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Title: Grassy knoll.
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Title: Grassy knoll.
Series Title: Grassy knoll.
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Publisher: Religious Tract Society
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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Poem
        Page 18
Full Text






THE GRASSY KNOLL.





















LONDON:
THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY;
Instituted 1799.
DEPOSITORY, 56, PATERNOSTER-ROW, AND
65, ST. PAUL'S CHURCHYARD.






THE GRASSY KNOLL.


IT was on the grassy knoll, by
the road side, that we were play-
ing when Jonas Jenkins came
up. His staff was too long for




4 THE GRASSY KNOLL.

him to hold at the top, so that he
looked like one of the pilgrims
of old times. And Jonas was, in-
deed, a pilgrim to the "city with
the golden gates," and I do think
that he wished to persuade every
one he came near, to journey with
him on the heavenly road. We all
loved Jonas, for if he were grave,
he was kind-hearted, and every-
thing that he said to us was for our
good. Just as Joras came to the
tump, we were about to send up,
our kite into the air, but the belly,
band was so low that it ,would not
fly. For some time we could not]
make out what was the matter
with it.




THE GRASSY KNOLL. 0

A good beginning makes a good
ending," said Jonas, as he joined
us, and picked up the kite to alter
the belly-band. A good begin-
ning makes a good ending, whe-
ther in flying a kite, or in trying
to mount upwards ourselves in
heavenly things. To begin right
is the way to go on right, and to
go on right is the way to end
right. You never yet saw an
arrow hit the mark that set off in
a wrong direction, and you never
will." While Jonas talked to us,
he held up the kite in his hand.
"Listen to me a moment," said
he, "before you begin your sport."
"All is good that God sends





6 THE GRASSY KNOLL.

us. Winter as well as summer,
shade as well as shine, wet as well
as dry, and bitter as well as sweet!
Try to remember this. He knows
what we want, and how and when
to send it. At one time he sends
corn and oil to feed the body, at
another his holy word to nourish
the soul, and sometimes he sends
the thunder and the lightning, and
plague, pestilence, and famine,
to teach us that He only is the
Lord. Again I say that all is
good that God sends us.
Crosses are ladders that lead
to heaven, that is, if they come
front God and are blessed by him!
We have not a toothache, a head-




THE GRASSY KNOLL. 7

ache, or a heartache too many. I
'knew a boy as well and as active
as any of you, but it pleased God
to afflict him with lameness, so
that he walked on crutches for
twenty years; yet often has he
told me that his lameness was a
blessing to him, for it kept him
from evil. The psalmist says:
' Before I was afflicted I went
astray, but now have I kept thy
word,' and he said so too. Yes !
yes! God's crosses are ladders
that lead to heaven.
"Little strokes fell great oaks.
One or two blows with the wood-
man's axe may hardly make a
mark on the sturdy tree; but when




8 THE GRASSY KNOLL.


the strokes are kept up, one after
another, they soon make a gap
wide enough to put your head in.
A very small piece of chip flies off
when the axe descends, but these
small chips altogether amount to
a large piece of timber, and at
last, down comes the old oak, with
a terrible crash, to the very ground.
By little and little you may work
wonders; never be cast down be-
cause you cannot do great things!
Drop by drop wears away marble,
and step by step you may climb
the highest hill.
No sunshine without shade;"
and one is as necessary as the
other. We require reproof, as,




THE GRASSY KNOLL. 9

well as praise, and to be put back
as well as to be brought forward.
Health would be but little prized
if we had no sickness, and joy
itself is made greater by coming
after sorrow. The checks we
meet with keep us in our proper
places. Your kite would not fly
in the air if the string did not
pull it one way, and the tail the
other. Be prepared for trouble
in the happiest hour, for there is
no sunshine without shade.
The less said the soonest mend-
ed. A chattering tongue does
more mischief than a mad dog,
therefore be on your guard. If
you go out of your way, you may




10 THE GRASSY KNOLL.


come back again to the right road;
if you make a wrong figure on
your slates, you may rub it out,
and make another; but when you
once speak a wrong word, you
can never recall it. Have a care
then, and keep a bridle on your
tongues. Speak evil of no one-
spread no bad report; but think,
and speak, and act with kindness
to all.
"He who does good, always
gets good. This is a truth worth
knowing. Again I say, he who
does good always gets good; he
cannot help it. We cannot serve
one another without serving our-
selves. Can you put a pin-fea-




THE GRASSY KNOLL. 11

there young bird, that has fallen
from the bough, into his warm
nest again without feeling happy?
Can you do a kindness to a play-
mate without making him want to
do you one in return ? No-that
you cannot. I say, then, that, at
your books, and at your play, in
the morning and at night, wher-
ever you are, and whatever you
may be doing, he who does good
will always get good.
One to-day is worth two to-
morrows. Two! it is worth ten.
You have heard the proverb, no
doubt, A bird in the hand is
worth two in the bush;' now to-
day is the bird in the hand. Like




12 THE GRASSY KNOLL.

the bird, it has wings and flies
swiftly; use it well, then, while
it is your own. He who uses to-
day well, may safely be trusted
with to-morrow and the next day;
but he who abuses it, loses it, and
flings away a pearl that he can
never recover. Up, and be doing
while the sun is in the skies.
Love God, fear God, obey God,
and glorify God. This may be
done at your books and your play,
on your rising and retiring to rest
-in your going out and in your
coming in.
All is well that ends well.
Ay! and all is ill, however de-
lightful it may be, that does not




THE GRASSY KNOLL. 13

end well. There is a way which
seemeth right unto a man, but
the end thereof are the ways
of death,' Prov. xiv. 12. Mind
what way you go, and look to the
end of it. The way of sin is the
way of death, the way of godli-
ness is the way of life eternal,
through Jesus Christ, who is 'able
also to save them to the utter-
most that come unto God by him,'
H-eb. vii. 25. Neither is there
salvation in any other; for there
is none other name under heaven
given among men, whereby we
must be saved,' Acts iv. 12.
All is well that ends well, but, as
I said at first, A good beginning




14 THE GRASSY KNOLL.

is the way to make a good end-
ing.' Begin the year well, the
day well, and the hour well, wher-
ever you are, and however you
may be employed. Now then,
hear the sum total of all that I
have told you. A good be-
ginning makes a good ending.'
'All is good that God sends us.'
' Crosses are ladders that lead to
heaven.' Little strokes fell
great oaks.' 'No sunshine with-
out shade.' The less said, the
soonest mended.' He who does
good, always gets good.' One
to-day is worth two to-morrows,'
-and All is well that ends
well.' "




THE GRASSY KNOLL. 15

Here Jonas Jenkins, having al-
tered the belly-band, held the
kite up high that we might run
and raise it in the air. It moun-
ted beautifully, and in a very
short time took up all our string.
Jonas stopped with us till the
kite was standing steadily in the
air, high above the church spire,
and then left us, saying, You
see, boys, that a good beginning
makes a good ending.'"


THE BIBLE.
'What a mercy !-what a treasure
I possess in thy dear word;
There I read, with holy pleasure,
Of the love of Christ my Lord.





16 THE GRASSY KNOLL.

"That dear word reveals the Saviour
Sinful children deeply need;
Oh! what mercy, love, and favour,
That for sinners Christ should bleed.

"Oh! the blessedness of knowing
Christ the tender Saviour's love,
Freely on a child bestowing
Grace and mercy from above.

"Let that Book be ever prized
Far above my little toys;
All besides shall be despised,
Led to seek far greater joys."


RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY.







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