• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 The snow-bird
 The rooster
 The two sisters and the good...
 The wolf, the dog, and the fox
 The bird's nest
 The boy and the bird
 Don't hurt it
 The deer and the fawn
 The bees






Title: Stories about birds and beasts
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00058335/00001
 Material Information
Title: Stories about birds and beasts
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Woodworth, Francis C.
Publisher: Clark, Austin & Smith
Place of Publication: New York
Copyright Date: 1853
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00058335
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: alj0567 - LTUF
002240028 - AlephBibNum

Table of Contents
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    The snow-bird
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    The rooster
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    The two sisters and the good dog
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
    The wolf, the dog, and the fox
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
    The bird's nest
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
    The boy and the bird
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
    Don't hurt it
        Page 88
        Page 89
    The deer and the fawn
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
    The bees
        Page 95
        Page 96
Full Text






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BIRDS AND BBAST
WITZ 1LLWIITRATIONI.o
FOR CHILDREN.



NEW YORK:
SCLARK, AuOVTIN & I,
8 nAR ROw k AIM
Ii



















Zv CLARK, AW5K, & CO.,
b Cf OMW O uf SO GkeAONAt Ee UN IWM Ir the
Iamhs Dwat~ ~ NOW Yak.







III




THE SNOW-BIRD.

There is a little bird tIt
comes around the house in the
winter, which some folbrc4.
the snow-bird. He is a d4r,
little fellow. Sometimes b'I.




6 STORIES ABOUT
so tame that he will come up
to the door, and eat the crumbs
of bread that are thrown on
the ground. Once in a while,
when it is very cold, and the
bird is pretty hungry, he will
come into the house, if any-
body will open the door for him.
You would like to see the
little bird come into the house,
would You not? Would you
try to catch him, if he should




BIRDS AND BEASTS. 7
come into your. kitchen or par-
lor? You would not hurt him,
I know. If you should catch
him, you would be very sorry
to hurt him. But the snow-
bird would not let you catch
him, whether you wanted to do
so or not. He likes little chil-
dren pretty well, but he does
not like to get into their hands.
When he sees you stfh *ut
your hand to try to Mcah 4hi




8 ITOIME ABOUT
he flies away as quick as he
can go.
The snow-bird does not know
how to sing as well as some
other birds. He cannot sing
as prettily as the robin does.
But he sings a little song, once
in a while. He sings, Chick-a-
de-de, chick-a-de-de; and that is
about all he can sing. Because
he sings so, some folks call him
a chick-a-de-de.




BIRDS AND BEASTS. 9
Once there was a little boy
who threw a stone, and killed a
snow-bird. He was a naughty
boy. If he had not been a
naughty boy, he would not
have killed the dear little bird.
The little bird that was killed
lay on the ground near the door
of the house where the boy
lived. Pretty soon the bird's
mother came. She saw the
young bird on the ground, aam




10 8TORIES ABOUT
she did not know that he w
dead. So she came to him
and tried to lift him up. But
the young bird could not stand
up. He was dead. The mo-
ther fried again to lift him up.
But no: the little creature
could not stand. He could not
hold his head up.
The mother began to feel
very bad. She did not know
what ailed her darling, but she




BIRDS AND BEASTS. 11
bought that something was the
matter with him, because he
id not get up when she spoke

ake him stand on his feet.
Then she went away, and
brought something for the
young bird to eat. She called
him again.
"Do birds talk?" you ask.
Yes, they talk to each other.
They do not talk the same aS




19 STORIES ABOUT
we do. But they talk so that
other birds know what they
say. The mother called the
young bird again. I do not
know what she said to him, but
I suppose she said," Come, little
dear, get up now, and eat some
dinner. I have got a nice
piece of cake for you." But
the young bird did not get up.
He did not speak to his mother.
H dI~Mt look at her. He




BIRDS AND BEAST. 18
was dead. That was the re&a
son. He could not speak.
He could not see any more.
Then that good, kind mother
put a piece of the cake into the
young bird's mouth. That is
the way old birds feed the
young ones, when they are
very small. This young bird
was not very small. If he had
not been dead, he could have
fed himself. He was old enough




14 STORIES ABOUT
to feed himself. But his mother
thought that something was the
matter with him, so that he
could not feed himself, and so
she fed him. Oh, how bad-
she felt when she saw that her
darling would not eat She
cried. She made a nois. as if
she felt very bad. That was
the ir the snow-birds cried,
whIs they felt very bad about
TJbtihing.






THE SONG OF THE SNOWBIRD.




The ground was all coverd with mow one day, And




two lit tie sis- ter were bu- y at play, Wha




now-bird was sitting close by on a tree, And merrily




singing hia chick-a de-de, chick-a-dede,




de,And mer-ri -ly singing his chick-.
^






THE SONG OF THE SNOW-BID.
The ground was all cover'd
with snow one day,
And two little sisters were busy
at play,
When a snow-bird was sitting
close by on a tree,
And merrily singing his chick-
a-de-de.
Chick-a-de-de, chick-a-de-de.
Ad merrily singing his chick-
a-de-de.





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BIRDS AND BEASTS. 21
I.
He had not been singing that
tune very long,
Ere Emily heard him, so loud
was his song.
"0 sister! look out of the win-
dowl" said she;
"Here's a dear little bird,'
ing chick-a-de-de. ,
Chick-a-de-de, chick-lde .
Here's a dear little bird,
ing chickam4 I4'





22 STORIES ABOUT

IIm.
"Poor fellow! he walks in the
snow and the sleet,
And has neither stockings nor
shoes on his feet;
I pity him so! how cold he
must be!
And yet he keeps singing his
chick-a-de-de.
Chick-a-de-de, chick-a-de-de.
And yet he keeps singing his
chick-a-de-de.





BIRDS AND BEASTS. 28

IV.
"If I were a barefooted snow-
bird, I know
I would not stay out, in the
cold and the snow.
1 wonder what makes him so
full of his glee:
He's all the time singing that-
chick-a-de-de.
Chick-a-de-de, chick-a-de-de.
He 's all the time singing. tht'
chick-a-de-de.





24 STORIES ABOUT

V.
"0 mother, do get him some
stockings and shoes,
And a nice little frock, and a
hat, if he choose.
I wish he'd come into the par-
lor, and see
How warm we would make
him, poor chick-a-de-de.
Chick-a-de-de, chick-a-de-de.
Hew warm we would make
him, poor chick-a-de-de.





BIRDS AND BEAPB. 95
VI
The bird had flown down for
some pieces of bread,
And heard every word little
Emily said.
"What a figure I'd make in
that dress!" thought he;
And he laughed as he warbled
his chick-a-de-de.
Chick-a-de-de, chick-a-de-de.
And he laughed as he warbi*H
his chick-a-de-de.





26 STORIES ABOUT

VII.
"I'm grateful," he said, "for
the wish you express,
But I've no occasion for such
a fine dress:
I had rather remain with my
limbs all free,
Than to hobble about, singing
chick-a-de-de.
Chick-a-de-de, chick-a-de-de.
Than to hobble about, singing
chick-a-de-de.





BIRDS AND BEA8TS. 27

vm
VIIL
"There is ONE, my dear child,
though I cannot tell who,
Has clothed me already, and
warm enough, too.
Good morning! 0 who are so
happy as we I"
And away he went, singing his
chick-a-de-de.
Chick-a-de-de, chick-a-de-d.
And away he went, singing hi.
chick-a-de-de.






THE ROOSTER.

Hark I what a crowing there
is in the barn-yard. I wonder
what is the matter. Ah I see
how it is. There is a young
rooster just beginning to crow,
and the old one is trying to
teach him. Hark! what work
the little fellow makes of i.
Try again, my good fellow.












.1's
~~I
Nb~o7cr ;! I




BIRDS AND BEASTS. 31
There, that will do a little
better. Can't you crow like
the old rooster? Ha! ha! ha!
I can crow better than that
myself. See if I can't. Cuck-
cu-riah-oh. You can't crow so
well as that, little fellow. Let
me see if you can. Oh! it
makes me laugh to hear such
crowing. But I suppose you
will learn to crow as well as the
old rooster, one of these days.




82 STORIES ABOUT
Yes, little girl. He will
crow as well as any one when
he is a few months older.
Fowls, as well as little boys
and girls, have to learn how
to sing and talk. You could
not talk at all once. You had
to learn. When you first began
to talk, you made as bad work
of it as this young rooster makes
of crowing. You tried to talk
so that the folks could mkow




BIRDS AND BERA 88
what you said. But they could
not tell what you said. Nobody
could tell what you said. By
and by, you talked a little.
You said two or three words.
You did not speak them very
plainly, at first. But you
learned, after a whilerA talk
better, and now you talk pretty
welL
I love to hear the rooster
Vow in the morning. I love
3




84 STORIES ABOUT
to have him wake me uljery
early, in the summer, so that I
can get up, and go out to walk.
Do you love to go out and
walk? I guess you do when
the weather is warm and plea-
sant, and the birds are singing.
I must tell you a story about
two little girls who used to get
up early in the morning. 1
must tell you where they went,
and what they did.









Kd


The Two SBtemr and the Good Dof.







THE TWO SISTERS AND THE GOOD 0DG.


Mary and Julia were sisters.
Their father had a very kind
and good dog, called Ponto;
Ponto loved his master.
loved all the family, too. U
loved Mary and Julia. How
he did like to go with them
when they went out to walk




88 STORIES ABOUT
Sometimes they would ghto
the meadow, to see if they
could not find some pretty
flowers. Then they would say,
"Ponto, here Ponto, we are
going to walk now." The dog
knew what that meant as well
as you would know, and he
would run, and jump, and frisk
about, as if he was half crazy.
I have known little boys and
girls do so sometimes, when




BIRDS AND BEASTS. 89
they were very glad about
something.
When the little girls started
to go, then Ponto woldd run
on before them. He would
run a great deal faster than
they did; and then he would
run back again, where the girls
were, and jump up, and try to
kiss their faces.
Sometimes they would .~her
a basketful of flowers, aeli




40 STORE ABOUT
it down under a tree, in the
cool shade, so that the flowers
would keep fresh and nice.
Then they would say, "Here,
Ponto, lie down by the side of
this basket, and do not let
anybody get it." And Ponto
would do just as they told him.
He knew what they meant.
Then the little girls would go
and get some more flowers, and
fill another basket, while Ponto




BIDS AND BEASTS. 41
watched the basket that was
full.
One day the dog was lying
down under the tree, watching
a basket which the sisters had
given him to take care of.
There were no flowers in it
this time. It was full d'straw-
berries, large ripe strawberries.
The little girls were not under
the tree where Ponto was, with
the basketful of strawberries:




42 STORIES ABOUT
they were picking some more
strawberries.
By and by, a little boy came
along. He was not a very
good boy. Good boys do not
steal. This little boy thought
it would be nice to take some
of these berries, and put them
in his pocket. So he came
close up to the place where the
basket was. "I wonder if that
dog will bite," he said to him-




BIRDS AND BEASTS. 48
self: "I guess not. He looks
as if he would not bite. He is
asleep, too, I think. His eyes
are shut. He will not see me,
if I take some of the berries."
Then he reached out his
hand, and took hold of the
basket. But almost as quick
as a flash of lightning, Ponto
sprang forward, and caught the
little boy by his arm. The
boy screamed. He was very




44 sToRI ABOUT
much scared. He tried to
get away. But Ponto would
not let him get away. There
the dog kept the boy a long
time. Poor fellow I he cried
and screamed so loudly that
the little girls came to see what
was the matter. Oh! how they
did laugh when they saw the
boy. "There, Ponto," Julia
said, "that will do, I guess.
Let the boy go now."




BIRDS AND BEASTS. 45
And Ponto let go of the lit-
tle boy's arm. He had not
hurt the boy any. I think he
did not mean to hurt him. He
only wanted to scare him, and
keep him from stealing the.
strawberries. So he caught
hold of the clothes on his arm.
He did not bite the skin any.
The father of these little
girls was taken sick, and died.
He was buried in the grave-




46 STORIES ABOUT
yard only a little way from the
house where he lived. This
good, kind, loving dog was very
sad then. He seemed to know
that his master was dead. He
found .the grave where he was
buried; and every day, for a
long time, he would go to the
grave, and lie on it, and cry
and moan for his master. For
more than a week he used to
stay at the grave almost all the




BIRDS AND BEASTS. 47
time, day and night. Mary
and Julia, when they found
where Ponto went, loved him
more than they ever did before.
And they used to go into the
graveyard, and carry the dog
something to eat, every day.
They would get up in the
morning almost as soon as it
was light, and walk to their
father's grave, to carry Ponto
some breakfast. "Poor Ponto "




48 STORIES ABOUT
they said, "be must be very
hungry there. He watches
all night, and does not go to
'sleep. Poor fellow! how he
did love our dear papa !"
So they went, and carried
him some good breakfast. But
Ponto did not eat much break-
fast. He felt so bad that he
could not. And one morning
the two little girls found Ponto
dead on his master's grave.






























th Do, Sud the mI.


`c~-~--=4






THE WOLU. TI DOG, AND THE FOX.
A FABLE.


A wolf, a dog, and a fox,
happened to meet one day.
They talked together a good
while, about a great many
things. By and by the wolf
said to the dog, "I 'k-n- Ie
to know why men doi*take
care of wolves, and feed -




5b STORIES ABOUT
and give them a good house to
live in, and a good bed to sleep
on. Why do they not take
as good care of us wolves as
they do of the dogs? We
are as good as the dogs are, I
think."
"Well," said the dog, you
wolves are pretty good sort of
folks, I suppose; but do you
not sometimes kill a lamb or
, two~ehen you get hungry "




BIRDS AND BEASTS. 58
"Yes, we do sometimes," said
the wolf.
"Aha said the dog, "I do
not wonder, then, that men do
not feed you, and take good
care of you. Dogs do not kill
lambs."
"But we do not kill lamw-
said the fox. "I shelld think
men might build houses for us,
and feed us. Why not'r
"Do your sort of folkmrw




54 STORIES ABOUT
kill geese and hens?" asked the
dog.
"Why, yes, once in a great
while we do such a thing."
"Then," said the dog, "you
need not find fault with the
men for not taking care of you.
Dogsdo not killgeese and hens."


MORAL.
Sometimes people
treated well, 'because
not deserve to be well


are not
they do
treated.







THE BIRD'S NEST.


Little Sarah said to her bro-
ther Edward one day, "Come,
brother, let us go down into the
orchard. I want to hear the
birds sing."
Edward said he would go;
and he got his hat, and went
with his sister.




66 STORIMS ABOUT
When they came to the or-
chard, they heard a great many
birds sing. It was in the
charming month of June. The
birds had nearly all of them
made their nests, and some of
them had little young birds in
their nests.
As Sarah and Edward went
along, they saw a robin's nest,
on an apple-tree. The nest
was not built very high. The




BIRDS AND BEASTS. 6.
robin is not so much afraid of
bad boys as some birds are. So
they do not build their nests
on the end of the boughs of
very high trees, as the oriole
and some other birds do.
"Oh, brother," said Sarah,
"look here! Here are four
little robins. Dear little crea-
tures We will not hurt them,
will we ?"
Edward ran to the tree




58 STORIES ABOUT
where the robin's nest was,
and he clapped his hands, and
jumped up I cannot tell how
high, he was so glad to see the
robin's nest. "We will go away
to that large pear-tree," he
said, "and see the old robins
feed the little ones."
They went to the pear-tree.
They did not stay under the
apple-tree, where the nest was,
because they thought that if




BIRDS AND BEASTS. 69
they did stay there, the old
birds would be afraid, and
would not come to feed their
young ones. The children did
not wait long before they saw
one of the old birds come to
the tree where the nest was.
He had something in his mouth.
It was a worm, I think. The
old robin spoke to the young
ones, and said he had something
for them to eat. The little




60 STORIES ABOUT
birds all opened their mouths,
and the old robin put the worm
into the mouth of one of them.
Then the old bird went away
again, and pretty soon he came
back with some more food, and
he gave it to another of the
young birds. The mother of
the little birds came with some-
thing to eat, too. They must
have loved their little ones very
much.




BIRDS AND BEASTS. 61
The children watched these
birds for a long time. They
thought they had hardly ever
seen a prettier sight.
By and by William Jones
came along. William was not
a good boy. "What are you
looking at there ?" he said to
Sarah and Edward.
The children did not tell a
lie. They did not want to
have William know that theri




62. STORIES ABOUT
was a nest of young birds in
the orchard, because they were
afraid that if he should find it
out, he would carry off the
young birds. But they did not
tell a lie to William. Their
mother had told them that they
must always tell the truth. So
they said they were looking at
some young robins. "Look !"
they said, "see the old birds
feeding their young. You will




BIRDS AND BEA=. 68
not hurt the little creatures,
will you ? I hope you will not
take the little robins away."
But William laughed, and
ran to the tree where the nest
was. Then he took the young
birds out of the nest, and put
them into his hat. Sarah and
Edward felt very bad when
that naughty boy carried away
the young birds; and they both
of them cried as they saw the




64 STORIES ABOUT
old birds flying round the nest,
trying to find their young, and
mourning because they could
not find them.
William was a very different
boy from the one that Mr.
Woodworth tells about in his
song of the Boy and the Bird.
Did you ever read that song?
Well, I will read it to you.





67

THE BOY AND THE BIRD.


So now, pretty bird,
You have come to my door;
I wonder you never
Have ventured before.
'Tis likely you thought
I would do you some hanr|
But pray, sir, what cause
Could there be for alarm? ',
*^ ~ '4'. .




68 8TORI8 ABOUT

You seem to be timid-
I 'd like to know why-
Did I ever hurt you ?
What makes you so shy ?
You shrewd little rogue,
I 've a mind, ere you go,
To tell you a thing
It concerns you to know.
m.
You think I have never
fieovered your nest;




BIRDS AND BEASTS. 69
'Tis hid pretty snugly,
It must be confessed.
Ha! ha! how the boughs
Are entwined all ioutid I
No wonder you thought
It would never be found.

IV.
You're as cunning a bird
As ever I knew;
And yet, ha! ha ha!
I'm as cunning as you I




t0 STORIES ABOUT
I know all about
Your nice home on the tree-r
'Twas nonsense to try
To conceal it from me.

V.
I know-for but yesterday
I was your guest-
How many young robins
There are in your nest;
And pardon me, sir,
If I venture to say,




.~IMDS AND BEASTS. 71
T fbeve iot had a morsel
Of dminor t day.'

VL'
* But you look very sad,
Pretty robin, I see,
As you glance o'er the
Meadow, to yonder green tree.
I fear I have thoughtlessly
Given you pain,
And I will not prattle
So lightly again.




78 STORBIE ABOUT
VM
Go home, where your mate
And your little ones dwell;
Tho' I know where they are,
Yet I never will tell;
Nobody shall injure
That leaf-covered nest,
For sacred to me
Is the place of your rest.
vm.
Adieu I for you want
To bo fling away,




SBRDS AJD BKA.

And it' would be cruel
To ask you to stay;
But come in the mornmi
Come early, and sing,
For dearly I love you,
Sweet warbler of spring.


.4;




4i ,




74 STORIES ABOUT
Shall I tell you, reader, what
thohtq there are in your mind
Think I can guess.
I have hardly any doubt that
you think it is a very wrong
thing to rob a bird's nest, and
that you would not rob one if
any one were to give you a
gold dollar. Am I not right ?
I hope I am, at any rate.





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78 STORE ABOUT
fine day, "mother, I should love
to see those animals dearly.
Mary Osborne has been, and
she says-"
"Well, my dear," said Mar-
garet's mother, "if you will be
a very good girl, we will go
and see them to-morrow."
Little Margaret was very
good, and the next day her
other told her she might go
s.d ee the show. Margaret




BIRDS AND BEAST~ 9
had sever seen any thing of
the kind before, and she was
very much pleased with all she
saw.
The man who kept the ani-
mals had a drum and some
other instrument, and he played
on these, and made music for
his pupils. His pupils were a i.
bear, two dogs, a rooster, and
three or four other animals.
The bear would stand on his




80 STORIES ABOUT
head a long time. He looked
as if he would bite; but he did
not bite anybody. He was a
very kind sort of a bear. It
made Margaret laugh a great
deal, to see the large clumsy
bear stand on his head.
As the man kept on playing,
the dogs would dance. They
had been taught to stand on
their hind feet, and dance like
men.





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BIRDS AND BEASTS. 88
held on until the man told
the pigeon to stop. Then the
pigeon stood still, and the little
canary-bird flew away to his
cage again.
One little bird, I think it
was a yellow-bird, came out of
his cage, and flew upon a wire
which was stretched across the
room. "Now dance, little fel-
low," the man said; and he
did dance. Then three or




84 STORIES ABOUT
four more little birds were let
out of their cages, and they all
I'ew upon the wire, and danced
just as the first one did.
Another little bird, about as
large as the canary-bird, was
called out, and his master made
him stand on a pistol which he
held in his hand. The pistol
was loaded. "There," said the
master, "stand there now. Do
not stir. I am going to fire




BIRDS AND BEASTS. 85
the pistol. It will make a great
noise. But you must not fly
away. You must not move
from that place. Mind, now."
Then the man fired the pistol
Bang! it went. We all start-
ed. Almost anybody will jump
when a pistol or a gun is fired.
But the little bird did not start.
He stood still on the pistol, just
where he was put in the first
place. He did not move at all




86 STORIES ABOUT
Then three or four more
birds were let out of their
cages. A harness was put on
them-a little harness, made
on purpose for the birds. This
harness was fastened to a little
cart, and the man spoke to
them as if they were horses
"Get up," he said. Then they
started off, and drew the cart
all around the room. "That
will do," he said, when they




BIRDS AND BEASTB. 8
had been drawing the cart long
enough; "that will do." Then
they all stopped, and took off
the harness themselves, and
"went into their cages again.



I





DON'T HURT IT.

I often feel as if I wanted to
say so when I see children so
careless in handling their little
pets. They sometimes seem to
forget that a kitten, or a rabbit,
or a dog, has any feeling. I
always think it is a bad sign
when I see a child who is not
kind to its pets, and who is care-
less about hurting them.









































ftwI







THE DEER AND THE FAWN.

The deer is a fine-looking
animal. See what large horm
he has. He can run very fast.
He never hurts anybody. If
the dogs run after him, he rum
away, if he can get away. But
sometime the dogs run fautst
than he can; and then Al poor
deer has to die.




92 STORIES ABOUT
The deer can be taught to
do a great many funny things.
There was one once, who was
taught to take a brand of fire
between his teeth, and to fire a
loaded cannon with it. The
same deer would bow to people
when they came into the room
where he was, just as f he had
been to school to. dancing
master; and he played a great
many other funny tricks, which




BIRDS AND BEASTS. 9
made everybody laugh who
went to see him.
I know a little girl who has
a little pet deer. It is quite
young. It is called a fawn
now. A fawn is a young deer.
This fawn will come and eat
out of the little girl's hands,
and he- will skip about, and
play, likL a lamb. He is not
at all afraid of the little girl,
and she loves him very much.




4 sarom ABOUT
She would feel very bad, if he
should die, or if he should be
killed. I would much rather
see a little girl or boy feeding
a deer, than to see anybody
shooting one. I should not
love to see a deer shot.







THE BEES

Bees will not sting you if
you let them alone, and do not
disturb them. But when I
was a little child, not more than
three years old, I came very
*near being stung to death by
them. They were swarming,
that is, they had gone out of
the hive, and were trying t

L --




96 NBD8 AND BEASTS.
find another. I went out-so
I have been told, for I do not
.remember it-I went out into
the garden, with the man who
was trying to keep them from
flying away, and the bees all
alighted on my bare head. I
suppose there were as many of
them as you could get into a
quart bowl. I tried to brush
them off with my hands, and
that made them sting me badly.




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