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Title: Florida 260 Corn-Soybean Club, 1979
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00056089/00001
 Material Information
Title: Florida 260 Corn-Soybean Club, 1979
Physical Description: 4, 6 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla.?
Publication Date: 1979?]
 Subjects
Subject: Corn -- Societies, etc -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Soybean -- Societies, etc -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: Caption title.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00056089
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 62614516

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Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida





/00 FLORIDA 260 CORN-SOYBEAN CLUB 1979
,F36M HUME LIBRARY
/ The "High Yield Club" is designed to create incentives, p blici god B 7
production techniques by growers, and to allow county agents t( spre an p
mote cultural practices now available for growing corn and soy means. The county
agent is most closely involved with the top producers in his ccd rRA.S.Hdfi.J fOsFlorida
the growth of the crops throughout the season and could ultimately verify the
yield obtained from various contestant's fields. This program would serve as
an educational tool for the county personnel to use, and allow them an opportunity
to point out areas where the grower may improve his production program. This
program can be self-sustaining through competition created by producers in each
county. Industry representatives who are in thq field have expressed a desire
to aid agents in detecting high yield fields. They could contact the agent
about a high yield field and the agent in turn would contact the specialist for
scheduling the weight wagon at harvest.
The rules for making the Club are to produce 1,000 bushels of 15.5% moisture
corn on at least five acres (200 bu/A), or 300 bushels of 13% moisture soybeans
on five acres (60 bu/A), and that the county personnel or a trained technician
be involved in the yield check. Yields will be verified the initial year by
extension specialists. Out of any 5 acre field, up to 3, one-tenth acre areas
may be checked with the farmer's combine using no border rows or ends of rows.
The farmer may choose the area to be harvested as the weigh wagon enters the field.
The county personnel will set a date to have the weigh wagon in his county, as
well as having the farmer's combine in the field ready to harvest as soon as the
weigh wagon arrives. Forms will be provided for the grower to fill out, with
yield and moisture being taken the time of harvest.
Joint meetings with county personnel, specialists, and industry representa-
tives may be held in the winter with farmers who will be participating in either
of the contests. Extension and industry personnel may be scheduled to talk on
the latest production techniques, varieties, pesticides, and other pertinent in-
formation associated with obtaining high yields. This program has been received
with high enthusiasm by industry and state personnel.
Each grower yielding enough to allow him to be a member of the "Florida
260 Corn-Soybean Club" will have the attached form to fill out indicating the
production practices he utilized. These and other pertinent production practices
will be published in the "Florida 260 Corn-Soybean Club" publication at the end
of the year. Recognition will be given to the participants of the contest through
the publication. The publication of the "Florida 260 Corn-Soybean Club" results
will give other farmers needed information on how to obtain high yields in follow-
ing years.
Industry representatives have expressed a desire to participate in this
program by recognizing the high yield producers at the end of the year with a
banquet. This will give the farmers a chance to talk with their associates from
other counties as well as industry personnel on their needs.
Weigh wagons and moisture meters have been set aside by industry representa-
tives to participate in this program with a promise of financial support by many
of the major seed companies that are not providing equipment.
MEASURING CORN OR SOYBEAN YIELDS

Yield measurements obtained from fields where various cultural practices are
used is meaningful to producers planning their future cropping sequences. Prac-
tices that produce highest yields can be measured readily and adopted by farmers
in the area.








To make comparisons between various treatments, plant several rows of corn
or soybeans in a uniform field with each treatment, such as 20 rows subsoiled
versus 20 rows not subsoiled, or with N-serve or any other treatment and use
the same maturity plant for the comparison. Unless one is comparing varieties,
a single hybrid/variety of corn or soybeans should be used across all variable
treatments. Mark the rows after treatment so that the location of each treat-
ment can be determined at harvest and then treat all areas alike during the
growing season.
At harvest,mark off equal areas in each treatment and harvest into individ-
ual wagons. Weigh each load minus the weight of the wagon and make yield cal-
culations as follows:
1. Weight of crop in the wagon
2. Square feet of corn or soybeans harvested (Row width in feet x row
number x row length in feet)
3. Percentage of an acre harvested
Row width x row number x row length (from above)
43,560 (square feet/acre)
4. Pounds of crop per acre
Weight of crop in wagon
acres in test (from above)
5. Percent moisture in crop
Determined by a moisture meter
6. Bushels per acre corrected for moisture content from table 1 for
soybeans and table 2 for corn
Number 2 shelled corn at 15.5% moisture weighs 56 pounds per bushel and
is used as a standard for corn while grade 1 soybeans at 13.00% moisture weighs
60 pounds per bushel and is the standard for soybeans.

HAND HARVESTING

If combine yields for corn were 197 or 198 bushels over a 5 acre area, a
hand harvest of 3 areas in a 5 acre, or larger area, containing one-hundredth
acre each, will help to determine percent loss due to combining inefficiency,
and can verify if 200 bushels of corn were grown or not.
Corn may be harvested by hand by the following method:
1. Measure off an area equal to one hundredth of an acre as shown in
table 4 in each of 3 areas.
2. Harvest the corn in the shuck from the one-hundredth acre area and get
a total weight of the ear corn with shuck in pounds Ibs.
3. Multiply the weight of the corn by 100 to obtain pounds of ear corn
per acre. lbs x 100 = Ibs. ear corn per acre.
4. Shuck about 40 ears of corn and weigh and record. Shell out the grain
of the 40 ear sample and weigh and record lbs ear corn,
Ibs shelled corn.
5. Determine shelling percentage by dividing the total 40 ear sample
weight by weight of grain and multiply by 100 to obtain shelling
percentage Ibs ear corn _Ibs shelled corn x 100
= shelling percentage
6. Determine grain per acre at field moisture by multiplying ear corn per
acre from 3 above by shelling percentage from 5.
Ibs ear corn/A x shelling percentage =
wet grain/A.
7. Determine grain moisture (use moisture meter) and record. % mois-
ture.







8. From table 5 for ear corn, record pounds of grain needed to equal one
bushel of No. 2 grain from moisture level from 7 above bs to
equal 1 bushel at _% moisture.
9. Determine bushels of No. 2 grain per acre by dividing wet grain per
acre from 6 above by pounds of grain per bushel from 8 above.
wet grain/A Ibs/bu = _bu No. 2 grain per
acre. After each of the 3 areas are determined as above, add the
yields from the three areas together and divide by 3. bu/A+
bu/A+ bu/A+ bu/A 7 3 = bu No. 2
grain per acre from across the 5 acres.

KEY MANAGEMENT PRACTICES

1. Select the most productive land on your farm that has been in a grass
sod to plant soybean into or a well fertilized legume crop for plant-
ing corn.
2. Plant corn in rotation with a legume crop such as soybeans to reduce
nematode, insect, and disease losses. Where corn is planted after
corn or soybeans after soybeans for several years, apply a nemati-
cide in a furrow in a 7 to 12 inch band over the row. (Nematodes are
fast becoming the #1 problem in crop production).
3. Use a soil test for both fertility and nematodes. Soil and nematode
tests may be obtained in October and November. Apply recommended
kinds and amounts of fertilizer and nematicides if needed.
4. Apply a minimum of 50 Ibs of elemental magnesium per acre if soil tests
indicate low levels, and apply micronutrients as needed. Lime should
be applied 2 to 4 months before the crop is planted to obtain a pH
of 5.8 to 6.0 for best results for both corn and soybeans. Micro-
nutrients, except for boron which is easily leached, may be applied
2 weeks before planting.
5. Use high quality seed of adapted varieties that have proven yield potential,
6. Use at least two hybrids of corn with no more than 1 week difference in
pollination date that have good lodging and disease resistance, and
at least two maturity groups of soybeans to space out harvesting.
7. Subsoil where a hardpan exists.
8. Subsoil in-row after the pan has been confirmed by use of a sharpened
metal probe.
9. Plant corn as early as possible after February 15 when soil temperature
is 550. Plant soybeans when soil temperature are in the 60's usually
between May 1 and June 15.
10. For corn plan on having approximately 30,000 plants, in 30" rows when under
irrigation, and use 30" or 36" rows for soybeans when they are planted
at the proper planting date. Utilize narrower row spacings with later
soybean planting dates.
11. Seed rates with early planting and no-till planting need to be increased
by 15% to obtain the recommended population with these practices on
either irrigated or non-irrigated fields.
12. Control weeds by proper crop rotations, deep plowing, herbicides, culti-
vation, and crop competition.
13. Control nematodes by using rotations with other crops and nematicides.
(Fumigants are more effective for several nematode infestations but
are usually more expensive).
14. Nematode tests should be a routine practice to determine levels on a
yearly basis after crop harvest.











15. Scout fields for insects, disease, nutrient, or weed problems. Fields
should be checked twice weekly to detect problems in an early stage.
16. Use disease resistant varieties.
17. Fertilize according to soil tests. From 200 to 240 Ibs of nitrogen is
adequate for high corn yields when applied in split applications.
No nitrogen application is necessary for soybean production unless
poor nodulation occurs.
18. The initial nitrogen application to corn should be banded to the side
and below the seed.
19. Where soil tests indicate high levels of phosphorus and potash, response
of corn to starter fertilizer would be minimal, especially if nitrogen
was banded at planting.
20. Irrigate to prevent moisture stress.
21. Tensiometers should be used to schedule irrigation at 20 cb (centibars)
for corn and 50 cb of moisture tension for soybeans.
22. Harvest corn as soon as the moisture content of the grain is at 30%.
23. Dry corn promptly and store at 13% moisture.
24. Adjust the combine to obtain maximum harvesting efficiency.
25. Keep accurate records of all production inputs and any special problem
that arises during the growing season.






Table 1. Pounds Needed to Equal 1 Bushel No. 1 Soybeans at Various
Moisture Levels


%
Moisture
8.0
.1
.2
.3
.4
.5
.6
.7
.8
.9
9.0
.1
.2
.3
.4
.5
.6
.7
.8
.9
10.0
.1
.2
.3
.4
.5
.6
.7
.8
.9
11.0
.1
.2
.3
.4
.5
.6
.7
.8
.9
12.0
.1
.2
.3
.4
.5
.6
.7
.8
.9


lbs.
56.74
56.80
56.86
56.93
56.99
57.05
57.11
57.17
57.24
57.30
57.36
57.42
57.49
57.55
57.61
57.68
57.74
57.81
57.87
57.93
58.00
58.07
58.13
58.20
58.26
58.33
58.39
58.46
58.52
58.59
58.65
58.72
58.78
58.85
58.92
58.99
59.05
59.12
59.19
59.25
59.32
59.39
59.46
59.52
59.59
59.66
59.73
59.80
59.86
59.93


%
Moisture
13.0
.1
.2
.3
.4
.5
.6
.7
.8
.9
14.0
.1
.2
.3
.4
.5
.6
.7
.8
.9
15.0
.1
.2
.3
.4
.5
.6
.7
.8
.9
16.0
.1
.2
.3
.4
.5
.6
.7
.8
.9
17.0
.1
.2
.3
.4
.5
.6
.7
.8
.9


lbs.
60.00
60.07
60.14
60.21
60.28
60.35
60.42
60.49
60.56
60.63
60.70
60.77
60.84
60.91
60.98
61.06
61.13
61.20
61.27
61.34
61.41
61.48
61.56
61.63
61.70
61.78
61.85
61.92
62.00
62.07
62.14
62.22
62.29
62.37
62.44
62.52
62.59
62.67
62.74
62.82
62.89
62.96
63.04
63.12
63.20
63.28
63.35
63.43
63.51
63.58


%
Moisture
18.0
.1
.2
.3
.4
.5
.6
.7
.8
.9
19.0
.1
.2
.3
.4
.5
.6
.7
.8
.9
20.0
.1
.2
.3
.4
.5
.6
.7
.8
.9
21.0
.1
.2
.3
.4
.5
.6
.7
.8
.9
22.0
.1
.2
.3
.4
.5
.6
.7
.8
.9


lbs.
63.66
63,74
63.82
63.89
63.97
64.05
64.13
64.21
64.28
64.36
64.44
64.52
64.60
64.68
64.76
64.85
64.93
65.01
65.09
65.17
65.25
65.33
65.41
65.50
65.58
65.66
65.74
65.82
65.91
65.99
66.07
66.16
66.24
66.33
66.41
66.50
66.58
66.67
66.75
66.84
66.92
67.01
67.09
67.18
67.27
67.36
67.44
67.53
67.62
67.60


-Moisture
23.0
.1;
.2"
.3
.4
.5
.6
.7
.8
.9
24.0
.1
.2
.3
.4
.5
.6
..7
.8
.9
25,0


Ib.
67.79
67.88
67.97
681 06
68.15
68.24
.68,32
68.41
68,50
68.59
68,68
68.77
68.86
68.96
.-69.05
69.14
69.23
69 32
69.42
69.51
469.60












mois-
ture Ibs


Table 2. POUNDS NEEDED TO EQUAL ONE BUSHEL OF NO. 2 SHELLED CORN
AT VARIOUS MOISTURE LEVELS



U.


10.0
11.0
12.0
.1
.2
.3
.4
.5
.6
.7
.8
.9
13.0
.1
.2
.3
.4
.5
.6
.7
.8
.9
14.0
.1
.2
.3
.4
.5
.6
.7
.8
.9
15.0
.1
.2
.3
.4
.5
.6
.7
.8
.9


52.58
53.17
53.77
53.83
53.89
53.96
54.02
54.08
54.14
54.20
54.27
54.33
54.39
54.45
54.52
54.58
54.65
54.71
54.77
54.83
54.90
54.96
55.02
55.09
55.15
55.22
55.28
55.35
55.41
55.48
55.54
55.61
55.67
55.74
55.80
55.87
55.93
56.00
56.07
56.13
56.20
56.26


16.0 56.33
.1 56.40
.2 56.47
.3 56.53
.4 56.60
.5 56.67
.6 56.74
.7 56.81
.8 56.87
.9 56.94
17.0 57.01
.1 57.08
.2 57.15
.3 57.22
.4 57.29
.5 57.36
.6 57.43
.7 57.50
.8 57.57
.9 57.64
18.0 57.71
.1 57.78
.2 57.85
.3 57.92
.4 57.99
.5 58.06
.6 58.13
.7 58.20
.8 58.28
.9 58.35
19.0 58.42
.1 58.49
.2 58.56
.3 58.64
.4 58.71
.5 58.78
.6 58.85
.7 58.93
.8 59.00
.9 59.08


20.0 59.15
.1 59.18
.2 59.22
.3 59.25
.4 59.29
.5 59.32
.6 59.44
.7 59.55
.8 59.67
.9 59.78
21.0 59.90
.1 59.98
.2 60.05
.3 60.13
.4 60.20
.5 60.28
.6 60.36
.7 60.44
.8 60.51
.9 60.59
22.0 60.67
.1 60.75
.2 60.83
.3 60.90
.4 60.98
.5 61.06
.6 61.14
.7 61.22
.8 61.29
.9 61.37
23.0 61.45
.1 61.53
.2 61.61
.3 61.70
.4 61.78
.5 61.86
.6 61.94
.7 62.02
.8 62.10
.9 62.18


24.0 62.26
.1 62.34
.2 62.43
.3 62.51
.4 62.60
.5 62.68
.6 63.76
.7 63.84
.8 63.93
.9 63.01
25.0 63.09
.1 63.18
.2 63.26
.3 63.35
.4 63.43
.5 63.52
.6 63.61
.7 63.69
.8 63.86
.9 63.86
26.0 63.95
.1 94.04
.2 64.12
.3 64.21
.4 64.29
.5 64.38
.6 64.47
.7 64.56
.8 64.64
.9 64.73
27.0 64.82
.1 64.91
.2 65.00
.3 65.09
.4 65.18
.5 65.27
.6 65.36
.7 65.45
.8 65.54
.9 65.63


28.0 65.72
.1 65.81
.2 65.90
.3 66.00
.4 66.09
.5 66.18
.6 66.27
.7 66.37
.8 66.46
.9 66.56
29.0 66.65
.1 66.74
.2 66.84.
.3 66.93
.4 67.03
.5 67.12
.6 67!22
.7 67.31
.8 67.41
.9 67.50
30.0 67.60
.1 67.70
.2 67.80
.3 67.89
.4 67.99
.5 68.09
.6 68.19
.7 68.29
.8 68.38
.9 68.48
31.0 68.58
.1 68.68
.2 68.78
.3 68.88
.4 68.98
.5 69.08
.6 69.18
.7 69.28
.8 69.39
.9 69.49


32.0 69.59
.1 69.69
.2 69.80
.3 69.90
.4 70.01
.5 70.11
.6 70.21
.7 70.32
.8 70.42
.9 70.53
33.0 70.63
.1 70.74
.2 70.84
.3 70.95
.4 71.05
.5 71.16
.6 71.27
.7 71.38
.8 71.48
.9 71.59
34.0 71.70
.1 71.81
.2 71.92'
.3 72.03
.4 72.14
.5 72.25
.6 72.36
.7 72.47
.8 72.58
.9 72.69
35.0 72.80
.1 72.91
.2 73.03
.3 73.14
.4 73.26
.5 73.37
.6 73.48
.7 73.60
.8 73.71
.9 73.83


36.0 73.94
.1 74.06
.2 74.17
.3 74.29
.4 74.40
.5 74.52
.6 74.64
.7 74.76
.8 74.87
.9 74.00
37.0 75.11
.1 75.23
.2 75.35
.3 75.48
.4 75.60
.5 75.72
.6 75.84
.7 75.96
.8 76.08
99 76.20
38.0 76.32
.1 76.44
.2 76.57
.3 76.69
.4 76.82
.5 76.94.
.6 77,07
.7 77.19
.8 77.32
.9 77.44
39.0 77.57
.1 77.70
.2 77.83
.3 77.96
.4 78.09
.5 78.22
.6 78.35
.7 78.48
.8 78.61
.9 78,74
40.0 78.87










Table 3. Row length required for .1 acre for various row widths and row numbers.
V


Length in


Width row


1 row


2,614
2,178
1,867
1,742
1,634
1,452
1,376
1,307


2 rows


1,307
1,089
933
871
817
726
688
653


feet for .1 acre
4 rows


653
545
467
436
408
363
344
327


436
363
311
290
272
242
229
218


Formula: 43,560 ft2 /A 3 row width in inches
12


Hand Harvesting

Table 4. Row length required for .01 acre for various row widths and row numbers,


Width 1 row 2 rows 4 rows 6 rows 8 rows

20 261 130 65 43 33
24 218 109 54 36 27
28 187 93 47 31 23
30 174 87 43 29 22
32 163 81 41 27 20
36 145 72 36 24 18
38 138 69 34 23 17
40 131 65 33 22 16


6 rows


[ I


eA.*.j


AA 3







Table 5. POUNDS NEEDED TO EQUAL ONE BUSHEL OF NO. 2 EAR CORN
AT VARIOUS MOISTURE LEVELS



mois-
ture lbs

10.0 63.49
11.0 64.25
12.0 65.00 16.0 68.94 20.0 73.96 24.0 79.76 28.0 85.62 32.0 91.43 36.0 97.17
.1 65.15 .1 69.05 .1 74.09 .1 79.91 .1 85.76 .1 91.64 .1 97.32
.2 65.24 .2 69.17 .2 74.22 .2 80.00 .2 85.90 .2 91.86 .2 97.46
.3 65.32 .3 69.28 .3 74.34 .3 80.20 .3 86.04 .3 92.07 .3 97.61
.4 65.41 .4 69.40 .4 74.47 .4 80.35 .4 86.18 .4 92.29 .4 97.75
.5 65.50 .5 69.51 .5 74.60 .5 80.50 .5 86.32 .5 92.50 .5 97.90
.6 65.59 .6.69.63 .6 74.75 .6 80.65 .6 86.46 .6 92.57 .6 98.05
.7 65.68 .7 69.74 .7 74.90 .7 80.80 .7 86,61 .7 92.64 .7 98.20
.8 55.77 .8 69.86 .8 75.06 .8 80.95 .8 86.75 .8 92.71 .8 98.34
,9 65.86 .9 69.97 .9 75.21 .9 81.10 .9 86.90 .9 92.78 .9 98.49
13.0 65.95 17.0 70.09 21.0 75.36 25.0 81.25 29.0 87.04 33.0 92.85 37,0 98.64
.1 66.04 .1 70,21 .1 75.50 .1 81.41 .1 86.98 .1 92.99 .1 98.79
.2 66.14 .2 70.33 .2 75.64 .2 81.56 .2 86.93 .2 93.13 .2 98.94
.3 66.23 .3 70.45 .3 75.79 .3 81.72 .3 86.87 .3 93.28 .3 99.08
.4 66.34 .4 70.67 .4 75.93 .4 81.87 .4 86.82 .4 93.42 .4 99.23
.5 66.42 .5 70.69 .5 76.77 .5 82.03 .5 86.78 .5 93.56 .5 99.38
.6 66.51 .6 70.81 .6 76.21 .6 82.19 .6 87.11 .6 93.70 .6 99.53
.7 66.61 .7 70.94 .7 76.36 .7 82.35 .7 87.46 .7 93.85 .7 99.68
.8 66.70 .8 71.06 .8 76.50 .8 82.50 .8 87.80 .8 93.99 .8 99.83
.9 66.80 .9 71.19 .9 76.65 .9 86.66 .9 88.15 .9 94.14 .9 99.98
14.0 66.89 18.0 71.31 22.0 76.79 26.0 82.82 30.0 88.50 34.0 94.28 38.0 100.13
.1 66.90 .1 71.44 .1 76.94 .1 82.96 .1 88.64 .1 94.42 .1 100.28
.2 67.09 .2 71.57 .2 77.09 .2 83.09 .2 88.79 .2 94.57 .2 100.43
.3 67.19 .3 71.69 .3 77.23 .3 83.23 .3 88.93 .3 94.71 .3 100.58
.4 67.29 .4 71.82 .4 77.38 .4 83.36 .4 89.08 .4 94.86 .4 100.73
.5 67.39 .5 71.95 .5 77.53 .5 83.50 .5 89.22 .5 95.00 .5 100.88
.6 67.49 .6 72.08 .6 77.67 .6 83.64 .6 89.36 .6 95.14 .6 101.03
.7 67.59 .7 72.21 .7 77.82 .7 83.78 .7 89.51 .7 95.28 .7 101.18
.8 67.69 .8 72.34 .8 77.96 .8 83.91 .8 89,65 .8 95.43 .8 101.33
.9 67.79 .9 72.47 .9 78.11 .9 84.05 .9 89.90 .9 95.57 .9 101.48
15.0 67.89 19.0 72.60 23.0 78.25 27.0 84.19 31.0 89.94 35.0 95.71 39.0 101.63
.1 67.99 .1 27.73 .1 78.40 .1 84.33 .1 99.09 .1 95.86 .1 101.78
.2 68.09 .2 72.87 .2 78.55 .2 84.47 .2 90.24 .2 96.00 .2 101.94
.3 68.20 .3 73.00 .3 78.71 .3 84.62 .3 90.38 .3 96.15 .3 102.09
.4 68.30 .4 73.14 .4 78.86 .4 84.76 .4 90.53 .4 96.29 .4 102.25
.5 68.40 .5 73.27 .5 79.01 .5 84.90 .5 90.68 .5 96.44 .5 102.40
.6 68.51 .6 73.51 .6 79.16 .6 85.04 .6 90.83 .6 96.59 .6 102.55
.7 68.52 .7 73.55 .7 79.31 .7 85.19 .7 90.98 .7 96.73 .7 102.70
.8 68,72 .8 73.68 .8 79.46 .8 85.33 .8 91.13 .8 96.88 .8 102.86
.9 68.83 .9 73.82 .9 79.61 .9 85.48 .9 91.28 .9 97.02 .9 103.01
20.0 40.0 103.16





GROWER INFORMATION SHEET


Grower
County
Address
County Agent
Bu/A on
Hybrid or variety
Planting date / /
Previous crop: Summer Winter
Soil Type:
Land preparation: Fall Spring
Weeds present:


Grasses
Ch.chsi~r w _rs_problem?
Herbicides:


Effectiveness
Poor(P)Fair(F)Good(G)


acres


Broadleaves


Cost/A


preplant rate/A $
Early post emergence rate/A $___
Late post emergence_, rate/A $_
Broadcast rate/A $
Cultivation:
Yes ,No Date
ematicide rate/A $
ngicide rate/A


Number applications
Dates of application
Insecticides
Number applications
Dates of application
Subsoiled:


rate/A


Yes ,No
Was field checked for traffic pan?
Yes ,No
Original pH P205 ,K20 ,
Ca Mg S ,
Zn Mn, Fe ,
OM%
Fertilizer used:
N rate/A
P205 rate/A
K20 rate/A
Mg rate/A
Zn rate/A
S rate/A
Mn rate/A
B rate/A
Other rate/A
Form of N fertilizer used:
Urea ,Anhydrous amm. Amm. Nit.
Fertilizer application methodss:
Drilled ,broadcast ,irrigation system ,
other


$


$


$


$__
$.. ..
$
$
$
$
$
$ ..


,Other_____

chiseled_ _


Ne
Fu


Broadleaves









Lime applied when ,rate/A
Manure: Yes No Type Amt/A
Row spacing inches
Drill spacing inches
Date Harvested
Harvested Plant Population
Irrigated:
Yes ,No Type: Center Pivot
Travelling gun
other
Number times Amt/application
Water source:
Well ,Pond ,Stream
Were tensiometers used?
Yes ,No
Irrigated at what stages) Cost/A $
Total cost from above $


Highest yield obtained in past:


Corn
Soybeans


bu/A
bu/A


This public document was promulgated at an annual cost of $149.55
per copy to inform growers, county personnel, and other interested
of production increasing practices.


or 15 cents
individuals




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