• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Historic note
 Main














Group Title: Agronomy research report - University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences ; AY-86-09
Title: Corn grain yield response to pesticides in conventional and no-tillage management
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00056056/00001
 Material Information
Title: Corn grain yield response to pesticides in conventional and no-tillage management
Physical Description: 7 leaves : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Gallaher, Raymond N
University of Florida -- Agronomy Dept
Publisher: Agronomy Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 1986?
 Subjects
Subject: Corn -- Yields -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Corn -- Diseases and pests -- Control -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Raymond N. Gallaher.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: gronomy research report - University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences ; AY-86-09
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00056056
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 62557645

Table of Contents
    Historic note
        Historic note
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida










Agronomy Research Report AY-86-09


Corn Grain Yield Response to Pesticides in Conventional and No-Tillage

Management



By


Raymond N. Gallaher, Professor of Agronomy, Agronomy Department, Institute of

Food and Agricultural. Sciences, University of Florida, 631 Wallace Building,

Gainesville, FL 32611.


FLB 28 199(
Comments


Data in the attached 4 tables are results from pesticides applied to--

compare response under two tillage management treatments in an Alfisol soil

at Williston, Florida. Corn in this study was planted with an in-row subsoil

no-tillage planter either were no prior land preparation had occurred or

where the soil had been prepared conventionally prior to planting. The

system was continuous monocropped corn planted in the same plots over the 3

years of this study and for 3 years prior to implementing the pesticide

treatments. The monocropping corn systems were in place for a total of 6

years ending in 1983.

Yield data is given for the individual years (Tables 1-3) and the 3 year

average (Table 4). These data strongly indicate that corn yield response to

Furadan and Counter pesticides are different due to tillage. It further

suggest that we can not take conventional tillage recommendations for growing

corn and apply them to no-tillage corn with the same results. We will have









to test management variables in the environment in which the corn crop is

grown for greater accuracy in making recommendations to farmers.

Lodging was a severe problem in 1981. This was associated with an

extensive dry corn growing season in the Levy County area. It was noted that

lodging appeared to give a greater yield loss from Counter treated plots

(Table 5 versus Table 1 data) ,than Furadan treatments or control plots.

Lodging on the Robinson farms and the Whitehurst farms was severe in 1981.

They both used Counter that year on their no-tillage high yield irrigated

corn. Although the disease was not identified, a form of stalk rot appeared

to be the problem. In the no-tillage experiment it appeared that Furadan

gave some protection from the stalk rot based on lodging and a check of

rotted and weakened stalks near the ground.



Acknowledgements


Grateful acknowledgements are extended to Mr. Raymond Robinson and Mr.

Andy Robinson for the use of their land, equipment, irrigation, and other

resources to carry out these studies. Also without the technical field

assistance by Mr. Sonny R. Tompkins and Mr. Timmy Summers the research would

not have been possible.











Table 1. Corn (DeKalb XL71) grain yield at 15.5% moisture
as affected by tillage and pesticide treatment in 1981.

Tillage
Pestici ------------
Treatment None Conventional Average

---------------- bu/a -----------------
bu/a
2 lb Furadan 240 208 224 a

1 Ib Furadan 211 219 215 ab

2 Ib Counter 210 199 205 ab

Control 196 186 191 b


Average 214 203 NS

Pesticide rates are in active ingredients/acre. Values in
columns among pesticide treatments not followed by the same
letter are significantly different at the 0.05 level of
probability according to Duncans new multiple range test.
NS = No significant differences between tillage treatments
at the 0.05 level of probability.

Conclusions:

1. No yield differences were found between tillage
treatments but a trend was for higher yield in no-tillage.

2. The 2-pound furadan rate gave higher grain yield than
the control.











Table 2. Corn (DeKalb XL71) grain yield at 15.5% moisture
as affected by tillage and pesticide treatment in 1982.
--------------meeeom-------------------------------------
Tillage
Pestici ------------
Treatment None Conventional Average
------------------wom-w----------------e---mem-m----mem---
----------------bua --------
2 lb Furadan 147 151 149 a

1 Ib Furadan 142 151 146 a

2 lb Counter 132 153 142 a

Control 119 101 110 b


Average 135 139 NS
----------------------------------------------------------
Pesticide rates are in active ingredients/acre. Values in
columns among pesticide treatments not followed by the same
letter are significantly different at the 0.05 level of
probability according to Duncans new multiple range test.
NS = No significant differences between tillage treatments
at the 0.05 level of probability.

Conclusions:

1. No yield differences were found between tillage
treatments.

2. Yields were equal among all pesticide chemical
treatments but all gave higher grain yield than the control
treatment.











Table 3. Influence of tillage and pesticides on corn grain
yield at Williston, Florida in 1983 by R.N. Gallaher,
Agronomy Department, University of Florida, Gainesville
32611.
---------------------------------------------
Pesticide Rate No-tillage Conv-tillage Average
-----------------------------------------------
-- aiA ------ Bu/A -------------
Furadan 2 Ib 176 a 162 a 169

Furadan 1 Ib 128 b 148 a 138

Counter 2 lb 148 ab 143 ab 146

Control 0 Ib 124 b 99 b 112


Average -- 144 138 NS
-----------------------------------------------
B = Brand. # = Pound. ai = active ingredient. Values within
tillage treatments among pesticides not followed by the
same letter are significantly different at the 0.05 level
of probability according to Duncans new multiple range
test. NS = no significant differences between tillage
treatments. LSD (.05) = 44.5 among pesticide treatments.
CV = 22 % among pesticide treatments.


This is the third year of comparing pesticides under long
term no-tillage versus conventional tillage corn on the
Robinson farm Williston, Florida. Note that there is a
trend for higher yields in the no-tillage plots except for
the one pound Fruadan treatment in no-tillage. This was
Likely an error ode to bad data from one replication. Both
Furadan and Counter at the two pound active ingredient rate
were equal in both tillage treatments but note that only
the Furadan was different from the control. Counter was
close to being significant in the conventional tillage
plots over the control. According to LSD test at the .05
level of probability it would be significantly different.
A CV of 22% was high in this test and was due in part from
lack of adequate technical support to maintain, and harvest
plots adequately. Even so the data is in line with
previous years data and will in part support previous
conclusions.











Table 4. Influence of tillage and pesticides on corn grain
yield at Williston, Florida averaged over 3 years from 1981
to 1983 by R.N. Gallaher, Agronomy Department, University
of Florida, Gainesville 32611.
--------------------------- --------------------
Pesticide Rate No-tillage Conv-tillage Average
--------------------------- 7--------------------
-- aiA -- --------- Bu/A ------------
Furadan 2 Ib 188 a 174 a 181

Furadan 1 lb 160 b 173 a 167

Counter 2 lb 163 b 165 b NS 164

Control 0 lb 146 c 129 c 138


Average -- 196 160
-----------------------------------------------
B = Brand. # = Pound. ai = active ingredient. Values within
tillage treatments among pesticides not followed by the
same letter are significantly different at the 0.05 level
of probability according to Duncans new multiple range
test. NS = no significant differences between tillage
treatments. = significant difference between tillage
means within a pesticide treatment at the .05 level of
probability.













Table 5. Corn (DeKalb XL71) grain yield at 15.5% moisture
as affected by tillage and pesticide treatment in 1981
after adjustments for lodging.
-------------------------- I-------------------
Tillage.
Pesticide -------------------------------
Treatment None Conventional Average
--------- -------------bu/a
---------------- bu/a -----------------
2 lb Furadan 225 a 189 a 207

1 Ib Furadan 203 ab 201 a NS 190

2 lb Counter 189 b 152 b 171

Control 178 b 169 ab NS 174


A average 199 178
----------------------------------------
Pesticide rates are in active ingredients/acre. Values in
columns among pesticide treatments not followed by the same
letter are significantly different at the 0.05 level of
probability according to Duncans new multiple range test.
* = Significant difference between tillage treatments at
the 0.05 level of probability. NS = No significant
differences between tillage treatments at the 0.05 level of
probability.


Conclusions:


1. Grain
than for
no-tillage


yield was higher for the 2
the 2-pound counter rate
After adjustment for lodging.


-pound furadan rate
or the control in


2. Grain yield was higher for the 2-pound or 1-pound
furadan and the control than for the 2-pound counter in
conventional tillage after adjustment for lodging.


3. Both the
resulted in
conventional


2-pound
higher
tillage


Sfuradan and 2-pound counter treatments
grain yield for no-tillage corn versus
corn after adjustment for lodging.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs