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Group Title: kind boy.
Title: The Kind boy
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00056835/00001
 Material Information
Title: The Kind boy
Physical Description: 16 p. : ill. ; 11 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Religious Tract Society (Great Britain) ( Publisher )
Publisher: Religious Tract Society
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: c1855
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00056835
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AMF3051
alephbibnum - 002447791

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Poem
        Page 18
Full Text











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THE KIND BOY.


LONDON:
THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY;
Instituted 1799.
SOLD AT THE DEPOSITORY, 56, PATERNOSTER-ROW
AND 65., ST. PAUL'S CHURCHYARD,
AND BY THE BOOKSELLERS





THE KIND BOY.


THE kindest and best boy in
our village, say what you will,
is my little friend, James
SLewis, who lives at the White
SHouse, near the long row of





4 THE KIND BOY.


elm trees, just beyond the
church. Whether you see
him at home with his little
brothers and sisters, or run-
ning about in the fields, or at
play with other boys, you will
never find him doing a cruel
or an unkind act. He is not
the one to rob a bird of its
nest for the sake of the pretty
spotted eggs which lie so soft
and snug within; nor was he
ever known to torment a poor
harmless frog, to tease a
kitten, or even to hurt a fly.
My little friend is a lively boy,




THE KIND BOY.


and is always ready to enjoy
a merry game of play; but
he has a kind heart, which
cannot find pleasure in any
sport that may give pain to a
living thing.
At home, all dearly love
him; even the baby will clap
her little hands when she sees
him, and hold up her pretty
mouth for a kiss. Arthur,
who is just three years old, is
also very fond of him: they
are nearly always -with each
other; and James told his
mother not long ago that he




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6 THE KIND BOY.
found it more and more need-
ful that he should be a good
boy, since, whatever he might
say or do, little Arthur would be
sure to try to say and do the
same. This is, indeed, a great
reason why elder brothers and
sisters should strive to do
right; for little folks are al-
ways ready to copy the pat-
tern which is set before them,
whether it be good or bad.
One day in the summer,
James had a penny given to
him to spend as he liked, and
he asked his mother's leave to




THE KIND BOY.


go with Arthur to the shop in
the village, where he might
buy a new top. His mother
said they might go, for she
could trust James to take care
of his little brother: so they
put on their straw hats, and
James took hold of Arthur's
hand, and away they went.
They passed through the
garden gates, and were just
under the tall elm trees, when
Arthur drew away his hand
from James, and ran across
the road, to look at something
that was crawling along upon





8 THE KIND BOY.
the ground. James ran too,
and saw that it was a little
brown snail,with his shell upon
his back, and two thin horns
sticking up on each side of his
head. The poor snail went
creeping on, never thinking
of danger, till Arthur gently
touched him with his foot;
then he quickly drew in his
horns, and rolled himself up
in his shell, and lay quite still
upon the path. Arthur, I am
afraid, wanted to stay and
tease him, but James called
him away, saying that the poor


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THE KIND BOY. 9
snail had as good a right as
themselves to enjoy his morn-
ing walk.
I did not hurt the poor
snail," said little Arthur ; "I
did not want to hurt him; I
only made him go into his
house."
Perhaps not," said James,
"but you put him into a sad
fright: and I dare say he will
be very glad when he ventures
to creep out of his house, and
finds that we are gone quite
away."
Who made the snail ?"





10 THE KIND BOY.


asked Arthur, as they walked
along, hand in hand.
It was God," said James,
speaking very slowly, it was
God, who made you and me,
and all things that are in the
world. He made the little
snail."
Did God make the sun ?"
asked Arthur, trying to look
up to the sky; but it was so
bright that his eyes were
dazzled, and he was glad to
turn them again upon the
fresh green leaves, and the
grass that grew by the way-




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THE KIND BOY. 11

side. "Did God make the
sun ?"
"Yes; I can tell you a
verse about that," said James,
" and you may learn it if you
like :
'God made the sun to shine on high,
The moon to give her light;
And stars to twinkle in the sky,
Through the long winter night.' "
While James was saying
this verse, little Arthur drew
closer to him, and took faster
hold of his hand. James soon
saw what it was that made the
little boy feel afraid. There





12 THE KIND BOY.


was a poor woman with a baby
in her arms, sitting under a
tree by the roadside; and she
had an old cloak thrown over
her head, which made her look
something like a gipsy: it was
this that made Arthur keep
fast hold of his brother's hand,
as they came near the place
where the poor woman was
sitting.
James was passing on, for
his parents did not approve of
his speaking to strange persons
whom he met by the way; but
this poor woman seemed ill,




THE KIND BOY. 13
and she looked so sadly in his
face, that he thought it could
not be wrong to stop and hear
what she had to say.
My good young master,"
she said, can you bestow a
half-penny to buy me a piece
of bread ? I have had nothing
to eat to-day."
James looked at the poor
woman, with her pale and
hungry face; and then he
thought of his new top, and
of the penny that had been
given him to spend. He did
but think a minute, that he




14 THE KIND BOY.
might be sure he was doing
right; and before the woman
could ask him again, he
dropped the penny into her
hand. He was glad that he
had done so, when he saw how
pleased and thankful she
was, and when he heard her
pray that God would bless
him for his kindness.
James could read his Bible,
and he knew that Jesus, who
came down from heaven to
die for sinners, tells us to pity
and help the poor. His mo-
ther taught him to pray each




THE KIND BOY. 15
morning and night for the
grace of the Holy Spirit, to
take the sin from his heart,
and to make him like the good
and holy Jesus; and he hoped
that God would hear his
prayer. It was because he
felt pity for the poor woman,
and because he wished to keep
the commands of Jesus, that
he gave away the penny that
day; and so, though he had
to turn back with little Arthur
instead of going on to the
village, and though he had to
play with his old top for nearly




16 THE KIND BOY.
a month longer, yet he never
once wished for the penny
again, nor felt sorry for what
he had done.
Now, what do you think of
my little friend, James Lewis ?
Try to be like him, in feeling
pity for the poor, and in help-
ing them when you can; for
your Father in heaven, who is
so good and kind to all, tells
you to be kind to others.


THE RELIGIlOUS TRACT SOCIETY.







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