their neighbours.
Mr. Goodman thought all this, but |
did not say it. He smiled, and
continued his stly:
"Once upon a time there was
a little mischievous-"
k Ar





ADVENTURES OF


"Boy," whispered Mary.
"Squirrel," said her father, and
Frank laughed with a look of tri-
umph at Mary, to think he had
escaped so nicely.
"Well, this young squirrel felt
very large of his age, and waspot
much disposed to listen to what
his father and pother said to
him."
"Ho! ho!" shouted Frank-
"squirrels a-talking !"





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


"( The squirrel's name was Ro-
bert, and his playmates called him
Bob, for shortness. He was sent
to a very excellent school, and his
father and mother tried every
means to teach him to climb up in
the world; but I am sorry to say
that Master Bob was sometimes
naughty and disobedient. He paid
little attention to the entreaties
of his mother, and the good advice
of his father, but was continually





ADVENTURES OF


running away, and getting into all
manner of troubles and diflftl-
ties. His father and mother lived
in a very large and respectable old
oak, where he might have been as
happy as the day is long. Close
. to this oak was a large lake-"
Such a one as our Frank went
.sailing upon ?" asked Mary.
"Very much, I dare say," said
the father, and went on with the
story.





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


"There were plenty of fine
apse and nut trees near hithome,
and a delightful large playground
for Master Bob, all round the
tree. Robert's father and mother
always loved to see hifl playing
here where he was safe and happy,
for he was their only son."
"Had he a sister ?" asked
*
Mary.
"Yes," replied Mr. Goodman,
9 one."




ADVENTURES OF


"Oh, I say this is not fair, fa-
ther !" cried Frank. *
What?" asked his father.
"Oh, you know what I mean,"
answered Frank, pretending to be
very much displeased, although he
was really as anxious to hear the
rest as his sister Mary was. The
parents exchanged pleased glances,
and Mr. Goodman continued:
The peaceable life of a well-
disposed and well-behaved young





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


squirrel did not seem to suit the
temper and disposition of Master
Bob. He was continually running
away from home, and putting his
good father and mother in trouble
to know what had become of him;
and at last he wished, like some
bad boys I have heard of, that he
could get away frop the care and
control of his parents altogether.
He saw that some wild young
squirrels of his acquaintance,





ADVENTURES OF


whose friends did not do their
duty by them, were left to go
when they pleased, and come home
when it suited them; and he de-
sired, in search of the largest li-
berty, to go to sea."
"Oh father!" interrupted Mary,
"that's whIt Frank is always a-
saying !"
Frank gave his sister a look
Which was intended to be very
cross; but it ended in a lauh,





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


ani Mr. Goodman went on with
the story.
"(The little squirrel thought he
should like to take a trip over the
lake. He was tired, he said, of
always seeing the same trees, and.
the same green grass, and It-
wanted to find out what the rest
of the world was made of. His
father and mother charged him
not to go, and his father warned -,
h'L that he would meet in ths
V

Ir





ADVENTURES OF


world many artful and cruel ene-
mies, and that he was too young
to guard against danger. Master
Bob, who thought he knew what
was right, was fully determined
upon going. Wilful boys-"
c "Boys, father ?" interrupted
Frank, with a curious look.
"Squirrels, I should say," an-
swered his father; "but boys are
just as bad.
"Wilful and naughty y44,


9





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


squirrels are never willing to listen
to the advice of their elders, but
choose to try for themselves. So
when Master Bob found he could
not get permission, he determined
to go without. He stole away
from home, and making a raft or
boat out of the bark of a willow,
loaded it with nuts as his provi-
sion. He then launched his boat,
and skipped on board, with as
much importance as the rocking





ADVENTURES OF


of his crazy vessel would permit.
His parents, who discovered what
'he was doing. too late to stop him,
called after him; but he paid no
heed, and his father then told him
that he really hoped he would
meet difficulty enough to bring
him back home, in his senses."
"Be still!" shouted Frank to
his sister.
"Why, what's the' matter ?"
asked Mrs. Goodman.





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


"Mary might look at father,
when he -is talking, and quit
laughing at me!"
-" The old squirrels, when they
found they could not check their
undutiful child, ran up into the
branches of their tree, to see him
fairly off. Notwithstanding his
undutiful behaviour, they hoped
he would learn good from his tra-
vels. The bad conduct of chil-
dren makes parents bitterlygrieve,





ADVENTURES OF


but cannot kill their affection.
Captain Robert Squirrel, as the
vain Master Bob now styled him-
self, hoisted his sail with great
pomposity-"
"What is pomposity, father ?"
inquired Frank.
"Why, parade, or dignity, or
consequence; or, as you boys say,
brag; such as a little fellow I
know of shows, when he has his
tin sword, his wooden musket, and





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


his noisy drum, all at once, and
fancies himself a whole regiment,
with a band of music."
Oh, is that all ?" asked Frank;
" I thought pomposity might be a
name for the mast."
Father laughed and tried to go
on with the story; but Frank was
curious now to know what kind
of a sail the squirrel had.
"Why, it was a sail au natural,
as the French would say; a do-





ADVENTURES OF


mestic arrangement entirely, which
Bob always took with him, wherev-
er he went. And, by the way, my
dear children," said Mr. Goodman,
" we cannot too much admire the
goodness of God in furnishing the
lower animals with the quality
called instinct. Man has reason
for his guide, because he is called
upon to act as a responsible being."
"What is responsible, father ?"
asked Frank.





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


"Well, really, the more I ex-
plain, the deeper I get into diffi-
culty," said Mr. Goodman, smiling.
"A responsible being is one who
knows right from wrong, and will
be held to answer for what he
does; now, animals are not re-
sponsible-"
Why, then," asked Mary, do
people whip horses ?"
"Because instinct leads horses
to fear blows; and therefore, in.





ADVENTURES OF


stinct makes them shun what has
caused them a whipping before.
But if I do not make haste, we
shall not get done with the story
until bed-time.
"Bob crossed his paws know-
ingly before him, and had nothing
to do but sit still, and be blown
along. It was now fine weather
with Captain Robert. He looked
upon the sky, and the water, and
the shore, as if they all belonged





BOB THE SQUIRREL. 31

to him, and he was merely taking
a voyage of survey over his pos-
sessions. Every thing attracted
his attention; and he made him-
self very happy, and very much at
home in his excursion.
"The fine weather continued
for two days and two nights, and
Captain Robert Squirrel break-
fasted, dined, and supped at his
own hours, and helped himself
first, because there was nobody





ADVENTURES OF


else to eat. He thought it was
mighty fine not to have to wait
until his elders were served, and
only wondered that he could have
been willing to submit so long to
his parents, when, by launching
out into the world, he could be so
much more of a hero, and his own
master besides."
Mrs. Goodman here watched
her son's eyes, and found by their
animated expression that Master





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


Frank was vety much, just now,
of the opinion of Captain Robert.
Once, indeed, Frank's lips parted,
as if to speak; but he wisely
thought he would wait, and hear
a little more of the squirrel's ad-
ventures, before he committed
himself.
This was all very fine," con-
tinued Mr. Goodman, "but, un-
luckily, sailors have not the direc-
tion of the weather. If they had,
C





ADVENTURES OF


any old lady might go to sea, with-
out losing the starch from her
nightcap, and any rattle-headed
boy could launch away, whenever
he was tired of his own good home.
On the third day, a furious storm
spoiled his breakfast. Heigho!
thought Bob, this is life, and some-
thing like! So he kept' sail
spread, in defiance of wind and
weather, and fancied he was going
ahead at a fine rate. But at last





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


his pride was upset; Captain Ro-
bert, provisions, and all, were
spilt into the water, and his little
boat was made a complete wreck.
He had to swim for it; and if his
father had not taught him how, he
would have been in a sad plight.
"Captain Robert did not feel
like Captain any more, but like
plain Bob, and very sorry at that,
and heartily did he wish that ho
was safe and sound at home again,





ADVENTURES OF


and in the tree he used to despise
so much. Thoroughly broken
down, tired, and almost dead with
cold, he succeeded, at last, in get-
ting to the shore.
But it requires a great deal to
teach wisdom to a discontented
squirrel, or to a disobedient boy.
So the shipwrecked Captain Ro-
bert hardly found himself safe on
land, before his vanity returned
again; and he was rather pleased





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


than otherwise to have a ship-
wreck to boast of. What matters
a little drenching ? he said. What
great squirrel ever went free of
dangers ? How many famous na-
vigators have been cast upon un-
known shores!
"But while he tried to make
light of his misfortunes, and to
laugh at his distress, night came,
and found him unprovided with
food and lodging. The disobedi-






ADVENTURES OF


ent child, who could treat with
contempt the tears of his mother,
was not able to put aside, so easily,
the cravings of his stomach; and
Bob, like many naughty boys, be-
gan to think how convenient it
would be to have parents, if he
could only neglect them always,
except when he wanted to eat or
to sleep. He turned his steps to-
ward a neighboring forest, and
was fortunate enough to encounter





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


there a kind old lady in Dame
Rabbit.
She saw that he was a runa.
way, by his looks; but, good and
obliging creature that she was, she
knew that even a runaway must
eat. So Captain Robert, with all
his pride and dignity, was glad to
accept the hospitality and bounty
of the poor old dame; just as I
have known some other children
to run away from home, where





ADVENTURES OF


they had plenty to eat, and a nice
bed to sleep in, and to trespass
upon the charity of those who
have enough to do to provide for
their own."
Has black Jane any children ?"
asked little Mary.
"Ask Frank," said his mother,
" I believe he has spent a night
there."
Poor Frank! He made no an-
swer 'to this teasing, and Mr.





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


Goodman again resumed the nar-
rative.
"Dame Rabbit gave him a nice
supper, and a comfortable lodging,
and in the& morning Bob took
leave of his kind hostess, and de-
termined .upon climbing a high
hill which, he saw. a. distance.
Now browsing a little on the grass,
as boys pick apples or berries by
the way; now smoothing his fur
a little, which had suffered some





ADVENTURES OF


in the shipwreck, as runaways
scrape off a little mud at a time;
and now staring about him, as
truants generally do, to divert
their conscience from its re-
proaches, Bob found the sun al-
ready set, when he reached the
top of the hill. There he was,
without any supper, too late to go
back, and not a tree in sight in
which he could make his bed for
the night.





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


"He began to think that the
independence for which he had
longed was no such very desirable
thing, after all; and he thought
of the times when he so very fool-
ishly ran off at bed-time, and put
his good mother to so much trou-
ble to compel him to take his own
comfortable rest. What could he
do ? All his boasted freedom
could not help him, and he was
too happy when he discovered the





ADVENTURES OF


residence of Sir Hare, of whom
he very penitently begged supper
and lodging. Sir Hare looked
very curiously at him-"
Did he tell him he would send
him to jail, as a little vagrant ?"
asked Mary.
"Why, what put that in your
head, child ?" said her father.
"Oh, nothing; only it's what
Squire Jones-"
"Do be still interrupting!"





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


shouted Frank. We can't take
any sense of father's story."
We, indeed," said Mrs. Good-
man, laughing till she almost cried,
while Mr. Goodman continued:
Sir Hare looked very earnestly
and suspiciously at the young wan-
derer. If he had-given him what
he needed most, Bob would have
been warmed, with a good .whip-
ping.; but. as people are not very
apt to volunteer in a disagreeable





ADVENTURES OF


duty, Master Bob did not receive
what would have done him more
good than his supper. If he had
been severely punished that night
by Sir Hare, he might have hum-
bly asked to be sent home to his
parents.
But as Master Bob did not
receive the whipping he merited,
his supper and comfortable lodg-
ing made him as bold and foolish
as ever. Having found a lodging





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


two nights with the charitable, he
thought now that all he had to do
was to enjoy himself all day, and
trust to fortune that some good
animal would give him a bed at
night. So he wandered and ca-
pered about, as the whim took
him, roving here, wandering there,
and taking as little thought or
care of himself as if he had his
mother at hand, to run home to,
as soon as he needed rest.





ADVENTURES OF


Before noon, however, he was
pretty well tired and rather hun-
gry. The chance food that runa-
ways pick up is not like the whole-
some fare that children receive at
home, and in Bob's hunger, he
stumbled upon some articles which
made him sick. Young gentlemen
are very apt: to think that their
mothers do not know much, and
that their fathers are very little
wiser; but if Bob's mother had





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


been with him he would not have
poisoned himself with wild ivy."
Wild ivy !" said Mary, laugh-
ing, and pinching her brother's
elbow, thls what Frank ate !"
"Oh quit !" cried Frank, and
his father went on again.
"Weary, and not quite so con-
fident, Master Bob wandered about
in the afternoon, and soon began
to have his fears whether a lodg-
ing was to be had that night for
D





ADVENTURES OF


the asking. He met no respecta-
ble animal to take pity on the
runaway, and although a snake or
two would have been glad to have
taken him in, h happened to
know enough to think their kind-
ness would not have been much
to his profit.
"An obliging porcupine did in-
deed offer him part of her den,
assuring him he would not be at
all in the way. But Bob soon





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


found that if he was not in the
way of the porcupines, they were
very much in his, with their sharp
quills, and he was obliged to take
to the oper9 for it.
"To add to his discomfort, it
rained smartly. Crouched down
in the grass, soaking wet, and
half frozen, Captain Bob would
very gladly have given up his free-
dom, for shelter in his mother's
arms.





52 ADVENTURES OF

"He did not cling to his cold
lodgings very long after daybreak,
though like some other young peo-
ple, he used to like very well to
cling to his bed, aft le breakfast
bell had rung at home."
"Oh ho!" cried Frank, break-
fast bells in a rabbit's nest !"
"Spirit-broken and cowed, at
early dawn he recommended his
wanderings. The storm continued
through the whole day. The


.





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


country was deserted and wild.
Not a tree afforded food or shel-
ter, and scanty indeed was the
fare tiat the poor squirrel could
find. q
"' Completely cured of his desire
to travel, Captain Robert would
gladly have taken the way back
to his own green forest, and his
father's house. He looked on
every side for some friend who
might direct him,-but who would





ADVENTURES OF


be strolling about in such weather
as this, except foolish, disobedient,
wandering Robert ?
"Troubles never come singly
to the truant; and while our poor
squirrel was looking for the way
home, and thinking of nothing
else, he came very near being
saved the trouble of looking fur-
ther.
% "A hungry, mischievous fox,
saw and almost caught him. In





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


spite of his fatigue and hunger,
unlucky Bob had to skip for it
now. The fox was too fast for
him on the level ground, and
Master Robert just saved his dis-
tance, by running fleetly up some
ragged rocks, where the fox could
not follow.
"Here was a pretty case for
Robert the bold captain, who de-
spised danger, and laughed at the
tears of his mother, and the warn-





ADVENTURES OF


ings of his father. His fine bushy
tail dragging on the wet earth, his
paws torn and bleeding with run-
ning among the sharp stones, and
not a bit of food, or a drop of
drink, to be found on the barren
rock to which he had been com-
pelled to betake himself for
safety."
Was the fox a hound, father ?"
asked Mary.
"No, child, I imagine not," an-





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


swered Mr. Goodman, "A hound
is a dog."
"Oh, that's what I mean-a
dog fox-no, a fox hound," said
Mary, clapping her little hands.
" It was Squire Jones's fox hounds
that chased our Frank up into the
hay-loft."
Captain Robert Squirrel's
plight was a bad one, indeed,"
continued Mr. Goodman. "He
feared to descend, cold, shivering,





ADVENTURES OF


and all exposed as he was; for
though he could not see the fox,
who could tell out of what hole
his cunning and watchful enemy
would pop, to seize him ? And
if he stayed where he was, the
chances were that he would die of
cold and hunger.
Now, then, Bob was compelled
to confess his faults, and to own
to himself how foolish and wicked
he had been, while every moment





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


he imagined his foe was watching
his distress from some sly corner,
and making up his mind what
sauce was best to eat squirrels
with.
'Oh, dear!' sobbed the poor
runaway,'if I was only at home,
in my native forest, and in my
father's tree, I would never run
away again, nor wander off from
my parents! There is the hole
in the old oak, my mother's cup-





ADVENTURES OF


board, all filled with apples and
nuts, and nice acorns for a relish,
and they have no need to-day to
wet so much as the tips of their
ears in the rain! And here am
I, half drowned, and starving be-
sides There is my comfortable
bed of dry, sweet leaves, and no
dangers near it, while here I must
run for my life, without a tree to
take refuge in, and no rest for my
weary limbs, and no sleep for my





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


eyelids! Oh, my dear, wise fa-
ther what a wicked fool I was to
scorn your advice Oh, my poor,
dear mother! How much better
I should have fared, if I had
minded your entreaties !'
All his tears, however, did not
help the matter any, but rather
made it worse. The more he
thought of his home, the worse
the present place seemed; and
the more he lamented himself, the





ADVENTURES OF


more his conscience smote him.
While he was thus deploring his
folly, and nearly blind with grief,
an enemy came from a new and
unexpected quarter.
"A raven, who, like the poor
squirrel, was half famished, made
a dive after him; and Bob, who
had taken a high place to get
away from the beast, was glad to
hurry down to escape the talons
of the bird.





SON fta *QUIRREL.


"Away he scampered, and the
raven after him; fear giving him
new strength, and the terror of
the raven making him forget the
fox.
"But that hungry gentleman,
who had merely taken a nap with
one eye open, while he waited for
the squirrel to come down from
his perch, was awakened by the
outcry which was made by the
pursuer and the pursued, and the





ADVENTURES OF


poor squirrel found himself in a
double danger. The fox was at
his heels, and the raven was over
his head. If there had been a
tree by which he could have got
away from the fox, it would not
have saved him from.the raven;
and if there had been a hole which
would have protected him from
the bird, the beast would have
followed him into it.
Which of the two deaths he





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


would die seemed now the only
choice left for him; and the raven
at last settled that matter, by
catching him up, and giving him
a sail in the air, as an offset to
his former sail on the water.
Master Reynard, the fox, was
sadly disappointed at thus losing
his dinner, and ran along under-
neath them several rods, in the
hope that the raven would find
the load too much, and let poor
a





ADVENTURES OF


Bob down again, to be welcomed
by his foxship's fine rows of sharp
teeth.
"But there was no such good
luck that day for the fox. The
squirrel, weak, and famished, and
unresisting, was an easy burthen
for the raven. Away she flew,
over mountain and valley, and
rock and field, making herself
quite happy, in the expectation of
the fine treat the squirrel would





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


afford her young ones. There is,
however, many a slip betwixt cup
and lip.
"An eagle, who had watched
the whole affair, thought he would
have a word in the matter. The
King of Birds determined to seize
both the captor and captive; so,
sweeping along, he gave the raven
a furious blow, but missed half
his prize. The raven let poor
Bob go, and down he went, down,





ADVENTURES OF,


down, down. Happily, the eagle
left off hunting the squirrel, to
pursue the raven."
"What was Bob thinking of,
when he was falling ?" asked
Frank.
I declare! What a child !"
cried Mary. "As if any body
could think, when he was falling !"
"But they can, though, Miss
Mary," said Frank, and I know
it!"





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


How ?" asked his father.
"Why, when I was falling from
the loft-"
Where the fox-hounds had
chased you ?" asked Mrs. Good-
man.
Frank blushed as he answered
"Yes, mother." And then he
added, "I thought a thousand
years in one minute !"
Father and mother, and Mary,
and even Frank, had a hearty





ADVENTURES OF


laugh, and then Mr. Goodman
went on with the story.
"Fortunately for Bob-or, I
ought to say, providentially, for
Providence takes care even of the
naughty, and gives them'a chance
to try again, when they are really
sorry, and mean to do better-
providentially for the squirrel, he
fell into a thick tree, where he
lodged, and the leaves and
branches concealed him from his





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


cruel enemy. He was torn, and
bloody, and weak, and could only
use one fore paw, for the other
was broken."
"Ho !" shouted little Frank,
"Now I *say you ar'n't fair !-
You said you wouldn't tell my
story!"
"But you are not a squirrel,
Frank," said his mother, laughing.
" Besides, I did not hear your fa-
ther make any such promise."





ADVENTURES OF


"Well," said Frank, a little
puzzled, "he looked the pro-
mise."
"You are a physiognomist,
Frank," said his father, smiling.
No, sir, I am sure I am not,"
said Frank; but, what kind of
a person is a phys say it again,
father! I know I can't be one,
because I can't tell what it
means."
"It is one who reads faces,





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


Frank; and children and dogs are
the best in the world."
Oh, let's have the rest of the
story, father," said little Mary.
"Well," the father resumed,
"Bob fell asleep with fatigue, and
the stunning effect of the fall.
When he opened his eyes, what
was his joy to find himself in his
own little bed. His father was
near him, and his mother, who
was glad to get her little bad





ADVENTURES OF


child back, sat at the foot of the
bed, with her hands to her eyes,
crying.
They had so much pity for
him, that they did not speak one
word of reproof, because they
thought he had suffered enough.
The doctor came, and hurt him
more in setting his arm-"
Arm, father ?" said Frank.
"Paw, I mean. The doctor
hurt Bob more than he hurt him-





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


self in falling; but he behaved
like a little hero, and promised
never, never, never to run away
any more!"
"Did he keep the promise?"
asked little Mary.
We don't know," answered her
mother, "but have got to see, yet."
"There! there !" said Frank,
"I knew it would turn out to
be me! Didn't I run away, and
take John Dory's boat ?"





ADVENTURES OF


"And get upset," said his sis-
ter.
"And swim to land, like a good
fellow," said Frank.
"And beg a lodging and sup-
per, half-drowned and half-starved,
of old black Jane," added Mary.
"And get chased by Squire
Jones's dogs," said Frank.
Up into the hay-loft," added
Mary.
"And fall and break my arm,"





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


said Frank, with a look at his
now useless limb in the handker-
chief.
"Yes, my poor boy," said his
father, drawing Frank between
his knees, and parting the hair
affectionately over his forehead.
" All these mishaps certainly be-
fell you, in consequence of your
playing truant.
I read this little story I have
been telling you, a great many





ADVENTURES OF


years ago, when I was a little boy,
as you are now. When I began
to-night, I was going to tell it as
I read it, as near as I could recol-
lect; but it seemed to make so
much amusement for you all, that
I altered it a little as I went
along.
"You have suffered severely
for disobedience; but you must
thank your Father in Heaven for
preserving your life, and for giving





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


you a lesson in your youth, which
you will never forget, I hope, let
you live as long as you may."


And now, having heard the fa-
ther's story, and the children's
comments, let us hope that the
lesson will .not be lost upon any
of our little readers. Children
look only to present amusement,
being unable, even if they desired
so to do, to understand causes, or





ADVENTURES OF


to predict consequences. They
may always feel sure that what
their parents enjoin, is the result
of knowledge and experience;
and they are in duty bound to
have so much confidence in those
who have them in charge, as to
obey without hesitation and with-
out doubt.
The story of Robert the Squir-
rel is what is called a FABLE; and
it relates things which could not





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


be true of a squirrel, but which
may be true of little boys and
girls.
The instinct of the young squir-
rel leads him to do what is best
without so much instruction from
his parents as little boys and
girls need; but our reason, while
it shows us how to do right, is
apt often to invent excuses for us
when we do wrong.
As children live longer, they
F





BOB THE SQUIRREL.


discover every day the cause of
prohibitions and directions which
they could not understand when
they were given. There are many
things of which the best of us
have to be ashamed as we grow
older; but among these, obedience
and kindness to parents never are
found.


THE END.





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