• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Chapter I: Visit to Mr. Jones
 Chapter II: Dick at home
 Chapter III: Dick at school
 Chapter IV: Dick in trouble
 Chapter V: Dick's punishment
 Chapter VI: Dick's adventure
 Chapter VII: Dick's story
 Chapter VIII: Dick taming...
 Chapter IX: Dick and the Deaco...
 Chapter X: Dick's visit to...
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Happy home stories for boys ;, 1
Title: Diligent Dick, or, The young farmer
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00056256/00001
 Material Information
Title: Diligent Dick, or, The young farmer
Series Title: Happy home stories for boys
Alternate Title: Young farmer
Physical Description: 107 p., 4 leaves of plates : ill. ; 16 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Leslie, Madeline, 1815-1893
Rudd, Nathaniel ( Engraver )
Cloues, Samuel ( Engraver )
Hyde, J ( Illustrator )
Young & Bartlett ( Publisher )
Russell & Richardson ( Engraver )
Publisher: Young & Bartlett
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: c1871
 Subjects
Subject: Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Diligence -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Mothers and sons -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Country life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Family stories -- 1871   ( local )
Bldn -- 1871
Genre: Family stories   ( local )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Aunt Hattie.
General Note: Added series title page and some illustrations engraved by Russell & Richardson, Rudd, and S. Cloues after Hyde.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00056256
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002221510
notis - ALG1734
oclc - 57624176

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Frontispiece
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Advertising
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Table of Contents
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Chapter I: Visit to Mr. Jones
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Chapter II: Dick at home
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Plate
    Chapter III: Dick at school
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Chapter IV: Dick in trouble
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Chapter V: Dick's punishment
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Chapter VI: Dick's adventure
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
    Chapter VII: Dick's story
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Plate
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
    Chapter VIII: Dick taming the horse
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
    Chapter IX: Dick and the Deacon
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
    Chapter X: Dick's visit to Maine
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
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DILIGSNT DI(CK


OB,



THE YOUNG FARMER:


BY AUNT HATTIE.


"Seest thou a man diligent in his business ? he shall
stand before kings; he shall not stand before
mean men." Solomon.








BOSTON:
YOUNG & BARTLETT,
26 SCHOOL STREET.






























Entered according to Act of Congress. in the year 1871, by
HENRY A. YOUNG & CO.,
in the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.














LIST


OF VOLUMES IN


THE HAPPY HOME STORIES.


FOR BOYS.






I. DILIGENT DICK.

II. COUSIN WILLIE.

III. LAZY ROBERT.

IV. LITTLE FRITZ.

V. THE NEW BUGGY.

VI. BERTIE AND HIS SISTERS.















LIST


OF VOLUMES IN


THE HAPPY HOME STORIES.


FOR GIRLS.





VOL. I. LITTLE FLYAWAY.

VOL. II. THE SPOILED PICTURE.

VOL. III. FLEDA'S CHILDHOOD.

VOL. IV. THE SINGING GIRL.

VOL. V. MOLLY AND THE WINE GLASS.

VOL. VI. THE TWINS.
















CONTENTS.




CHAPTER I.
Page.
VISIT TO MR. JONES, 9

CHAPTER II.
DICK AT HOME.. 19

CHAPTER III.
DICK AT SCHOOL, 27

CHAPTER 1V.
DICK IN TROUBLE, 37

CHAPTER V.
DICK'S PUNISHMENT, 43

CHAPTER VI.
DICK'S ADVENTURE 62







8 CONTENTS.

CHAPTER VII.
DIcx's STonY, 63

CHAPTER VIII.
DIoK TAMING THE HORE, 75 '

CHAPTER IX.
DICK AND THE DEAON, 83

CHAPTER X.
Dric's VISIT To MAINE,. 93








DILIGENT DICK.


CHAPTER I.

VISIT TO MR. JONES.

Mn. JONES sat in his office on Pearl
Street one of the hottest afternoons
in August, eighteen hundred and ffty-
eight. His linen coat was thrown
on the back of his chair, his vest was
loosened from top to bottom, a pitch-
er of iced water stood convenient to
his hand; but he puffed and panted
continually.
"This is terrible he said to Mr.
Follinsby a gentlemen sitting op-
posite, trying to lose the recollection
of his discomfort in the columns of the
newspaper, terrible Thermome-






10 DILIGENT DICK.

ter ninety-eight in the shade. I pity
the horses -"
"A boy to see you, Mr. Jones,"
said a clerk smiling.
"Ha! a boy is there? Well ask
him in. Any body who ventures out
in the street under such a sun ought
to have important business."
The gentlemen both looked toward
the door, and were rather surprised
to see a little fellow, not more than
twelve years of age, standing there,
with his straw hat in his hand. He
had on what is called a French shirt
of some light material made loose with
wide sleeves, to which his pantaloons
were attached, and a small ruffed col-
lar round his neck. Before he spoke
a word, he took a handkerchief from
his pocket, and wiped the perspira-






VISIT TO MR. JONES. 11

tion from his forehead, brushing back
the heavy mass of curls which had
fallen there. The only parts of his
countenance which deserve particular
notice at this time, were a pair of
honest, earnest, blue eyes, which look-
ed straight, without fear or hesitation,
into the face of the one he addressed;
and a small, well cut nouth, which
told, without his speaking, a whole
story of the possessor's sweetness of
temper, and mirthfulness; and yet the
manner of shutting it proved that he
had firmness too.
All this, which has taken so long to
describe, only cost the two gentlemen
one searching glance; then the boy
took two or three steps forward, say-
ing in a pleasant, respectful tone,
"I want to see Mr. Jones."






12 DILIGENT DICK.

"That is Mr. Jones," remarked Mr.
Follinsby, waving his hand toward the
gentleman.
"Are you the chairman of the Com-
mittee on decorating the St. Stevens'
church?"
This question was so wholly un-
expected by Mr. Jones, who sup-
posed the boy had come 'to ask char-
ity; or perhaps to seek a place as
errand boy in his store, that for one
moment he did not answer, but sat
eyeing the lad with a perplexed
smile, then he said:
"Hem! yes, I'm the one."
"Have you engaged your ever-
greens for Christmas, sir ?"
"For Christmas? ha! ha! ha! we
haven't begun to think of Christ-
mas yet, my little fellow."






VISIT TO MR: JONES. 13

I want to engage the job, if you
please. I'll supply the evergreen
as cheap as any body. I know,
it's a good while before Christmas;
but mother says it's best to be in
season when you're to do any thing."
He said all this in such a matter-of-
fact way, as though he had been used
to business of the kind for years, that
Mr. Jones, after a glance at his friend,
burst into a hearty laugh, in which
the boy joined with perfect good hu-
mor.
"What is your name?" was the
next question.
"Richard Monroe Stuart, sir."
"How old are you?"
Twelve last March."
Have you ever decorated a church,
before?"






14 DILIGENT DICK.

"No, sir; and I don't expect to
decorate it this year. Mother says it
takes tall men with ladders, to do that.
I only want to supply the evergreens.
I'll do it as cheap as any body, sir."
"Where do you live, Richard ?"
"I live in Annesley, sir. They al-
ways call me Dick at home." He
added this with a smile, so full of hu-
mor that both the gentlemen laughed.
"Is your father living, Dick? "
'' Oh, yes, sir! He is the minister
in Annesley."
"And you are doing the business
on your own account ?"
"Yes, sir. One of our neighbors
has a church in the city to decorate
every year; and he makes a good
deal of money."
I suppose your parents are willing






VISIT TO ME. JONES. 15

you should do this; I mean that they
knew of your coming here ? "
Mother does, sir, of course. I nev-
er do any thing without telling her."
Why not your father, too ? "
"I want to surprise him. The peo-
ple are poor; and so they can't give
much salary. If I get the job, I'm
going to buy a new buffalo robe.
We've needed one for the sleigh a
good while."
Whew! ejaculated Mr. Jones,
"will it ever be cold enough to need
buffaloes?"
Dick laughed aloud, mentally re-
solving to tell his mother what a very
pleasant man Mr. Jones was.
"I don't know what Mr. Jones will
do," said Mr. Follinsby; bt if I
were the chairman of the Committee,






16 DILIGENT DICK.

you should have the job. I approve
of boys who tell their mothers every
thing."
Thank you, sir. There's one
thing I haven't told mother yet. Last
spring our hod got broken. If I make
enough I want to get her a new one."
"That's a good boy. I guess you'll
have enough besides the buffalo robe.
If you don't, it wont be a very profit-
able job. Shall you gather the ever-
green yourself?"
Yes, sir, in the vacation at Thanks-
giving. Mother says she thinks she
shall have time to help me wind it
evenings; and then I can keep it
fresh down cellar. Do you think, Mr.
Jones, I can get the job ? "
"C ome here the first of November,
and I will tell you. Our church are






VISIT TO MR. JONES. 17

feeling rather poor this year; but if
we decorate at all, you shall supply
the evergreens. Here is my card.
Shall you remember ?"
Oh, yes, sir! I should remember
you, and where you live; without any
card ; but I'll take it if you please."
Mr. Follinsby put his hand in his
pocket, and drew out his portmonnaie.
Suppose, Dick," he said, that I
give you enough to buy a hod now.
It's inconvenient to do without one."
A flush of honest pride flew into
Dick's cheeks, and even mounted to
his forehead.
"I'm much obliged to you, sir," he
said very seriously; but I'd rather
earn the money for it. Mother'd like
it a great deal better. I'll be sure to
be back, sir, the first of November."
2






18 DILIGENT DICK.

He made a bow which would not
have disgraced a drawing room, and
was retiring when Mr. Jones held out
his hand:
Good bye, Dick," he said, You've
got a good mother, I'm sure."
"Yes, sir," the boy answered, his
blue eyes dancing with pleasure.
"She's the best woman in the,
world." He held out his hand to Mr.
Follinsby, and said, thank you, sir,"
once more and went away.






DICK AT HOME. 19




CHAPTER II.

DICK AT HOME.

"I'D give a hundred dollars if my
boy had been here to see Dick," said
Mr. Follinsby. He'll make his mark
in the world. He's got the true grit."
"I'd give ten thousand if I had
one like him," said the other. "The
idea of C'(1i -tii.,- decorations on this
hot day and he ha, ha'd, till the ceil-
ing rang with his mirth.
"We shall hear- of Mr. Richard
Monroe Stuart again; or I'm mis-
taken," he added presently.
In the mean time Dick, who had
accompanied a neighbor to the city,






20 DILIGENT DICK.

hurried back to the main street to be
in time to ride home with him in the
covered wagon. But finding by the
clock on the great steeple that he
had still an hour, he set off on a
tour of inspection through the streets.
In a small purse at the bottom of
his pocket there was a fourpence-
ha'penny, an old fashioned coin for
which the half dime and a penny
have long been substituted. This
had been given him by his mother to
spend as he pleased, and it was a
matter of grave importance with him,
that it should bewell expended. iHe
passed up and down the main street,
gazing in at the windows, smiling at
the many objects of interest, laugh-
ing outright at the swarthy figure of
a man holding cigars at a shop door,






DICK AT HOME. 21

laughing again at the toys displayed
in a large window; but never dream-
ing of changing his coin for any thing
he saw. He held it tightly in his
hand, walking back and forth until it
was time for him to meet the neigh-
bor at the stable, and then with a
smile concluded to give it back to his
mother again.
Once more inside the wagon, he
pulled from under the cushion a
small paper bundle, and taking out a
cake said, as he ate it with a relish,
"Nobody makes such good ginger
snaps as mother does."
At home there were three boys
younger than Dick all of whom were
daily taking lessons of industry and
thrift, as well as lessons in practical
godliness.






22 DILIGENT DICK.

Richard, though only a few months
past twelve, had already made up his
mind to be on the Lord's side. To
be sure he knew little of the great
army of foes arrayed against the
Captain of his Salvation; the world,
the flesh and the Devil; but he knew
well the iniquity of his own heart. He
knew how much easier it was to do
wrong, to be lazy and selfish and un-
kind to his brothers when his interest
crossed theirs, than to be diligent,
generous, and thoughtful of their
wishes; but he had also learned by a
happy experience the delight of con-
quering himself, for the sake of pleas-
ing his dear Saviour.
Richard being the eldest, somehow
did not regard himself as a boy. He
had always taken care upon himself,






DICK AT HOME. 23

so as to relieve his mother, and though
the merriest fellow alive, singing or
whistling at his work, he had never
within his recollection spent a whole
day in play. The fact is," said his
father watching him as he took the
milk pail, the night after his visit to
Mr. Jones, and went out to do the
barn chores, "the fact is, our Dick
makes play of his work."
Mr. Stuart was a scholar, naturally
absorbed in the duties of his profes-
sion. He betook himself to his study
at an early hour and midnight
very often found his lamp still burn-
ing. His wife was competent to
manage the affairs of the little house-
hold, and he wisely left them to her,
often wondering, however, how she
made the small salary cover even






24 DILIGENT DICK.

their frugal expenses. Happily freed
from this charge, he gave himself en-
tirely to his work, and brought forth
to his people deep, hidden treasures.
As a pastor he was unwearied and al-
most unrivalled. Like a true shep-
herd he cared for his flock, leading
them unto green pastures, and be-
side the still waters. In sickness he
was by their side. In sorrow he wept
with them. In all circumstances of
life, their firm, faithful and sympa-
thizing friend, leading them through
prosperity or adversity to look be-
yond this world to the mansions
a1'ove the skies.
The minister's family lived in a
small house which they owned; and
connected with-it was a farm of four-
teen acres. They kept a horse, cow,






DICK AT HOME. 25

pig and chickens. In the spring a
man was hired to plough, and assist
in planting the corn and potatoes;
and he generally came again in the
fall to help get in the harvest. The
hoeing and weeding of thb vegetable
garden was done mainly by Richard;
his long summer vacation coming just
in the time he was most needed.
Eddy, the boy next in age, not yet
ten, had this year assumed the re-
sponsibility of the chicken house and
with his little saw and hatchet could
cut kindlings as well as any body;
but Richard was the one on whom
his mother mainly depended.
After his visit to the city, the
church decorations and the probabil-
ity of his securing the job, were often
the subject of discussion between him-






26 DILIGENT DICK.

self and his mother. But Dick was
shrewd as well as industrious.
"I'd better not tell the school boys,"
he said one day. "If I do, they'll be
pulling all the evergreen in Mr.
Pond's pasture; and there isn't any
more within half a mile. How many
wreaths can I make in a day? "
I don't know, Dick. You may go
over some afternoon to Mr. McIntosh's
and learn how; then you can teach
me and I'll help you."
Thank you, mother. I do hope the
church wont be too poor to decorate.
Mr. Jones was real kind about it."













1 7; i -






















D'ci swEri] NG PO IS MOTHER. -Page 27.






DICK AT SCHOOL. 27





CHAPTER III.

DICK AT SCHOOL.

THE fall term of the District school
commenced in September. It was
hard at first for Richard to take his
mind from his work, and fix it upon
his studies. He was up in the morn-
ing as soon as it was light, to feed the
horse and cow and groom them, -
to feed the pig, and milk, and sweep
out the barn floor. Then after break-
fast and family prayers he was off to
work in the garden till mother rang
the bell for him to dress for school.
Sometimes he had to go on an errand






28 DILIGENT DICK.

for her, or his father, and hurry Eddy
and little Lyman along, so that by the
time he was seated behind his desk,
he was often sleepy. But he loved
study and soon roused himself, resol-
ved to do this term, as he had last,
and keep his place at the head of the
class.
Fortunately for Dick, the teacher,
Miss Wheeler, was every way'worthy
of her trust. She had studied the
character of every scholar. She loved
them and spared no pains to help
them to progress in their studies.
Richard, her dear minister's son,
was a special object of interest to her.
She trusted him implicitly. She was
very strict in her government, a little
stiff in her manners, but occasionally
was thrown off her guard by some






DICK AT SCHOOL. 29

witty answer, and laughed more hear-
tily than she herself approved.
Every Wednesday there was dec-
lamation by the boys, and reading of
composition by the girls. Richard,
as his teacher always called him, was
fond of speaking; and not being timid,
generally carried off the palm. He
gathered his pieces for these occasions
from a Third Class Reader, selec-
tions from the speeches of Webster,
Clay or Everett.
"Richard Stuart, you may come to
the desk," called Miss Wheeler one
morning. "Have you your piece
ready? "
Yes, ma'am."
What is the name of it? "
The thunder storm."
From what book did you learn it?"






30 DILIGENT DICK.

I didn't find it in a book. I found
it in a paper."
Are you sure you can say it with-
out being prompted? "
Oh, yes, ma'am! "
"Very well. I shall call you the
first one after recess."
The thunder Storm, by Richard
Stuart," called out the teacher at the
appointed time.
Richard rose from his seat, and with
a slight flush on his face, took his posi-
tion on the platform, bowed and com-
menced, with great animation:

"The thunder roared,
The clouds grew big,
The lightning flashed,
And killed a pig."

He had made his parting bow and






DICK AT SCHOOL. 31

taken his seat, before either his teacher,
or the scholars, had time to recover from
their surprise. Miss Wheeler stood in
front of her desk, a little ruler, with
which she thumped upon it to call
the scholars to order, in her hand,
staring at the place where the boy
ought to be, but where he was not.
Then recovering herself in a degree,
she glanced toward Richard, whose
eyes were fixed on a book before him,
a suspicious smile playing about his
mouth. She could endure it no longer;
but burst into a hearty laugh in which
all the scholars joined.
"Richard," said the teacher after
school, "how came you to get such a
piece as that? I supposed from the
name it would be very fine."
"I thought it was a good one; and it






32 DILIGENT DICK.

was easy to learn. I said it to father
first."
What did he say to it ? "
He didn't say any thing; but he
laughed till he choked himself. You
see, he thought wouldd be a long
piece."
The next time Richard's selection
was a poem on the Union by Whit-
tier; and he received ten good marks
for it.
The week following, there were
visitors present; and among them
the Pastor ; Richard, being the best
speaker, was called out among the
first.
After his bow, he announced as his
subject, The Seasons;" and then
went on.
"Some people like Spring best,






DICK AT SCHOOL. 33

some like Summer best;" then with
a sudden burst of feeling clasping his
hand on his heart, he continued, But
as for me, give me liberty or give me
death."
When he bowed himself off the
stage the clapping commenced, while
the dignified teacher, struggling be-
tween her inclination to join the
laugh and to maintain order blushed
crimson.
That speech is impromptu, I pre-
sume," she said addressing the boy.
" I would like you to repeat the one
you gave us last week."
So, Dick, nothing loath, came out
again, and this time acquitted him-
self with honor.
Miss Wheeler was on her way
home when she heard her name
3






34 DILIGENT DICK.

called, and presently, Richard over-
took her.
Didn't you like my piece ?" he
asked looking shyly in her face.
"No, I don't think I did."
Then I never shall speak another
without showing it to you."
Thank you for the promise, Rich-
ard, I am entirely satisfied now."






DICK IN TROUBLE. 35





CHAPTER IV.

DICK IN TROUBLE.

MANY of the children in Annesley
were in the habit of going to school
barefoot through the warm weather.
Dick had often urged his mother to
let him go without shoes. This she
had decidedly refused.
The second week in September
was extremely warm. One day Rich-
ard was going home from school with
a companion, when the boy said:
"I wouldn't wear shoes this hot
day, for any thing, it's so much cooler
without them."






36 DILIGENT DICK.

I'd like to try it," answered Dick.
Why don't you, then ? "
Perhaps I shall this afternoon."
He intended at the time to make
one more plea with his mother; but
when the hour came she was busy
with household duties; and there was
a grave expression on her face which
did not look very hopeful. He went
out the back door to be by himself.
"I have a good mind to try it," he
began. Mother hasn't said any thing
about it this grmat while, so I shouldn't
be disobeying. I'll hide my shoes
here and put them on before she
knows it."
"If you are not disobeying, why
do you hide them?" asked con-
science.
Dick knew he was doing wrong;






DICK IN TROUBLE. 37

and he did not deceive himself by
any more arguing. Mother don't
know how hot my feet are with shoes
and stockings," he said to himself
" or she wouldn't make me wear them."
After he had gone, the door bell
rang; and Mrs. Stuart answered it.
It was a 1-:_ -.-., v who wanted food and
old clothes. When she had supplied his
wants to the best of her ability, she
saw him take something from beneath
the front steps, and hide it under his
coat.
"Mother mother i cried little Ly-
man, rushing into the house. Man
has got Dick's shoes."
"Are you sure Dick did not wear
shoes to school? "
"I saw him take 'em off under the
steps."






38 DILIGENT DICK.

Oh, Dick! could you have seen your
mother's face then, not angry; but
so sad, so grieved that you had dis-
obeyed her, you would have been
sorry I am sure !
Mrs. Stuart sat down with a sigh
to a basket full of mending. She was
not fond of mending, and now the
holes to be patched were many and
large. She felt discouraged but not
at the work. She did not even think
of that. She was grieving for her
boy, who had disobeyed her and dis-
pleased his heavenly Father.
"I did hope he was a Christian
child," she said half aloud. "I thought
he had begun to remember that he
was not his own that he was
bought with a price, that he had
pledged himself to obey Christ's com-






DICK IN TROUBLE. 39

mands. What if he had deceived
himself?"
Tears rolled down her cheeks and
fell on her work. At last she re-
flected that he was only a child, liable
to fall into temptation. I will wait
and see whether he confesses," she
said. If he does, I will freely for-
give him, and I will pray God to for-
give him."
Her husband looked into the room
and was surprised to see instead of
her usual bright smile, a clouded
face.
"What is it? he asked.
She told him what had occurred and
her own fears about her boy.
Dick is trying to be like his Mas-
ter," was his encouraging reply. I
am sure of that; but like all the rest






40 DILIGENT DICK.

of us, he sometimes yields to the
temptations of the arch deceiver. I
feel sure his conscience will not let
him rest till he has confessed, both
to God and to his mother."
I hope not, husband."
In a few minutes a wagon drove up
to the door, and one of their neigh-
bors, a young farmer, sprang to the
ground.
"Why there's Dick !" exclaimed
Mrs. Stuart growing very pale. I
hope nothing has happened."
Mr. Pond took the boy in his arms
and brought him into the kitchen.
"I was going by the school house,"
he explained, "while the children
were out at recess. There was a
scream and presently the teacher
found that Dick had stepped with his






DICK IN TROUBLE. 41

bare feet on some glass. She tried to
stop the bleeding' and then asked me
to bring him home.
You'd better let me carry him up
stairs. He's a pretty good armful."
All this time Dick had avoided his
mother's eye; and did not speak a.
word. Only when his father took off
the handkerchief bound around his
foot, and pressed the place with his
finger the tears ran down his pale
cheeks.
"Does it hurt you, dear ? asked
his mother.
He bowed his head.
"Was it a large piece of glass,
Dick ?"
No, sir, it was window glass. We
were playing catch and I stepped on
it."






42 DILIGENT DICK.

Dick sobbed so much his father
could scarcely understand.
"I'm afraid there is glass in his
foot now," urged the gentleman.
"If so we must have the doctor here,
with his forceps."
Dick gasped. I don't think there's
any in it," he sobbed.
"I'll do it up," said Mrs. Stuart.
" If he is no better in the morning,
we will have the Doctor examine it."






DICK'S PUNISHMENT. 43





CHAPTER V.

DICK'S PUNISHMENT.

ALL this time not a word had been
said about his disobedience. When
he cried, his mother stooped over the
bed and kissed him. Presently she
left the room to get some bandages,
and as soon as he was alone his tears
burst forth afresh.
"Oh how sorry I am I was so
naughty! he said to himself. How
good mother is. I do love her dearly.
I'm glad I meant to tell her before I
got hurt."
"Will .you please shut the door,






44 DILIGENT DICK.

mother," he said still sobbing. "
want to tell you something."
She came and stood by his side,
putting her hand on his damp fore-
head.
"I (11 .:.,I.v1: you, mother," he be-
gan. I went without my shoes. I
didn't feel happy because I knew
how wicked it was to do it when
you'd forbidden me. Will you for-
give me, mother ?"
Yes, my dear, with all my heart.
But you know there is another whom
you have offended; One whose com-
mands you have promised to obey."
I know it, mother. I thought of
it in school; and I couldn't study, so I
lost my place in my class. I thought
of it, and prayed in my seat that
God would forgive me, and help me






DICK'S PUNISHMENT. 45

to be good. It was then, before I
was hurt, that I resolved to tell you.
I hid my shoes under the front steps,
and I meant to put them on again
before you saw me, my stockings are
in my pocket."
"I knew it all before you came
home, my dear. A beggar came here
and when he went away he carried off
your new shoes; but I scarcely
thought of that; .o pained was I that
my son should disobey me and dis-
please God."
"Oh mother! mother,! I never
will do so again. I mean I'll try not
to. You knew best when you said it
was dangerous to go barefoot. My
foot does ache, mother. Do you
think it will have to be cut ?"
I hQpe not."






46 DILIGENT DICK.

The night following, neither Dick
nor his mother slept one moment.
As soon as it was light Mr. Stuart
started off on horseback for the Doc-
tor, who lived a mile away.
When the physician came, he
loosened the bandage, and found the
whole ball of the foot inflamed. He
said there were small pieces of glass
in it, and that getting them out would
be a bad business.
"Dick is a brave boy," said his
mother. "I'm sure he'll try to be
quiet."
If you will hold my hand, mother,
I'll try not to move."
"You may scream as loud as you
please," said the Doctor laughing, "if
you'll keep your foot still."
But Dick did not even groan. He






DICK'S PUNISHMENT., 47

shut his teeth firmly together grow-
ing paler and paler every minute,
until with a gasp, he lost his con-
sciousness.
Mrs. Stuart felt his hand loosen its
grasp on her's; and motioned her hus-
band to run for the camphor bottle.
"Never mind," said the Doctor,
"I've almost done. Let him be a min-
ute. These little pieces must be got
out or they'll make mischief."
Richard looked so much like death,
that his mother could not let him be.
She chafed his hands, and kissed his
pale cheeks, murmuring words of
love; while the faithful physician
probed and pressed abLout the wound
until he was quite sure he had re-
moved all the glass.
Then he laid a towel under the






48 DILIGENT DICK.

foot to catch the blood when it began
to flow, and threw a handful of water
in the face of the fainting boy, which
soon brought back the color to his
cheeks.
"All right now, my brave fellow;"
he said gayly. "The glass is all out.
Now, Mrs. Stuart, if you will give me
four spoonsfull of real cream, I'll
make an ointment."
He poured some liquid from a bot-
tle and gave the mixture a good stir,
making a thick, nice salve. This he
spread over the soft linen the mother
had provided, and bound around the
foot.
You will have to give up farm-
ing for a week or two," said the Doc-
tor laughing. Perfect rest and daily
applications of the ointment are all






DICK'S PUNISHMENT. 49

that will be necessary. Next time,
Dick, I advise you to wear shoes."
It was a weary time for the poor
fellow on many accounts. He wor-
ried secretly about the work and
about his lessons. He sent to school
every day by Eddy to find out who
was at the head of the spelling and
grammar classes; but he confessed to
himself that his punishment was a
just one.
After a long conversation with his
mother on the subject, he covered his
face and thanked his kind Father in
heaven for the chastisement which he
could now see was sent in love to re-
mind him of the truth of the words,
"The way of transgressors is hard."
"You did just so, mother, when baby
kept running to the stove, and you
4






50 DILIGENT DICK.

were afraid he would be burned up if
he did not learn; so you let him
burn his fingers a little mite. Oh,
how he cried, and hid his face in your
neck! but he knew he mustn't touch
the stove again. Don't you remem-
ber how he would go toward it and
then look at you and say so cunning,
' No! no! Berty burn!' and then
he'd blow as you did on his poor fin-
gers.
Perhaps, mamma, God knew that
if I went to school barefoot and came
back without hurting me I should go
on growing more and more disobe-
dient, and so he let me hurt myself
to save me a worse hurt as you did
Berty."
Yes, Dick, that is the right view
to take of it. That is what St. Paul






DICK'S PUNISHMENT. 51

meant when he said; Now no chas-
tening is for the present joyous, but
grievous; nevertheless afterward it
yieldeth the peaceable fruits of right-
eousness to them that are exercised
thereby.' "






52 DILIGENT DICK.





CHAPTER VI.

DICK'S ADVENTURE.

THANKSGIVING week and thanksgiv-
ing vacation came at last, but to the
great disappointment of Richard, the
ground was covered with snow. It
was fortunate that he had already
gathered one wagon load of evergreen
at the time he learned to wind the
wreaths at Mr. McIntosh's. This
would give him employment for the
vacation; and perhaps the snow
would melt away before Christmas.
It was more of a job than he' had
imagined to wind the evergreen into






DICK'S ADVENTURE. 53

wreaths. Though he worked with all
his might he only finished three the
first evening.
Mrs. Stuart's mending prevented
her helping him at this time; but she
sat near and watched his progress.
After he had retired, she took the bas-
ket of selected pieces, and finished the
handsomest one yet made, in fifteen
minutes.
"Let me help you plan your work,"
she said the next morning, after her
wreath had been greatly admired.
"Eddy and perhaps Lyman, too,
can help you pick over your ever-
green during the day. Put the pieces
ready to wind in a pile by themselves.
This evening we will have a bee, and
make up as many wreaths as we can."
"I shall only make a hundred in all,






54 DILIGENT DICK.

mother," exclaimed the boy clapping
his hands with delight. Mr. McIntosh
has a hundred and fifty for his large
church; and Mr. Jones told me they
couldn't afford to decorate a great
deal. About forty dollars, he said
they would pay. Do you think I
have enough to make a hundred, mo-
ther ?"
"We can tell better t6 night, my
dear."
"It wont be so much work to wind
the other for looping up, mother. It
doesn't have to be done thick like the
wreaths. Mr. Jones said I might
bring what I could afford for forty
dollars."
So he thought you would forget
the decorations before November, did
he?"






DICK'S ADVENTURE. 55

I Yes, mother, and he shook hands
with me as though he had always
known me. I thanked him ever so
much for his kindness."
Christmas came this year on Thurs-
day. On the Monday previous Dick
plead for leave to take his wreaths to
the city, and engage the amount he
wished to buy; The snow had lain
on the ground nearly a month, and
there had been no opportunity to
gather more evergreen. A cold sleet
had been driving against the windows
all the morning and his parents could
not consent to his riding so far in an
open sleigh.
Poor Dick could think and talk of
nothing but his decorations. He had
obtained permission of Miss Wheeler
to be absent from school on neces-






56 DILIGENT DICK.

sary business, on condition that he
made up his lessons. This he had
done for iMn'lJi y ; and it was a terri-
ble disappointment not to be able to
go. The morning was half past be-
fore he recollected that he might go
to school to day and in the evening
learn the lessons his class would re-
cite on Ti.-l.-iy.
The next morning was clear but
very cold.
"I hate to have the child out all
day in such weather," remarked Mrs.
Stuart to her husband.
"He wont mind it, his blood runs
briskly," answered his father with a
smile.
So Dick started off, his hands and
ears well protected, after receiving
many cautions to be careful of his






DICK'S ADVENTURE. 57

driving in the city, and to put the
horse under cover as soon as possible.
Old Charley having eaten an extra
feed of oats, felt pretty lively. He
knew as well as anybody that some-
thing unusual had taken him out of
his warm stable, and turned to watch
the last arrangements of his young
master with a satisfied neigh.
"Good bye! good bye! I hope
you'll have great success," cried one
and another shouting after him, as
with a merry laugh Dick drove out of
the yard.
I don't think he'll make any thing
by his speculation," remarked his
father; but it will be a good lesson
for him."
About four o'clock Eddy and Ly-
man stationed themselves by the






58 DILIGENT DICK.

front window to watch for their
brother's return. Early in the after-
noon, the weather had grown cloudy
again, and now the fine sleet had be-
gun to fall.
"Bring Dick's Sunday jacket and
shoes, and put them near the fire,"
said his mother. He will be wet
through."
After waiting supper an hour be-
yond the usual time they reluctantly
took their seats at the table, wonder-
ing every moment why he did not
come.
In the centre of the table there
was a great dish of hasty pudding of
which the absent boy was particu-
larly fond. Mrs. Stuart took out a
portion into a bowl, and set it into
the top of the teakettle. By the






DICK'S ADVENTURE. 59

time the dishes were cleared away,
she had become really anxious.
It was now seven, a cold disagree-
able night, where could the child be ?
Two or three times the mother went
to the door, thinking she heard a cry
of distress.
"We had better have prayers,"
urged Mr. Stuart. "Baby's eyes
are growing very heavy."
Eddy brought the Bible and sing-
ing books; but the reading had not
commenced when the sound of some
one pushing open the barn door
startled them.
There's Dic. ? cried Eddy.
No, dear! we should have heard
the bells."
Mr. Stuart, however, took the lan-
tern down from its appropriate shelf,






60 DILIGENT DICK.

lighted it and prepared to assist his
son.
"I've got home, father," called out
Richard in a cheerful voice.
"Are you very wet? We have
been quite anxious about you. How ?
Why ? where did you borrow this buf-
falo robe "
Dick laughed merrily. "I'll tell
you all about it, sir, when we go into
the house."
You'd better go in alone. I'll un-
harness, and put the horse up. The
feed is all ready in his crib."
Old Charley has done splendidly.
He's been well fed t6o. I saw to it
myself, and stood by till he had eaten
his oats clean. Mr. Pond told me
the tricks of the stable men. Now I'll
run in with some of my bundles."






DICK'S ADVENTURE. 61

Once, twice, he ran with a load to
the back kitchen seeing no one.
Then perceiving that his father was
ready, he said:
"Will you please carry the buffalo
in? I must give it to the owner all
safe." Then he took the last bundle
from the sleigh, and followed his fa-
ther to the sitting-room."
'Tis Dick, mother! I hear his
vicee" and out rushed the whole
group to mdet and welcome him.
Dick walked in, his head erect, his
eyes twinkling with fun, while about
his mouth was a peculiarly mysterious
smile which his mother understood
very well.
He presented rather a strange ap-
pearance. On his head was a cap of
fur with ear pieces fastened under the






62 DILIGENT DICK.

chin. Over this his common cap was
tied with, a scarf. His hands were
protected by a pair of fur gloves with
deep gauntlets.
He took these last off, and tossed
them upon the table with an air of
unconcern; then untied his scarf, and
did the same with his cap.
You must have come into a fortune
somehow," said his father smiling.
" I was never the owner of a pair of
gloves like these. Are they yours,
Dick ?"






DICK'S STORY. 63





CHAPTER VII.

DICK'S STORY.

RIcnARD drew a chair up to the fire
and sat down.
"I'll tell you all about it," he be-
gan.
Not till you've had some supper,"
urged Mrs. Stuart.
SI'm not a bit hungry. Old Char-
ley trotted off well, I tell you. Just
as I was going over the car bridge,
three miles this side of the city, a
gentleman hailed me."
Can you give me a ride, my boy ? "
he asked.






64 DILIGENT DICK.

"I looked at him sharp for a min-
ute, and when I saw that he was a
true gentleman, I said,
"'Yes sir, I'm pretty full; but if
you wont mind your feet being
crowded, I can take you as well as
not.'
"He told me he had been waiting
for an omnibus; and he wanted very
much to catch the train from the city
to Providence.
"He asked me my name and a
great many questions; and I liked
him so well I told him all about the
chance I'd got to decorate St. Ste-
vens' church.
By and by he took out his pocket-
book full of bills and currency, and
offered me fifty cents.
'Thank you, sir. I don't want any














. *1 .WILL -TEL G B.





I.*lig I 5.
'







r 4. a '" L y .. t -.-

. "+- ? ._ ,,' -' ;r' -







A-" dDY WILL TEL' o,.I WII'' E GOV. BL --E LIVES,






DICK'S STORY. 65

pay. I can take you to the depot
if you'll show me the way.'
"lHe urged me a good deal and
tried to press the money into my
hand, but I kept -:l:-in- :
"' No, sir, I thank you just the same;
I'd rather not take it.'
"After this he seemed pleasanter
than before. He told me he lived in
Providence; and then I said, my
mother has a cousin there.' He is
Professor in the college; and I hear
that he is very rich. His name is
Mr. Grath.
Ah! is he your cousin? I know
him very well. I was at a dinner
party at his house last week. Per-
haps you'll go to Providence some
time. If you do, you must call on
me; my name is Blake. Any body
5






66 DILIGENT DICK.

will tell you where Governor Blake
lives."
"That is really an adventure,
Dick," said his mother.
Yes, and I mean to call. He re-
minded me of it again, when he got
out; and he shook hands as hearty as
could be, and wished me great suc-
cess.
When I went to the place where
Mr. Jones told me to carry the ever-
green,-the vestry back of the church,
I found ever so many people there,
ladies and boys. As soon as they saw
me with some wreaths on my neck
and on my arms, they cried out:
"' Oh! here is our young hero!
We are all ready for you. You're just
in time.'
"The boys helped me bring the






DICK'S STORY. 67

wreaths from the sleigh. They said
they were beautiful, the handsom-
est they'd ever had.
"' I have only ten yards of wound
evergreen here,' I said. I want to
know how much you need; and I'll
have it here in.a few minutes.'
"I saw some on my way, and found
how much I could buy it for. So
when they told me, I drove Charley
right back, and bought it with the
money father lent me. Just as I was
going in, I heard one lady say:
"I knew he'd be sure to bring it
in season. Father told me about his
coming to the store one of the hottest
days in August.
I carried in all they wanted; and
they thanked me over and over for
being in season. If I'd gone yester-



*






68 DILIGENT DICK.

day, mother, the vestry would have
been locked up.
"I put up Charley then, and gave
the man his blanket to cover him;
and I didn't leave till I'd seen his rack
full of hay.
"I staid-in the stable-office a little
while to warm myself; and I wanted
to count how much I had made. It was
twenty dollars, besides twenty which
I gave for the evergreen I bought.
There's your money, father, all in new
bills; and here's a buffalo robe for
your Christmas present.
Will you please come to the kitch-
en, mother, for yours.
"I heard you say you wanted a
new hod, and so ,I bought you one,
and some knives for the table. There's
half a dozen, good steel too."






DICK'S STORY. 69

SMy dear boy," said his mother.
"I didn't expect any thing. You
should'have bought for yourself."
Dick undid a bundle and distribu-
ted a tooth-brush to each member of
the family, except baby. For him he
had a sugar horse.
"I bought the cap and gloves for
myself," Dick went on, and those
fowls are for all of us."
He -pointed to the table where lay
two turkeys weighing nine pounds
each, and a pair of chickens.
"Wonders will never cease," said
his mother, laughing heartily. "You
don't mean that you bought all these
things for twenty dollars."
"Please come in where it's warm;
and I'll tell you all about it."
"I meant all the time to buy a






70 DILIGENT DICK.

turkey for Christmas dinner, and I
went to the market to see how much
it would cost. There were crowds
and crowds of them; but they were
very high. As I came out I saw a
man getting into a pung. He was
grumbling awfully. I went up to
him and found he'd got turkeys and
chickens; but they were not very fat
and he couldn't sell them..
How much do you ask ? I said.
"C Just what I can get,' he answered
real cross. I'm twenty miles from
home and the rain is coming on
heavy.'"
"I picked out the best two turkeys
and two chickens which I could find;
and I said,
"I'll give you a dollar and a half
for those."






DICK'S STORY. 71

Clear out! 'he screamed. 'll
carry 'em home first.'
So I cleared out and went to the
other end of the market. In half an
hour I came back. Haven't you
gone yet ?' I asked laughing.
"' Come,' says he, I can't wait
here. I'll sell dirt cheap.'
So I said again, I'll give you a
dollar and a half for those I've picked
out.'
"'I aren't quite a fool yet,' he
answered growling. 'I'spose youthink
I haven't cut my eye teeth.'
I went back into the market out
of the rain; but I didn't look for a
turkey. I knew the man would let
me have'em if I waited'long enough.
When I went back again I saw him
standing in his pung waiting for me.






72 DILIGENT DICK.

"' Boy! boy !' he shouted, 'Here!
this way a minute.'
I didn't hurry much.
I shall freeze and so will my
horse,' he said growling again.
C You may have the lot for a dollar
and a half.'
"c I've concluded not to give so
much now,' I told him. I'll pay you
a dollar for 'em.'
le waited a minute. It was grow-
ing real dark and then he snatched 'em
out of the pung.
S"' There take 'em,' says he. It's
just giving 'em away.'
I took out the dollar and gave it
to him and thanked him, and took the
blanket off his horse, and tucked it
round his knees so that he might be
warm.






DICK'S STORY. 73

"' Which way are you going,
youngster?' he asked.
"I'm going twelve miles to Annes-
ley. I've got a horse in the stable
on Blossom street."
'Jump in, then,' says he; and
I'll carry the stuff there. I go right
past the stable.'
"We only rode a little way; but I
got him to laughing, and he said he
wished I'd ride all the way home with
him. He added 'if you are only
twelve, you've got your eye teeth cut,
no mistake; I've allus heard that
ministers had smart chaps.' He shook
hands real hearty when I left him.' "
Mr. Stuart threw back his head
and laughed heartily.
"I forgot to tell you," said Dick,
"that when I carried my bill to Mr.






74 DILIGENT DICK.

Jones, he was just going to dinner,
and he made me go with him. He
lives a little way from the State
House and his parlors were fixed up
big. Now I'll eat some hasty pud..
ding and go to bed."






DICK TAMING THE HORSE. 75





CHAPTER VIII.

DICK TAMING THE HORSE.

I AM disappointed," said Mr.
Stuart coming into the house one
warm day the following spring. Mr.
Fuller has sold his oxen, and can't
plough my land this year."
"Let me plough the garden, fa-
ther," exclaimed Dick. I'm sure old
Charley and I can do it."
"You," repeated the minister smil-
ing. I think that would be an odd
sight."
"May I try, father? It wont do
any hurt for me to try."






76 DILIGENT DICK.

A few days later Mr. Stuart was
returning from a call on a sick parish-
oner, when he saw a number of men
standing near the wall which sepa-
rated his garden from the main road.
Wondering what had called the peo-
ple together he hurried toward them.
Standing in the midst of the
ploughed ground was Dick talking to
old Charley, who it seemed had been
inclined to be refractory, and who had
been dealt with after the Rarey fash-
ion.
This method of taming refractory
horses was much talked of at the
time, and though Dick had never seen
it actually put in force, he had seen
and studied the illustrations in a pop-
ular pictorial.
Accordingly when Charley was fas-






DICK TAMING THE HORSE. 77

tened to the plough; and when after
being politely requested to move
along, he did not budge an inch, but
only looked around at his yomng mas-
ter with disdain, Richard thought it
a good opportunity to show him that
he must submit.
When Mr. Stuart came in sight, he
had been thrown to his knees twice
by the wonder working strap, and
now seemed quite subdued.
After patting his head and speak-
ing a few encouraging words, Dick
once more fastened the chains to his
harness, and the old fellow walked off
as steadily as one could desire; the
spectators meanwhile shouting and
clapping their hands.
A smart chap, your son is, Par-
son," remarked one stout farmer






78 DILIGENT DICK.

laughing. "'Twas as good as a show
to see him manage the dumb crea-
ture."
"I'm afraid Dick wiill get hurt some
of these days," said his father, he is
so fearless."
Having proved conclusively that he
could plough the garden, Dick plead
with his father to allow him to hire
another horse and plough the field for
corn and potatoes.
The very idea is absurd, Richard,
very few men can drive a pair of
horses, and plough at the same time."
"You thought I couldn't plough
with one horse," urged the boy glanc-
ing archly in his father's face. I
wish you'd let me try. I saw how Mr.
Kingsbury managed. He put the
reins round his neck. Charley goes






DICK TAMING THE HORSE. 79

as steady as an old sheep; and if I can
hire Mr. Fuller's one day I aren't
afraid to try."
"Well," was the reluctant reply.
"I wish father'd sell Old Charley
and get a better horse," Dick went on,
when the gentleman had left the room.
" He's such an awkward looking crea-
ture. He never goes out of the gate
head first unless he goes backward."
"That is because he likes to see
what is going on behind him," sug-
gested his mother laughing.
Charley is a good creature," add-
ed Mr. Stuart returning. "He has
served well in his day and generation.
I couldn't get another that would
stand as he does. Why he'd stand at
the gate of one of my parishioners
all day if I wished it."






80 DILIGENT DICK.

"But we want a horse to go, father,
and not to stand. Charley stops short
when we come to a hill. I'm curing
him of it, though."
Dick went the same evening to en-
gage Mr. Fuller's horse, and the next
morning his mother heard him going
softly down the stairs a few minutes
after four.
At half past five a gentleman, just
arrived from New York by the ex-
press train, was hurrying to his home
a short distance beyond the minister's
house, when he saw a novel sight.
He waited until the horses had
reached the wall close to the road,
watching with a pleased curiosity the
ingenuity of the child who was work-
ing them.
How do you do, Richard ?" he






DICK TAMING THE HORSE. 81

asked. "It seems to me you have a
new method of ploughing. You do
not work on the ten hour system, I
see."
Dick tossed back his curls. He
wanted to wipe the perspiration from
his face, but his hands were too dirty.
- I like faringg" he said with a
merry laugh; "but I never knew
before why farmers wiped their faces
on their shirt sleeves," suiting the ac-
tion to the words. Father thought
it was absurd for me to try," he
went on; "I want to show him I
can plough with a span and without
a driver too."
Richard pulled the rein as it hung
about his neck and the horses started
on the next furrow. Though he had
no idea at the time that the gentle-
6






82 DILIGENT DICK.

man watching him had any thing
more than mere curiosity, yet subse-
quent events proved that this morn-
ing's work had a great effect on his
future life.






DICK AND THE DEACON. 83





CHAPTER IX.

DICK AND THE DEACON.

THE next winter the teacher of the
advanced school did not prove sat-
isfactory. IMrs. Stuart urged that
Dick ought to be sent to an Academy,
where he could attend to the higher
branches. Her husband agreed with
her; but where was the money to
come from to pay his expenses?
"It does seem best," the minister
said one evening when they had to-
gether asked God to lead them in
the path of duty; and if it is
best the means will be provided."






84 DILIGENT DICK.

"I can wear my cloak another
winter," said the mother, cheerfully,
"that will save ten dollars towards it."
Mr. Stuart rose and walked the
room, his hands joined behind him as
was his habit when meditating. At
last he said,
By a little extra effort, I can fin-
ish a series of articles for our relig-
ious paper. One of the Editors pressed
me for them when I was in the city.
Dick is such a good boy and has
done so much for us I want to give
him an education. That is all I ex-
pect to give my children."
In consequence of these plans,
Richard was sent to an Academy in a
neighboring state where he remained
a year. He boarded in the family of
a deacon, who had a large farm, but






DICK AND THE DEACON. 85

whose health did not permit him to
work upon it. He was often in the
habit of hiring the young men con-
nected with the Academy to pick ap-
ples, husk corn, or do other chores
not interfering with their lessons.
The Deacon was very strict in his
religious opinions. At home Richard
had always been in the habit of join-
ing with the family in singing a
hymn at morning and evening devo-
tions, and on Sabbath evening each
one selected his or her favorite hymn
and tune, which were sung in turn.
Richard had a very fine treble voice,
which had been carefully trained.
He greatly missed the singing at
prayers, and ,i,-i.__.- .1 to his room-
mate that they should sing on Sun-
day night in their chamber.






86 DILIGENT DICK.

They commenced with the hymn:

"Jesus lover of my soul."

and then proceeded to another:

Salvation, oh the joyful sound."

when they were interrupted by aloud
voice at the foot of the stairs.
"Boys, boys! What are you doing
up there ? "
S"We're singing the praises of
God," answered Richard opening the
door.
Well, you must stop. I can't
have any such noise in my house.
It's Sunday; and I'm not used to it."
After this unusual strictness, Rich-
ard looked of course for a corres-
Sponding uprightness of character.
Brought up as he had been, and with






DICK AND THE DEACON. 87

-his eyes wide open to what passed
around him he noticed some traits
which in his opinion were not exactly
consistent. For instance, in the fall
when the immense orchard was strip-
ped of its apples, the boy observed
that there was one basket kept for
measuring those to sell and another
to send to the store when there was
any thing to be bought.
Soon after the corn was gathered
into immense heaps and carried into
the barn floor.
Would you like the job of husk-
ing, Richard ? the deacon asked.
"Yes, sir. How much will you
give a bushel ?"
"The usual price is three cents."
"I'll do it, sir. I'll begin now. I
have ten minutes before school.






88 DILIGENT DICK.

SScore the number of bushels on
the barn door," added the deacon.
Catching up the small basket, Dick
ran to the barn, and filled it half full
of ears. When he came home he
went to finish the bushel before din-
ner. It was only by improving his
odd minutes that he could do the
work without neglecting his lessons.
He smiled when he saw that the
small basket had been taken away
and a large one substituted.
He filled it and said nothing. Then
he went on husking as fast as he
could, waiting for the dinner bell,
throwing the ears into a pile. He
did the same after school at night, -
until he had accumulated a good
many bushels. Then with a curious
smile, which his mother would have






DICK AND THE DEACON. 89

well understood, he walked into the
kitchen where the Deacon sat tipped
back in his chair, talking with a
neighbor, and asked:
Have you done with that bushel
basket, sir? I want it to carry away
my corn."
Why don't you use the one I put
there ? inquired the Deacon, his face
growing red. It's exactly the size of
the other."
"Yes, sir, but isn'tt half so handy
to carry; besides it doesn't fill up
near so quick. You say, sir, they're
exactly alike in measure; so I sup-
pose you'd just as lief I'd use. one as
the other."
Richard looked straight into the
Deacon's eye; but there was a comi-
cal smile playing around his mouth







90 DILIGENT DICK.

which told the other that his trick had
been discovered. He hemmed a lit-
tle, before he answered:
Certainly certainly !" and -then
turned the subject at once. So Rich-
ard husked two hundred bushels of
corn, and made, as nearly as he
could calculate, about two dollars by
a change of baskets.
While in New Hampshire Dick
sung regularly with the choir, as he
had done at home. He also took a
class in Sunday school, though he
would have preferred being a pupil.
But as there was a want of compe-
tent teachers he reluctantly consented,
if his mates would join him to act as
teacher, though it soon became by his
management a class for mutual in-
struction. The preparation for this






DICK AND THE DEACON. 91

exercise, aided as it was by books
from the Pastor's library, freely off-
ered for the benefit of the young men,
was perhaps his favorite employment
of the week. First he read the pas-
sage with some commentary; then he
looked out in the Bible atlas, any
place mentioned and found whatever
he could in relation to it; and last of
all he examined Robinson's researches
in the holy land in search of any
thing in connection with the subject.
From the very first evening of his
arrival, he had maintained the habit
of secret devotion in his room; a habit
which his chum though not a profes-
sor of religion always respected.
Soon after his connection with the
school, he invited the boys to form a
meeting for social worship.






92 DILIGENT DICK.

For weeks six young men, all profes-
sors of religion, met in the Academy ouit
of school hours, and sung, and read, and
prayed together. One day Richard
was on his way to the room when he
overtook a gay youth, and invited
him to the meeting. Out of curios-
ity he consented, another and another
followed, until there were so many,
that they 1.:ln :~l.1 to the vestry by
the advice of the Pastor, where he
took charge of it.






DICK'S VISIT TO MAINE. 93





CHAPTER X.

DICK'S VISIT TO MAINE.

BUT, going back a few months, dur-
ing the winter vacation at the Acad-
emy, Dick persuaded his parents to al-
low him to go to Maine for the pur-
chase of a cow.
He was now nearly fourteen years
of age, was tall and stout; but his
father needed much arguing, both
from Dick and his mother, before he
gave his consent.
What do you know about the se-
lection of a good cow? the minis-
ter asked.






94 DILIGENT DICK.

"I have read the Agricultural re-
ports, father, and the Farmers' jour-
nals, about the good points in a milk-
er. I can learn the rest."
But you will have to carry the
money about you; what if you should
be robbed ?"
"I'll venture that," answered Dick,
his eyes twinkling. "I shall take
your oldest e.,.l:,,t-h:-I', with a few
clothes in it; I shall carry my money
in that. When I go into the boat, I
shall throw it under the seat. No one
will imagine it contains any thing of
value or I should take better care of
it."
"I consent," said his father laugh-
ing; "but it's a mystery to me how
you have learned so much of the
world."






DICK'S VISIT TO MAINE. 95

It was near the close of a cold win-
ter's day, that Richard left the cars
at Newark, and started on foot for
the back country where he had heard
cows were very cheap. He had his
half-filled carpet bag in his hand
and was trudging through the snow
in the middle of the street, feeling, I
will not deny it, rather homesick.
He was only a boy after all, fondly
nurtured in a sweet home. He was
alone in a strange land. He knew
not where he should find a place to
sleep. One thing Dick did know.
He was sure that he had not gone
beyond the notice of his heavenly
Father.
' "I can't be lost," he said half aloud,
"while He sees me, and He knows
that I need help," and up his heart




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