Group Title: Mimeo report - Indian River field laboratory ; IRL-71-1
Title: Yield and crude protein content of pasture grassses at the Indian River Field Laboratory during 1962-1965
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055954/00001
 Material Information
Title: Yield and crude protein content of pasture grassses at the Indian River Field Laboratory during 1962-1965
Series Title: Indian River Field Laboratory mimeo report
Physical Description: 15 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Kretschmer, Albert E ( Albert Emil ), 1925-
Indian River Field Laboratory
Publisher: Indian River Field Laboratory
Place of Publication: Ft. Pierce Fla
Publication Date: [1971]
 Subjects
Subject: Grasses -- Field experiments -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Grasses -- Composition   ( lcsh )
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. 5).
Statement of Responsibility: Albert E. Kretschmer, Jr.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "January 1971."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055954
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 66526448

Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida






Indian River Field Laboratory Mimeo Report IRL-71-1


January, 1971


t,.


J/ Professor of Agronomy, Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations, Indian River
Field Laboratory, Ft. Pierce, Florida.


I oO
Wo YIELD AND CRUDE PROTEIN CONTENT OF PASTURE GRASSES LIBRARY
AT THE INDIAN RIVER FIELD LABORATORY DURING 1962- ~6I

S\ aAlbert E. Kretschmer, Jr.21/ ? 7 1371

SUMMARY I.F.A.S. Univ. of Florida

A four-year clipping experiment was used to compare yields, and crude protein
and dry matter contents of various untried and common grasses.

'Although annual and total yields varied only slightly, large differences oc-
curred during specific periods in the year. Dry matter and crude protein contents
varied, depending on grass species.

Crude protein contents were consistently lower in the summer than in the winter
while the opposite was true for dry matter yields. Crude protein yields followed
trends of dry matter yields, with marked reductions during the winter months.
Average recovery of nitrogen by the harvested grasses was between 40 and 53 percent
of the nitrogen applied.

None of the grasses tested produced enough growth during the winter months to
be considered as "winter-growing" types.

INTRODUCTION

Grass growth has been recorded at the Indian River Field Laboratory for about
15 years. Initial results with the major commercial grasses were published in
1963 (1). Additional work with grasses growing in combination with white clover
was published in 1964 (2).

A new series of grasses was established in 1962 to compare yields of untried
grasses with the common commercial ones. The results of these comparative tests
are reported here.







EXPERIMENTAL

In Table 1 are listed the grasses included in the experiment, the date they
were cut (for staging) prior to the first harvest, and the origin of each when
known. Three of the grasses were established in 1963 and two in 1964. The rest
were planted in 1962. The experiment covered a period of four summer seasons.

There were four replications. Plot size was 12.5 by 17.5 feet. A sickle-bar
mower was used to harvest plots, and the effective cutting swath was 2.5 by 10
feet. Samples were weighed within a minute or two after harvest to obtain fresh
weights, and were then dried at 70-750 C in a forced-draft oven to obtain dry
matter. Crude protein'/was determined on the dried samples by the Macro Kjeldahl
procedure.

After each harvest an equivalent of 50-25-25 pounds per acre of N-P 05-K20
were applied as 16-8-8 commercial fertilizer. Soil analyses of.plots were .obtained
in 1963, and those having low pH and calcium levels were limed December 5, 1963.

Plots were harvested approximately every six weeks from March to December.
They were then harvested after eleven weeks, and again in four weeks following
the eleven-weeks' harvest.

RESULTS

Data reported in the tables and shown in the figures are'aS follows: Table 2--
dry weight yields for each harvest, Table 3--dry weight yields for specific periods
of the year, Table 4--dry matter percentages, Table 5--crude protein percentages,
Table 6--crude protein yields, Table 7--percent nitrogen recovery, Table 8--frost
damage data; Figure 1--crude protein percentage changes for different harvest dates,
and Figure 2--relationship between dry weight yields and crude protein percentages
for various types of grasses.

Dry Weight Yields
In Table 2, individual harvests, total yields and average yields per acre per
12 month period are recorded.' This latter value gives a more accurate comparison
of yields than the total values because of the different lengths of time some of
the grasses were in the experiment. Previous work showing lower yields of the
bahiagrasses under a clipping regime was substantiated. In this'experiment they
produced about 20 percent less than the grass with the highest yield.

To evaluate the production capabilities during different periods of the year,
yields of grasses were compared for specific times. October until May generally
represents the less favorable growing season because of cold weather and or shorter
day lengths. Differences among grass yields for the October-May interval are
considerably larger than those for the annual data (Table 3). During this October-
May period the Digitaria species, except for pangolagrass grew relatively well.
The bahiagrasses and pangolagrass grew very poorly while African stargrass (#8).
and Rhodesgrass performed well.

The approximate four month period from December to April and the six week
period from March to May also resulted in large yield differences very similar
to those for the October to May period. Pangolagrass produced considerably less
forage in this experiment during the winter months than the Digitaria species
(#133 and #134). Rhodesgrass production during the winter was consistently high.

2/ Crude protein analyses were made at the Everglades Experiment Station, Belle
Glade, under the direction of Dr. F. H. Thomas, Assistant Soil Chemist.







At the end of the growing season, however, between August and October, pangolagrass
growth was superior to the above-named grasses.

Average grass yields were greater from May to the July harvest than at any
other time, with about 40 percent of the annual dry matter production occurring
during 20 percent of the year. Least production occurred between about the third
week in October until the third week in February, when only 9 percent of the annual
yield was produced during 30 percent of the year. From about the first of May until
September 10 (about 36 percent of a year) average grass production was almost 75
percent of the annual production. This confirms other experiment results.

Also, grass growth was very slow during a period of four weeks in February-
March (Table 2). About 4.5 percent of the total annual production occurred during
about 8 percent of the year. Even more important, however, is the effect that
climate had on production during a particular year. For the three years involved,
average grass production was 1070, 630, and 280 pounds of dry matter per acre,
during the four weeks, February-March period. According to these results, some
years there would be three times the available dry matter available as in other
years.

Dry Matter Percentages
The dry matter contents (Table 4) of the bermudagrasses were greater than all
other grasses except Pensacola bahiagrass. The Digitaria species, including
pangolagrass, generally had lower dry matter percentages. Although average values
for grasses varied from about 21 to 33 percent at any given harvest, there is no
clear trend with respect to seasons. These differences would not be expected to
influence significantly dry matter intake by grazing animals.

Crude Protein Percentages
Average crude protein contents (Table 5) of the'harvested portions of the
grasses were higher for the commercial bermudagrasses and bahiagrasses. Levels
were considerably higher during the winter months (November-March) than other times
of the year. Crude protein levels, as noted from other published (1) and unpub-
lished work showed this trend. This is contrary to general opinion that protein
levels start falling in the fall and remain low until the following late-spring.
The amount of crude protein per acre available to cattle should not be confused
with the crude protein percentage. Cattle grazing-free-choice would have more
available crude protein per acre during the summer months, and the material grazed
selectively would have a higher crude protein content than those values listed in
Table 5. However, cattle grazing grasses in the winter would not be lacking
sufficient crude protein unless the grass was frosted or unless they were unable
to obtain sufficient dry matter. The primary problem in the winter with grasses
managed as in these yield tests would be the lack of digestible dry matter.

In Figure 1 are plotted variations of crude protein contents as affected by
harvest data. These include average values for pangolagrass, for the two bahia-
grasses, and for all of the bermudagrasses. Crude protein percentages were lower
during the growing season. This was due to more rapid dry matter production and
concomitant dilution of the protein in'the grasses.

This relationship, between dry matter yields and crude protein percentages,
is shown in Figure 2. Although these data support other work in Florida and
elsewhere, it is doubtful that the relationship is well-recognized. Lines were
drawn by eye and are given for the averages of the two bahiagrasses, the Digitaria
species (including pangolagrass) and the average for all grasses. Under the regime








of harvesting.and fertilization in this experiment, if the dry weight yields for
a particular clipping exceeded about 2000 pounds per acre, the crude protein level
of the above ground portions of grasses would be expected to be between about 5.0
and 7.5 percent depending on variety. If the yield were less than about 1000 pounds,
the average crude protein percent would be expected to be higher than 10.

If higher nitrogen rates were used after each harvest during the summer period,
crude protein contents would be higher (unpublished.work) than those recorded here;
but the slopes of the.curves would.be similar. .Under most commercial operations,
where less nitrogen is used, crude protein contents would be less than those shown
in Figure 2.

Crude Protein Yields
These values (Table 6) were obtained by multiplying nitrogen contents times.
dry matter yields and converting to protein yields. The dry matter yield has a
greater effect on the protein yields than does the percent crude:protein. The
relatively small differences between average yearly production of crude protein
among grasses is similar to that found for dry.matter yields; but seasonal differ-
ences among grasses are large. The average crude protein yields varied from 52 to
301 pounds per acre depending on the harvest date.

Percent.Nitrogen Recovery
Average percent of applied nitrogen recovered by the harvested portions of the
grasses varied between about 4o to 53. .Recovery in the bahiagrasses was much less
than in the commercial bermudagrasses and pangolagrass.

These average values.are similar to those found previously (1) except the
value for Suwanee bermudagrass. The large average recovery values during the
first three harvests may have resulted from residual nitrogen that was applied
to establish the grasses originally. Average recoveries of nitrogen (Figure 1)
increased during the spring, decreased in late.summer, and were fairly constant
from October until April. Thistrend is similar to that for crude,protein yields.
and opposite to that for crude protein.percentages.

Frost Damage Ratings
There were two observations made on frost susceptibility of the grasses.
Average ratings (fromfour replications) are presented in Table 8. The fro.-it on
December, 1962, would have had its. effect on the yields of February 25, 19W:', It
appears that the small; damage recorded for the bermudagrasses, #8 and #24,. L :
associated with higher yields, although this association does not pertain to the
bahiagrasses. The bahiagrasses grow very little during winter, even wi-lh'o:. frosts.
With the exception of Rhodesgrass, and possibly Pensacola bahiagrass., only c:call
differences .in frost resistance were, noted for the January 1965 frost. The higher
yields are reflected in the ensuing February 22 harvest for Rhodesgrass, but yields
of Digitaria species.#133 and 134 also were high even though frost damage was
recorded as high.


DISCUSSION

Results of clipping tests cannot easily be projected for use.under grazing
conditions. However, the various trends of crude pro-::l. contents and yields,
and dry matter .production should be remembered. Thi- c- .l i:~eo an influence on
management practices involved with fertilization and stocking rates, harvested
feed programs, and supplemental feed programs..








None of the commercial or introduced grasses in this test were of much value
during the winter, but all performed well during the summer growing period. None
could be classified as frost tolerant although several could add to slight increases
in winter production compared to pangolagrass.

From an experimental standpoint little would be gained from further clipping
experiments of this type during the summer period. There are numerous grasses
available for summer production.

The winter growth period is critical. Future experiments should include
winter testing of newly introduced species, winter fertilization, and clipping
interval tests using commercial varieties. It is doubtful that analyses for crude
protein would have much value, since there are numerous results available and the
trends are well-established. Digestibility and grazing studies are nee~.~ .:i con-
junction with testing new varieties. However, the primary emphasis e-.'ud be placed
on finding a grass that grows well in the winter and will survive during the summer.
This job will be difficult, but changes in south Florida appear to be much better
than in the northern areas.


REFERENCES

1. Kretschmer, Albert E., Jr. and Norman C. Hayslip. 1963.
Evaluation of several pasture grasses on Immokalee fine sand in
south Florida. Florida Agr. Exp. Sta. Bul. 658.

2. 1964.
Evaluation of several combinations of grasses and white clover
on Immokalee fine sand in south Florida. Florida Agr. Exp. Sta.
Bul. 676.








Figure 1. EFFECT OF HiRVEST DATES ON CRUDE PROTEIN PERCENT AND PERCENT NITROGEN RECOVERY
OF VARIOUS GRASSES


i-

l--



L /


h /










.--


i__.. _L.
Feb. Mar.


Pangola ---

Bermudas ( ------ .

Bahias ----

N Rec. <


(~1

I


-ON

/ x
' ^^'^ ^'L: '-*'*'


I I
May June


17.0

16.0

15.0

14.0

13.0

12.0

11.0

10.0

9.0

8.0

7.0

6.0


Oct. Nov. Dec.


"0---


July Aug. Sep.

TIME OF HARVEST


100

90

80

70

60

50

40

30

20

10


Lir
0l


Apr.
Apr.






-7-


Figure 2. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DRY MATTER YIELDS IN POUNDS PER ACRE
AND CRUDE PROTEIN PERCENTAGES OF VARIOUS GRASSES


5000 1 all grasses

iPangolagra s
i +
4500 Digitarias




4ooo000 -




3500- Pensacola

j' Argentine
\I bahiagrass
pq
3000 --"




2500 -
i l



2000 -




1500 .




1000




500-


5.0 7.5 10.0 12.5 .- -20.
5.0 7.5 10.0 12.5 15.0 17.5 ` 20.0


CRUDE PROTEIN I-











TABLE 1. DESCRIPTION OF GRASSES USED IN REPLICATED SMALL-PLOT CLIPPING EXPERIMENT 1962-65


IRFL
Accession
7",-


Grass Name


Common


P.I. No.


Origin


Date staged
for 1st
harvest


Cynodon plectostachyus
Cynodon dactylon
Digitaria decumbens
Digitaria pentzii
Cynodon dactylon
Cynodon dactylon
Paspalum notatum
Paspalum notatum
Chloris gayana
Digitaria pentzii
Digitaria pentzii
Cynodon dactylon
Cynodon dactylon


Star Bermuda
Bermuda
Pangola
Giant digitaria
Suwannee bermuda
Coastal bermuda
Pensacola bahia
Argentine bahia
Rhodes
Digitaria
Digitaria
Bermuda
Coast-Cross #1 bermuda


F-ilO82,
224152


N- -



unknown2/
279651
279652
225957


Africa
unknown
Africa
Africa




unknown
Taiwan
Philippines
Ethiopia
Georgia


/ Plant Materials Center, Arcdia, Florida, numbers.

2/A contaminant in seeds of Digitaria glauca.

3/ Single plot yields until Feb. 22, 1965.


8.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
89.
133.
134.
7.
153.


Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Nov.
Oct.


1962
1962
1962
1962
1962
1962
1962
1962
1963
1963
1963
1964/
1964


.1 -------


Scientific








TABLE 2. OVEN DRY WEIGHT YIELDS OF DIFFERENT GRASSES IN POUNDS PER ACRE


1962


Grass Variety


5/1;1/ 6/11 7/30


9/11 10/22


12/5 2/25 3/25 5/11


1963
6/17 7/29


9/9. 10/21 12/2


Bermuda
Bermuda
Pangola
Digitaria
S. Bermuda
C. Bermuda
P. Bahia
A. Bahia
Rhodes
Digitaria
Digitaria
Bermuda


3830 4000 1530 3120
3960 3900 4090 3450
2800 4800 5350 3830
2020 4870 4110 2530
2570 3320 3590 2110
2880 4400 3970 2840
- 3520 3150 2460
- 3110 3970 3150


2130 3100 2980 3070
- -


2110 610 12110 11.50
2130 370 1290 870
2000 310 310 li. O
2020 350 450 11i0
1810 520 800oo 100
2230 280 400 1100
1050 160 50 610
1310 50 0 210
2390
1100
510
2470 1130 2750 1480


153. Bermuda -
S Avg. 3310 3890 3640 2950 1900 420


1550
1570
1520
1760
1600
1740
1930
470
3310
2350
1830
-


2940
2490
4300
3410
2110
2680
2610
2350
4490
3610
2910
-


2800
2440
2580
2180
1920
2400
1990
3030
2610
3100
2650
-


1620
1670
1790
1860
1430
1390
1460
2230
1920
1760
1970


1530
1670
1460
680
940
820,
1220
1760
990
1270
1110


1930
1850
1130
2870
890
440
540
640
1430
1360
1650


610- 1070 1780 3080 2520 1740 1220 1250


1964


2/24 3/23 5/5


b/15 7/22


9/o u10/19


11/30 2/22 3/22


1965
5/3' 6/14 7/26


9/10 .10/25 Total Avg/Yr f


1450 540 2100 2200 4120 2370
1290 '350. 1710 2930 2670 1970
1160 420 1200 2390 2780 1600
1170 630 2610 3380 3250 2070
960 1030 2110 2180 2360 1880
570 580 1760 2160 2990 1850
140 500 1930 3410 2910 2300
10 210 700 2270 3680 3100
1550 730 2280 2160 2810 1450
1080 1100 2230 3030 4680 2540
1160 890 2790 2700 3680 2250


S10 15 2620 3270 2130
960' 630 1950 2620 3270 2130


1050
660
450
420
660
1050
1220
1530
660
610
560


610
470
350
520
840
350
260
190
680
570
560
- \


8- .510
10o 510


1010
750
700
960
870
780
170
20
1790
1110
1170
660
1030
8500o


450
310
210
300
440
160
140
30
330
350
260
450
240
280


2610
1550
990
1760
3330
3030
1930
640
1740
2860
3480
1640
2560


510 4080
1790 3400
520 4830
113o1/4630
1130 4830
540 4270
1920 3240
1000 3940
1500:/4220
730 5310
520 4060
800 3680
730 4290


4460
3640 920
3850 1460
4580 -
3210 -
3500 -
3900 890
6570 820
4060 730
4690 101o
3690 770
4290 1250
3730 1060


2160 -990 4210 4170 990


1/ Estimated yields.


8.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
39.
133.
134.
7.


8.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
89.
133.
134.
7.
153.
Avg.


57,520
56,160
56,260
56,570
50,500
51,160
45,615
46,990
42,330
46,450
41,170
31,880
14,300


16,620
15,690
15,720
16,350
14,500
14,790
13,180
13,580
16,410
14,980
13,280
14,210
11,910


II I II


, ,9 .. m i


/r
/r -r -


II I I I


--


--


II I l I


I I I


-- --


- ~ --


960 630 195
.
1--vg.


--270


'











TABLE 3. OVEN DRY WEIGHT YIELDS, IN PCUNDS PER ACRE, OF GRASSES
HARVESTED DURING DIFFERENT PERIODS IN TiH WINTER AND SPRING


Grass Variety


Between
Oct. and Mayl/
Total Avg.


Between
Dec. and April-/
Total Avg.


Between
April and-May3 '.
Total -- Avg......


Between
Aug. and Oct.-/
Total ... Avg.


8. Bermuda
24. Bermuda
25. Pangola
26. Digitaria
27. S. Bermuda
28. C. Bermuda
29. P. Bahia
SA. Bahia
R. hodes
.133. Digitaria
134.Y Digitaria


Included 3 harve'sts between.about October.20..and.May 5 depending on year 3 years data.
SIncluded 2 harvests between about December 1. and March 23 depending on year 3 yearsdata.:
3/ Included I'hatVest from about March 23 to-.May..5,depending on year 1 years data.
/ Included 2 Harvests -between about July. 29 and Oct.. 20.depending on.year -3 or 4 years data.
5Two years data.
/ Numbers irr parentheses show relative yield positions.


H
0


15,250
12,380
9,470
14,560
14,450
11,190
8,360
3,620
10,530
10,660
11,960


5,o80(4)6/
4,130(7)
3,160(9)
4,850(5)
4,820(6)
3,730(8)
2,790(10)
1,210 (1.)
5,270(3)
5,330(2)
5,980(1)


7,230
4,860
3,970
4,690
5,160
3,590
1,610
480
4,400
3,640
3,480


2,410(2)
1,620(7)
1,320(9)
1,570(8)
1,720(6)
1,200(11)
540 (12)
160(13)
2,200(3)
1,820(4)
1,740(5)


6,260
4,830
3,710
6,130
7,040
6,530
5,790
1,810
7,330
7,440
8,100


2,090(6)
1,610(9)
1,240(10)
2,040(7)
2,350(4)
2,180(5)
1,930(8)
6oo(11)
2,440(3)
2,460(2)
2,700(1)


11,800
16,110
16,140o
9,580
8,830
10,180
14,510
20,470
9,810
11,880
10,350


3,930(7)
4,030(5)
4,110(4) .
3,190(12)
2,940(13)
3,390(10)
3,630(8)
5,120(2)
3,270(11)
3,960(6)
3,450(9)


I


i"









TABLE 4. DRY MATTER PERCENTAGES OF DIFFERENT GRASSES


Grass Variety


4 1962
5/1-7 6/18 7/30 9/11 10/22 12/5


1963


2/25 3/25 5/11 6/17 7/29 9/9 10/21


Bermuda
Bermuda
Pangola
Digitaria
S. Bermuda
C. Bermuda
P. Bahia
A. Bahia
Rhodes
Digitaria
Digitaria
Bermuda


34.7
38.4
23.5
22.2
39.0
40.2


32.7
33.6
21.1
19.9
37.1
35.7


33.2
34.3
23.8
22.0
36.2
36.6
26.7
24.4


34.1
35.6
28.7
27.7
40.2
4o.8
27.1
23.7


34.3
35.6
26.8
35.4
36.1
41.0
30.4
25.5


25.7
27.4
19.2
18.7
29.2
31.7
33.2
30.7


27.5
29.6
24.1
22.0
33.6
39.4
38.2
41.2


25.3
20.0
17.8
18.0
28.0
27.5
28.1
28.9


34.9
34.9
24.5
25.3
40.7
40.8
30.4


- -- -
- 21.3
26.5


153. Bermuda -
Avg. 33.0 30.0 29.7 32.2 33.1 27.0

1964
2/24 .3/23 5/5 6/15 .7/27 9/8 10/19 11/30

8. 29.5 28.0 26.9 34.5 29.2 33.1 32.5 22.6
24. 28.9 28.1 29.8 30.1 27.1 28.6 30.2 19.6
25. 24.7 23.3 21.6 25.9 22.2 24.2 26.0 16.6
26. 22.8 21.9 2i.5 26.6 23.5 23.9 26.1 13.0
27. 36.9 29.5 35.3 38.8 33.2 32.7 35.9 24.8
28. 36.8 32.4 30.5 36.0 31.4 25.7 34.0 22.9
29. 41.5 30.3 28.8 28.8 27.1 28.9 28.1 31.5
30. 24.7 23.0 22.7 26.7
89. 28.3 24.8 25.7 28.6 27.7 27.1 29.5 21.1
133. 22.5 19.3 20.0 24.0 21.6 23.0 24.6 14.5
134. 23.7 20.5 22.8 25.3 22.6 24.0 25.5 14.5
7. -
153. 22.8
Avg. 29.6 25.8 26.3 29.9 26.4 26.7 28.6 20.9


31.8
29.7
22.1
23.5
37.7
38.6
28.7


20.1
23.2


29.3
29.6
21.6
22.1
31.7
34.6
29.4

25.6
19.7
21.6


30.0
29.7
22.7
21.3
32.5
32.8
30.6

25.5
21.2
22.9


34.7
32.6
27.0
26.5
34.6
38.0
28.2

28.5
26.8
26.6
-


32.0 24.2 31.0 28.4 26.5 26.9 30.4 24.6


__1965
2/22 3/22 5/3 6/14 7/26-9/10 10/25


35.3
27.1
23.2
30.4
39.5
33.4
39.8
31.9
40.7
26.7
29.3
29.5
39.4
32.8


20.2
21.0
19.6
17.8
27.5
23.5
29.0
18.6
23.8
17.6
19.9
21.3
20.6
21.5


31.8
27.8
27.0
22.5
39.1
35.6
30.6
28.7
27.1
24.6
25.0
35.9
31.4
29.8


24.0
25.3
21.9
19.1
33.7
33.9
30.3
26.8
21.2
20.3
22.4
24.0
28.2
25.6


31.1
22.8
18.1
21.1
35.6
32.2
25.8
24.2
26.1
19.8
20.4
31.1
33.9
26.3


36.1
27.1
25.8
27.2
36.1
35.6
29.3
28.7
30.4
28.5
26.3
36.1
34.6
30.9


26.9
24.2
21.7
21- 7


30.6
25.8
22.9
22.7
21.6
26.9
34.6
25.8


8.
214.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
89.
133.
134.
7.


12/2


24.9
24.3
21.3
17.3
28.7
34.6
35.5

20.6
18.1
21.1


Avg.

30.1
28.7
23.0
22.8
34.4
34.2
30.6
26.8
26.6
21.8
23.1
29.3
30.7


_









TABLE 5. CRUDE PROTEIN PERCENTAGES OF DIFFERENT GRASSES


Grass Variety

8. Bermuda
24; Bermuda
25. Pangola
26. Digitaria
27.- S. Bermuda
28. C. Bermuda
29. P. Bahia
30. A. Bahia
89. Rhodes
133. Digitaria
134. Digitaria
7. Bermuda -
153. .Bermuda .


Ave.


S- .. .1962 .. .. ..
5/1 6/18- 7/30 9/11 10/22 12/5

6.2- 6.9 5.8 5.0 8.6 16.3
7.4 6.8 6.1 6.2 7.4 15.7
7.4 6.4 6.0 5.2 7.3 16.1
8.0 8,0 6.6 5.6 6.8 18.3
8.7 8.1 6.9 6.9 7.6 15.8
8.5 7.6 6.2 6.4 6.6 15.8
8.7 7.6 7.9 11.4 15..9
8.4 8.2 7.4 10.5. 15.7


7.7-. -7.6.. Z6.7 ..3:..8.3.


-' 1963 *
2/25 3/25 5/11- 6/17 7/29 9/9 10/21 12/2

11.8 14.4 8.3 7.4 7.8 7.4 7.4 17.4
11..6 14..1 8.3 8.1 8.2 8.3 7.6 17.2
12.0 14.0 8.1 7.1 6.7 7.7 8.0 15.2
11.3 15.3 8.1 8.4 9.0 7.7 6.6 17.5
12.4 15.5 7.9 8.8 8.8 8.5 7.8 15.8
11.8 16.3 8.6 8.2 8,5 9.3 7.9 13.9
14.0 15.6 9.2 8.4 8.8 8.8 10.7 15.8
-, 15.4 9.7 9.0 9.5 8.0 10.9 14.5
6.7 6.9 7.1 6.1 6.5 12.0
12.9 6.7 6.6 6.1 6.4 6.4 14.2
12.7 6. 7.0 5.6 6.9 7.8 14:0


12.1...14.6. 80... 7.8 7.9. 7.7 8.0 15.2


2/24 3/23


13.7
13:..5
10.3..
16.3
17.9
10.8
19.7
13.0
- 7.5
9.9
14.1
6.0


12.5
12.4
12.4
11.7
13.1
14.2
14.2
14.9
11.5
11.4
14.5
-


1964
5/5... 6/15 .7/27 ..9/8 10/19


9.9
11.0
10.8
9.3
9.4
9.5
10.1
11.5
8.1
7.5
8.0


LJ-. -
Avg. 12.7 -13.0 9.5


7.2 5.5 5.9 7.1
6.9 6.8 5.2 7.4
6;4 6.5 5.2 7.6
5.1 5.9 5.4 6.8
6.7 6.9 6.5 8.0
7.5 7.2 5.2 6.8
7.4 7.6 6.9 7.5
9.1 8.8 9.0 9.1
6.5 5.9 5.5 6.3
5.1 5.6 4.9 6.8
5.9 5.5 5.3 7.1
5.6
5 5.4
6.7 6.6 5.9 -7.0


.11/30


10.2
12.8
12.8
15.6
11.9
14.2
14.2
15.2

13.6
14.2
9.1
10.9
12.9


2/22-3/22.


11

11
11
14

1]
13
14
16

12
1i


13


1965
5/3 6/14


1.4 19.2 6.8
f.2 20.1 8.0
t.4 17.7 7.6
i.0 16.5 8.4
3.3 17.2 6.7
3.7 20.3 7.7
.3 18.0 9.0
.0 19.3 10.5
).1 16.7 6.3
..4 18.4 5.6
L.9 19.3 6.2
..1 19.2. 6.4
>.8 18.7 7.0
.3 -18.5 7.4-


11.8
13.4
12.5
9.1
10.7
9.9
8.8
10.2
10.7
10.7
11.0
11.9
11.4
10.9


7/26 9/10 Avg. .

8.0 9.7
8.1 9.7
6.4 5.8 9.4
5.8 9.9
7.4 10.2
6.9 10.0
7.7 6.2 10.9
7.8 11.3
7.0 4.6 8.0
5.3 4.6 8.6
6.3 4.9 9.3
6.7 5.6 9.3
5.7 5.6 9.7
6.9 5.3-..


8.,
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
89.
133.
134.
7.
7 .*--


.


I I


. J I /


i i i i I ll i


. f T


. .. .. I I] ] I


16.2.







TABLE 6. CRUDE PROTEIN YIELDS OF DIFFERENT GRASSES IN POUNDS PER ACRE


Grass Variety

8. Bermuda
24. Bermuda
25. Pangola
26. Digitaria
27. S. Bermuda
28. C. Bermuda
29. P. Bahia
30. A. Bahia
89. Rhodes
133. Digitaria
134. Digitaria
7. Bermuda


1962
5/1 6/18 7/30 9/11 10/22 12/5


237
293
207
162
224
245


276 89 '156 181
265 249 214 158
307 321 199 146
390 271 142 137
269 248 146 138
334 246 182 147
306 239 194 120
261 326 233 137


53. Beermuaa -
Avg. 228 301 249 183 146 54

1964` .
2/24 3/23 5/5 6/15 7/22 9/8 10/19 11/30

8. 199 68 208 158 227 140 75 62
24.. 174 43 188 202 182 102 49 60
25. 119 52 130 153 181 83 34 45
26. 191 74 243 172 192 112 29 81
27. 172 134 198 146 163 122 53 100
28. 62 82 167 162 215 96 74 50
29. 28 71 195 253 221 159 92 40
30. 1 31 81 207 324 279 139 29
89. 86 84 185 140 166 80 42
133. 107 125 167 154 262 124 41 91
134. 164 129 223 159 202 119 40 80
7. -
153. 72
Avg. 118 81 180 173 212 129 61 64


1963
2/25 3/25 5/11 6/17 7/29 9/9 10/21 12/2


146 166 95 218 218-120 113
150 123 130 202 200 139 127
37 164 123 305 173 138 117
51 181 142 286 196 143 45
99 164 126 186 169 122 73
47 179 150 220 204 129 65
7 95 178 219 175 128 131
32 46 212 288 178 192
222 310 185 117 64
142 157 238 189 113 81
65 112 204 148 136 87


336
318
172
502
141
61
85
93
172
193
231


77 131 135 236 195 133 100 209
S1965
2/22 3/22 .5/3 6/14 7/26 9/10 Total Avg/yr


125
107
101
134
116
107
24
3
181
138
139
86
132
107


.86 -177-
62 124
37 75
50 148
76 223
32 233
25 174
6 67
55 110
64 160
50 238
86 105
45 179
.52 155


60 326 -
240 275 -
65 309 85
103 268 -
121 357 -
53 295 -
169 249 55
102 307 -
161 295 34
78 281 46
57 256 38
95 247 70
83 245 59
107 286 55-


4361
4434
3928
4509
4168
3881
3657
3583
2689
2905
2877
689
815


1270
1290
1150
1320
1210
1130
940
1040
1140
1200
1190








TABLE 7. PERCENT RECOVERY OF NITROGEN FROM DIFFERENT GRASSES


Grass Variety

8. Bermuda
24. Bermuda
25. Pangola
26. Digitaria
27. S. Bermuda
28. C. Bermuda
29. P. Bahia
30. A. Bahia
89. Rhodes


1962
5/1 6/18 7/30 9/11 10/22 12/5


76 88 29 50. 58
94 85 80 69 51
66 98 103 64 47
52 125 87 45 44
72 86 79 47 44
78 107 79 58 47
98 77 62 38
84 104 75 44


133. Digitaria -
134. Digitaria -
7. Bermuda -
153. Bermuda -
Avg. 73 96 82 59 47 17
1.964
2/24 3/23 5/5 6/15 7/22 9/8 10/19 11/30'

8,- 64 .22 67 .51 73 '45 24 20
24. 56 14 60 65 58 33 "16 19
25. -38 17 42 49 58 27 11 14
26. 61 24 78 55 61 36 9 26
27. 55 43 63 47 52 39 17 32
28. 20 26 53 52 69 31 24 16
29. 9 23 62 81 71 51 29 13
30. 0 10 26 66 104 89 45 9
89. .28 27 59 45 53 26 13 -
133. -34 40 53 49 84 40 13 29
134. 53 41 71 51 65 38 13 26
7. -
153. 23
Avg. 38 26 58 56 68 41 19 21

* Not including September 10, 1965 -data.


1963
2/25 3/25 5/11 6/17 7/29 9/9 10/21 12/2

47 53 30 70 70 38 36 108
48 39 42 65 64 45 41- 102
12 53 39 98 55 44 37 55
16 58 45 92 63 46 14 161
32 53 40 60 54 39 23 45
15 57 48 70 65 41- 21 20
2 30 57 70 56. 41 42 27
10 15 68 92 57 61 30
71 99 59 37 21 55
45- 50 76 61 36 26 62
21 36 65 47 44 28 74


25 42 43 76 62 43 33 67

1965
2/22 3/22 -5/3 6/14 7/26 9/10 Avg.*

40 28 57 19 10 o 48 ...
34 20 4o 77 88 53
32 12 24 21 99 27 46
43 16 47 33 86 53
37 24 71 39 114 49
34 10 75 17- 94 46
8 8 56 54 80 18 43
1 2 21 33 98 42
58 18 35 52 94 11 43
44 21 51 25 90 15 44
45 16 76 18 82 12 44
28 28 34 30 79 22 40
42 14 57 27 78 19 40
34 17 50 34 84 18





-15-

TABLE 8. FROST DAMAGE RATINGS FOR GRASS VARIETIES


Grass

8.

24.

25.

26.

27.

28.

29.

30.

89.

133.

134.

7.

153.


1/ 1 = no damage to leaves
5 = about 50% leaf burn
9 = complete leaf burn (no green showing)

Only partial coverage of plots.
















IRL-71-1
350 copies


.9651/


Variety

Bermuda

Bermuda

Pangola

Digitaria

S. Bermuda

C. Bermuda

P. Bahia

A. Bahia

Rhodes

Digitaria

Digitaria

Bermuda

Bermuda


Dec. 20,

4

4

9

9

6

6

4

7

2*

9

9


19621/ Jan. 20, 1

7.3

7.8

8.0

8.0

7.3

6.8

5.8

6.8

3.5

7.0

7.3

7.0

6.0*







































































































N>




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