• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Content
 Back Cover






Group Title: Truth will out, or, The yolk laid on the right shoulders
Title: The truth will out, or, The yolk laid on the right shoulders
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00056236/00001
 Material Information
Title: The truth will out, or, The yolk laid on the right shoulders
Alternate Title: Yolk laid on the right shoulders
Physical Description: 16 p. : col. ill. ; 13 x 20 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Foster, William, 1853-1924
Foster, William, 1853-1924 ( Illustrator )
Evans, Edmund, 1826-1905 ( Engraver , Printer )
E. & J.B. Young & Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: E. & J.B. Young and Co.
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: 1889
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Owls -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Birds -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Theft -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Trials -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Parent and child -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1889
Genre: novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: written and illustrated by William Foster ; engraved and printed by Edmund Evans.
General Note: Title, caption, and running title printed in red.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00056236
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002229909
notis - ALH0249
oclc - 70294493

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Page 1
    Title Page
        Page 2
    Content
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
Full Text

THE TRUTH WILL OUT
OR .----
THE YOLK LAID

THE RIGHT SHOULDERS.








NEW YORK: E. & J. B. YOUNG AND CO.,
COOPER UNION, FOURTH AVENUE.
COOPER UNION, FOURTH AVENUE.





















ThB~
~Pln~ L~b~Uor
Ulti~F~i~y
F1~id.
B














.I
\ :::4 ~
,r
,1
r "

~; c.1, :a





-- ~d$C~






THE TRUTH WILL OUT;


OR,

The Yolk laid on the Riyht Shoulders.



WRITTEN AND ILLUSTRATED BY WILLI-.',. FOSTER.

ENGRAKVED A\ND P'RINTI'LU BY EDMUND EVANS.





NEW YORK: E. & J. B. YOUNG AND CO.,
COOPER UNION, FOURTH AVENUE.
1889.







T HE T R UTH WI L L O UT;

OR,
THE YOLK LAID ON THE RIGHT SHOULDERS.


IT was a lovely summer's day, and the world looked very beautiful; so very
beautiful indeed, that Owly, from his perch high up in an old ivy-clad oak,
felt that the time had come when he ought to set off and endeavour to make his
own living. Hitherto, he had seen nothing but the glimpses of country that were
visible from the branch just outside his small home, and he longed to know more
about it.
It was an immense undertaking, for he had never yet caught a mouse or rat
for his dinner, but had taken what was brought to him without enquiring whence
it came or how it was caught. His fond parents tried to persuade him to wait
a bit longer, but his mind was made up, and off he set in a new hat, which he thought
would astonish the world by its gloss. He had not gone many yards before a
collection of very common little birds mobbed him, calling out and pointing at






4 TlIE TiUTif W1l7i OUT.

him-" There's a guy!" Who's your hatter?" "Yah! there's a masher!" Owly
was very indignant and somewhat :i ;..1, but he managed, by slipping through






1TI TR U Ti 11ILL OUT. 5

a few thick trees, to escape at last, with his personal pride somewhat shaken. He
journeyed on until he came to a large field, which he stopped to admire with his
big eyes very wide open. While he was still gaping with wonder up came two






6 TI/I TRUJlI WILL OUT.

smart-looking fellows, one of whom began to talk to him. You from the country?
Yes, you look it; so am I, and so is my friend, Magpie. My name is Crow-Grey Crow,
old country family. Ever been here before? No? Well, we might shew you about
a bit, but we don't know very much of these parts." So Crow rattled on, and Owly
thought him a charming fellow, and entirely forgot his home in the delightful
company of his newly-found friends. They then took him for a walk along the
field, Magpie chattering all the way, and telling amusing stories of, and imitating
his friends.
Presently they came to a part of the hedge where Crow stopped and
whispered to Magpie; he then asked Owly if he would like to play a game of bowls
-did he know it? No ? Well, then, they would teach him. He knew of some bowls
in the hedge, and, pointing out the place, sent Owly to fetch two. When Owly got
to the top of the bank he found a hollow with quite a lot of bowls. He brought
down two, but could not help wondering why Crow and Magpie laughed so much.
He had no sooner brought down the bowls than Crow stuck his beak into one and
Magpie into the other, and out spurted a stream of yolk and white, for they were






THE TRUTH \1 ./l. OUT7. 7

Hen's eggs. Owly was amazed "Is that how you play bowls ?" he asked. You



li













X__ f






ST//f/ TR/UT 11 7/LI., OUT.

scem to like it. Is it good ?" "Rather," guzzled out Crow, with his nose well down












I k k4



...






THE TRUTH WIILL OUT. 9

his egg, "you'd better get one and try." But just at this moment Magpie, ever on
the look-out, cried, Here come the bobbies !" and off he went, closely followed by
Crow. At the same instant the Hen who's nest had been robbed rushed on the scene
and fairly bowled Owly over, knocking his hat off I've caught you in the act,"
she said. Look at those empty egg-shells! You've ruined the sitting. I had only
got to lay four more to make it complete. Oh, you little wretch !" Owly protested
in vain that he didn't know what they were, that he had never eaten an egg and
didn't want to; but up came the bobbies, took his name and address, and walked
him off.
Now Magpie and Crow were much bigger and stronger than any of the bobbies,
but still they feared them, for they knew that they were very friendly with the cook
at the Manor House, who used to give them food on a cold morning when their
beat was that way (and it generally was that way), and they felt sure that if the
bobbies complained to the cook about them she would tell the young Squire, who
loved shooting, and their lives would be in danger. They therefore made off as fast
as they could go, leaving Owly, as they thought, in a trap, and chuckling to themselves






io THE TRUTH' WILL OUT.


at their lucky escape. What made matters worse was that the cook was very fussy





.._^ -, ; --







THE TRUTH WILL OUT I


and particular about her poultry and eggs, and this, one of the bobbies told Owly, and
it made him tremble in his shoes and long to be safe back again in his ivy-clad home.
But off he was marched for trial. There happened to be, some miles away, an old
learned Judge, a great Owl, and a Swift was quickly sent to fetch him. Two other









4,







"t-, .,






12 THE/ TRUTH WILL OUT.

Judges, very learned Owls, were also found, and a Jury of twelve small birds of many
sorts was hastily called together. Owly had told about Crow and Magpie, and they
were ordered to appear, but few believed his tale. The moment of the trial came.
The Judges arrived in state, with a force of bobbies guarding them from the rude
common birds that would have buffetted them if they had had a chance; and then
the Court was formed, the Judges on the bench looking very wise and sleepy, the Jury
all eyes and ears, the Court crowded with birds who came to see it out, the Hen who
had been robbed, and her husband, the Cock, from the Manor House. Crow and
Magpie were there too, with Jackdaw, a wily old lawyer, to defend them.
Owly, between two bobbies, was brought in, and the trial began. The Hen told all
about the robbery and sucking of the eggs, and how Owly was found near the empty
shells; she then cackled out a lot about how hard it was for a poor lone woman to mind
her eggs and get her food, but one of the Judges said that would keep till another day,
and she might sit down. Owly was then asked if he had any defence to offer, and he
very simply told how he had been led away by Crow and Magpie into stealing the
eggs without knowing what they were, for they had told him they were to play a game




THE 7RUTIH WtILL OUT. 13
of bowls with. The Jackdaw replied, and accused poor Owly of trying to throw the








"^v L .
," i7":X"
, /d ._. -!! ... & : r._ :._.. ...





14 TI 7A' TRUT/ ViL, f OUT.

blame on two innocent birds who had never done wrong; he asked the Jury not to
believe a word of it. Was it likely that two respectable birds would make up such
a story? The Jury twittered a good deal, and Owly felt very faint, for he saw that





C N
/ '


!l~~j





THE TRUTH WILL OUT. 15

Jackdaw's words were making an impression, when suddenly up jumped a tiny Wren,
and in a shrill voice screamed out that she had been close to the nest and eggs when
Crow, Magpie and Owly came up, and that, feeling afraid of such big birds, she hid
behind a dock leaf and saw and heard everything-how Crow and Magpie had made
Owly fetch the eggs, had called them bowls to deceive him, and had chuckled at the
prospect of getting a meal without any danger, had finally sucked them, and then
flown away when the bobbies came in sight.
Jackdaw was very furious, and called Wren an untruthful little minx, but the
Manor House Cock crowed out hoarsely that he had seen Magpie and Crow flying
away in a great hurry ; and he also mentioned that Jackdaw was not above pilfering
the chickens' food when he was hungry.
This settled it. The Judges found Owly not guilty, and Jackdaw, hastily
picking up his papers, hurried away with Crow and Magpie without waiting to hear
more, warned off by a bobby, who shook his truncheon at them. One of the bobbies
cheerfully undertook to warble to the cook the whole truth about the theft of the
eggs, and Owly returned to the bosom of his family wiser and sadder, but he soon





16 THE TRUTH WILL OUT.


forgot his troubles in the peace that he enjoyed on the Manor in return for the
services he rendered in catching the mice and rats with which the place swarmed.






I^*':














.I
\ :::4 ~
,r
,1
r "

~; c.1, :a





-- ~d$C~














- T




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs