• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Stand by your colors
 The young man's course
 Why did it
 Water-lilies
 Which do you like best
 Charley's trials
 I'll not begin
 Our flag
 Whiskey did it
 Marched out
 A man in a bottle, and a bottle...
 Danger
 The light-house lamp
 The good right hand
 Signing the pledge
 Mamma's mince-pies
 The wise printer
 What a tract did
 Well done, Dinah!
 A brave boy
 Happy rabbits
 Sign the pledge at school
 A little band of hope boy's...
 I've signed the pledge
 Bricks better than barrels
 The little preacher
 My position
 That's the way to do it
 The merry boy
 What I like
 The pledge and strawberries
 Corn and whiskey
 Back Cover






Title: Gems for bands of hope
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00056248/00001
 Material Information
Title: Gems for bands of hope
Physical Description: 72 p. : ill. ; 17 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Penney, L ( Lizzie ) ( Editor )
Smith, Daniel T., fl. 1846-1860 ( Engraver )
Andrew, John, 1815-1875 ( Engraver )
National Temperance Society and Publication House ( Publisher )
Publisher: National Temperance Society and Publication House
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: 1888, c1886
Copyright Date: 1886
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Temperance -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1888   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1888   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1888
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: edited by L. Penney.
General Note: Illustrations engraved by D. T. Smith and J. Andrew.
General Note: Contains verse and prose.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00056248
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002230219
notis - ALH0567
oclc - 70331453

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Stand by your colors
        Page 4
        Page 5
    The young man's course
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Why did it
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Water-lilies
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Which do you like best
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Charley's trials
        Page 15
    I'll not begin
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Our flag
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Whiskey did it
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Marched out
        Page 22
        Page 23
    A man in a bottle, and a bottle in a man
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Danger
        Page 27
    The light-house lamp
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    The good right hand
        Page 31
    Signing the pledge
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Mamma's mince-pies
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    The wise printer
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    What a tract did
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Well done, Dinah!
        Page 42
        Page 43
    A brave boy
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Happy rabbits
        Page 47
    Sign the pledge at school
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    A little band of hope boy's address
        Page 53
    I've signed the pledge
        Page 54
    Bricks better than barrels
        Page 55
    The little preacher
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
    My position
        Page 62
        Page 63
    That's the way to do it
        Page 64
        Page 65
    The merry boy
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
    What I like
        Page 69
    The pledge and strawberries
        Page 70
    Corn and whiskey
        Page 71
        Page 72
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
Full Text























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The Baldwin Library

ImmPl da







GEMS

FOR


BANDS OF HOPE.








EDITED BY

Miss L. PENNEY,
Author of National Temperance Orator," Readings and Recitations,"
Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6; "Juvenile Temperance Reciter,"
Nos. I and 2, etc., etc.








NEW YORK :
THE NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SOCIETY AND PUBLICATION HOUSE,
58 READ STREET.
1888.
























Copyrighted, 1886, by the

NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SOCIETY AND PUBLICATION HOUSE.
















4 -






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I! I











emns for anbs of ope.



STAND BY YOUR COLORS.
A YOUNG lad once signed the temperance pledge
in his Sunday-school. Several of his companions
laughed at him for doing so, and resolved that he
should break it. He told them they might laugh
at him as much as they pleased, but lie had made
up his mind, and nothing they might say would
change it. He had seen enough rpin caused by
using liquor, and lie meant to have nothing to do
with it.
One day, when sent to the village on an errand,
they met him near the tavern and tried by coaxing
him to make him take a "glass of something."
But one of them, called John, became very angry
and swore that lie should. He got a glass of beer
and tried to pour it down his throat. He resisted,
and finally John began to fight him to make him
yield. This was too much ; but one or two men
standing by admired the boy's courage and took
5







6 GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE.

his part, daring John to lay hands on him again.
This happened many years ago. The boy has
grown into a fine Christian man, and not a drop
of liquor has ever passed his lips. Not so wiih
the other boys. They all became dissipated, and
are not much good to themselves, their families,
or the world. You see it is best to begin right.

THE YOUNG MAN'S COURSE.
I SAW him first at a social party. He took but
a single glass of wine, and that because of the
request of a fair young lady.
I saw him next, when he supposed he was un-
seen, taking a glass to satisfy the slight desire
formed by indulgence. He thought there was no
danger.
I saw him again with those of his own kind
meeting at night to spend the time in playing
cards and drinking. He said it was only inno-
cent pleasure.
I saw him yet once more-he was pale, cold,
and motionless, and was carried to his last rest-
ing-place.
I thought of his future state. The Bible
teaches, Drunkards shall not inherit the king-
dom of heaven."






GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE. 7:

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8 GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE.

WHAT DID IT.
I'M sure it was nothing but Daisy and Grace
that ever saved their father from a drunkard's
grave. He had loved his wife truly and tenderly
when she was a bride, and for years after ; but he
grew to love his wine as well, and then better; and
her anxious look and pleading voice only pained
him more and more. And when she saw it, and
stopped pleading, her pitiful silence irritated him,
and Ruth Grayson gave up in despair.
"A man that won't care for his wife when
she's patient and true, and works as I do, is just
a hopeless case," she said to herself at last. And
who could blame her ? But she might, after all,
have taken a lesson from her own little seven-
year-old Daisy. It did seem as if the darker
things grew in the house, the brighter Daisy was.
The harsher her father got to be, the pleasanter
Daisy was. There was always something left that
was "pretty" or a "comfort to have," and the
brightest and prettiest things she could get were
sure to be in sight when her father was coming
home. Grace caught Daisy's spirit without know-
ing it. See my boo'ful flowers; make papa a
pitcherful !" she exclaimed one evening, with her
apron full of daisies and milkweed blossoms from






GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE. 9












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10 GEi-S FOR BANDS OF IIOPL .

the roadside. A "pitcher" was Daisy's-vase, and
she smelled the flowers as if they were fragrant
pinks, and made a "pitcherful," and put it on
the table her mother had spread for tea, and
which waited their father's return.
"My blossoms and Daisy's bookay shouted
Grace, as her father took his seat at the table
and looked at the poor daisies and pale milkweed
flowers.
Something touched his heart, but he only
looked sadder than usual, and sat gazing at the
"pitcherful" of flowers.
Grace thought you liked 'em," said the little
girl, half-pouting; Grace picked 'em for you."
And she burst into tears. He assured her that
he did like the flowers, and said she was a very
kind-hearted little girl.
I said I thought his children saved this man,
fast on a road to disgrace and ruin. Was it shame
that he could scorn pure, childish affection ? Was
it remorse that he had blighted living flowers ?
They deserved something better than what he
gave them. He sat very quietly thinking after
tea, and he thought to some good purpose, too,
for from that hour Walter Grayson became a
changed mai.






GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE. it


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WATER-LILIES.
THE Band of Hope in Springdell were going
to have a celebration for the Fourth of July. So
they had a fine dinner-each four boys having a
table of their own, with cakes, lemonade, ice-

I






12 GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE.

cream, or anything nice they could coax their
mothers to prepare or extra pennies to furnish.
Very low were their prices, and very well patro-
nized were their half-dozen tables. And no one
sold more than Jessie and Ralph Sterling. I think
it was because of the beautiful fresh water-lilies
that formed a complete edge about their table.
How could that be ? Nothing easier. Get the
thinner to make a tin trough, about two inches
wide and an inch high, just to fit about the four
sides of your table, and fill it with wet sand, and
put in your white lilies in their beautiful green,
and you will see what a table they had. And for
what was the money which the Band of Hope
boys took in ? To get silver badges for their old
tin ones, and to take the Temperance Banner
for their new Sunday-school. No wonder the girls
formed a new Baud of Hope after this celebration,
and kept their secrets well, letting nothing be
known of their most important doings save the
name of their society, which, of course, was THE
WATER-LILIES." They are working hard and
put to shame many older temperance workers.
Perhaps their secret will come out next Fourth
of July!






GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE. 13

WHICH DO YOU LIKE BEST.

THERE are two path in life, in one or the other
of which all the boys in the land are travelling;
one leads to happiness, sobriety, and joy for ever,
and the other
to wretchedness, a.
misery, and woe. ,
The boy who
starts right, obeys
his parents, heeds
the instructions of
the Bible, trusts
in God, and reads .'
good books and
papers, will be
found in the right .
path; while the
other boy, who
disobeys his parents, uses wine and tobacco, and
something stronger after awhile, is fast passing
over the other and dangerous road.
These pictures show the two kinds of boys.
Which do you want to be like? The one who
reads good temperance books and papers and fol-
lows their advice, and who never takes wine,






14 GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE.

brandy, or any strong drink will never be found in
the path of the
drunkard. When
a boy begins to
r-- do wrong it is an
-- easy matter to
keep on. Avoid
the beginning. If
the saying is true
that "the boy
is father to the
man," then it
shows that if you
want to be a good,
S pre, true man,
you must be a
good, true, pure boy.

WHATEVER you do, boys, the saloon beware,
Heed not its attractions, its music and glare;
These are but false baits, poor mortals to blind--
The poison of death lies concealed behind.
Pass by it, avoid it-a demon's within;
He lurks in the bottles of whiskey and gin,
He hides in the barrels of beer and of stout-
From hogsheads of wine you may see him peep out.






GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE. 15

CHARLEY'S TRIALS.

Poon Charley had a hard time on shipboard.
He was a Band of Hope boy, and wanted to do
right and lead a Christian life, but everything
seemed to be against him.
If he took out his Bible, Dick was sure to espy
it, and begin some of his small persecutions-
maybe it was only a handful of peas that came
rattling down his back, inside the collar of his
loose jacket. Perhaps a lump of duff," the sail-
ors' pudding, or a bit of salt junk hit him plump
between the eyes. One night the sailors were
determined he should drink and break his pledge.
Come, take your grog like a man, Charley,
as you used to," said one. "It's going to be a
wet night, and you'll need it."
I find I am better without it, wet nights or
dry."
"Ho, ho! that's some of your land temperance
notions. Needn't tell an old salt, that's followed
the sea for thirty years, that his grog is no good
to him."
He's getting rabid on temperance and Bible-
reading," said Dick. "It's quite upset his head.
I move we cool him off." And in a twinkling a






16 GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE.

cold, wet towel was wrapped roughly about his
head.
"Now, don't flare up, Charley," said another;
' you know it is your duty to take it meekly.
Maybe it will help you some to fancy you are a
martyr."
Charley wouldn't take a drop, though, even
when they put the glass close to his lips and tried
to force him to drink it. He told them he had
promised his dying mother he would never drink
or swear, and no man should make him break his
promise.
"That's right, Charley; I'll stand by you,"
said an old sailor who had been looking on ; and
he did from that day on. He was never tempted
by them again.

I'LL NOT BEGIN.
WHY should I learn to smoke and chew ?
No reasons good I know ;
It helps not body, heart, or soul;
And is it manly? No!
Why should I not ? It injures health;
'Tis filthy, leads to sin ;
Costs money, time, and intellect;
No no I'll not begin.








GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE.











.--


-. : :1_ -- : --_---':., : -_l ,







18 GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE.

OUR FLAG.
ONCE more our floating banner out
Unto the breeze we fling;
Beneath its folds with song and shout
We'll gather our band and sing.
We'll sing of those who fought of old
For freedom's holy right,
And tell the deeds our fathers bold
Won in the glorious fight.
We are the children of the free,
Our land is freedom's home;
There's none like us so truly free,
Who touch no drop of rum.
And thus our floating banner out
Unto the breeze we fling;
Beneath the folds with song and shout
We'll gather our band and sing.

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GiOES FOR BANDS OF HOPE.. 1













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20 GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE.

WHISKEY DID IT.

WELL, it is lovely Who would have thought
you could make it out of cardboard, Lu ? And
my little cork-and-cotton men are not so bad.
Our contribution to our orphanage fair will not
be a shabby one. But, dear me where do all
the poor orphans come from ? I can count a
dozen orphan homes. How are they filled ? What
did it ?"
I asked Aunt Ann that, and she said prompt-
ly, Whiskey did it.' "
"Possible Why, father said yesterday that
three-fourths of his hospital cases are whiskey
cases; and mother says nearly all of the crowds
that come to the Relief Association for food and
clothes are wives, children, or aged mothers of
drinking people, or are people who have ruined
themselves by drink."
"Aunt Ann is one of the visiting committee at
the almshouse, and she took me there, and on the
way she said nearly all the people who came there
were reduced to beggary, and had lost home and
health, by the means of liquor. I said, What
can fill that huge building with paupers ?' and
she said, Whiskey did it.'"








GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE. 21









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22 GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE.

"I'm sure it is true, Lu. At dinner yesterday
I heard the gentlemen talking, and one said nine-
tenths of all the murder, riot, assault and battery
cases, and many others, came from the use of
liquor; and Judge Penn said: 'Yes, yes, shut
the grog-shops and my office would be an easy
one. I wouldn't have much to do.' "

MARCHED OUT.
IT was rather a perversion of Yankee Doodle,"
but that was what the drummers beat and the
soldiers sang as they marched off Corporal Flip in
an immense beer-barrel. He had held too much
from the barrel, and the colonel thought it
was a poor rule that wouldn't work both ways,
and so he let the barrel hold him. How would
you like that, boys ? Look at Corporal Flip's
head, and see how fine a thing it is to be made
conspicuous !
In the army men have to walk pretty straight.
Sometimes they are punished by having to drag
about with them a heavy ball and chain. Some-
times they wear a placard on their backs, with the
word "Coward" or "Thief" printed on it in
large, bright letters. But the punishment of Cor-
poral Flip is worse than either. Yes, because his






GEMSr FOR BANDS OF HOPE. 23












II-








crime was worse. You can easily see that he has
been guilty of drunkenness. You may not as
easily see that it is worse than cowardice or theft,
but it is. It is the father of cowards and of
thieves, and, more, of murderers. "But you are
not in the army, so you can drink and not be made
conspicuous, like Corporal Flip !" Do not de-
ceive yourselves. There is a Cold Water Army,
and every boy or man who breaks its laws soon be-
comes as conspicuous as Corporal Flip. He may






24 GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE.

not march to a lively tune, in a beer-barrel, but
le is none the less conspicuous for that. He reels
along beneath a crownless hat, with a troop of
boys shouting in his train ; and it needs no words
in bright printed letters to set forth his guilt.
"For Intoxication" is stamped on his bloated
features, his swollen eyes, his staggering step, his
road-side bed, as plainly as you can see it on Cor-
poral Flip's beer-barrel.
Will you join the Cold Water Army, and never
be the one to be marched out ? If you aim to be
conspicuous, don't seek it as the hero of a beer-
barrel.


A MAN IN A BOTTLE, AND A BOTTLE IN A MAN.
I WAS very much astonished the other day at
seeing a big bottle walking up the street. It was
a champagne-bottle six feet high. Of course I
was startled (who would not be at such a sight ?),
and it came right up to me. Well, I stood still,
and when it got near me I saw that there was a
man inside the bottle ; and that it was simply an
advertising dodge, made out of sheet-iron and
painted to look like a wine-bottle. The bottle
had little windows on each side through which







GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE. 25

the man inside could look out, and all he had to
do was to walk up and down Broadway. Peo-
ple would smile when they
saw the bottle pass by.
I thought to myself, "I
wouldn't like that man's
job ; it looks so silly to be
walking up and down the
street inside of a bottle."
A short time after this I
met another man dressed in
BUY
a fine fashionable suit, but JONE'S
his clothes were all covered PATENT
with mud, his hat was bat- CORKSCREW
tered in, his nose was bleed-
ing, and it took two police- 1
men to lead him along and .
keep him from falling down.
What was the matter ? A I
case of too much bottle.
He had a bottle of wine in --
him; that was all.
"Well," thought I, "I would rather be the
man inside the bottle than this man with the bot-
tle inside. The man inside the bottle can walk
straight; this one cannot even stand. The man






26 GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE.

in the -bottle gets paid for being there-even
though his bottle does advertise some patent cork-
screw. This man has had to pay considerable
money for the bottle he has put inside himself.
No one can see the man in the bottle, and if peo-
ple do laugh they don't know who they are laugh-
ing at; but everybody can see this man, poor
silly fool that he is The first man can throw off
the bottle and go home to his wife and children;
but the bottle of wine which the man has put in-
side of himself has thrown him into the gutter
and now is taking him into a police-station." So
I came to the conclusion that if I had to be one
or the other I would rather be the man inside
than the man who had put himself outside a bot-
tle of wine. Would not you ?



(-, I
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GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE. 27














DANGER.
KEEP away from the web, little fly,
For behind it is hiding a spider.
Keep away from that barrel, my boy,
For a bigger one's hid in the cider.


THE LIGHT-HOUSE LAMP.
ONCE there was a man who lived in a light-
house, and no one with him but his little daugh-
ter. One day the man took his boat and rowed
to the shore to fetch some things he wanted for
himself and little girl, telling her he would be
back again long before it was dark. But while he
was on shore the man was waylaid by some wicked






GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE. 27














DANGER.
KEEP away from the web, little fly,
For behind it is hiding a spider.
Keep away from that barrel, my boy,
For a bigger one's hid in the cider.


THE LIGHT-HOUSE LAMP.
ONCE there was a man who lived in a light-
house, and no one with him but his little daugh-
ter. One day the man took his boat and rowed
to the shore to fetch some things he wanted for
himself and little girl, telling her he would be
back again long before it was dark. But while he
was on shore the man was waylaid by some wicked






28 GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE.

people who wanted to prevent the lamps being
lighted, so that vessels might be wrecked and
goods washed ashore for them to pick up. They
took the man away with them to a house and
locked him up all night. He was terribly dis-
tressed, not only because his little girl was all
alone, but also because he thought about the un-
lighted lamps, and how poor sailors, missing the
lights, would be lost. But he could not help
himself, and had to stay where he was.
But the wicked men were disappointed after all,
When it grew dark they got down to the shore to
wait for tle wreck they hoped might happen,
when lo all at once the light-house lamps began
to shine, and all their wicked plot wis defeated.
Can you guess how this happened ? It was the
little girl who lighted the lamps. When it began
to grow late in the afternoon and her father did
not come back, she grew a bit alarmed and waited
and watched. At last the time came when her
father always lighted the lamps, and he was not
there to do it. While, of course, she was very
anxious about her father, she still thought about
the lamps. Whatever could she do ? She had
often seen her father light them, but they were
very high up, out of her reach.






GEMS FOR BAIDS OF HOPE. 29










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@--~~-~--~------





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30 GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE.

At last she resolved to try. She took a candle
with her and went to the very top of the light-
house; still she was unable to reach them. Then
she got a chair and put it on a table, and so was
just able to reach the lamps, which were all ready.
Oh how pleased she was to see them burning;
and though her poor little heart was terribly flut-
tered at being alone in that place with the waves
dashing and roaring outside, she sat and watched
the lamps all night-pleased to think that, after
all, the poor sailors were safe.
Now, every Band of Hope girl and boy may do
just what this little woman did. They are all lit-
tle light-house keepers ; and you know who has
told them what to do. Jesus said : Let your
light shine before men." That means, let them
see what you do is right. All around is the terri-
ble sea of drunkenness, with its waves dashing
and destroying. When we sign the pledge and
keep it we light our lamp; and who can tell how
many may be saved from shipwreck ?
We can warn others ; we can tell them of the
danger of using strong drink, and can do tempe-
rance work in many ways. We must light the
lamp, keep it trimmed, and see that it is always
burning.







GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE. 31




















THE GOOD RIGHT HAND.
"MY good right hand," says Charlie Bland,
I'm very proud to show it;
With fingers long, and straight, and strong,
And muscles firm below it.

"This hand must toil, on sea or soil,
Among its honest fellows;
Must write or row, must rake or sow,
Or blow the smithy's bellows.







32 GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE.

But while I strive these fingers five,
That all the time are growing,
Must scorn to take, for fashion's sake,
The tempting wine that's flowing.

"A mission grand, my good right hand,
Is yours, if you will heed it.
By right divine the pledge first sign;
In coming life you'll need it."


SIGNING THE PLEDGE.













A BOY asked his father, who was in the habit of
using wine, if he might go to one of the Band of
Hope meetings.
Yes, my boy," le said ; "but don't you dare






GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE. 33

to sign the pledge. I won't have any such foolish
notions."
He went, and they sang the tune, Cheer up,
my lively lads," repeating the chorus over and
over again, as follows :
Cheer up, my lively lads,
In spite of rum and cider;
Cheer up, my lively lads,
We've signed the pledge together."
As he was walking home, however, the thought
struck him that he had been singing what was not
true: "We've signed the pledge together." He
had not signed the pledge. When he reached
home he sat down at the table, and on it was a
jug of eider.
Jem," said one of his brothers, "will you
have some cider ?"
"No, thank you," was the reply.
Why not ? Don't you like it ? "
"Oh I'm never going to drink any more cider;
nothing that is intoxicating for me "
"My boy," said his father, "you have not dis-
obeyed me ? You have not signed the pledge ?"
No, father," said he, I have not signed the
pledge, but I've sunq it; and I'm never going to
touch another drop as long as I live."
r






34 GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE.

MAMMA'S MINCE-PIES.

A BRIGHT little boy about six years old had
been to the Band of Hope, and signed the iron-
clad pledge of total abstinence from all the drinks
that make men drunk.
Pretty soon after Thanksgiving day was com-
ing, and his mother was very busy getting ready
for it. The kitchen was a lively place just then,
where all hands were kept busy baking and roast-
ing and stewing. Jack liked to be there to see
all that was going on. When his mother was
making the mince-pies she told him to go to the
closet up-stairs and get the brandy-jug, as she
wanted some "nice flavor" for her pies. The
little fellow was always very obedient, and he
started at once to go do as she had said. But
suddenly he stopped, just as he was turning the
knob of the door, and, wheeling around, he glanced
timidly up into his mother's face and said, while
a troubled look came into his own :
"Mamma, do you think it looks well for a lit-
tle temperance boy to be carrying a brandy-jug ? "
Her cheeks grew red, but she did not reply.
He closed the door, and, coming up to the table,
he said :







GExMs FOR BANDS OF HOPE. 35










.If









'',!
- ; '






36 GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE.

Mamma, you get the jug, and I will stir the
batter while you are gone."
So he took the spoon, though he did not handle
it very well, and his mother went up-stairs. In a
couple of minutes she came back with the jug,
saying to her little temperance teacher :
"If it hadn't been for spoiling the floor I'd
have spilt out what's in this jug up-stairs; but
come and see what I am going to do."
They went out by the side of the wood-shed,
and there the hateful stuff went gurgle, gargle "
into the drain, and the mother told her boy that
was the last of brandy mince-pies in her house."
He didn't say hallelujah," or amen," but he
clapped his little hands and shouted Goody "
at the top of his lungs.
Often it is the young that help those who are
older to see the truth. Often in our temperance
work a little child shall lead them."

THEY undervalue nature's wealth
Who say strong drink will give me health.
The flowers are springing everywhere,
Pure and fragrant, fresh and fair;
Their health and vigor they. sustain
With draughts of dew and baths of rain.






GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE. 37





__ L },,














IT is well for ns to le l cn about th'





lives of noted people, that we may follow their
example in that which made them wise or brave
or good. There was oe ma oted as a philoso
or good. There was one man noted as a philoso-







33 GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE.

pher who was a total abstainer, and showed to his
friends that cold water gives strength instead of
taking it away, as beer and other drinks do. You
know who I mean ? Benjamin Franklin, a wise,
learned, and famous man. When he was a very
young man he went to England. He had learned
to set type when a boy, and so he went to a print-
ing-office to get work. When the head printer
heard that he was from America he made fun of
him. Young Franklin asked for permission to
show what he could do, and, walking up to a case,
lie quickly set up this sentence : "Can any good
thing come out of Nazareth ? And Philip an-
swered, Come and see."
After this he got along very nicely, only he
would not drink beer, as all the other printers
did. They said they could not get along without
it, they needed it to make them strong. lie said
he would try strength with any of them, and he
asked the one who was talking if he could lift a
heavy "form" that stood near by. With much
puffing and blowing he lifted and carried it
across the room. Then young Franklin stooped
gracefully and lifted the same form with one hand
and another equally heavy with the other, and
carried both across the room without difficulty.







GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE. 39

After this he was teased, no more to drink beer.
If beer-drinkers would only try doing without,
they would find after a while how much stronger
they would be without it.






















A LITTLE boy, who wouldn't run to the store for
his mother until he had a drink of water from
the well, pleaded as an excuse that even a river
couldn't run when it was dry."







40 GEMS POR ANDS OF HOPE.

WHAT A TRACT DID.
A BOY who had joined the ranks of the cold
water army wanted to do real earnest temperance
work. He not only meant to be right himself,
but wanted to set others right. He obtained a
supply of temperance tracts, and his use of one of
them resulted as follows: A cousin of his, who
was employed in the same office where the boy
was, was one day told to bring in a bottle of wine
by his employer. After giving some to a friend
he offered the young man a glass. The boy
stepped forward and put a temperance tract over
the mouth of the tumbler. The man took it up
and looked at it, and the first words he cast his
eyes upon were, "No drunkard shall inherit the
kingdom of God." He dashed the glass upon the
floor, exclaiming : "That is the last of my drink-
ing liquor, God being my helper." He has kept
his resolution.

WINE IS r R IS 1 RA
.- ." ,,,

."A _t + ,
rf I ^ ^~" -<=-- *'^, ,^
p






GEMS FOR BANDS OF 110PE. 41






;






^I', ^^.^^^ -^







42 GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE.

WELL DONE, DINAH!
OH so, Massa Jim, you tinks I can't jine de
temp'rance society and come to your meeting' ?
lioh does you say dat little Dinah don't know
noffin, an' can't git up an' make a speech ? Meb-
be I can make a speech, if my ten toes is b'ar.
S'pose I an't got noffin on my head in de way ob
a bat. I's got suffin in my head, you jes' 'mem-
ber dat! Likely I'd hav' a bonnet wid a big yeller
sunflower on it too if daddy jined temp'rance,
like your daddy, Massa Jim. Why, I jes' 'magines
I'm a member ob dat ar society an' up on de flo'
making' a speech. Sez I : 'Ladies an' gemple-
mum, white an' brack, 's I was coming' 'long de
street I sees a man all mud an' dirt down in de
gutter, wallerin' jes' like a pig-it was all along ob
whiskey neat; 's I was coming' here I sees a man
dat walked all ober de whole street, 'zactly like he
was trying' to trace out a worm-fence; he went
zig-zag, zig-zag-crooked enuf--all along ob whis-
key straight; I see a man in de bar-room do' a
kickin'-up a row, an' de bar-tender he took him
by de crop ob de neck an' he sent him cl'ar out in
de middle ob de road-as yer might suspects, dat
was all along ob whiskey sling; I see a feller
cryin' an' a howlin' cause his head was broke an'


































r!
GEMS FOR BAYDS OF HOPE. 43






















nI



j~f







44 GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE.

his pocketbook was los'-dat cryin' was all along
ob too much whiskey smile; I see anodder man,
lyin' like a bag o' taties on de tail ob a cart,
a-gettin' hauled off to jail-dat was along ob gin
cocktail.'"

A BRAVE BOY.
THIS boy, who was named Martin Fairbrother,
and was only twelve years old, was noted for his
great determination. One day his father sent
him with a check to a brewery to pay a bill for
some beer. Martin had never tasted the drink,
but, having seen a little of the misery produced
by the love of it, he had made up his mind that
not a drop of intoxicating liquors should ever pass
his lips. He placed the check on the counter,
and whilst waiting for the receipt resolved to be
,out of the place as quickly as possible. The clerk
landed Martin the receipted bill and then said :
Of course you will take a glass of ale ?"
"'No, thank you, sir, I never drink any."
"That's all nonsense; every one coming into
the brewery is expected to taste our ale. It will
Snot hurt you, because it is pure and wholesome."
"No, sir, thank you," was Martin's firm reply;
"I am resolved never to drink any."








GEMS FOR .BANDS OF HOPE, 45













I I

* I -












7F







46 GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE.

The man laughed, and out of pure mischief de-
termined to make the boy take a sip at least ; so,
coming to the other side of the counter, he grasped
Martin's arm, and said that he should not leave
the brewery till he had tasted their ale, at the
same time calling to a fellow-clerk to bring a
glass.
The two now held Martin, one holding each
arm, while one of them held the glass of ale be-
fore the lips of the lad. He shut his teeth to-
gether, so closely it would have been difficult to
have got a pin between them.
"You belong to the Band of Hope, I sup-
pose ?" said one of the clerks. You're a nice
teetotaler, coming to a brewery."
Martin never answered a word, but kept his
teeth closed.
"Now come, mv lad, give us a temperance
speech, and then you shall go."
No reply. The month was still closed. Martin
could breathe through his nose.
They teased him for at least half an hour, ask-
ing him many foolish questions. They got no
reply, and at last Martin, seeing them not holding
him quite so fast, gave a sudden pull and got out
of their power.






GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE. 47

You may be sure he did not forget to relate all
the facts to his mother.
"Why didn't you answer their questions ?" she
said to him.
"Because, mother, I was afraid if I opened
my lips they would have thrown the ale dowin my
throat."









__S




HAPPY RABBITS.
IF in our lives and habits
Se were pure as little rabbits
Then there would be no vice;
No scratching, fighting, tearing,
No drinking, smoking, swearing;
Oh wouldn't that be nice ?

*






48 GEMS FOR BAxDS OF HOPE.

SIGN THE PLEDGE AT SCHOOL,

"THERE goes Madge after her father," said
Alice Gray, as she stood looking out of the
.econd-story window. "You'll see her almost
every evening about this time start off for him,"
she added, as her cousin, Bessie Young, who was
visiting her, came and looked curiously over her
shoulder.
"What an old face the child has !"
"Yes, indeed. Madge's father was a school-
mate of papa's, and, though I can hardly believe
it, papa says he was one of the handsomest,
brightest boys in the school. Father says one
day an old man came to the school and talked to
the boys about the harm that liquor and tobacco
does in the world, and asked them to sign a pledge
not to touch either liquor or tobacco. Father
signed, and about half a dozen boys, but Jim
IRobson, Madge's father, made fun of the pledge,
and said a man ought not to be afraid of liquor
or tobacco; a man ought to know when he'd had
enough and stop, but a little would not harm him.
lie talked so that a lot of the boys would not
sign, and then when Jim smoked a cigar just to
show his independence, and bought a glass of





GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE. 49









S1.--5-






!" .






50 GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE.

beer instead of lemonade, just to seem grown up,
those boys did the same.
Still, father says Jim Robson never drank
much, and was thought to be a very fine young
fellow, and married one of the prettiest girls in
tile village. His wife is dead, but Madge keeps
house for him, and the two little boys, younger
than her, earn money by blacking shoes, putting
out ash-barrels, and so on."
Just as Alice finished her sentence Bessie caught
sight of the poor little girl leading her father
home. He was so drunk that she could hardly
keep him up, and, in spite of all her coaxing, he
would cross the street just as a heavy wagon drove
by. They saw Madge push him in front of her,
but a moment more and the wheel had knocked
the child down-she was not run over, but lay
as if stunned in the street.
Alice and Bessie wera soon pushing their wily
through the little crowd which had gathered, and
with the help of a policeman carried the poor
girl into Mrs. Gray's sitting-room. Jim Robson
walked in with them, sobered at once by his
fright.
"If she's dead, I've killed her," lie kept saying.
"She might better die," said Alice bluntly,







G1,MS FOR BANDS OF HOPE. 51


I ll "







_ A -
-- l '-- .- .- ," :








52 GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE.

" than live such a wretched life as you make her
lead."
S" Hush, Alice !" said Mrs. Gray, really fright-
ened lest the drunkard should knock her daugh-
ter down--"'hush "
''No, no, ma'am !" said the poor man sadly,
" she says but true It's a miserable life the lass
has led But, by the help of God, if my girl is
but spared I'll drink not a drop."
The last words he spoke loudly and solemnly,
as if taking an oath, and they seemed to waken
poor Madge. She opened her eves and said:
"What's that ? Father, do you mean it ?"
I do I do e cried earnestly.
Madge did not die, but she was badly hurt.
She lay for many weeks unable to move or help
herself, but Alice and Bessie did all they
could. Mr. Gray found work for Jim, and Madge
thought the fall the best thing that ever hap-
pened.
God let me fall to save father," she said again
and aglin, and would not coml)lain.
Jim Robson did not drink again, and became a
sober, steady man ; but oh how often he wished
he had signed and kept the pledge when he was a
boy at school I







S GEMS FOR BANDS OF 1hOPE. 53
























A LITTLE BAND OF HOPE BOY'S ADDRESS.

I'Mr mamma's little darling,
I'm auntie's little joy ;
I'm sister's little torment,
I'm papa's cunning boy.
I don't drink beer or whiskey;
Some folks there are who do;

*







54 GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE.

I'd rather have cold water-
I think it's best, don't you ?

I do not use tobacco,
Cigars, or even snuff;
I don't intend to, either-
I do not like such stuff.
I think that I can travel
Life's journey all way through
As well without as with them-
And if I can, can't you ?

I am a little signer-
I've signed the pledge for life;
And when in years I'm older,
Please count me in the strife.
The good, the true, the noble
Through life I will pursue ;
I'd live to aid the erring,
And restore them-would not you ?


I'VE signed the pledge, I've signed the pledge,
And I will never touch
The ruby wine, the foaming beer,
The bright champagne, the cider clear,
Though tempted e'er so much.






GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE. 55













THE ABSTAINER-" I own 'IHE DRINKER -"All I
miy own home, and no rent to have iefr, and even they belong
pay." to ihe brewer."

BRICKS BETTER THAN BARRELS.
BoYs and girls, which do you think pays the
best, beer-drinking or total abstinence ?
Suppose two men earn the same amount of
money at their work, but one spends some of his
for beer, while the other prefers to save it for a
better purpose. He means to own a house some
day, and all he can spare goes towards that. Who
has the most money at the end of the year ?
Why, the total abstainer, of course. If he puts
his money in a savings-bank it will make more
money for him, and by and by he has enough to
buy or build a nice house. He looks upon it with






5( GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE.

nuch pleasure, because it is the result of his sav-
in-', temperate habits.
What has the beer-driiiker to show for his
iiney ? What has his beer done for him ? lie
is fatter and ha' a redder face, but he is not, any
stronger or more healthy. What else has he to
show for his money ? Nothing but empty barrels,
and even these must go back to the brewer. IH!s
money has been worse than wasted. Which do
you choose to have, boys, houses or barrels ? The
girls want the houses, and it will be their delight
to keep them tidy and bright ; but the boys must
go out and earn the money. What shall your
money go for ? Now is the time to decide.

THE LITTLE PREACHER.
"Cousix GRACIE, tell me a story, won't you,
please ? pleaded Jennie. And up she climbed on
her lap.
"What shall I tell about ? What kind of
stories do you like best ?"
"Oh I like real, true ones Tell me about
the little boys and girls where you used to live."
"Well, I'll tell you about a little boy whom I
knew very well. He went to our school ; a bright
little fellow, only seven years old. We called him







GEMS FOR BANDS OF HIOPPE.










I '





i I4 6
II







58 GEM.S FOR BANDS OF HOPE.

our little temperance preacher. His name was
Eddie."
How did he learn about temperance ? Did
his ma teach him the same as mine does me ?"
No, his mother had never taken any interest
in such things. A number of ladies where I lived
formed a Woman's Christian Temperance Union.
They thought something ought to be done to save
the boys and girls from drinking, so they formed
a Band of Hope. We had sixty members, and
Eddie was among them. They belonged to the
different Sunday-schools, and some had never been
to any school at all. The ladies met with us once
a week, taught us lessons from the Catechism on
Alcohol," and told us how alcohol would injure
our bodies if we drank it, because it is a poison
drink. We used to sing and speak, had Bible
lessons-for the Bible is against strong drink, too;
it says that no drunkard shall enter the kingdom
of heaven. We learned that Jesus will only dwell
in pure hearts, and if we would grow up to be
pure men and women we must begin by being
pure, clean boys and girls; never to use bad
words; to have nothing to do with tobacco or
strong drink. Well, Eddie came regularly to
every meeting, till one week we missed him."







GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE. 59

"What was the matter ? Did his mother keep
him home ?"
"No, he was sick. He was sick for three
weeks, and one day called his mother to him and
told her he was going to die. He told her not to
cry, and said : 'Mamma, I want you to promise
this : I want you to tell the Band of Hope that I
never took any wine or any of the bad drink while
I was sick ; and tell them never, never to break
their pledge. When I die I want you to have my
funeral in that .church where they never have any
temperance meetings; you know what one I mean.
I want the minister to tell the people that I never












N.






60 GErs FOR BANDS OF HOPE.

broke my pledge. Will you promise ?' The
mother gave the promise, and then Eddie kissed
her and began to sing, 'Safe in the Arms of
Jesus.' He was so weak that he could not sing
loud, and while he was singing the breath left the
little body, and Eddie died."
Oh that was too bad," said Mollie, who had
sat down beside them. She and Jennie each
dashed away a tear.
"Yes, it was sad ; but now comes the pretty
part of my story. They held the funeral in the
very church Eddie had requested."
"Why did he ?"
Well, I guess it was because the people who
went there were fashionable, and, perhaps, drank
their wine. They would not allow any tempe-
rance meeting to be held in their church, and I
don't know that the minister ever preached tem-
perance. When the day for tile funeral came all
the members of the Band of Hope, fifty-nine in
all, marched to the house where Eddie had lived
and welit with the friends to the church. The
little body was carried in, and behind that walked
the parents and friends, and then followed the
Band of Hope. The members all had badges on,
so every one knew they were Band of Hope chil-






GEMrS FOR BANDS OF HOPE. 61

dren. Theyall carried flowers; some had wreaths.
The minister told the people of Eddie's message
to the members. After the sermon the children
all marched to the cemetery, which was not far
off, and when the coffin had been lowered in the
grave they threw their flowers down on it, the
last thing they could do for their little friend.
When the grave was filled and the earth pil, d on
it nicely, those who had wreaths placed them on
it, and then came away and left their little friend
all alone. They could do no more for him."
Said Mollie: I think that was just splendid.
To be sure, it was sad for him to die so young ;
but he was a brave little boy, and I guess his
work was done. Don't you think so, Gracie ?"
Yes ; the Saviour wanted him and knew when
it was best to take him. lie had filuld his lit-
tle mission, he had preached his little sermon,
and now he is with the Saviour whom he loved."



S _- -

"--**- -.-t- _s '-
t..Jb~sI(
I -----







62 GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE.

MY POSITION.

I BELONG to the Band of Hope;
With strong drink I mean to cope
Every day ;
For it really is no good
For one's muscle, brain, or blood
Anyway.
I'm opposed to beer and wine,
They are deadly foes of mine,
Foes that blight.
And I to the bitter end
Will my principles defend-
They are right.
And I simply ask if you
Will defend the good and true
From this hour ?
Will you help our youthful Band
This vile monster to withstand ?
You have power.
Will you do each day your mite,
Will you help us in the fight ?
If so, come and join our Band,
Drive the demon from the land-
Beginning now, to-night.







GEMs FOR BANDS OF HOPE. 63





















\I


-A--






64 GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE.
THAT'S THE WAY TO DO IT.
CHARLIE, a New Hampshire boy who lives near
where the grand old mountains point up toward
the sky, means to do right, but he is a little bash-
ful, and doesn't like to be laughed at. When a
Band of Hope was started there lie joined it, but
some of his playmates did not, and laughed and
jeered at his badge. The next meeting he re-
fused to wear it. Just for one hour, Charlie,"
pleaded his auntie.












"No. Please, please don't make me!"
She let him go without it,-but thought how sad
it is that good boys are ashamed of goodness, and
bad boys are proud of b:uaness. They think it
.. "








bad boys aire proud of badlness. They think it






GEEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE. 65

manly to smoke and swear and say bad words,
and by and by will drink; yet of the jeers of such
boys good boys are afraid Before the next
meeting Charlie walked 1ip to her.
"I shall wear my badge to-day. Pin it good
and strong. I am going to wear it until I go to
bed. There, now !"
As it was being pinned on he said :
The fellows were tickled last time, I tell you.
I'll show 'em this time 1 can't to be dared by them.
Well, I guess not !" He wore it until bed-time.
As he took it off le said :
There hasn't a fellow dared me ...7.,. You
know Jim's always laughing at me. Justas quick
as I got my badge on I went straight to him and
said : You better go to the Band of Hope to-
day.' He waited a minute, and said Well, I
will' ; and Mrs. D- spoke to him, and smiled,
and said she's glad to see him, and he says he's
going to join it. And we went and asked his
mamma, and she is just as glad as she can be."
"I am very glad you have dared to do right,"
said his aunt.
"Yes, I've found out how to stop 'em : show
you can't afraid of 'em-that's the way to do it."
Yes, that's the way to do it."







66 GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE.

THE MERRY BOY.
I MET a little merry boy
With face so bright and gay,
And from his lips a joyous laugh
Broke forth that sunny day.
He walked, a banner holding high,
A medal on his breast,
And both his smiles and kindling eyes
His happiness expressed.

"My little lad," to him I said,
"Where hasten you this morn ?
Why carry you this pretty flag,
And thus yourself adorn ?"
O don't you know our Band of Hope ?"
He quickly answered me;
"We go to-day to Bradley Woods
To play, and then take tea."

"A Band of Hope, a Band of Hope-
What mean these words, my child ? "
The little fellow looked at me
And shook his head and smiled.
You know full well," he said at last;
"You're asking me for fun ;
And yet I'll tell : a Band of Hope
Is temperance work begun.








GEs ro FO BANDs o HoPS. 67
















(h -







68 GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE.

"Begun with little boys and girls;
But oh sir, when we're grown
We'll show some good and glorious fruit
From all this seed that's sown.
We mean to stop the sale of drink,
And stop the making, too;
When all the world's teetotal, sir,
There'll be no need to brew.

















"And, what is more, I do believe
That I shall live to see
The end of wine, and gin, and beer,
And all that company.






GEIMS FOR BAYDS OF HOPE. 69

And won't I ])hel to shout Hurrah
King Alcohol's laid low-'
But now I'm off to Bradley Woods.
Good-by, sir, I must go."



WHAT I LIKE.
" I LIKE the sweet and tender corn
Fresh from its yellow silk,
I like the honey from the comb,
I like a glass of milk.

" I like the chestnuts in the wood,
Like raisins and like dates;
I like the rosy apple, too,
That ne'er intoxicates.

" I like sweet butter on my bread
And sugar in my tea,
I like a little tender hind,
A fish from out the sea.

" But oh there's one thing I am sure
I like with all my might;
When I am dry there's nothing like
A glass of water bright !"






O7 GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE.


s I /






















THE PLEDGE AND STRAWBERRIES.
ONE of the best temperance lectures ever de-
livered fell from the lips of a little child in Cov-
ington, Kentucky; the child of a reformed man.






GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE. 71

"Father," said she, "are you always going to
wear the blue ribbon ?"
"I hope so, my dear," was his reply.
So do I," said the little one.
Why do you hope so ?" asked her father.
Because I've never had so many strawberries
in my life as I've had since you signed the pledge
and put on that blue ribbon." Strawberries are
better than rum. He could not afford both.

CORN AND WHISKEY.
Do you know how many bushels of corn are rais-
ed in one year in the United States ? 1,606,604,902.
Just think how many
families could be fed with
good nourishing food if it
/ all went to the mill and
Snone of it to the still.
/ Corn in the ear and not
corn-whiskey in the jug is
l' what makes health and
Happiness.
About one-fourth of all
the corn that is raised is
spoiled by the distiller.
He takes it and turns it into whiskey, which does







72 GEMS FOR BANDS OF HOPE.

harm and not good. It makes those who drink it
poorer; it makes them
lazy, cross, and cruel;
it poisons them, bc-
cause it contains one
Sof the worst kinds of
: poisons-alcohol. It
causes sorrow, crime,
and death.
An Indian brought an ear of corn to a white
man and asked him to show him how to fix it so
he could drink it out of a bottle, just as he had
seen white men do. The Indian was wiser with-
out the knowledge than he would have been with
it. The curse of the land is the curse of the still.
Boys, if you ever become farmers, see to it that
the miller gets your corn and not the distiller.




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