• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 All for the best
 The mind
 The new boots
 The rash boy
 Fancy work
 Charles and Thomas
 Bed-time
 Back Cover






Title: Short stories in words of one and two syllables
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00056260/00001
 Material Information
Title: Short stories in words of one and two syllables
Alternate Title: Happy hours for little people
Physical Description: 32 p., 1 leaf of plates : ill. ; 13 cm.
Language: English
Creator: D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
G.T. Day & Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: D. Lothrop & Co.
G.T. Day & Co.
Place of Publication: Boston
Dover N.H
Publication Date: 1871
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1871   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1871
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
United States -- New Hampshire -- Dover
 Notes
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00056260
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002237477
notis - ALH7964
oclc - 57568419

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page i
    Frontispiece
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Preface
        Page v
        Page vi
    Table of Contents
        Page vii
        Page viii
    All for the best
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    The mind
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    The new boots
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    The rash boy
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Fancy work
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Charles and Thomas
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Bed-time
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
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AMY AND HER MAMMA.
Page 3.


















SHORT STORIES



IN WORDS OF



ONE AND TWO SYLLABLES.
















BOSTON: D. LOTHROP AND CO.;
DOVER, N.H.: G. T. DAY AND CO.

1871.






























'4


















AN old lady, whom I shall call Mrs. Prosy,
has always a story to tell. But it is seldom
that those to whom she tells them, hear the
end of them. The hearers have to leave,
or they fall asleep, or Mrs. Prosy finds out
that she has made her visit too long, and
that she has kept other friends waiting for
nearly an hour.
Some persons think that there is no end
to Mrs. Prosy's stories, and very few chil-
dren care to listen to such stories as hers.
They mostly begin in this way: "When
I was a girl-deary me ah, that's a long
time ago There were no railways then.
Talking of railways, I see there is to be a






vi PREFACE.
new line from-well, I forget the name of
the place; and I ought not to forget it,
for that is where my friend Mrs. Laine has
an aunt living. I was there the winter
before last, and what a winter it was!
The snow lay on the ground for I forget
how long; but Mr. Smith, who lived next
to my uncle, of whom I began to tell you
a story last Monday-you know I had to
go early-I was caught in the rain-and
that just reminds me that I was going to
tell you about Mrs. Laine's aunt-she is
sister to Mrs. Laine's uncle, and lives not
far from where that great fire took place-
let me see-how long ago ?"

Dear reader, Mrs. Prosy is not the author
of these stories. They were all written
during the time that she was telling the
first part of one of her shortest stories.





















4 zC(flnTEI1Th_ @p; :







Page
ALL FOR THE BEST, ... ... .. ..... 9

THE IND, ... ... ... ... ... .. ... 13

THE NEW BOOTS, ... ... ... ... ... ... 16

THE RASH BOY, ... ..... ... 20

FANCY WORK, ... .. ... .. .. .. ... 23

CHARLES AND THOMAS, ... ... ... .. ... 27

BED-TIME, ... ... ...... ... ... .0










(^ "
















SHORT STORIES.



ALL FOR THE BEST.
"WELL, now!" said Annie Bennet,
as she looked out of the window, "I
thought it would be so fine to-day, and
that I should enjoy a ramble through
the meadows with Sarah Bassett. It
is all over now; for even should this
heavy rain soon cease, mamma will be
sure to say that the ground will be too
damp for me t6 go out. Never mind,
it is all for the best. I can content
myself at home. It is pleasant, after-






10 ALL FOR THE BEST.
all, to see the rain pouring down so
quickly-to see the large pools in the
road, and to hear the rain patter,
patter against the windows."
In this way Annie talked to herself
for a long time. Had her temper been
fretful instead of cheerful, she would
have felt sad instead of happy. She
never made trifles troubles. We can-
not all be as happy as we would like to
be, but none of us are so happy as we
might be. We are too apt to look on
the dark side of things instead of
the bright side. It is easy enough to
say, "It is all for the best; but it is
not always so easy to think so.
Annie, after watching the rain for
some time, had taken up a book, and
was so pleased with it that she
kept on reading, and did not notice
that the rain had ceased, and that the






ALL FOR THE BEST. 1




TI,



I, I













sun was shining brightly. The tramp-
ing of horses and rumbling of wheels
in the garden, caused her to lay down
her book and go to the window. It
was her aunt Mrs. Cole's landau.






12 ALL FOR THE BEST.
Oh, I am so glad, Annie dear, that
you were not out. I have come to
take you and your young friend Sarah
Bassett, whom I hope to find at home,
to see one of the finest sights you have
ever seen. A ride of five miles out
and five miles back will be pleasant to
you both; and by the time we get
home there will be a party of young
friends to meet you."
Annie was glad that the rain had
kept her in for a short time; for had
she gone out when she wanted to do
so, it is likely that she would have
missed a great treat.



J.;K ,..





THE MIND. 13


THE MIND.


" BLANK paper Writing paper with-
out a word written on it! And you
sit looking at it as though it were a
nice letter or pretty book. Why do
you do that, Cousin Mary? "
"I was thinking, Eva, of what Mr.
Goodman said about storing the mind."
Oh, I should like to hear what he
said; do tell me."
"That I will, and gladly, for it may
be of use to you. He said that in
some respects the mind is like a clean
sheet of writing paper. We may
write on it something that may be read
by ourselves with pleasure and with
profit, and that others may also read
with pleasure and profit. Or we may






14 THE MIND.
write upon it something that should
not be written, and that is not fit to be
read. We may scribble over it all
sorts of figures and odd marks and
shapes, that have no meaning at all.
Or we may soil it and spoil it so that
it cannot be written on at all."
"But how can we write on the
mind, Cousin Mary? "
I will tell you. All that we learn
and all that we think about is, as it
were, written in our minds. It may
seem a hard task to learn what we
have to learn, but it would be a still
harder task to forget what we have
once learnt. It may seem strange, but
it is quite true."
"I wish I never could forget the
lessons I learn."
Perhaps your wish is granted.
You may not be able to repeat your





THE MIND. 15









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%I ( -v 82



lessons word for word, but you may
have them in your mind for all that.
I might write on this paper with a
pencil, and then rub out what I have
written; I might write on it with ink,






16 THE NEW BOOTS.
and then scratch out the writing, or blot
it over so that it could not be read; but
I cannot be sure that, if I learned
something naughty, I could get it out
of my mind when I wished."
Thank you, Cousin Mary; I know
now what you mean."




THE NEW BOOTS.

"Do, dear mamma, buy those pretty
boots for me. I am sure they will
fit me very nicely. They are just like
Fanny Elson's."
So said Jessie White to her mamma,
who was taking her for a morning walk
through the city. It was a fine day
in autumn; the weather was very warm
for the time of year, and few young
A






THE NEW BOOTS. 17





i6





















would come in a few weeks, or even
in a few days.
Mrs. White liked to please her
A





18 THE NEW BOOTS.
little daughter, but she well knew that
the boots Jessie so much wanted were
not so well made as those she had on,
and as others that she wore.
If I were to buy those boots for
you," said Mrs. White, "you would
take cold, and then you would require
something out of this shop,"-and she
turned with a gay laugh towards a
chemist's at the corner of the street.
"No, dear mamma; do buy those
pretty boots, and I shall be so happy."
Mrs. White let her little daughter
have her own way. She took her
into the shop, the boots were tried on,
and fitted very nicely. They were
bought, and Jessie was much pleased.
cannot say that she was happy.
Jessie had not worn her fine boots
longer than a week, before her mamma's
words came true. She was out in the





THE NEW BOOTS. 19
garden, one morning, plucking a nose-
gay, to give to her friend Fanny
Elson. Her feet felt very cold, but
she thought that she could soon warm
them again. She did warm them; but
as she sat by the fire, she began to
shiver, and she was so ill that she had
to go to bed. The doctor was sent
for, and when he came he said, Ah!
miss, mamma was right. I was stand-
ing close by, when she told you that if
you caught cold by wearing thin boots,
you would have to take physic. My
advice now is, Let mamma decide
what is best for you."
You will be glad to hear that Fanny
took the physic, and soon got well;
and, what is better still, she took the
doctor's advice.





20 THE RASH BOY.


THE RASH BOY.


Miss HOOPER was one day walking
along, with a nice little basket of fresh
flowers in her hand.
Thomas Shepherd knew Miss Hooper
well. She was about four years older
than he, but they had been playmates
from the time that Thomas was a baby.
They were always playing each other
tricks; but their tricks were harmless,
and never spiteful.
Thomas was a little way behind
Miss Hooper, but she did not know it.
" What fine fun it would be," said he
to himself, to go behind her and take
some flowers out of her basket-I
should give them back to her, of
course."






THE RASH BOY. 21






















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22 THE RASH BOY.
She was going to say something
more, but just at that moment her
cousin John turned the corner, and
without saying a word to either her or
Thomas, sprang forward, jerked the
nice basket of flowers to the ground,
and struck Thomas such a heavy blow
that it felled him. He did not notice,
until poor Thomas was lying moaning
on the ground, that it was the nice lad
with whom he had spent a happy day at
his cousin's house only the week before.
John was very sorry-all the more
so, that he had to go back to school
the next day. Poor Miss Hooper felt
sad indeed when she found that
Thomas was badly hurt, and that he
had to be kept in bed.
John gave all his pocket mbney to
buy nice things for Thomas; and he
begged that his cousin would write to





FANCY WORK. 23
him often, to let him know how Thomas
was getting on. How glad he was
when he heard that Thomas was quite
well again!
Those who act rashly often do harm
when they mean to do good. It is
wrong to delay doing what should be
done at once; but we should always
think before we act, and before we
speak.


FANCY WORK.

WHEN Amy Grant was just six years
old, her mamma, as a birth-day present,
gave her a basket made of shells, and
filled with wax flowers.
It was a handsome present, and, if
it had been bought in a shop, it would
have cost a large sum of money.





24 FANCY WORK.
Much time and great care were needed
to make both the basket and the
flowers.
Amy at first thought that the flowers
were real. Oh, mamma! she said,
" how nice those flowers look, and how
nice they smell! Mrs. Grant had
put some little packets of scent at the
bottom of the basket, and Amy thought
that the perfume was the fragrance of
the flowers.
But when Amy found that the
flowers could be kept for many years,
and that they, as well as the handsome
shell basket in which they were placed,
were made by her own dear mamma,
her pleasure was great indeed. It
was at first a puzzle to Amy to know
how it was that her mamma made the
flowers of spring, summer, autumn,
and winter from nature for each





FANCY WORK. 25
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*,












flower was the model of a real one
out of Amy's own garden.
"You forget, my dear Amy," said
Mrs. Grant, that I could not model
all those flowers in one day, nor in one





26 FANCY WORK.
week. I had many other things to
do, as you know. I began to make
that basket of flowers the day after
your last birth-day, and I did not com-
plete my task till this morning. The
task was a pleasure, for I did little by
little in some of my leisure time.
Work of this sort should never become
a toil; it should be done for the pleasure
it brings."
Amy knew what her mamma meant,
and said, "I hope, dear mamma, that
your present will always remind me of
your advice, never to neglect needful
work, and only do fancy work when I
have nothing else to do."
It is quite right for young ladies to
learn fancy work, but it is not right
for them to neglect plain work. There
are many ways in which it may be
useful to them and to others.





CHARLES AND THOMAS. 27


CHARLES AND THOMAS.


WHEN Charles Granton slipped down
and broke his leg, by treading on a
piece of orange-peel thrown by a care-
less boy on the pavement, he had to
keep his bed for a long time.
His friend Thomas Howes had often
spoken to him of the dangers that
surround us at all times and in all
places. But Charles used only to
laugh and say, "Thomas, when you
grow up to be a man, you shall be a
preacher; and then, when I am tired of
laughing and fun, I will come and hear
you preach; and whilst I listen to you
I will look just like this; -and then
he would pull such a long, grave face,
that Thomas could not help laughing.





28 CHARLES AND THOMAS.
Charles made the same mistake that
many others make, old as well as
young. He thought that those who
love to read the Bible, and go to
the house of GOD, and talk about
the things which concern their peace,
must be dull and sad.
Now, when he was not able to go
about, he found that those who were
glad to be with him when he was
strong and active, kept away from him.
Thomas Howes often came to see
him, but he did not even ask Charles
to let him read to him. One day
Charles said, "Thomas, I should be so
glad if you would read to me some of
your good books. I see that they do
not make you look sad. You do not
laugh so much as I do, but you are
always smiling, and you seem to be
happy."





CHARLES AND THOMAS. 29









.-- i








Thomas was glad to find that his
friend was willing to read good books
and ,o hear them read, and to talk on
those subjects that should engage the
minds of us all more than they do.





0 BED-TIME.
He did not speak to Charles as though
he himself were holy, and Charles
were one of the worst of sinners.
He told him that all have sinned and
come short of the glory of GoD; that
we can do no good thing of ourselves;
and that even those who, through the
grace of GOD, do good works, can be
saved only through the merits of Him
who came to save the lost.



BED-TIME.

HERE is a little boy at his prayers
before he goes to bed. His mamma
is teaching him what to say. It is
right that we should, at the close of
the day, praise GOD for his goodness
towards us. It is he who gives us





BED-TIME. 31














health and strength, and keeps us
from harm. He gives us homes, and
friends, and clothes, and food, and no
words can tell in how many ways GOD
is good to us, and yet we do wrong,
and break GoD's holy law. Though
we do no murder-though we do not
steal, nor do any crime that men call
great, we know that all that is not
right is sin in the sight of GOD. Bad





32 BED-TIME.
thoughts are sin; bad wishes are sin:
we sin without meaning to sin. GOD
knows that, for he knows all things;
and for the sake of his dear Son, who
died that we might live, he forgives
us.
The darkness cannot hide us from
GoD. He can take care of us by night
as well as by day; and if we ask him,
he will give us the grace of his holy
Spirit, that we may try to walk in his
ways.
GOD loves to hear the prayer and
praise of little children.



-;;."--.




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