• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 The troubadour
 The cottage fire-side
 A visit to Holland
 Searching the scriptures
 The United States Mint
 The city of Mexico
 Alice Warton and her piano
 The Turkish people
 Encounter with a polar bear
 The Spanish gipsies
 Frolic at a country school
 Encounter with a boa constrict...
 The sick dove
 The battle of the Thames
 Napoleon dethroned
 Passage of the bridge of Arcol...






Group Title: Troubadour
Title: The Troubadour : and other stories
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00058932/00001
 Material Information
Title: The Troubadour : and other stories
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Leavitt & Allen
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: 1853
Copyright Date: 1853
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00058932
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: alh9248 - LTUF
002238726 - AlephBibNum

Table of Contents
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
        Front Matter 3
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    The troubadour
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    The cottage fire-side
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    A visit to Holland
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Searching the scriptures
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    The United States Mint
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    The city of Mexico
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Alice Warton and her piano
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    The Turkish people
        Page 33
    Encounter with a polar bear
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
    The Spanish gipsies
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Frolic at a country school
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Encounter with a boa constrictor
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
    The sick dove
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
    The battle of the Thames
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
    Napoleon dethroned
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
    Passage of the bridge of Arcola
        Page 63
        Page 64
Full Text




cr'H


OM5 WOURADo






THE

TROUBADOUR:
AND


OTHER


STORIES.


NTW-ITOI.
SLUAVITT & ALLNN.


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lAw" suring hto Aod I OsgqNiU tAsyew S1, by
LUAV~m a ALLEY,
L go C1.kds Oft. of tSo. Dist 0=4t d the United Rsno
Is *#d hr the Rai Dhtas ed N v-Yak








STrORES

THE TROUBADOUR.
MaX hundreds of years ago, at the
time when bold-knights of Euope went
to war against the Turks.and Saracens in
the Holy Land of Palestine, there was a
set of inst aled Troubadours. Some
of them were of noble rank, and other
sprang from the poorer lasses of the
people. They were good players upon
harp, the lute, and the guitar, and com.
posed IIadsk in which*the exploit of
warriors, and the their
loves were narrated.
"a5~ '.





!IU OMURADOUIL


One of these troubadours was a young
French nobleman, called the Count of
Montaigne. He had no estate. But he
was commonly called a count, because
his father had been Count of Montaigne.
He was a handsome youth, and one of
the most skilful troubadours in Europe.
He went with one of the armies to the
Holy Land, where he-fought bravely, but
did more service by singig such ballads
as roused the wamirs to fary, and made
them fight like lions. Arspending a
year in the Holy Land, the Count of Mon-
taigne returned to France. He had been
very anxious to get home, because there
was a lovely young lady thereto whom
he was very mnpi attached.
SOne evening, just after' sunset, this




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THB TROUBADOUR AND Tm LADT.





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THU TROCUAIUo.


young lady heard the sound of a lute be-
neath the window of her chamber. Then
a voice sang her praises in a beautiful
ballad. She looked out of the window
and saw the young troubadour. But she
did welcome him home. She went out
into the garden and the troubadour came
there to meet her. He knelt at r feet,
and spoke passionate words. But she
turned awayher head; and, at length, as
she burst into tears, she told him that
hearing that he had been killed in the
Holy Land, she had parried a ,I
knight. The troubadour p
feet, bade the false lady fareel
once more to the HolyLand, here he
was killed. On hearing of his death, t
false lady died of a brokeneaurt

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THE COTTAGE FIREBIIDI


Wa love the broad hearth and the
blazing fre of a cottage. There we may
see more cheerful and happy faces than
in the flest parlor. During the day, the
cotter and his family work very hard, and
they are often compelled to go forth in
the meet bitter weather in winter. But
when night comes, their cares are at an
end, and they can sit by the fire, crack
jokes and tell stories; for, though
Abeir bodies are weary, they have light
beark .and do not fear trouble. Some-
'(10)

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TH KIOTTAON UMU-MID


times the cotter can read the Bible, and
then he reads it aloud to his family, and
explains its good lessons. We once knew
of a cottage, in which dwelt an old man,
his three sons, the wife of oe.of his sons
and her Jittle boy. TIfese made up a
party which could pass many evenings
pleasantly together. They seldom had
any visitors, and did not seem anxious to
have any; but a stranger who came to
see them was always sure of a welcome.











A vJTO HOLLAND.
HomGU is a country in the north of
Europe, which was onoemown as a part
of the Lowlands or Netherlands. The
greater portion of Holland i below the
level of the sea, which would overflow it
but for the walls, or dikes whish have been
bailt by the government The people of
Holland are called Dutch. They are a
strong, hardy and industrious nation.
Their farms are welltilled, and their
ouses are keptvery neat and clear. Their
a tori are numerous and they and.
(14)

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A HatLANDU SKATIN.


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A TUM 6m NWOIU W
forth many he fabrics. rTh cities o
Holland have canals in onne portion in
place of streets. During te long winter,
these anals r from~e and men aud wo
menmaybe een sk~tmignpothem. Some
of these peranos date for plesue, id
parties of young men and girls are oten
formed for moonlight oexurios on skates
Others skate while going from one part
of thcity to another on bu. At
this season, the Cnals are t Some
of these woaen skate very pmg y.
-^











SEArCHw NG THE SCRIPT B.
SAs soon as children len to read they
should be instruted to read daily in the
Bible. There is much, to be sure, in that
bopk of boo, which they will not be able
to cmhpand; but there is mch more
that~ to the child as to the man.
Thoe d ho readthe Bible will find
lessons theyphich will be of more benefit
to thehr throughout their lives than all
the teaching of.othe books.
Lucy Morgawas taught to read her
Bib as soo as she could read at all Bf
(18)s




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miUMallzM 3 21
the time A was twelve Years of ,he
knew wheo fndg most of the beautiful
and instructive portions of te blessed
book Abattht time ]ocy's mother
died. he little cried very much when
she found her beloved mother w1 cold in
death; but she remembered thalshe had
been taught read the Bibln the time
of grief aaidffiiction, and going thber
liely chamber, she read about th trials
of ob, and the patience with which that
good man bore them. She knew that her
auses of sorrow were nothing compared
witbthose whiclf Job had suffered and she
bauaked God that she was still blesed
wt a kind father who would watch over
*protect her. Search the Soripturea
' aen, in the daysof your piet







.




'Tr UNITED aT.
A mnip place whii iscoined
under thtorders of go nt The
Mist o the UnitedSta i
Chestaut Street, east Broad
Philadelphia. It is a large and spj1
S building, constructed of white
S the Grecian style. In the, picture, ya
may see the fine front of the Mint
you enter the Mint, you will see one
hall, wit'great number of dwra.
doors lead to small- rooms, in which
S work o comingg is carried on. Te

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winery of the Mt kpJrien by steam.
It is iswthis bmldimg tihatoee pretty
gold, silver,rd copper pieces which you
see ox of various kinds
are coined ge number of persons
are emplyd aboat the Mint, and the
wages and salaries for a gle week
amount to a great sum; but we should re-
member these persons ork for the whole
gited States. The coining machines
kept clean and polished brightly. The
gRstest care is exercised in dealing out
he precious metal for joining, and none
t responsible iesons are employed. &


-*r;-; - ? ;- -r--1-~41




0 *


THE CITY OP M XOO.
Tau Cf of Mexico is situated in a
beautiful valley, almost sugounded by
lofty mountains, the two highest of which
are volcanoes. The city is built upon a
regular plan. There is a great square in
the Antre, and the streets are mostly
brpad and straight. The national palace
and the cathedral are the largest amd
most spladid buildings. The private
awllings 'are mostly built of stone, in
the, form of a hollow square, about two

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stories high, and with fat roo~f. The
) fronts of the houses are glazed and pained
of vari The Maricana speak
the Spaish lW ae and are much like
the people of ..Spain in their habits.
They are fond of music and dancing, and
never fail to enjoy the forms of worship
enjoined by the Catholio church. It is
not safe for an unarmed man to go forth
in the streets of Mexico at night There
are but few lamps in the streets, o that
murders may be committed, almost with-
out fear of detection. Mexico wants a
good government








4


ALICE WARTON ANDAEB PIANO.
Aioc WarToN was very fond of music.
She often said she would like to learn
how to play on the piano. At length,
her kind uncle George bought her a costly
piano, of a fine tone, and her father en-
gaged a Spaniard, named Pedro Guzman,
td teach her how to play. Alice soon
found there was a great deal of study and
practice to be gone through with before
she could produce that beautiful music
she had heard others play. She got ex-
(30)



































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AUCUI AT THU PIANO-


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THE TURIISH P30P. 83
if they are they must veil their faces or
ride in sedan chairs completely closed.
The sultan, or King of Turkey, has many
wives; but there is always one among
them who is esteemed above therest; and
who is called the sultana. Sometimes, a
pretty and artful sultana gains each con-
trol of the sultan that she can persuade
him to do almost anything she wishes.
Such a sultana once induld the sultan
to put his chief officer of state to death,
and seize upon all his property Bantit
is seldom that a sultana gains so w '
power; for the sultan commonly trea te .
his wives as slaves. The partofthe pala .
where the women are kept is called the
harem."












ENCOUNTER WITH A POLAR BEAR.
Sorn years ago a ship sailed from New
York on an exploring voyage to the cold
region of the far north. The crew were
wellequippto withstand such a voyage.
After sailing for many days, the ship
rested Bamin's Bay, where the crew first
.p r e vast fields of ie and hills of snow
that are nearly alws to be seen in the
tic region. The ship sailed for some
stance up the bay, and was then so closed
by the great masses of floating ice, some
Which were overabundred feet inheigt,
ALA -



















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THE SHIP IN. TIIE AROTIC REGION. '


*0 .1111




*7

ENooUNTrs wrrI A POLAR anA. 87

that the crew were compelled to ancifor.
One day while the vessel laid in this sit-
uation, a large white bear was seen upon
the ice. The crew, eager for. sport, and
careless of danger, gotout twoboats, armed
themselves and pursued the monster. The
bear was brave and although it was
wounded at the first fire from the guns of
the crew, it swam to te boats and strove
to sink them. The men were then greatly
frightened. But one, braver than the
rest, clubbed his gun and dashed the
bear's brains out. The animal was of the
largest size and possessed great strength. .


0 40)








/



THE SPANISH GIPSIES.
GIPSIES are numerous in Spain. They
wander about the country in tribes, or
parties, telling fortunes or stealing to get
a living. They are commonly ragged and
dirty, and are so noted for their vicious
habits that the Spaniards who wish to be
thought decent and respectable, shun their
coftl y. Sometimes, a party of the
Gipsy men may ho seen sitting or loung-
ing on the ground, playing cards for money
or other stakes. They are very fond f
mbting. Fierce disputes often oqW
(38) a
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SPANISH GIPSMIN GAMRBLXG. so


9






Tra SPANISH GIPSINS. 41

during their games. Perhaps the quarrel
ends in a fight. Then the knives are freely
used and blood is shed. Travellers say
they have seen men killed in such fights,
and yet the gambling went on as if no-
thing had happened. These gipsies are
great vagabonds; and should either be
driven from the country or compelled to
work for their living like honest people.
Wherever they go, they commit theft and
murder. When farmers have filled theig
barns and are rejoicing for their full har.
vest, these gipsies appear and carry off
his corn and grain.












FROLIC AT A COUNTRY SCHOOL
TnoxAs WILsoN was a lively boy while
at school in the country. Indeed, he was
so fond of fun that he often went a great
deal too far to obtain it. He was the
leader of that portion of the school which
was disposed for mischief. One day, the
scholars came to school; but there heard
that the teacher was sick, and could not
attend until the next day. Some of the
scholars then started for home; but
Thomas Wilson and his party resolved to
have a frolic while they had a chanm.
(42)




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TIHE FALSE SCIIOOLMASTEL





WpRUO AT A OOUNTBZ T 80OO


Thomas put on the long gown the teacher
usually wore while at school, brushed up
his hair, made a pair of paper spectacles
and put them on, stuck a paper nose of
great length on his own, put some fur on
his chin, and sat in the teacher's. seat.
He made a laughable figure, and the boys
were very much amused. Then Thomas
got his laughing friends to come up and
recite their lessons. Several pretended
not to know what they had been told to
learn, and they were chased all over the
scho6l-room by Thomas. After the boys
had had their frolic, they started for home.
The next day, the teacher made some of
them pay dearly for their sport












ENCOUNTER WITH A BOA CON-
STRICTORB
TnH Boa Constrietor is the largest ser-
pent now known to exist. It is sometimes
found in the island of Java and other parts
of the East Indies between thirty and forty
feet long, and very quick. This sepent
lives in the dense thickets called jungles,
and only goes forth when it is very hun-
gry. Some of them are laVge enough to
L swallow a cow or a deer whole The Boa
.Constrictor does not bite its prey to pieces.
It wraps itself around the body, cmrt
(48) f
































AoufsTrlMTOBo CATCHING





NoomaTUN WIT A BOA o0Urmora. 40
all the bones, then smears it with spittle,
and swallows it slowly. When the eerent
makes such a meal, it is perfectly helpless
and may be killed by a boy. The Boa
Constrictor will attack men if it is hungry.
Some years ago, two Javanese, as the ha-
tives of Java are called, were walking
through a thick wood in the eastern part
of the island, when they were suddenly
assailed by one of these monstrous ser-
pents. One of these men escaped by swift "
running. The other was ieed by the 4
serpent, crushed to death in afevoments i
and tden devoured. Soon afterwards the
man who had escaped came back, saw
the serpent laying helpless on the ground,
and coolly walking up to it, cut off its
.bead.











THE SICK DOVE.
HAvI you ever seen a dove-cote ? It is
a place where doves are kept. Deves are
very pretty birds. They look so innocent,
that we often say that a person is as
hamnless as a dove. Jane Manton had a
dwe-cote, where she kept several pairs of
doves. She had good warm nests made
for them, and fed them well. In spring
and summer, the window of the dove-cote
was opened; and then the pretty birds
could fly out and in just as they pleased.
Jane loved all her doves; but there was
(50)




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JAMN IUDING BE DOVES.


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one that she always petted above the rest.
This was because that dove seemed to
know her better than the others. It would
come to her and eat out of her hand. One
day, Jane went to the dove-o and
fund her pet drooping and huddled up in
one corner of a box as if it was sick. She
offered it food; but it would not eat She
then knew that it was sick. She tsk it.
down to her mother, found out what to give
it and tended it with a great deal of care.
After a few days, the dove got well enough
to be put in the dove-ote. The bird
seemed very grateful for the care of its
mistress; and whenever she went to feed
her pets this one would fly upon her
shoulder and flutter its wings, as if it was
very glad.

*






* r


TH TTILE OF THE THAMZOL
Ti 'battle of the Thames was fLmght
on the 5th of October, 1813. The British
S. f :.e Indians had long been the tirrbr
e(*e people on the frontier of the United
S States. They were under the 6iannd
of General Proctor, a Wbd, active, but
i ruel man. General Harrison had com-
mand of the American troops, who were
i mostly mmooted iilemen from Kentucky
and Ohio. General Harrison pursued the
B ituis and Indians, and overtook the .
t Octob. -They werq

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TB BATTL Of THE THAMlX. 57
up in order of battle, and in a strong po-
sition. On one side were the British
regular troops, with their brilliant red-
coats and shining bayonets. On the other
were the painted Indians, under thlcom-
mand of their great chief, Tecumseh. Ge-
neral Harrison ordered the mounted rifle-
men to charge upon the British regulars
and after breaking the line, to turn~ .
fire upon them. This was done. The
British then threw down their arms, and
became prisoner of war. The Indians
under Tecumseh, maintained a longer
fight. The troops who attacked them*tre r
commanded by Colonel Johnson of Ken-
tucky. At length, Tecumseh was killed
and then the Indians fled. This was a
great victory.












NAPOLEON DETHRONED.
FOR many years, Napoleon Bonaparte
fought against nearly all the kingdoms
of rope. At length, he lost so many
troops that he couli not bring a very
large army into the fih; then his enemies
invaded France, det mf him and ba-
nished him to thej e island of Elba, in
the Mediterranean a. Before he started
he took leave of his .faithful soldiers at
Fontainbleva. Many of them shed tears
ag the,great man embraced them, and
hade them fareWell.


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Napolon WW". UO his txoo et FAW*M.
NAPOLEON TAXEG EAVE Of H8 TM U ,


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NIL144on at Axoia
NAPOLION AT AROOLA.


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PASSAGE OF THE BRIDGE OF
ARCOLA.
NAPOLor BosNPAI T was one of the
Sgredtstwarriors that ever lived. He won
maun battles, and rose, by his skill and
courage from a poor Cersioan boy to be an
emperor, and the most powerful sovereign
in Europe. When only twenty-six year
old, he was appointed to command the
French army which was then fighting
Spiit -the Austrians in Italy. He then
'. his career of triumph. Under his
'l orders, the French defeated, |he


'1





64 THE1 BIDGI 01 AOOLA.
Austrians in several battles, and at length
drove them out of Italy. The French
troops thought that their young general
never could be beaten. On several ocea-
sions Napoleon showed that he was as
daring as skilful. At the assault upon
the Austrians at Arcola, the French were
driven back by the awful fire of the Aus-
trian artillery which was stationed at the
end of a bridge. Napoleon rushed to the
front, siezed a flag, ordered those who
were brave to follow him, and headed
the assault. The Austrian guns were cap-
tured, and the French gained a great
triumph. Under such a general, troops
are not to be beaten.




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