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 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 The hen and chickens
 Human beings






Title: hen and chickens
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00057745/00001
 Material Information
Title: hen and chickens
Series Title: hen and chickens
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: General Protestant Episcopal S. S. Union and Chruch Book Society
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: 1853
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00057745
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ALK9630
alephbibnum - 002256848

Table of Contents
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    The hen and chickens
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Human beings
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
Full Text





THE



HEN AND CHICKENS.






A BTORY FOR LITTLE FOLIR






NEW YORK:
GENERAL PROTETANT EPISCOPAL S. & UNION
AND
eburtb 38ook Satittl,
DKI oOrm 20 JOni srin.
1868.











THE HEN AND CHICKENS.




WHEN Martha Wood came home
from school'one afternoon, her
mother said to her, Martha, the
carrier brought a basket here
to-day for you."
A basket for me I Who can
have sent me a basket? What






6 THE HEN AND CHICKENS.

is in it, dear mother? where is
it?"
Martha did not wait to have
all her questions answered; but
as soon as she heard that it was
in the kitchen, away she ran,
and found on the table a small
brown hamper, covered with a
lid, and having a card tied to it,
on which was written her name,
MARTHA WooD.
Before she had time to open
it, she heard something moving







THE HEN AND EHICKBUN. 7

inside; so she was sure it was
an animal of some kind. She
soon got a knife, and cut the
string by which the cover was
fastened all round; and what do
you think she saw? Why, a
beautiful, large, speckled hen!
She was so much delighted at
first, that she did not see a letter
that was tied to the inside of the
cover, until her mother showed
it to her. Then she opened it
and read it. It came from her






8 THE HEN AND CHICKENS.

kind uncle, who said he had sent
her a hen, because he had heard
she was a good girl, and he hoped
she would take care of it, and
never forget to feed it.
The hen was quickly taken out
into the yard and allowed to run
about with the other fowls which
were kept there, and Martha gave
it a handful of corn, for she
thought it must be very hungry
after traveling a long way in a
hamper, without food.






THE HEN AND CHICKENS. 9

Every morning Martha used to
save the crumbs from the break-
fast-table, and carry them out to
her hen, which soon knew' her
voice, and ran to her the very mo-
ment she called, and would even
pick the crumbs out of her hand.
All day Mrs. Speckle (for that
was the name which Martha
gave her) walked about the yard,
scratching among the straw and
looking for grains of corn, or
walked into the meadow, picking






10 THE EN AND CHICKENS.

up seeds and insects, and in the
evening she always came back
before dark, and flew up to a
beam near the top of the stable,
with the other fowls, and slept
there until morning.
One day Martha brought out
the crumbs as usual for her hen's
breakfast, when she saw Mrs.
Speckle coming out of the stable,
screaming out, Cluck, cluck,
cluck, clauck; cluck, cluck, cluck,
clauck." So she ran in to her






THE HEN AND CHICKENS. 1

mother in great haste, and asked
what could be the matter. Her
mother told her that whenever the
hen cried "Cluck, cluck, cluck,
clauck," she meant to say that she
had just laid an egg. Away
went Martha again, and, after
looking about very carefully,
found among the straw in the
corner of the stable a beautiful
white egg. Her mother told her
not to take it away, and per-
haps she would soon find another






12 THE HEN AND CHICKENS.

there. In a few days Mrs.
Speckle again cried, "Cluck,
cluck, cluck, clauck," and then
Martha found two eggs in the
nest; and so she went on for a
long time until there were twelve
eggs in the nest.
Mr. Speckle now changed her
mode of life altogether; instead
of wandering about all'day pick-
ing up seeds and insects, she
stayed at home taking care of
her eggs and seldom left her nest






THE HEN AND CHICKENS. 18

even to eat. Martha, however,
took care that she should not
go without her food, for she
frequently went into the stable
and threw down a handful of
corn near the nest, which the
hen picked up at her ease. After
she had sat on her eggs in this
way for two or three weeks,
Martha one morning went into
the stable to pay her a visit; but
there was nothing in the nest but
broken egg-shells. She heard,






14 TB HEN AND CHICKENS.

however, a chirping sound com-
ing from another part of the
stable, and, looking round, soon
spied her favorite spreading out
her wings over a brood of
chickens which had been hatched
early that morning. She quickly
ran away to her mother to tell
her what had happened, and soon
came back with some soaked
bread, and was delighted to see
the hen lead over her young
brood, who began to pick away so






THE RIN AND CHICKENS. 1.

cleverly, that she could scarcely
believe that this was their first
breakfast. They ate so fast, and
so busily, that you would have
fancied their mother had been
teaching them ever since they
were hatched, and that they had
learnt their lesson very well.
When they had finished, they all
ran back to their mother, who
covered them over with her
wings, so closely that you could
not see one of them. There they






16 TH HE N AND CHICKENS.

stayed for a long while. You
might have heard them chirping
softly now and then; but they
liked the warm shelter too well
to come out.
When they were two or three
Says old there came a fine sunny
,day, and Mrs. Speckle was
:allowed to come out into the
yard, but not allowed to go down
where she liked, for fear she
should take her chickens to some
place where they would be stolen






THE HUN AND CHICKENS. 17

or hurt. So to prevent her going
too far, she was placed under a
coop; that is, a kind of large
cage, without any bottom. The
little chickens could go in and
out between the bars, though
the old hen was too large to
get through; but she was quite
content to see her chickens run-
ning about, and picking up
crumbs and insects. When it
grew cold, she cried, "Cluck,
cluck," and the little ones would






18 THR HBN AND CHICKENS.

then run in and nestle under her
wings. A saucer full of water
was placed inside the coop, and
when they were thirsty they
would stand on the edge and dip
their beaks in, sipping a little
and lifting up their heads as if
to let the water run down their
throats. It was very pretty to see
the old hen, when food was thrown
into the coop. Before she tasted a
bit, she cried, Cluck, cluck," and
the chickens came running as fast






THB HB AND oIOCKm 1

as their little legs would carry
them, and then she broke the
crumbs into small pieces with her
feet and beak, and they picked
away very busily. When they
had had as much as they wanted,
she used to eat some herself.
The chickens never quarreled,
though they used to peck one
another sometimes with their
sharp bills, in play; and some-
times they climbed up on their
mother's back and clapped their






20 THE HEN AND CHICKENS.

wings, and then, if they were
not careful, they tumbled off,
though I don't think they ever
hurt themselves.
I told you that whenever the
hen wanted her chickens to come
to her, she cried, Cluck, cluck;"
and they knew very well what
she meant, and ran to her in an
instant. Sometimes she called
them to their dinner; but she
also cried, Cluck, cluck," when
there was danger near, and the





THE HEN AND CHICKENS. 21.

chickens never knew what they
were wanted for until they came;
they loved their mother too much
to stay away when she called
them, and they always came
directly. Now there was one
among them who was not so
obedient as he ought to have
been, for whenever his mother
called him, and he would rather
have stayed where he was, he
was always very slow in coming;
indeed, he was generally the last,






22 MTM HEN AND CHICKBN8.

except when it was dinner-time,
and then he was very nimble. It
happened, one afternoon, that
they were all scattered about the
yard picking up seeds and little
worms, when all at once, they
heard their mother cry," Cluck,
cluck," very loud, so they started
off instantly, and did not stop
until they were safe in the coop,
except the one, who I told you
did not like doing what he was
told to do directly. He heard






THe HUN AND CHICKuN. 28

his mother call as well as the
rest; but perhaps he thought to
himself: "I wonder what she
wants me for; I have had my
dinner, so she can't be calling
me to that; I should rather not
go in yet, for I should like to
pick up a few more of these nice
worms first." Just then his
mother called out so loud that he
was quite frightened, and as he
thought that there must be some-
thing amiss, he began to ran






24 THE HEN AND CHICKENS.

towards the coop: but, alas he
had not gone many steps when a
fierce hawk pounced down upon
him as quick as an arrow, stuck
her sharp beak into his head, and
carried him off in her claws to
her nest, where he was quickly
torn in pieces, and his bones
picked by the hawk's young ones.
The old hen, and the brothers
and sisters of the one who had
been carried off, were dreadfully
shocked at what had happened.






THE HEN AND CHICKENS 25

I suppose that they cried, if
chickens ever cry, and talked
over his sad fate in their way.
Martha too, was very sorry when
she came home from school, and
found that one of her chickens
was gone. She had counted them
in the morning, and then there
were twelve; but now there
were only eleven. Neither Mrs.
Speckle nor her chickens could
tell her what had become of the
one which was lost, because, you






26 THE HEN AND CHICKENS.

know, though they could cluck
or chirp, they could not talk, and
Martha does not know yet whether
it was stolen, or whether it was
carried off by a rat, or a hawk,
or a cat.
You know: but if you should
see Martha, I hope you will not
tell her, unless she asks you; for
she would be sorry to hear how
the chicken was punished for not
coming as soon as his mother
called him.











HUMAN BEINGS.

THE SENSES.




I AM a human being. I walk up-
right. All human beings do the same.
Other animals walk with their faces
towards the ground. I use my legs
in walking. Other animals also use
their legs in walking.
I can see, hear, feel, taste, and
smell. Other animals do the same.







28 HUMAN BEINGS.

Seeing, hearing, feeling, tasting, and
smelling, are called the five senses.
I see with my eyes, I hear with my
ears, I taste with my tongue, I smell
with my nose, and I can feel pain
in any part of my body. Other
animals also see with their eyes,
hear with their ears, taste with their
tongues, smell with their noses, and
feel pain when they are hurt. I can
also feel joy, sorrow, and fear. The
other animals feel the same. The dog
feels joy when he sees his master
pleased, feels sorrow when he sees







HUMAN BEIaae. 29

his master uneasy, feels fear when
he sees his master threaten him with
a whip.
I can speak. I can express what
I feel in words. Other animals utter
sounds, but they cannot speak. The
dog expresses joy by barking, and
pain by howling: he expresses sorrow
by a look, and fear by hanging down
his tail between his legs, but he can-
not speak.
I can think. Reason is the power
of thinking. Reason is one of the
gifts which Almighty God, in his







OU HUMAN BEINGB.

great goodness, has bestowed on
human beings. God has not given
reason to the other animals. He has
given to them instinct. Animals
which are without reason are called
brutes.
I can understand by reason why a
house has windows, doors, and chim-
neys; why a stove is made of metal,
and not of wood; why a pitcher has
a handle; why the blade of a knife
has a sharp edge; and thy my shoes
are made of leather, and not of tin,
wood, or cloth. The brutes cannot







UMAUN sUtNs. 81

understand what I do. For example,
neither a cat nor a dog knows the
reason of these things.
I can also understand why I m
not always permitted to do what I
please; why I ought to do what my
parents and teachers desire; why I
ought to be obedient, diligent, and
attentive.
I observe that the rose is like the
carnation, for both are flowers: both
have an agreeable smell and fine
colors; both have q root, leaves, and
stem; both grow from a bud; both






82 HUMXA BBmINS.

come out into flower for a short time,
sd then fade.
But I observe also that they are
like. The rose differs from the
carntion, for it has not the same
kind of smell. The rose has thorns,
but the carnation has not. I can by
reason compare the rose with the car-
nation; and I can distinguish the
one from the other.




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