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 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Frontispiece
 Fanny, the child who al-ways wish-ed...
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Title: Fanny, the contrary little girl.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00057802/00001
 Material Information
Title: Fanny, the contrary little girl.
Series Title: Fanny, the contrary little girl.
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Willis P. Hazard
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00057802
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ALK2787
alephbibnum - 002251026

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Fanny, the child who al-ways wish-ed to do what she was told not to do
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text






































RheMNB r-Y











FANNY,

THE CONTRARY LITTLE GIRL.










FANNY,

THE CHILD WHO AL-WAYS WISH-ED TO
DO WHAT SHE WAS TOLD NOT TO DO.

Fan-ny Grant was the old-
est of four chil-dren in her
Mam-ma's nur-se-ry; she liv-ed
in Lon-don; she had two bro-
thers and one sis-ter; she was
six years old; one boy was fiv,
1





FANNY.
one four, and the oth-er lit-
tle girl was two years old.
Fan-ny ought, as she was
the eld-est, to have been the
best.
The boys were rude, as most
boys are; but lit-tle girls should
be gen-tle and qui-et, and not
climb on the backs of chairs,
or roll on the floor, or hal-loo
and scream like boys.
Fan-ny was ve-ry fond of
do-ing all these things; and
2





FANNY.


what was worse, she lik-ed to
do what she was told not to do.
If she was told to go and
kiss or shake hands with a la-
dy, she would ne-ver do it; but
if she was told to go up stairs,
then she would stay to kiss
all the ladies round, on-ly just
to do what she was told not to
do.
When the time was cane for
her to go out to walk she cri-
ed to stay at home; if it rain-
8




FANNY.
ed, and her Mam-ma thought
it was too wet for her to walk,
she cri-ed to go out.
In short, she was one of the
most cross and most tire-some
chil-dren I e-ver saw, and all
the ser-vants in the house ha-
ted her; and her nurse was
quite worn out with her noise.
Her Mam-ma at last would
not give her leave to come at
all in-to the draw-ing-room, and
Fan-ny found it ve-ry hard to





FANNY.


stay up stairs when the oth-er
chil-dren were with the la-dies;
but this was not the worst of
all, as you shall hear.
Ma-ny sad ac-ci-dents she
had, be-cause she would not do
as she was bid-den; once, when
the nurse and the maid took
them to walk in the. Park,
.Fan-ny would not walk qui-et-
ly with her sis-ter and her
nurse, but ran out in-to the
mid-dle of the road where the
5




FANNY.


coach-es went, and a dir-ty
boy, who was play-ing with his
dog, threw a stone for the dog
to run af-ter, and hit Fan-ny
on the cheek, and the blood
ran down, and co-ver-ed her
white tip-pet and frock; poor
nurse was in a fright, and so
was her poor Mam-ma, when
she came home all o-ver blood,.
and cry-ing so loud, you might
hear her all o-ver the street.
Her cheek was wash-ed with
6





FANNY.
bran-dy, and sad-ly it smart-
ed, and ma-ny days it was be-
fore it got well: when it was
well she for-got the pain, and
was as tire-some as e-ver.
She was told ne-ver to
touch the knives and forks at
ta-ble till she be-gan to eat;
but she al-ways would climb
up in-to her chair be-fore din-
ner came up, and put her knife
and fork in-to her mouth,
and down her throat; she
7





FANNY.
not on-ly made her mouth
ve-ry wide and ug-ly, but one
day she cut her mouth ve-ry
bad-ly in-deed, and could eat
no-thing with-out pain for a
long time to come; she al-so
taught her poor lit-tle sis-ter
ma-ny tricks: one was climb-
.ing up the chairs and stools;
and one day she climb-ed up-on
a high chair and stood up;
the ba-by tri-ed to do the
same, for ba-bies al-ways do
8





FANNY.
as el-der sis-ters do, and down
she fell and hurt her head
so bad-ly, that there was a
great bump up-on it for ma-ny
days.
Fan-ny was told al-ways
to walk down stairs gent-ly,
and not to jump, or crawl up
the bal-us-trades like boys;,
but Fan-ny, who al-ways chose
to do as she was bid-den not
to do, had seen the boys slip
down tie bal-us-trades, and,
9





FANNY.


when her nurse was com-ing
out of the room af-ter her,
she ran quick-ly on be-fore,
and got on them, and slip-ped
down.
When she got half way,
her head turn-ed ve-ry gid-dy,
and down she fell up-on the
stone hall, and broke her
leg, and was tak-en up al-most
dead.
The nurse took her up stairs
and put her to bed. Her
10





FANNY.


poor Mam-ma sent for the
sur-ge-on, who came and ti-ed
up her leg, and gave her a
great deal of nas-ty phy-sic
to take, which when she would
not take, was forc-ed down
her throat; and great pain
she had in her leg; but the
worst of all was, that, though
all the care in the world
was ta-ken of her, the leg
ne-ver got quite straight a-gain,
but was drawn up so much
11





FANNY.


short-er than the oth-er, that
Fan-ny could not put her foot
up-on the ground, but was forc-
ed to walk with a crutch un-der
her arm to hop a-long up-on.
A crutch is a long stick
to lean up-on. And she could
ne-ver run or dance a-ny more,
but was forc-ed to sit still, or
hop a-long on her crutch. You
may be sure that Fan-ny was
ve-ry sor-ry that she had not
mind-ed what her kind pa-rents
12





FANNY.
had told her; for then she would
have still had the use of all
her limbs. She used of-ten to
cry when she saw oth-er chil-
dren play-ing in the fields, and
look-ing so hap-py; but it was
then too late. E-li-za, her sis-
ter, who grew up a tall straight
girl, was al-ways ta-ken for the
eld-est; for Fan-ny was al-ways
short from her fall, as she could
not grow with-out ex-er-cise, and
you know she could not take
13





FANNY.
mucn with one leg short-er than
the oth-er.
This is a sad sto-ry, and I
hope all girls who read it will
try to be good, and do as they
are bid-den; for their pa-rents
are the pro-per per-sons to give
them ad-vice, as, hav-ing liv-ed
so much long-er than their lit-
tle chil-dren, they have, of
course, a great deal more
knowl-edge of what is good
and what is bad.
14




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