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Group Title: wren's nest.
Title: The Wren's nest.
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00056852/00001
 Material Information
Title: The Wren's nest.
Series Title: Wren's nest.
Physical Description: Book
Publisher: Religious Tract Society
Place of Publication: London
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00056852
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AMF3034
alephbibnum - 002447774

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Poem
        Page 10
Full Text






THE WTIEIE4'S NEST.














r L T R 0i c n
VO 4'i R~ L v-I






THE WREN'S NEST.


MA.Rv and Jane "ere two little A
girls of six and eight years old.-:
Mary %as the elder. She was-
fond of her book, and took great .
p:iins that she night learn to read
well. She had a Bible of her,-
own, airphiad learned one o0




2 THE WREN'S NEST.
short chapters, and a great num-
ber of texts. What is still better,
it was, hoped that she had given
her heart to God. She loved to
go into her own room by herself,
and to kneel down and pray that
God would forgive all that she
had done amiss, for the sake of
his dear Son, Jesus Christ, who
came into the world to save sin-
ners, and died for them upon the
cross; and that he would keep
her from sin, and inake her a holy
child.
I cannot give so good an ac-
count of little Jane. She was
very giddy, and did not always
mind what was said to her. Some-
Stimes she was not willing to do
as she was bid; and this, as you
know, is a very sad fault indeed.
It I' hoped that as Sane grew
Soiler, she would improve; and her




TIHE WREN'S NEST.
mother often talked to her as she
sat upon her knee, and told her
to pray that Jesus would pardon
her sins, and give her his Holy
Spirit to change her naughty
heart: for Jesus hears the prayers
of little children; and, if they ask
him, he will help them to be good.
Mary and Jane had a brother
named Robert, who was nearly
ten years old. They lived in a
pleasant house in the country,
and had a little garden of their
own, which Robert would dig
himself, and his sisters helped to
weed, and to sow the seeds and.
plant the flowers. Close by their
garden, at the end of the walk,
was a small arbour, with ivy:
growing up the sides and ov-er
the top. There was a round
wooden table, and a seat inside;
and the children called it their





4 THE WREN'S NEST.
arbour, and were fond of going
there to play on a summer day.
Once in the spring they all
went to stay a month with their
aunt and uncle at the farm. The
morning after they came home,
Robert was up before his sisters,
and ran into the garden to see
what changes had taken place
While they had been away. By
and by, just as Mary and Jane
were ready to go down stairs,
they heard his voice outside, call-
ing them to make haste, for he
had something to show them, he
said, something which he had
found. Little Jane put out her
head at the nursery window, and
saw Robert standing below, with
a large brown ball in his hand;
so away they ran down stairs, and
their cousin Sarah soon ran after
Them, to see where they weregoing.





THE WREN'S NEST. 5
"I have found a nest in the
arbour!".said Robert, coming to
meet them; "a wren's nest, I
know it is; for I read about it the
other day. See, it is made of
moss, and nearly round."
"And there are little birds in-
side, I declare!" said Jane, holding
up her hands with delight. One,
two, three, four! Look, Mary,
what droll little creatures; what
yellow heads, and how wide they
open their beaks! Oh! Robert,
where did you find it? And will
.you give me one of the young
birds ?"
Yes," said Robert, you
shall each have one, and I will
keep the other two. We will
feed them and bring them up;
and when they can fly, we will
let them loose, for it would be
cruel to keep them shut in a cage.




6 THE WREN'S NEST.
I found the nest near the ivy that
grows over the arbour. It was
quite hidden by the leaves, and I
should never have seen it, only
the old bird flew out as I stood
by the flower bed; so then I
went up and peeped among the
branches: but you never saw
anything placed in so cunning a
way."
Robert was going on very fast,
when his sister Mary put her
hand upon his arm. Dear bro-
ther," she said, do not you
think it will be very unkind to
take the young birds from their
mother ? Poor thing! how sorry
she will be when she comes back
to her home, and finds that her
nest is gone And the poor little
birds, they will miss her, I am
sure. How should we like to be
taken away from dear papa and




THE WREN'S NEST. 7
mamma, never to see them any
more?"
Robert was not a cruel boy,
but he often acted without think-
ing whether he was doing right,
as had been the case this morn-
ing. As soon as Mary began, in
her voice of pity, to plead for the
poor wren and her young ones,
he felt very sorry for the mis-
chief he had done, and wished to
amend it if he could. He would
gladly have put the nest back in
its place, but was afraid that the
bird would now forsake it, and
leave her young to perish; yet
he could not feel happy in keep-
ing it, after what Mary had said.
At last they agreed to go'to their
papa, and ask him to give his
advice.
Robert felt much shame in own-
ing that he had been guilty of




8 THE WREN'S NEST.
taking a bird's nest; and his papa
told him to be more careful how
he acted another time; for hasty
conduct, he said, often causes
both trouble and sorrow. Then
they went down to the arbour, and
the children stood at a little dis-
tance, while their papa put back
the wren's nest into its place
among the ivy, trying to make it
look as it did before. No one
went near again all the morning;
and there were many hopes and
fears about the old bird's return.
But greatly to Robert's joy, as
he stood there watching in the
middle of the day, he saw the
little wren again fly in and out.
I need not say that Robert never
wished to disturb a bird's nest
again.

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