Group Title: Mimeo report Agricultural Research Center, Fort Pierce
Title: New legumes for the Latin American tropics
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055999/00001
 Material Information
Title: New legumes for the Latin American tropics
Series Title: Mimeo report Agricultural Research Center, Fort Pierce
Physical Description: 17 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Kretschmer, Albert E ( Albert Emil ), 1925-
University of Florida -- Agricultural Research Center
Publisher: University of Florida, Agricultural Research Center
Place of Publication: Fort Pierce
Publication Date: [1971]
 Subjects
Subject: Legumes -- Field experiments   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: A.E. Kretschmer, Jr.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "May, 1971."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055999
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 66877999
clc - 000384740

Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida





Agricultural Research Center, Fort Pierce *-*
Mimeo Report 71-3 May, 1971



NEW LEGUMES FOR THE LATIN AMERICAN TROPICS


A. E. Kretschmer, Jr.1



FAO has estimated that there will be a world deficit of about three

million tons of dressed beef by 1975, excluding mainland China. The

demand for beef increases year by year in Latin America, although this

demand is not fulfilled in many instances because of high prices. A

large part of tropical Latin America is suitable only for forage pro-

duction. Production of beef in Latin America is almost completely

based on grazing systems. Little concentrate is being fed for fatten-

ing purposes. Increased beef production per acre will be needed in the

future to meet the demands of the consumer. The use of fertilizer mat-

erials, newer cattle breeds, and generally better management practices

will have an important influence in the overall productivity in Latin

America. Quality of pastures can be improved through the use of ni-

trogen fertilization plus proper grazing management. Higher quality

pastures also may be obtained by the use of tropical legumes in mixtures

with permanent grass pastures, without the use of additional nitrogen.

This paper deals with the use of tropical legumes in mixtures with per-

manent pasture grasses for grazing purposes.

Knowledge of the use of temperate legumes in the United States,

Latin America, Europe, Australia and elsewhere is world-wide. This has

been the basis, for many years, for pasture courses taught in the tem-



1 Professor of Agronomy, University of Florida, Agricultural Research
Center, Ft. Pierce, Florida.


11-15






11-16


operate regions. Most of the graduate students in the past who lived in

the tropical or sub-tropical areas have received their training in tem-

perate regions on this basis. Almost everyone can relate the words: al-

falfa, white and red clovers. Many are still under the impression that

these temperate legumes are the only choices if a legume is to be included

in a forage program. This was a natural occurrence because pasture re-

search in most of the tropics did not actively begin until after World

War II. Shortly after the end of World War II there was considerable in-

terest in utilizing the vast northeastern tropical part of Australia for

the production of beef and sheep. From the beginning the research empha-

sis was on the use of improved tropical legumes for grazing and other

uses. Many of the legume introductions were unknown and many came from

the Latin American tropics where they naturally occurred. In fact, many

of these tropical legumes were and are being grazed in Latin America with-

out full knowledge of their value.

Beef cattle research in Latin America has been almost completely dom-

inated by the animal scientist who was interested in obtaining better

breeds of cattle. It was not until 15 or 20 years ago that interest in

the pasture phases began to have an effect on the increased productivity

of pastures through the use of improved pasture grasses and management

practices.

At present almost all cattle-oriented people know of the tropical

grasses: pangola, guinea, kikuyu and jaragua. The use of these grasses

has helped to increase the animal carrying capacity of pasture land. Newer

grasses, such as Rhinochloa polystachya ("Aleman"), Setaria anceps (S. spha-

celata), Cynodon plectostachyum ("African star"), etc. are now being tried

in an effort to obtain more adaptable grasses for specific purposes.






11-17


Of the tropical legumes little was known of their potential. With

few exceptions, Latin America has had large virgin areas that were to be

planted to or were in native grass pastures. Part of the success of

early cattle operations was undoubtedly due to the native legumes such

as Calopo (Calopogonium mucunoides), Desmodium and Stylosanthes species

that were being grazed in the pasture complexes without being recognized.

Many of these legumes did not appear to be legumes because of their vi-

ney-type growth or non-white clover or alfalfa type appearance. In

Costa Rica, for example, more that 15 Ienera of native tropical legumes

have been described.

Probably one of the first and better known tropical-type grazing

legumes that was recognized widely was tropical Kudzu (Pureraria pha-

seoloides). This legume has been commercially used in the higher rain-

fall areas of Latin America and other tropical areas for more than 15

years. Of the 15 tropical legumes that have been used commercially in

northern Australia during the past 10 years, 10 had their origins in

tropical Latin America.

More recently there has been increased interest in all tropical

areas in the use of tropical legumes. Research work with tropical le-

gumes in Florida, Hawaii, and various tropical areas in Latin America,

Asia and Australia have aided in this. The World Bank, USAID, FAO, and

other organizations also have helped to disseminate new information as

it became available. Commercial use of various tropical legumes on a

small scale has started in several countries including Mexico, Costa

Rica, Panama, Venezuela, Colombia, Paraquay, Ecuador, and Brazil.

In spite of the interest and the adaptability of some of these tro-





11-18


pical legumes, a majority of the seeds still must be purchased from Aus-

tralia.

In comparing tropical legumes and temperate legumes it can be stated

that the tropical legumes contain many more diverse qrowth-habit types

than do the temperate legumes. It has been estimated that there are at

least 50 genera containing 2500 species that may be worth investigating

for purposes of forage production. Furthermore, there are very large

varietal differences within a given species.

Climatic Limitations

In Figure 1 is a diagram showing the general effect of altitude, lati-

tude and rainfall on the ability of tropical legumes to survive; and the

ability of white clover to survive. The majority of tropical legumes are

not suited outside the latitudes of about 30 south and north of the equa-

tor. Exceptions are several of the annual legumes which have not been uti-

lized successfully in permanent pastures. The closer the equator is ap-

proached the higher the minimum altitude at which white clover would be

expected to grow. This is because average temperatures decrease about

0.60C. each 100 meters above sea level. Also, above about 2000 meters

(at the equator), where white clover will grow, most tropical legumes

would not grow well. Annual rainfall of 500 millimeters and possibly less

will support certain types of tropical legume growth. Normally the smaller

the quantity of rainfall the more woody would be the plants that can sur-

vive. For example, with 500 millimeters of annual rainfall one would ex-

pect that tropical legume trees and bushes would survive while at 1250

millimeters many of the tropical herbaceous species would survive as well.

White clover has a higher water requirement than many of the herbaceous

tropical legumes.





11-19


Tropical Legume Species

In Tables I and 2 are presented names of the most widely used tro-

pical legumes. They have been classified according to climatic and oth:

adaptation. This classification presents an approximate estimation of

the legumes' potential for a given area but is not inten ed to be more

than a general guide.

Siratro is the most drought resistant of the perennial types, S.

guyanensis, tropical Kudzu and Centro are probably the most water to-

lerant, and Glycine and the Desmodiums are most adaptable for cooler

year-round climates.

In Table 3, there is a listing of other tropical legumes mentioned

in the Literature or being used commercially that appear to have special

qualities making them potentially important. About half of the 14 have

been used commercially on a limited scale.

Soil Fertility Requirements

Although tropical legumes require the same mineral elements re-

quired by the temperate legumes, many of the tropical legumes have the

ability to extract phosphorus and other elements more efficiently than

the temperate legumes. For example, in one experiment the average rel-

ative yield of tops of five tropical legumes on a given soil was about

50 percent of the growth that would be expected with sufficient calcium

present. On the same soil white clover yielded only 6-1/2 percent com-

pared with the same soil where sufficient calcium had been added. The

uptake of calcium was much greater for the tropical legumes than for

white clover. On the other hand, tropical and temperate legumes over-

lap in their tolerance of aluminum and manganese excesses. Siratro, for

example, is more sensitive to excess manganese than white clover while







11-20


it has been found that the tolerance for aluminum by Glycine and white

clover is about equal. in some instances, the tropical legumes can ex-

tract more of some nutrients than the associated grasses. This helps the

legume in the competitive process.

In Australia large responses to phosphorus and molybdenum have been

obtained with many of the tropical legumes. In Costa Rica and other Latin

American countries however, there is some doubt as to the needs of adding

phosphorus or other elements for maximum tropical legume growth. Perfectly

normal tropical legume growth was observed in many different areas of Costa

Rica without the addition of fertilizer elements. In Costa Rica pH values

of above 5 appeared to be sufficiently high to provide the necessary cal-

cium and magnesium. In other areas, where pH values may be lower than 5,

there is a distinct possibility of aluminum and, or, manganese toxicity

caused by high soil acidity.

Extractable soil potassium levels of 100 ppm or more were sufficient

for maximum tropical legume growth in Costa Rica. In Florida, potash

(K20) applications of about 80 kilograms per hectare annually were ob-

served to be satisfactory.

Seeding Inoculation and Weed Control

A clean cultivated seedbed is the best type for obtaining maximum

seedling growth of the tropical legumes. The associated grass can be

planted at the same time. A drag or roller can be used to slightly bury

the legume seed. It is more difficult to obtain a stand of legumes when

the seeds are over-sown on an established grass pasture in areas of con-

tinuous rainfall. Firstly, the grass must be heavily grazed and then the

area should be chopped or disked in order to reduce grass competition.

Cattle should be left on the pasture for a short period of one to two weeks






11-21


after seeding to help bury the seed in the surface soil. This will aid

in rapid germination. Management of the cattle should be such that grass

growth is maintained at a low level until legume seedlings are able to

compete.

Proper inoculation of the tropical legume seeds has been extremely

important in Australia, where the proper strains of Rhizobia bacteria

generally are absent. However, in many areas of Florida and Latin Amer-

ica, there are numerous bacteria present in the soil because of the na-

tive legumes growing in the areas. Most of the legumes listed in Table

I and 2 have a wide range of adaptability with respect to the proper

strain of bacteria. Because of this, commercial "cowpea-type" inocu-

lant is very effective in assuring nodulation. It would depend on the

area involved whether there is a need to inoculate tropical legume

seeds; and this would depend on the types of native legumes present.

However, because of the inexpensive cost of inoculant, all seeds should

be inoculated as a safeguard measure.

On the other hand, two relative important legumes require a special

strain of bacteria. They are Leucaena leucocephala and Lotononis baine-

sii. Some Stylosanthes species also require special strains of bacteria

for maximum nitrogen fixation.

There is a good possibility that herbicides can be used to reduce

competition from broadleaf weeds before or after seeding. Treflan, at

a rate of about 2 qts. per hectare as a pre-emergence herbicide was

found to be effective in Costa Rica with Siratro, Glycine, Centro, and

S. humilis. Certain of the tropical legumes also are not very suscep-

tible to 2,4-D. It is believed that results of further experimental

work will show that small dosages of 2,4-D could be applied which will







I 1-22


effectively kill many of the broadleaf weeds while not markedly effecting

legume seedling growth. In any event, it is extremely important during

the first 2 to 3 months after seeding to maintain a balance between the

grass and tropical legume and to reduce weed competition as much as pos-

sible through mechanical, chemical or grazing practices.

Nitrogen Fixation

Tropical legumes that are properly nodulated and contain the proper

strain of bacteria will fix nitrogen. If improperly nodulated these le-

gumes would probably die in the field since they cannot compete well with

associated grasses for soil nitrogen.

It is generally conceded that the tropical legumes can fix almost

as much nitrogen as white clover. Values up to about 280 kilos per hec-

tare of nitrogen annually have been reported fixed by tropical legumes

in northern Australia. About 100 kilos of nitrogen per hectare per year

have been removed by clipping panaolagrass in mixtures with several dif-

ferent tropical legumes in south Florida. In Florida the growing season

for tropical legumes is about six months.

Feeding Values

Nutritive values of the temperate legumes, white clover and alfalfa,

are high compared with those for tropical legumes. Dry matter (DM) dige-

stibilities for white clover have been reported to be about 72 to 82 per-

cent, and alfalfa slightly less. These values are considerably greater

than those reported for most tropical legumes. The quality of tropical

legumes, however, does not decrease rapidly with age as does that for

most tropical grass species; and the digestibilities for tropical legumes

many times is greater than those for tropical grasses. Average dry mat-

ter digestibility values for tropical grasses have been reported to range





11-23


from 45 to about 60 percent which is the general range for tropical leg-

umes.

Voluntary intake is more important than digestibility as an indi-

cator of feeding value in tropical pasture plants. Generally voluntary

intake of tropical legumes is higher than that for tropical grasses, but

still less than that for white clover and alfalfa.

Protein levels in most tropical legumes in almost all stages of

growth is adequate for maximum animal production. Many times protein

content in the tropical grasses can limit animal production. In mixtures

with grasses, the tropical legume can be considered a protein supplement

for the animals.

Grazing Management

Once a reasonable plant population of the tropical legume has been

established, grazing management is the most important aspect of maintain-

ing the legume in the mixture. The first general rule is to manage the

mixture with respect to the legume. The grass will "take care of it-

self". There is no single method for accomplishing this because of dif-

ferences in legume and grass growth habits, climatic differences, rain-

fall differences, and differential palatability of legumes and grasses.

Several of these differences can be explained, however. For example,

we can compare Stylosanthes humilis (an annual) growing with jaraqua-

grass compared with Siratro growing with the same grass in a wet-dry en-

vironment. S. humilis does not compete with jaraguagrass as well as Si-

ratro. In the spring of the year or at the beginning of the rainy sea-

son jaraguagrass growth is extremely rapid compared with the seedlings

of S. humilis. Under these circumstances, heavy grazing pressure must

be exerted on the pasture to maintain the grass in a shortened condition.





11-24


It may be necessary to stock the pastures intermittently with as many as

6 to 8 animals per hectare until the S. humilis plants have reached the

height of several inches. Even after this, the grass should never be

permitted to attain the height of more than 50 centimeters under a rota-

tional grazing system. Siratro, on the other hand, being perennial, can

survive the dry season, and in fact, the mature plants will already he

growing at the commencement of the rainy season while jaraguagrass is

still dormant. Siratro is able to compete much better than S. humilis

under these conditions. On the other hand, Siratro cannot withstand in-

tense grazing as well as S. humilis. Over-grazing of Siratro can reduce

its vigor and its ability to perenniate. For this reason, the Siratro-

jaraguagrass should be grazed less heavily than the S. humilis-jaragua-

grass. Another example would be the comparison of grass-S. humilis pas-

tures growing on a fertile soil and on a rocky infertile type of soil.

On the fertile soil, management of the S. humilis-grass would be similar

to that explained above. However, on the rocky very infertile soil that

does not have the proper fertility, the S. humilis growth would be rela-

tively good compared to most grasses. Grazing intensity would not need

to be as great on the infertile soil compared to that on the fertile soil

to maintain the legume population. Experience has shown that the annual

type of tropical legume is less adaptable to areas of continuous rain-

fall than perennials. It would almost be essential to utilize a peren-

nial legume under these conditions because of the perennial growth of

associated grasses. On the other hand, the annual tropical legume would

have a place in certain areas with an extended dry season on very rocky,

hilly, low-fertility soils. It was demonstrated that perennial legumes

such as Siratro, Glycine and Centro can survive at least 6 months of dry






11-25


weather in Costa Rica and actually produce some green forage during this

period. These were grown on a rather fertile soil where the annual S.

humilis was dead during the latter part of fall and did not contribute

much forage before the following July.

Under certain conditions it might be wise to broadcast more than 1

type of tropical legume seed in the same area. For example, under the

wet-dry climatic conditions (5 to 6 months without rain), where rainfall

during the rainy season is intense (1500 to 2500 millimeters per year),

it was noted that Centro grew extremely well during the high rainfall

part of the year with a high water table. Siratro, on the other hand,

although surviving these heavy rainfall periods grew at a reduced rate

until the end of the rainy season. Siratro, on the other hand, grew

relatively well during the dry season compared with Centro and grew

extremely well at the beginning of the next rainy season. Siratro was

able to grow with low rainfall and a low water table while Centro was

able to grow under a high water table-rainfall regime. A mixture of

both would be complimentary under these conditions.

A difficult zone for establishing tropical legumes would be the

high, yearround continuous rainfall areas. Under these conditions tro-

pical Kudzu has shown to be adapted for growing in mixtures with Para-

grass. Tests with Siratro, Centro and S. humilis in guineagrass pastures

in Costa Rica, where the legumes were overseeded in a permanent guinea-

grass pasture, indicated that only Centro might be adaptable. In Au-

stralia, Stylosanthes guyenansis and Centro have been used successfully

in mixtures with guineageass, with and without the addition of tropical

Kudzu in the mixture. This has proven to be very successful under rain-

fall conditions of 3000 to 5000 millimeters per year. The possibility





11-26


of maintaining the above 3 legumes in a Paragrass or guineagrass on the

high rainfall areas would depend on the method of sowing, management,

etc. It is strongly recommended that the seeds be sown at the same time

with the grass in order to establish the legume in a better competitive

position.

Conclusions

The recent recognition that tropical legumes can provide high-quality

feed and provide additional nitrogen for associated grass growth has led

to increased interest in their use. Much information is needed on the

establishment and management phases. There are several legumes that have

proved successful competitors with associated grasses under various envi-

ronmental conditions. Special management care and observations of tro-

pical legume-grass mixtures should be made by ranchers until the correct

grazing management can be determined. In this manner a stable legume-

grass mixture can be maintained that will provide higher yielding quality

pastures for the tropical areas.








Table 1. Comparison of Various Commercial Perennial Tropical Legumes


Grass Companion Grazing
Adaptation Pressure
i-n
"I Climatic Adaptation ( >- o
.I ) o Tropics Subtropics 43 o o .- = M CM
S. o -C 3/ 4/ 5/ 6/ 77 8/ 9/ 10/ 11/ 12/ .E E
-.- O "-0 O',
Perennials LR LD LH LM LG M H RG MG SG .

1. Phaseolus atropurpureus
(Siratro) W E X X X X X X X X X X X X -
2. Centrosema pubescens
(Centro) W S X X X X X X X X X X X X X -
3. Glycine javanica
("Tinaroo" Glycine) W S X X X X X X X X X X
("Cooper" Glycine) W M ---X X X X X X X X X X -
("Clarence" Glycine) W M X X X X XXXX XX -
4. Pueraria phaseoloides
(Tropical Kudzu) W S X -X X X X X X X X X X X X -
5. Desmodium uncinatum
(Green Leaf Desmodium) EP S - X X X - X X X X X
6. Desmodium uncinatum
(Silver Leaf Desmodium EP M X X X X X X X X X
7. Stylosanthes guyanensis
(Schofield Stylo) EP S X X X X X X X X X X X -
(Fine-stemmed Stylo) EP E X X X X X X X X X X X -


1/ Most common growth habit: E = erect; P = prostrate; W = winding-trailing.
2/ S = commences flowering only in very short days (very late); M = flowers in short days (late); E = flowers
in longer days (early); A = flowers regardless of day length.
3/ through 14/: X = probable ability to grow or react under conditions listed.
3/ LR = lowlands (0-500 meters), continuous rainfall; 4/ LD = lowlands, distinct dry season up to 6 months;
5/ LH = lowlands-high water table during rainy season--poor drainage; 6/ LM, = lwlr.ds-..cderate water table
during rainy season--moderate drainage; 7/ LG = lowlands-low waner table ri-n rainy season--cood draina-e;
8/ M = latit-ude between 500 and 1000 meters; 9/ -= highlands asboe 1~00 n-.ers; 10/ = rapid cool weather
(fall and spring) growth; 11/ MG = moderate cool weather growth; 12/ SG = slow or no growth in cool weather.








Table 2. Comparison of Various Commercial Annual-Biennial Tropical Legumes


Grass Companion Grazing
Adaptation Pressure

1 NClimatic Adaptation m > = 1 0 o
4 o Tropics Subtropics e e) o a .- o I > m
o0 0 3/ 4/ 5/ 6/ 7/ 8/ 9/ 10/ 11/ 12/ '- L CL l: O:T 4-J L
.. L M M m ms o 0 ol0M
Annual-Biennial a a' LR LD LH LM LG M H RG MG SG zcj G a-

1. Aeschynomene americana
(Joint Vetch) E M X X X X X X X X X X X
2. Stylosanthes humilis
S. humilis (Townsville
Stylo) EP M X X X X X X X XX -
3. Phaseolus lathyroides
(Phasey Bean) E A X X X X X X X X X X X
4. Alysicarpus vaginalis
(Alyce Clover) EP M X X X X X X X X X X X -
5. Indigofera hirsuta
(Hairy Indigo) E M X X X X X X X X X X X X
6. Dolichos lab lab
(Lablab Bean) W S X X X X X X X X - - X X


Most common growth habit:


E = erect; P = prostrate; W = windino-trailing.


T/ S = commences flowering only in very short days (very late); M = flowers in short days (late); E = flowers
in longer days (early); A = flowers regardless of day length.
3/ through 14/: X = probable ability to grow or react under conditions listed.
3/ LR = lowlands (0-500 meters), continuous rainfall; 4/ LD = lowlands, distinct dry season up to 6 months;
5/ LH = lowlands-high water table during rainy season--poor drainage; 6/ LM = lowlands-moderate water table
during rainy season --moderate drainage; 7/ Lq = lowlands-low water table during rainy season--good drain-
age;
8/ M = altitude between 500 and 1000 meters; 9/ H = highlands above 1000 meters; 10/ RG = rapid cool weather
S(fall and spring) growth; 11/ MG = moderate cool weather growth; 12/ SG = slow or no growth in cool weather.





11-29


Table 3. Selected list and brief description of tropical legumes that
are of value in their native state that may have potential as
a commercial legume.



1. Desmodium heterocarpon perennial; similar to D. intortum but ear-
lier flowering; no report of being used at present.

2. Desmodium canum (creeping beggarweed) perennial; native to many
tropical and sub-tropical areas; utilized as a native legume for
grazing but not seeded commercially.

3. Desmodium sandwicense perennial; more erect than D. intortum, not
as vigorous, but earlier seed producer; little commercial use.

4. Desmodium heterophyllum perennial; more prostrate than D. intortum
but probably better quality.

5. Desmodium barbatum perennial native to Latin America; may have
grazing potential; presently utilized for grazing where naturally
occurs.

6. Desmodium ovalifolium very rapid growing perennial; wide adapta-
tion; no grazing information but excellent as cover-crop; possibly
unpalatable.

7. Lotononis bainesii growth habit similar to white clover but more
drought resistant; takes special inoculant; used in Australia on
small-scale commercial basis; very palatable.

8. Dolichos uniflorus annual twining; drought tolerant; palatable;
registered as commercial seed in Australia as "Leichhardt Dolichos".

9. Dolichos axillaris perennial; drought tolerant; competitive with
weeds and associated grasses; commercial Australian "Archer Dolichos"
seed available.

10. Calopogonium mucunoides (Calopo) native to most tropical Latin
American countries; as an annual in wet-dry lowland climates; not
palatable but high quality; tolerant to high rainfall and water
tables.

11. Zornia diphylla similar habitats as S. humilis under natural con-
ditions; perennial; heavy seed producer; withstand frequent defolia-
tion.

12. Luecaena leucocephala tree that produces high quality leaf material;
a browse plant; extremely drought resistant; successfully used in
Hawaii and Australia.

13. Teramnus uncinatus native to much of Latin America; similar to Cen-
tro in growth habit; commercial value not known.







11-30


14. Stylosanthes hamata perennial; similar growth habit to S. quyanen-
sis but produces seeds earlier while still maintaining vegetative
growth.






11-31


Figure 1. General altitude, latitude and rainfall conditions necessary
for tropical legume and white clover growth.







Altitude in Meters


300 S.
Latitude


2,700


Latitude)


30* N.
Latitude


White
Clover


Annual Rainfall, mm.








NUEVAS LEGUMINOSAS PARA LOS TROPICOS
DE AMERICA LATINA


por


Albert E. Krestschmer, Jr.
Departamento de Agronomfa
Universidad de Florida
Gainesville, Florida


Traducido por
Jimmy Nations



La FAO ha estimado un deficit de care, en el mundo entero, exclu-

yendo China Comunista de aproximadamente tres millones de toneladas, pa-

ra el aio 1975.

La demand de care en America Latina aumenta ano tras aio, sinembar-

go en muchos casos esta demand no puede satisfacerse debido a altos pre-

cios. Una gran parte del trdpico de America Latina es dnicamente propi-

cia para la producci6n de forrajes. La producci6n de care en America

Latina esta basada casi totalmente en el sistema de pastoreo, y peque-

nas cantidades de concentrado son utilizadas con propdsitos de engorde.

Para cumplir las demands del consumidor sera necesario en el future un

aumento de la produccidn de care por acre. El uso de los fertilizantes,

de nuevas razas de ganado, y en general, un mejor manejo de las condicio-

nes de explotaci6n tendrdn una influencia important en la produccidn to-

tal de America Latina.

La calidad de los pastos puede ser mejorada a travis del uso de fer-

tilizantes, y de nuevas species de plants.

Con el uso del nitr6geno y un adecuado manejo de pastoreos se pue-

de obtener una mejor calidad de pastos. Tambidn con el uso de legumi-

nosas tropicales, en combinacidn con pastos permanentes se puede obtener

11-15







11-16

una buena calidad de pastos sin el uso adicional de nitr6geno.

Este trabajo trata de la utilizaci6n de leguminosas tropicales en

combinaci6n con pastos permanentes para usarlos en pastoreo. Los conoci-

mientos sobre la utilizaci6n de leguminosas en climas templados en los Es-

tados Unidos, America Latina, Europa, Australia, etc. han sido por muchos

anos la base para la enseianza de utilizaci6n de pastos en las regions

templadas. Anteriormente la mayorfa de los estudiantes graduados que

vivfan en areas tropicales o subtropicales han recibido su entrenamiento

en base a las regions templadas. Casi todo el mundo puede relacionar

las palabras: alfalfa, trebol blanco y trebol rojo; muchos permanecen

bajo la impresi6n de que estas leguminosas de climas templados son la dni-

ca alternative, si las leguminosas van a ser inclufdas en un program de

forraje. Esto se debe a que las investigaciones de pastos en los trdpicos

comenzaron hasta despues de la Segunda Guerra Mundial. Poco despuds de

4sta hubo un gran interns en usar la inmensa region tropical del Noreste

de Australia para la producci6n de care de res y de cordero.

Desde un principio el dnfasis en las investigaciones fug en la uti-

lizaci6n de leguminosas tropicales mejoradas para pastoreo y otros usos.

Muchas de las leguminosas eran conocidas y muchas de ellas eran provenien-

tes de su habitat natural en la America Tropical. De hecho muchas de

estas leguminosas tropicales fueron y son pastoreadas en Amdrica Latina

sin tener conocimiento de su valor real.

Las investigaciones sobre ganado de care en America Latina han si-

do casi completamente dominadas por el zootecnista el cual ha estado inte-

resado primordialmente en obtener mejores tipos de ganado.

No fud sino como 15 6 20 aior atras que las fases de los pastos

comenzaron a tener un efecto en el aumento de-producci6n mediante el







NUEVAS LEGUMINOSAS PARA LOS TROPICOS
DE AMERICA LATINA


por


Albert E. Krestschmer, Jr.
Departamento de Agronomfa
Universidad de Florida
Gainesville, Florida


Traducido por
Jimmy Nations



La FAO ha estimado un deficit de came, en el mundo entero, exclu-

yendo China Comunista de aproximadamente tres millones de toneladas, pa-

ra el ano 1975.

La demand de care en America Latina aumenta ano tras ano, sinembar-

go en muchos casos esta demand no puede satisfacerse debido a altos pre-

cios. Una gran parte del trdpico de America Latina es dnicamente propi-

cia para la producci6n de forrajes. La producci6n de care en America

Latina estg basada casi totalmente en el sistema de pastoreo, y peque-

?as cantidades de concentrado son utilizadas con propdsitos de engorde.

Para cumplir las demands del consumidor serd necesario en el future un

aumento de la producci6n de care por acre. El uso de los fertilizantes,

de nuevas razas de ganado, y en general, un mejor manejo de las condicio-

nes de explotaci6n tendrdn una influencia important en la produccidn to-

tal de Amdrica Latina.

La calidad de los pastos puede ser mejorada a travds del uso de fer-

tilizantes, y de nuevas species de plants.

Con el uso del nitr6geno y un adecuado manejo de pastoreos se pue-

de obtener una mejor calidad de pastos. Tambidn con el uso de legumi-

nosas tropicales, en combinaci6n con pastos permanentes se puede obtener

11-15







11-16

una buena calidad de pastos sin el uso adicional de nitr6geno.

Este trabajo trata de la utilizaci6n de leguminosas tropicales en

combinaci6n con pastos permanentes para usarlos en pastoreo. Los conoci-

mientos sobre la utilizaci6n de leguminosas en climas templados en los Es-

tados Unidos, America Latina, Europa, Australia, etc. han sido por muchos

aios la base para la enseianza de utilizaci6n de pastos en las regions

templadas. Anteriormente la mayorfa de los estudiantes graduados que

vivfan en dreas tropicales o subtropicales han recibido su entrenamiento

en base a las regions templadas. Casi todo el mundo puede relacionar

las palabras: alfalfa, trebol blanco y trebol rojo; muchos permanecen

bajo la impresi6n de que estas leguminosas de climas templados son la dni-

ca alternative, si las leguminosas van a ser inclufdas en un program de

forraje. Esto se debe a que las investigaciones de pastos en los trdpicos

comenzaron hasta despuds de la Segunda Guerra Mundial. Poco despuds de

4sta hubo un gran interns en usar la inmensa region tropical del Noreste

de Australia para la producci6n de care de res y de cordero.

Desde un principio el infasis en las investigaciones fug en la uti-

lizaci6n de leguminosas tropicales mejoradas para pastoreo y otros usos.

Muchas de las leguminosas eran conocidas y muchas de ellas eran provenien-

tes de su habitat natural en la Amdrica Tropical. De hecho muchas de

estas leguminosas tropicales fueron y son pastoreadas en America Latina

sin tener conocimiento de su valor real.

Las investigaciones sobre ganado de care en Amdrica Latina han si-

do casi completamente dominadas por el zootecnista el cual ha estado inte-

resado primordialmente en obtener mejores tipos de ganado.

No fu4 sino como 15 6 20 aior atrgs que las fases de los pastos

comenzaron a tener un efecto en el aumento de producci6n mediante el





11-17


uso de mejoras en los pastos y en su manejo.

Hoy la mayorfa de las personas con orientacidn ganadera conoce los

pastos tropicales: pangola, guinea, jaragua y kikuyo. La utilizacidn de

estos pastos ha ayudado a aumentar la capacidad de carga de los potreros.

Nuevos pastos tales como Eriochoa polystachya (pasto aleman), Setaria

anceps (S. Sphacelata), Cynodon plectostachyum (estrellas africana), etc.,

estdn siendo probadas con la esperanza de obtener pastos mds adaptables

para determinados prop6sitos. Muy poco era conocido sobre el potential

de las leguminosas tropicales; con pocas excepciones, America Latina ha te-

nido grandes areas vfrgenes que iban a ser sembradas o que estaban con

pastos naturales.

Parte del 4xito de operaciones anteriores fue indudablemente debido

a que las leguminosas nativas tales como calopo (Calopogonium muconoides)

Desmodium y Stylosanthes fueron aprovechadas en los complejos de pastos

sin ser reconocidas. Muchas de estas leguminosas no pareclan ser legumi-

nosas debido a que algunas crecen como plants trepadoras o a su aparien-

cia de trebol (no blanco) o de alfalfa.

Por ejemplo en Costa Rica mas de 15 gdneros de leguminosas nativas

tropicales han sido descritas. Probablemente una de las primeras y mejo-

res leguminosas tropicales conocidas ampliamente para pastoreo fue el

kudzu tropical (Pureraria phaseloides). Esta leguminosa ha sido usada co-

mercialmente en las areas de alta pluviosidad de America Latina, asr como

en otras areas tropicales por mds de 15 anos. De las 15 leguminosas tro-

picales usadas comercialmente en la parte norte de Australia en los dlti-

mos diez anos, diez son originarias de America Latina.

Recientemente se ha incrementado el interns de toda el area tropi-

cal en el uso de las leguminosas. Trabajos de investigacidn sobre legu-





11-18


minosas tropicales en Florida, Hawai y varias regions tropicales en Ame-

rica Latina y Australia han ayudado en ese respect.

El Banco Mundial, USAID, FAO, y otras organizaciones tambidn han

ayudado a difundir todas las nuevas informaciones tan pronto como eran'

obtenidas. El uso commercial en pequeia escala de varias leguminosas

tropicales se ha iniciado en various pauses, que incluyen a Mexico, Cos-

ta Rica, Panama, Venezuela, Colombia, Paraguay, Ecuador y Brasil. A

pesar de su interns y de la adaptabilidad de algunas de estas legumino-

sas tropicales, la mayorfa de sus semillas todavfa tienen que ser compra-

das en Australia.

Comparando las leguminosas tropicales con las de zona templada se

puede establecer que las tropicales tienen mas variedades de habito

vegetative que las de zonas templadas. Se estima que existen por lo

menos 50 generos que contienen 2,500 species que valen la pena ser in-

vestigadas para la produccidn de forraje, ademas hay una amplia diferen-

cia de variedades dentro de las species en particular.


Limitaciones Climaticas

En la ilustraci6n 1 hay un diagrama demostrando los efectos genera-

les de altura, latitud y pluviosidad en la capacidad de supervivencia

de las leguminosas tropicales, y la capacidad de supervivencia del trd

bol blanco. La mayorfa de las leguminosas tropicales no son adaptables

por fuera de las latitudes de alrededor de 300 al sur y norte del ecua-

dor, exceptuando algunas de las leguminosas anuales que no han sido

utilizadas con dxito en los pastos permanentes. Al aproximarse al ecua-

dor se lieva proporcionalmente la altura mfnima en la cual se puede espe-

rar crezca el trdbol blanco. Esto se debe a que el promedio de la tempe-





11-19


ratura decrece alrededor de 0.60 centfgrados cada 100 mts. sobre el ni-

vel del mar. AdemSs por sobre de alrededor de 2000 metros (en el ecua-

dor) donde el trebol blanco puede crecer, la mayorfa de las leguminosas

tropicales no crecerSn bien.

Una pluviosidad annual de 500 milfmetros y posiblemente menos, ayuda

al crecimiento de algunos tipos de leguminosas tropicales. Normalmente

se puede relacionar la disminusi6n de la pluviosidad con el incremento de

parties leiosas en las plants que sobrevivan. Por ejemplo con 500 milfme-

tros de pluviosidad annual se espera que las leguminosas tropicales en for-

ma de arbusto y los matorrales sobreviviran, mientras que con 1,250 ml-

lfmetros muchas de las species tropicales herbaceas sobrevivirdn tambi4n.

El trebol blanco tiene una necesidad mayor de agua que muchas de las le-

guminosas tropicales de tipo herbaceo.


Especies de Leguminosas Tropicales


En los cuadros 1 y 2 se presentan los nombres de las leguminosas

tropicales mAs usadas, clasificadas de acuerdo a su adaptabilidad en re-

laci6n al clima y otras condiciones. Esta clasificaci6n present una es-

timaci6n aproximada del potential de las leguminosas para determinada Srea,

pero dnicamente procura ser una gufa en general.

El siratro es la variedad mSs resistente a la sequfa de los tipos

perennes, S. guyanensis, kudzu tropical y central son las que mejor to-

leran el exceso de agua; Glicina y Desmodiums son mds adaptables para un

clima frfo a travis de todo el ano.

En el Cuadro 3, hay una lista de las otras leguminosas tropicales

mencionadas en la literature o que estgn usadas comercialmente y que apa-

recen teniendo cualidades especiales que las puedan hacer comercialmente





11-20


importantes. Alrededor de la mitad de estas catorce han sido usadas co-

mercialmente en una escala limitada.


Requerimientos Concernientes a la
Fertilidad del Suelo


Aunque las leguminosas tropicales requieren los mismos elements

minerales que las de zona templada, muchas de las leguminosas tropicales

tienen la capacidad de extraer f6sforo y otros elements mas eficiente-

mente que las de zona templada. Por ejemplo en un experiment el prome-

dio de productividad de las capas de cinco leguminosas tropicales en un

suelo dado era alrededor del 50% del crecimiento que hubiera sido espera-

do con suficiente calcio present. En el mismo suelo el trebol blanco

rindi6 s6lo 6 1/2% comparado con el mismo suelo donde fud aliadido sufi-

ciente calcio. La ingesti6n fud much mas grande para las leguminosas

tropicales que para el trdbol blanco. Por otra parte las leguminosas

tropicales y las de zona templada se superponen en su tolerancia con res-

pecto al exceso de aluminio y manganeso.

El siratro, por ejemplo, es mas sensible al exceso de manganeso que

el trebol blanco; mientras que la Glicina y el trdbol blanco tienen casi

igual tolerancia al aluminio. En algunos casos las leguminosas tropicales

pueden extraer mAs de las mismas substancias nutrients que las hierbas

asociadas, dsto ayuda a las leguminosas en el process de la competencia.

En Australia amplia respuesta al f6sforo y molibdeno ha sido obtenida con

muchas de las leguminosas tropicales. Sinembargo en Costa Rica y otras

naciones de America Latina existe cierta duda acerca de la necesidad de

aadir f6sforo u otros elements para el crecimiento maximo de las legu-

minosas. Un crecimiento perfectamente normal de las leguminosas ha si-






11-21


do observado en Costa Rica sin la adicidn de elements fertilizantes.

En Costa Rica el pH por encima de 5 parece ser suficientemente alto,

para proveer el suficiente calcio y magnesio. En otras areas, donde el

pH puede ser por debajo de 5, hay posibilidad definida de toxicidad por

aluminio y manganeso debida a la alta acidez del suelo.

Niveles extrafbles de potasio de 100 ppm o mas fueron suficientes

para crecimiento mdximo de las leguminosas tropicales en Costa Rica.

En Florida la aplicaci6n annual de 80 kgs. de K20 (potasio) por hectarea

fud considerada como satisfactoria.


Inoculaci6n de Semillas y Control de Malezas


Un semillero limpio es el mejor lugar para obtener el crecimiento

maximo de las plantitas de leguminosas tropicales. La hierba asociada

puede ser plantada al mismo tiempo. Una rastra o apisonadora puede

ser utilizada para enterrar superficialmente las semillas de legumino-

sas. Es mas diffcil obtener un herbaje de leguminosas cuando se siembra

un exceso de semillas, en un drea con past ya establecido y en areas de

Iluvia contfnua. Primero la hierba debe ser sometida a pastoreos inten-

sos y luego el area debe ser chapodada o tratada con discos para reducir

una competencia muy grande. El ganado debe ser dejado en el area por un

perfodo de una o dos semanas despuds de sembrar para ayudar a enterrar

la semilla en la superficie del suelo. Esto ayudarfa a una germinaci6n

rdpida. El manejo de ganado debe de dirigirse de manera que el past

se mantenga a un nivel bajo hasta que las plantitas de las leguminosas

tengan suficiente tamano, para entrar a competir. En Australia la ino-

culaci6n correct de las semillas de leguminosas tropicales ha sido

muy important porque allf por lo general las cepas tiles de bacterlas






11-22


del gdnero Rhizobia no existe; sinembargo en muchas areas de Florida, y

America Latina, hay numerosas bacteria presents en el suelo a causa de

las leguminosas nativas que crecen allf. La mayorfa de esas leguminosas

en los cuadros 1 y 2 tienen una adaptabilidad muy amplia con respect a

las propias cepas bacterianas. Debido a esto el tipo commercial de ino-

culante: cowpeaa" es muy efectivo para asegurar nodulaci6n. Dependerd

del area en cuesti6n si hay necesidad de inocular la semilla de legumi-

nosas tropicales, y de esto dependera los tipos de leguminosas nativas

presents; sinembargo, dado lo barato del costo todas las semillas deben

ser inoculadas como salvaguardas.

Por otra parte dos leguminosas de relative importancia requieren

una cepa bacterial especial, ellos son Leucama leucocephala y Lotononis

Bainesii; algunas species de Stylosanthes requieren tambign cepas bacte-

riales especiales para una maxima fijaci6n de nitr6geno.

Existen buenas posibilidades de que se puedan usar herbicidas para

reducir la competencia de las malas hierbas de hoja ancha, antes o des-

puds de la sembrada. Usando Treflan a raz6n de 2 litros por hectarea

como herbicida pre-emergente fud encontrado efectivo en Costa Rica con

Siratro, Glicina, Centro y S. humilis. Algunas de las leguminosas tro-

picales no son muy susceptibles a 2 4-D. Se cree que los resultados de

trabajos experimentales adicionales demostraron que pequenas dosis de

2 4-D pueden matar muchas de las malezas de hoja ancha sin afectar acen-

tuadamente el crecimiento de las leguminosas.

De cualquier modo, es extremadamente important, el mantener un equi-

librio entire la hierba y las leguminosas tropicales y reducir la compe-

tencia con las malezas tanto como sea possible a travds de medidas de or-

den mecanico, qufmico o con pastoreo regulado, durante los primeros dos






11-23


y tres meses despugs de la siembra.


Fijaci6n de Nitr6geno


Las leguminosas tropicales bien noduladas y que contengan la cepa

bacterial adecuada fijardn nitr6geno.

Si estan noduladas inapropiadamente morirdn en el terreno por no po-

der competir bien con las hierbas asociadas por el nitr6geno del suelo.

Se acepta generalmente que las leguminosas tropicales pueden fijar

tanto nitrdgeno como el trdbol blanco,. Valores hasta de 280 kilos por

hectarea de nitr6geno anualmente han sido reportados como fijados por

leguminosas tropicales en Australia del Norte. Cerca de 100 kilos de ni-

tr6geno por hectarea por ano han sido obtenidds recortando pangola mez-

clada con diferentes leguminosas tropicales en la parte sur de Florida,

en donde las leguminosas tropicales alcanzan su crecimiento en un peffo-

do alrededor de seis meses.

Valores Alimenticios

El valor nutritivo de las leguminosas de zona templada, trebol blan-

co y alfalfa, es alto comparado con el de las leguminosas tropicales.

La digestibilidad de la material seca (DM) para el trdbol blanco

ha sido alrededor de 72 a 82%, y en alfalfa un tanto menos, los cereales

son mAs altos que aquellos reportados para la mayorfa de las leguminosas

tropicales; sinembargo, la calidad de las leguminosas tropicales no dis-

minuye rdpidamente con la edad, como lo hace la mayorfa de las species

tropicales herbiceas y su digestibilidad es muchas veces mayor que la de

las hierbas tropicales. El promedio de la digestibilidad de material

seca para hierbas tropicales ha sido reportado en una variacidn de 45

hasta alrededor de 60% que es lo usual para leguminosas tropicales.





11-24


Como un indicador del valor alimenticio de las plants tropicales forra-

jeras, la ingestion voluntaria es mas important que la digestibilidad.

Generalmente la ingestion de leguminosas tropicales es mayor que las de

hierbas tropicales, pero es adn menor que para el trdbol blanco y la

alfalfa.

Los niveles de protefna en la mayorla de las leguminosas tropicales

en todos sus studios de crecimiento es adecuada para una producci6n ani-

mal maxima.

Muchas veces el contenido de protefna de las hierbas tropicales

puede limitar la producci6n animal. En mezcla con hierbas, las legumino-

sas tropicales pueden ser consideradas como un suplemento de protefnas

para los animals.


Manejo de los Pastos


Al establecerse una razonable concentraci6n de leguminosas tropica-

les el manejo es lo mas important, para mantener las leguminosas en la

mezcla con las species herb4ceas. La primera regla general es manejar

la mezcla con respect a la leguminosa, la hierba se "cuida por si sola".

No hay un mdtodo inico para llevar esto a cabo debido a las diferencias

climdticas, pluviales y de palatibilidad de leguminosas y hierbas, sin-

embargo algunas de estas diferencias pueden emplearse: Por ejemplo, se

puede comparar el crecimiento de Stylosanthes humilis annual ) con jara-

gua y con siratro creciendo con la misma yerba en un ambiente hdmedo se-

co. El S. humilis no compite tan bien con jaragua como el Siratro.

En la primavera o principio de la estaci6n de lluvias, el crecimiento

del jaragua es extremadamente rdpido comparado con el de S. humilis.

Bajo estas circunstancias una acentuada presi6n de pastoreo debe ser





11-25


ejercida en los pastos para mantener la hierba corta. Podrfa ser nece-

sario cargar los pastos de manera intermitente con 6 a 8 animals por

hectarea hasta que las plants de S. humilis hayan alcanzado varias

pulgadas de alto. Adn despuds de dsto nunca debe permitirse que la hier-

ba alcance mds de 50 cm. de altura bajo un sistema rotacional de pastoreo

rotativo. El Siratro por otra parte al ser perenne puede sobrevivir a la

estaci6n seca y de hecho las plants adults estardn creciendo al princi-

pio de la estaci6n seca mientras el jaragua esta todavfa durmiente.

El Siratro competira much mejor que S. humilis bajo estas condicio-

nes. Por otra parte el Siratro soporta mal el pastoreo intensive tan bien

como S. humilis; el sobrepastoreo de Siratro puede reducir su vigor y

perennidad. Por esta raz6n la mezcla Siratro jaragua debe ser sometida

a un pastoreo menos intense que la mezcla S. humilis y jaragua.

Otro ejemplo serfa la comparaci6n de pastos de hierba y S. humilis

creciendo en un suelo fertil y en suelo infertil y rocoso. En el suelo

fertil el manejo serfa como se ha explicado mds arriba, sinembargo en

el suelo rocoso muy inf4rtil que no tiene la fertilidad adecuada, el cre-

cimiento de S. humilis sera relativamente bueno comparado con la mayorfa

de species herbaceas. El pastoreo no necesitara ser tan intense como

en el suelo fdrtil para mantener la densidad de leguminosas. La expe-

riencia ha demostrado que el tipo annual de las leguminosas tropicales

es menos adaptable a las areas de pluviosidad contfnua que las perennes.

Serfa casi esencial utilizar una leguminosa perenne bajo esas circunstan-

cias ya que las hierbas asociadas son perennes. Por otra parte las le-

guminosas tropicales anuales tendran un lugar en areas con una estaci6n

seca prolongada, en un suelo muy rocoso o de cerros y de baja fertilidad.

Se demostrd que las leguminosas perennes como Siratro, Glicina y Centro






11-26


pueden sobrevivir por lo menos 6 meses de sequfa en Costa Rica y produ-

cir algdn forraje verde durante ese perfodo. Fueron cultivadas en suelo

bastante f4rtil donde la S. humilis estaba muerta durante la dltima por-

ci6n de otoio y no contribuy6 con much forraje hasta el siguiente mes

de Julio.

Bajo ciertas condiciones es prudent sembrar mas de un tipo de se-

milla de leguminosas tropicales en la misma drea. Por ejemplo bajo las

condiciones climdticas de lluvia sequfa, (5 a 6 meses sin Iluvia) donde

la pluviosidad durante la estaci6n lluviosa es intense (1,500 a 2,500

millmetros) se not6 que Centro creci6 muy bien durante la parte del aio

de alta pluviosidad con una napa de agua muy alta, Siratro por otra par-

te crecid relativamente bien durante la estaci6n seca comparado con Cen-

tro y creci6 extremadamente bien al principio de la estaci6n lluviosa si-

guiente, Siratro pudo crecer con poca lluvia y una napa acuStica baja,

mientras Centro pudo crecer bajo el regimen de lluvia abundante y napa

alta de agua. Una mezcla de las dos serfa complementaria bajo esas

condiciones.

Una zona diffcil para el establecimiento de las leguminosas tropi-

cales, podrfa ser la zona alta y de lluvias contfnuas, bajo esas condicio-

nes el Kudzu tropical ha demostrado ser adaptable para cultivo mezclado

con past ParS. Las pruebas con Siratro, Centro y S. humilis con past

Guinea en Costa Rica, donde las leguminosas fueron sobresembradas en un

pastizal permanent de guinea, indicaron que solo Centro podrfa ser

adaptable. EniAustralia Stylosanthes guyenansis y Centro han sido usa-

dos exitosamente en mezclas con past Guinea, con o sin adicidn de Kudzd

a esta mezcla, y ha probado ser muy exitosa bajo condiciones de pluviosi-

dad de 3,000 a 5,000 milfmetros por a~o. La posibilidad de mantener






11-27

las tres leguminosas mencionadas junto con past Pard o Guinea en las

areas de alta pluviosidad dependerg en el mdtodo de sembrar, su mane-

jo ulterior, etc. Se recomienda enfaticamente que las semillas sean

sembradas al mismo tiempo que la hierba para establecer las leguminosas

en una mejor posici6n competitive.


Conclusiones


El reconocimiento reciente de que las leguminosas tropicales pue-

dan proveer alimento de alta calidad y proveer nitr6geno adicional para

el crecimiento de la hierba asociada ha conducido a un acrecentado inte-

rds en su uso.

Mucha informaci6n se necesita en las fases de establecimiento y ma-

nejo.

Hay varias leguminosas que han demostrado 4xito en su competencia

con las hierbas bajo condiciones ambientales diversas. Los ganaderos

deben dar especial cuidado al manejo y observaci6n de leguminosas tro-

picales mezcladas hasta que el aprovechamiento correct de los pastos

sea determinado.

De este modo una mezcla stable de leguminosas y hierba podrg ser

mantenida, la que proveera una calidad mas alta de pastos para las areas

tropicales.








TABLA 1 COMPARACION DE VARIAS LEGUMINOSAS COMERCIALES PERENNES TROPICALES


C
o
.-3 0
(D 0-
PERENNES 0
0


-(D
- -


( o

0


Adaptaci6n climcitica


Tr6pico
3/ 4/ 5/ 6/ 7/ 8/ 9/
LR LD LH LM LG M H


Subtrdpico
10/ 11/ 12/
RG MG SG


Adaptaci6n de
Asociaci6n de
Gramfneas
2 Cm -0 C- -0 C0 w
-G -.s -ZE
So 3 0 3
(DCD 6 0 C)
-tC) C-0)
030303


Capacidad
de
Pastoreo

o o _N a o
0 0 -.No 0
"0 3 a-n a) -S r
(D r+ (D (D 0)3
0) 0.
0 ---8--- p


1. Phaseolus atropurpureus
(Siratro)
2. Centrosema pubescens
(Centro)
3. Glycine javanica
("Tinaroo" Glycine)
("Cooper" Glycine)
("Clarence" Glycine)
4. Pueraria phaseoloides
(Kikuyu tropical)
5. Desmodium uncinatum
(Desmodium hoja verde)
6. Desmodium uncinatum
(Desmodium hoja platinada)
7. Stylosanthes guyanensis
(Schofield Stylo)
(Stylo Tallo-fino)


W E X X -X X X -

W S X X X X X -


X X
X X
X X


W M


W S X X -


EP S


-- X X


EP M X X


X -XXX

X XXXXXXX


- X
-XX
-XX


XXXXXXX

X ----XX


X

-
-


S -- -XXX

--- XXX
S XXX


1/ HAbito de crecimiento mAs comin: E = erecto; P = postrado; W = Rastro al viento
2/ S = Comienza a florecer en muy pocos dfas (muy tarde) M = Flores en cortos dfas (tarde); E = Flores en
largos dfas (temprano); A = Florece a pesar de la duraci6n del dfa
3/-14/ X = Probable habilidad de crecimiento 6 reacci6n bajo las condiciones mencionadas.
3/ LR = Tierras bajas (0 500 metros), precipitaci6n continue; 4/ LD = Tierras bajas,
seca hasta los 6 meses; 5/ LH = tierras bajas alta napa de agua durante estaci6n lluviosa drenaje
pobre; 6/ LM = tierras bajas moderada napa de agua durante estaci6n Iluviosa drenaje moderado;
7/ LG = Tierras bajas baja napa de agua durante estaci6n lluviosa buen drenaje; 8/ M = Altitud entire
500 y 1000 metros; 9/ H = Tierras altas sobre 1000 metros; 10/ RG = Rgpido crecimiento en clima frfo
(otoio o invierno); 11/ MG = Moderado crecimiento en clima frfo; 12/ SG = Bajo o no crecimiento en cli-
ma frfo


- X -

- X -


- X -

- XX -

- X -

- XX -
X XX -


I


0










TABLA 2 COMPARACION DE VARIAS LEGUMINOSAS COMERCIALES BIENALES TROPICALES


-Adaptaci6n de Capacidad
Asociaci6n de de
o 0 -- Gramfneas Pastoreo
1,c 5l2-1. _.- Adaptaci6n climatica z -n -o v -< 0-r 7
r. 3 -- D (D 0 0-- CD C
o -._ Tr6pico Subtr6pico (D -- g 0 .. Lc N -I
D 3/ 4/ 5/ 6/ 7/ 8/ 9/ 10/ 11/ 12/D in O r -0 C :_ r2
Anual Bienal LR LD LH LM LG M H RG MG SG m 0) o0 c
1. Aeschynomene americana E M X X X X X X XX X X
(Joint Vetch)
2. Stylosanthes humilis
S. humilis (Townsville Stylo) EP M X X X X X X X X X X -
3. Phaseolus lathyroides
(Phasey Bean) E A X X X X X X XXX XX X
4. Al sicarpus vaginalis
(Trdbol Alicia) EP M X X XX X X X X X XX -
5. Indigofera hirsuta
(Pelo de indio) E M X X X X X X X X X X
6. Dolichos lab lab
(Lablab Bean) W S X X X X X X X - - X X

1/ Hdbito de crecimiento mAs comdn: E = erecto; P = postrado; W= Rastro al viento
2/ S = Comienza a florecer en muy pocos dfas (muy tarde) M = Flores en cortos dras (tarde); E = Flores en
largos dlas (temprano); A = Florece a pesar de la duraci6n del dfa;
3/-I14 X = Probable habilidad de crecimiento 6 reacci6n bajo las condiciones mencionadas.
3/ LR = Tierras bajas (0 500 metros), precipitaci6n continue; 4/ LD = Tierras bajas, diferenciada estaci6n
seca hasta los 6 meses; 5/ LH = tierras bajas alta napa de agua durante estaci6n lluviosa drenaje
pobre; 6/ LM = Tierras bajas moderada napa de agua durante estaci6n Iluviosa drenaje moderado;
7/ LG = Tierras bajas baja napa de agua durante estaci6n lluviosa buen drenaje; 8/ M = Altitud entire
500 y 1000 metros; 9/ H = Tierras altas sobre 1000 metros; 10/ RG = Rgpido crecimiento en clima frfo
(otoo e invierno); 11/ MG = Moderado crecimiento en clima frfo; 12/ SG = Bajo o no crecimiento en
clima frfo.





11-30


TABLA 3 LISTA Y BREVE DESCRIPTION DE LEGUMINOSAS QUE SON DE VALOR EN
SU ESTADO NATIVE Y QUE PUEDEN TENER UN POTENTIAL COMMERCIAL

1. Desmodium heterocarpon --- Perenne, similar a D. intortum pero de
florecimiento mas temprano. No utilizada en el present.

2. Desmodium canum --- Perenne. Nativa en regions tropicales y sub-
tropicales. Utilizada como leguminosa native para pastoreo.

3. Desmodium sandwicense --- Perenne. MAs erecta que D. intortum.
No tan vigorosa pero produce semillas mas pronto. De poca utiliza-
ci6n commercial.

4. Desmodium heterophyllum --- Perenne. Mas postrada que D. intortum,
pero probablemente de mejor calidad.


5. Desmodium barbatum --- Perenne, native de Latinoamerica. Puede tener
potential para pastoreo. En sitios donde ocurre naturalmente esta
siendo usada para pastoreo.

.6. Desmodium ovalifolium --- Perenne de r6pido crecimiento. Amplia
adaptaci6n. No existe informaci6n de su utilizacidn para pastoreo
pero es excelente para protecci6n. Posiblemente tiene mal sabor.

7. Lotononis bainessi --- Habito de crecimiento es similar al trebol
blanco pero mas resistente en la sequfa. Necesita un inoculante es-
pecial, utilizada en Australia en pequeFa escala commercial. Buen
sabor.

8, Dolichos uniflorus --- Anual, resistente a la sequfa. Buen sabor.
En Australia estd registrada como una semilla commercial con el nom-
bre de "Leichardt Dolichos".

9. Dolichos axillaris --- Perenne. Tolerante a la sequfa. Hace buena
competencia a las malas hierbas y asociadas, de origen Australiano.
"Archer Dolichos", semilla disponible.

10. Calopogonium mucunoides --- (Calopo) --- Nativa de la mayor parte del
tr6pico de America Latina. Anual en las tierras bajas de clima hdme-
do seco. No tiene buen sabor pero es de buena calidad. Tolerante a
fuertes lluvias y napas de agua.

11. Zornia diphylla --- Bajo condiciones naturales su habit es similar
a S. humilis. Perenne. Buen productor de semillas. Puede soportar
frecuente defoliaci6n.

12. Luecaena leucocephala --- Arbolque produce hojas de alta calidad.
Planta extremadamente resistente a la sequfa. En Australia y Hawai
estg siendo utilizada con muy buenos resultados.

13. Teramnus uncinatus --- Nativa en la mayor parte de America Latina.





11-31

En su forma de crecimiento es bastante similar a "Centro". Su va-
lor commercial no es actualmente conocido.


14. Stylosanthes hamata --- Perenne.
milar a la de S. Guyanensis pero
mientras estS creciendo.


Su forma de crecimiento es simi-
produce semillas mds temprano',





Figura 1. CONDICIONES GENERALS DE ALTITUDE, LATITUD,
Y PRECIPITACION NECESARIAS PARA EL CRECI-
MIENTO DEL TREBOL BLANCO Y LEGUMINOSAS
TROPICALES.
Al ti tude
(mts)
---- 2,700


Precipitaci6n
Anual, mm.


1 1-32


300 S
Latitud


300 S
Latitud




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs