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Group Title: snow-ball
Title: Snow-ball
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Title: Snow-ball
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Eilzabeth, Charlotte
Publisher: Religious Tract Society
Place of Publication: London
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Bibliographic ID: UF00056849
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Resource Identifier: ltuf - AMF3037
alephbibnum - 002447777

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Poem
        Page 18
Full Text





THE SNOW-BALL.



BALOTTE ELIZABETH.
CHARLOTTE ELIZABETH.


LONDON:
RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY;
DEPOSITORY, 56, PATERNOSTER ROW, AND 65,
ST. PAUL'S CHURCHYARD.
803







THE SNOW-BALL.







BY




CHARLOTTE ELIZABETH


LONDON:

THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY;
Instituted 1799.
DEPOSITORY, 56, PATERNOSTEa ROW; AND 6f,
ST. PAUL'S CHURCHIYARD.





THE SNOW-BALL.


R 4





.tsj



"' HURRAH I who would care
for red fingers, and, may be,
ia pinch of cold in the toes
too, for the fun of such a
balling! -Here it goes, boys,




4 THE SNOW-BALL.
and every turn it takes over
the white ground, it gets big-
ger. Why, the great garden
roller is nothing to this.
What would papa give, I
wonder, for the use of it
next spring, to smooth down
the gravel walks ? Hurrah!
boys, here we go."
So said James, as he ca-
pered along, pushing the
great snow-ball with one hand
while he waved the other
over his head, shouting to
some playmates who were a




S THE SNOW-BALL. 5
little way off. William and
Joseph, meanwhile, were at
.work with both hands, puf-
fing and blowing, while Fanny
and Jane managed to keep
pace with the snow-ball; their
mamma kindly letting them
do so. She loved to see her
children out in the fine frosty
weather, enjoying the fresh
air, and rejoicing in the good-
ness of God, who has made
all seasons pleasant to man;
1and she knew that healthful
Iplay was good for their bodies




6 THE SNOW-BALL.
and their minds too. So they
ran on, as you may see, a
merry little party, till they
came to the house, and there
they put the snow-ball oppo-
site the window of the room
where they dined, and ad-
mired it not a little. Jane
called it papa's new rolling
stone, and they laughed to
think how surprised anybody
would be who had never seen
snow, to find it melting away.
" In a few days," said Fanny,
" as fine and big as it looks,




THE SNOW-BALL. 7
,it will come to nothing at
all." You are wrong," said
William, "it will come to
something." "Only to wa-
ter, brother, and that is as
good as nothing." And a
great deal better too," said
Jane; that snow-ball will do
some good."
The others laughed; but
she looked grave, and said,
"Don't you remember the
beautiful text, 'As the rain
cometh down, and the snow
from heaven, and returneth




8 THE SNOW-BALL.
not thither, but watereth the
earth, and maketh it bring
forth and bud, that it may
give seed to the sower, and
bread to the eater: so shall
my word be that goeth out
of my mouth. It shall not
return unto me void, but it
shall accomplish that which
I please, and it shall prosper
in the thing whereto I sent
it,'" Isa. Iv. 10, 11. "That is
very true indeed, Jane," said
several of the children ; we
never thought of that."





THE SNOW-BALL. 9
"I thought of it," said
Jane, when I walked about
and saw all the fields so bare
and white. It seemed to me
that the green in spring, and
the yellow in summer, and
the brown in autumn, that
cover the fields, were much
nicer. But then I thought
again how the soft snow water
would sink into the ground
and nourish the young corn
plants; and so I remembered
the text; and I could not
help thanking the Lord for




10 THE SNOW-BALL.
his great goodness." You
are a dear little girl," said
William; "for my part, I
think few things are so lovely
as a good deep snow. First,
it is so beautifully white;
then it is smooth, hiding the
hard edges and sharp corners
of things, and making them
all look round and elegant;
then it is pleasant to walk
on, or easy to sweep away.
Only fancy as much wet in
the shape of water lying on
the ground, frozen hard.




THE SNOW-BALL. 11
Why, you girls would not
know what to do, nor mam-
ma; you must go sliding or
skating along the road,-and
such tumbles as you would
get!"
They all laughed at this,
and their mamma said, Be-
sides, such a. frost, with wa-
ter instead of snow to act
upon, would kill all the ten-
der roots, and young plants.
Snow is not only soft, but
warm; it is also very nourish-
ing to the earth, and in this




12 THE SNOW-BALL.
climate, where we must have
sharp frosts, we cannot be
thankful enough for the snow.
In winter, as in spring, sum-
mer, and autumn, we must
still say to the Lord as the
psalmist does, Thou art
good, and doest good.' "
I love my snow-ball better
than ever now," said James.
So do I, and I, and I,"
said the rest.
One proposed that they
should read the chapter
where Jane got her text; for




THE SNOW-BALL. 13
these dear, happy children
took great delight in the Bi-
ble; not reading it as a task,
but as a very great treat, and
a treasure. So Jane found
the fifty-fifth of Isaiah, and
when they had read it, Fanny
said, "I think I know what
is meant by buying wine and
milk without money and
without price. It means, does
it not, mamma, that God
will give us everything we
want if we ask him ?"
"Yes, my love; it means




14 THE SNOW-BALL.
that we are saved by the rich
mercy of the Lord, by the
death of the blessed Jesus for
our sins; and that with him
also God will freely give us all
things, as the apostle says."
They talked a little more
about that beautiful chapter,
and then their mother told
them that as it was so fine
they should have another
half-hour out of doors before
they learned any more lessons.
They were all very glad, and
the ball was soon in motion




THE SNOW-BALL. 15
again, the lively James say-
ing, "Ah, Mr. Snow-ball!
though you have no tongue,
nor even a head of your own,
you are a very nice preacher.
We must give you another
roll, and then we will leave
you to melt and sink down,
that you may do the good
work you were made for; to
water the earth, and make it
bring forth and bud, that it
may give seed to the sower,
and bread to the eater."
So these dear children went




16 THE SNOW-BALL.
running along; and do you
think they were the less joy-
ous because the goodness of
God was in the thoughts of
their young hearts? Oh, no;
they were the happier a great
deal; and so will you be, dear
reader, if you make it your
delight to serve and praise
him.


THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY
INSTITUTED 179Q.



















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